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Roger news and articles

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SUKTUEN
02-28-2006, 03:48 PM
phone tennis game, looks good~~

RogiFan88
02-28-2006, 05:13 PM
:rolls: The look on Stan's face when Roger said that must have been priceless!

I think Stan w have relished the confrontation -- he's not intimidated by Rogi.

MissMoJo
02-28-2006, 10:56 PM
http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/news;_ylt=Ar0uqBvW1EM3Lf6d9SH8D8Q4v7YF?slug=ap-sampras-federer&prov=ap&type=lgns

AP Exclusive: Sampras calls Federer comparisons 'very valid'
By HOWARD FENDRICH, AP Sports Writer
February 28, 2006

All those comparisons between Roger Federer and Pete Sampras are right on the mark. Sampras himself says so.

"They're all very valid: Not only is he winning majors, but the way he's winning them -- with pretty much ease. He's pretty much the favorite in every major for the rest of his career," Sampras said in a telephone interview with The Associated Press.


"Clearly, he's head and shoulders above the rest. I don't see anyone pushing him over the next three or four years."

Sampras knows his record of 14 Grand Slam tournament titles could very well be threatened by Federer, who has seven so far. Time for the 34-year-old Sampras to come out of retirement and try to add to his total? Not quite.

Sampras is returning to the tennis court, though, signing up for the World Team Tennis Pro League more than three years after his last match.

"This is more about just getting myself a little busier and focused on something I used to be good at," he said ahead of Wednesday's announcement by the league. "It's time this year to do a little more. Last year, I was kind of floating along."

His last professional match was the 2002 U.S. Open final, when he beat longtime rival Andre Agassi. As much as he says he's looking forward to playing in the WTT, Sampras made one thing quite clear: Don't call it a comeback.

"I miss playing the game. I miss the majors. I miss competing. But to play at the level I used to play is a whole other animal. I've done that, and I know what it takes," he told the AP. "Me playing a little tennis this year is something I can control; there isn't any pressure. I can relax and have a little fun. Coming back is not something that crossed my mind."

While it's tough for him to watch Wimbledon, where he won seven championships, Sampras keeps tabs on the game.

And he's impressed by the top-ranked Federer.

"He moves great, does everything very well. He's gotten to a point that when he's not at his best, he's finding ways to win, and that separates him from the rest," Sampras said, a moment before making sure to bolster his own credentials a tad.
:lol:
"There are less great players today than there was when I was playing," he continued. "I just see him carrying on with what he's been doing. He's got the whole package. He doesn't have any holes in his game."

Federer has won Wimbledon three years in a row, and he's won the past three majors: Wimbledon, the U.S. Open and the Australian Open. The Swiss star heads to the French Open in May with a chance to complete a Grand Slam, albeit not in a calendar year.

The French Open is the only major Federer hasn't won; Sampras never made it past the semifinals at Roland Garros.

"Clay will be the toughest surface for Roger," Sampras said. "If things go right, if the weather's right, I think he can win it."

Sampras has never played in the WTT, a 12-team league that in recent years has featured such stars as Agassi, Steffi Graf, John McEnroe, Martina Navratilova, Andy Roddick and Venus Williams. Sampras will be chosen by a team in the March 28 draft and expects to play about a half-dozen matches during the July 6-26 regular season.

WTT co-founder Billie Jean King unsuccessfully tried to persuade Sampras to participate in the league while he was on tour.

"He's definitely someone that we wanted," WTT commissioner Ilana Kloss said. "We're just thrilled that Pete's going to be back out there, and fans will get an opportunity to see him again."

Sampras also will be appearing in an exhibition match at Houston in April. He said he's thought about working as a TV commentator, but he's not interested in coaching.

"When you retire, you take time away, you don't want to have anything to do with tennis. After two years of having fun and not doing much in the sport, you get a little bored and want to know what's the next chapter in your life. Last year was a turning point -- 'What am I going to do next?' -- and I had to make a decision," Sampras said.

"Playing in front of some people -- you kind of look forward to it a little bit."

Updated on Tuesday, Feb 28, 2006 2:54 pm EST

With his wtt participation and 'there less great players today' comment, seems like pete's trying to remind everyone that he's still relevant :p

nobama
02-28-2006, 11:48 PM
Seems to me Pete might be a bit irked by the likes of John McEnroe saying Roger's the greatest natural talent he's ever seen or Jim Courier saying Roger's the only guy he'd pay to see play or Ivan Lendl saying he'd pay to watch Roger practice. Why else would he feel the need to say there were better players when he was playing? Essentially he's saying Roger looks so good only because the competition is weak. But is it really that the competition is weaker or that Roger's just that much better. Look at Agassi, he's got a winning record or even sheet with most players in the top 50 yet he's lost to Roger like 8 times in a row. I don't agree with Pete matter of factly saing that there were better players in his day. I think it's open for debate. Maybe those in the top 10 were but I don't know about the rest of the tour.

TenHound
03-01-2006, 04:14 AM
Stupid headline on that article. It should have been Sampras doesn't see Nadal as Threat to Mighty Fed's Dominance.

SUKTUEN
03-01-2006, 02:48 PM
I Love Sampras~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Minnie
03-01-2006, 11:56 PM
I thought it was pretty mean spirited of Sampras to make that remark about there being better opposition in his day. It was unnecessary and doesn't really show him in a good light.

nobama
03-02-2006, 07:10 AM
I thought it was pretty mean spirited of Sampras to make that remark about there being better opposition in his day. It was unnecessary and doesn't really show him in a good light.It just wasn't very classy. Even if he feels that way he doesn't need to say it publically. Especially since Roger's had nothing but good things to say about Pete and how much he admires him and how phenomenal Pete's record is.

nobama
03-02-2006, 12:04 PM
http://www.tennis.com/Tennis_World_Blog/entry.asp?ENTRY_ID=812

I went round to the ESPN Zone restaurant on Times Square about a week ago to catch up with the Bryan Brothers, who were fresh off their doubles triumph at the Australian Open. Last year at this time, they had just completed the first leg of what they would later dub the “anti-slam” – losing in all four major finals of the same year. They narrowly averted that distinction cum anti-distinction by winning at the last major of the year, the U.S. Open.

By the time I arrived at the festivities, the only press pariahs left were a couple of girls from MTV; they were busy pumping Mike for gossip on, I think, Andy Roddick and Jessica Simpson. I, ever the mature and serious tennis journalist, was asking Bob really important questions, like, “So what do you do when the Leander Paes goes crosscourt instead of down-the-line with his backhand half-volley?”

The Bryans were coming off a busy few weeks during which they also played a few exhibitions; I assumed they had just been making hay while the sun shined - cashing in on what fame they have, while they have it.

But it turns out that the boys were on a more serious mission; the exos were fundraisers. The Bryans were looking for a way to recoup some of the legal fees they had poured into the lawsuit that became their big gun in the counter-offensive they mounted against the ATP’s move to kill doubles last summer. To further that end, an Atlanta exo may be in the works. So if you're a doubles fan, or simply appreciate the Bryans for taking matters into their own hands at considerable financial risk, you might want to attend.

The Bryans, together with their dad, Wayne, really stepped up and, working in conjunction with a few other activists, including Mark Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi, saved doubles as we know it - that's Big Daddy Wayne playing tennis hat/tambourine, with Bob and Mike, in the picture.

“I felt especially bad for Mark (Knowles),” Bob told me. “He was in the trenches, lobbing grenades, and it got to him. It started to affect his play to the point that he had a kind of meltdown at Monte Carlo. He was exhausted. Beaten down.”

One of my regrets is that I didn’t get around to doing a “Man/Woman of the Year (2005)” post before I went off to the Australian Open. If you remember, I did cover the doubles controversy in “Zaniest Story of 2005: the Doubles Mess” (it’s available in the archives). If you read that, you’ll see why Wayne Bryan deserved to be 2005’s Man of the Year. Thanks in large part to Wayne’s leadership and tireless lobbying, the Band of Doubles Brothers succeed in swinging the doubles issue in an astonishing 180-degree turn. They held the ATPs feet to the fire and percipitated a doubles renaissance, instead of allowing the doubles to succumb to a pre-emptive strike.

Ultimately, the only concession the doubles players made was accepting no-ad scoring and a super-tiebreaker instead of a third-set. That’s no small matter, especially to purists. On the other hand, the scoring change means that doubles has a far better chance now of being seen, both live and on television, by a significant, prime-time audience. With matches that can now be counted on to last for now more than an hour and change, tournament directors can now schedule doubles with no fear of diminishing their marquee singles schedule.

“You have to remember that the scoring change is just an experiment,” Bob said. “We just decided we were willing to go along with it for a year. The no-ad system does introduce a little bit more luck into it, I think, but I don’t mind being the test monkey for it.”

Significantly, though, the ATP insists that it researched the issue and can empirically show that the statistical difference between results employing the two systems (traditional vs. no-ad) is negligible.

Bob Bryan cited two other key players who helped get the new doubles deal done - one a usual suspect, the other anything but. Etienne de Villiers, the new ATP CEO, was a key player in bringing peace to the valley. As we at Tennis learned during his visit to our offices last week, de Villiers is a pragmatist and open-minded executive who doesn’t bring significant prejudices and predispositions to the job. His approach was simple: Doubles players unhappy? What can we do to make them happy without harming some other segment of the game?

“Etienne was the guy on their side who really turned it,” Bob said. “He came to the table asking, ‘what can we do to help the game?'.”

The unusual suspect was Roger Federer. The Mighty Fed apparently sat in on a bunch of meetings, and the Bryans (among others) were very impressed by his contribution to the debate. “A lot of Number One players, they steer clear of the politics,” Bob said. “Roger showed us he was really interested in helping the sport, because doubles isn’t just some luxury. It’s part of the sport.”

So here’s the million dollar question: If the statistics show that no-ad and traditional scoring produce virtually identical results (as well as rankings, etc.) would Federer go along with best-of-three, no-ad, super-tiebreaker singles, knowing that the altered scoring system has so many advantages?

Absolutely, positively, definitely. . . not.

Federer’s position apparently is that, at least on reasonably fast surfaces, traditional scoring ensures that a player still has a good chance of winning a game even if he’s down, love-40. It's a condition he doesn;t want to sacrifice.

Of course, the obverse is also true; with no-ad scoring, a player has that more of a chance of winning if he’s up 40-love.

But nobody felt like pressing that point on Roger. At least not yet.

SUKTUEN
03-02-2006, 04:16 PM
thanks

mangoes
03-02-2006, 04:19 PM
Thanks for the article Mirkaland. This brought a smile to my face. I really do admire Roger's committment to the sport.

SUKTUEN
03-02-2006, 04:22 PM
roger looks very good friend with this guy

veyonce
03-04-2006, 10:33 AM
Khaleej Times Online
Epic battle on the cards for Dubai trophy
By Cherian Thomas
4 March 2006

DUBAI — This is actually what you’d call a clash of Titans. In all respects they are the titans of tennis. They are ranked one and two in the world. Yet in today’s cut-throat world of professional sports, you couldn’t find two nicer, rather gentler, guys.

Strangely, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal have a mutual admiration society going. The respect they have for each other as sportsmen and as human beings is one of those very rare things in the world of professional sport these days.

On Thursday, Nadal lauded Federer as a sportsman par supreme and a gentleman. Federer returned the compliment yesterday, calling the young Spaniard a great athlete and a nice young man.

“He’s (Nadal) a very good player. He’s come back strong (after an injury lay-off). I missed him,” said the Swiss champion. “We don’t have that many good lefties in the game.”

Off court all that makes for good copy. But once they get on court — for their title match in the $1 million Dubai Open on show court of the Dubai Tennis Stadium this evening — you can be sure they will be like two gladiators, thirsty for blood.

There’s more than the first prize cheque (of $187,500) at stake. For one thing they will be playing each other for just the fourth time. Interestingly, the Spanish conquistador has won two out of their previous three meetings.

Federer, chasing his fourth straight title here, is keen to even things out. The winner here will also take a sharper edge into their contests that are certain to come their way the rest of the season. That psychological edge can make a big difference. With both of them playing pretty good tennis, everything might boil down to serves; the percentage of first serves that get in right. “I’m missing quite a few of my first serves,” said Federer after his easy 6-2 6-3 win over Mikhail Youzhny of Russia in the semifinals yesterday.

Even though he’s been performing consistently Federer insisted that a great performance comes once in a while; “maybe once every year.” But he said he was confident going into the final.

The world number one ranking is not at stake here; Nadal is way down below in points. The Spaniard is certain to go for his shots, and for the kill as he has nothing to lose here. A win over Federer is always good on the CV.

“For me it’s just another match against the world number one,” insists Nadal. But you know that deep down inside, the 19-year-old Spaniard is itching to take over as the best tennis player on the third rock from the sun.

Two epic battles — the men’s singles and the men’s doubles — will bring the curtain down on the DDF championships. It’s been two weeks of fun and frolic, heartaches and happiness. But for sure it’s been two weeks of fascinating tennis. You couldn’t have asked for more.

----------------------

The Independent
Nadal's chance to test his theory of the Federer gap
By Paul Newman in Dubai
Published: 04 March 2006

Their rivalry has the potential to become the biggest draw in tennis, yet Rafael Nadal is the first to dismiss any suggestion that he might soon dislodge Roger Federer from his No 1 status. The world's two best players meet here tonight in the final of the Dubai Duty Free Open, but when the Spaniard was asked if he ever thought about overtaking Federer his response was short.

"No, I am far," Nadal said in his engaging broken English. "But you're only a few points behind Federer," the reporter continued. "No, I am far," Nadal repeated. "Do you think about it anyway?" his persistent questioner asked. "I am very far - if you look at the points I am very far," Nadal said. His interrogator wisely admitted defeat.

The Spanish teenager will at least have the chance tonight to close the gap on a player he regards as "the best sportsman in the world". Nadal enjoyed a comfortable 6-4, 6-2 win over the German Rainer Schüttler in yesterday's semi-finals, while Federer beat Russia's Mikhail Youzhny 6-2, 6-3 with a performance that contained some thrilling tennis after an erratic start.

Nadal, who was out for three months over the winter with a foot injury, is playing his second comeback tournament after reaching the semi-finals in Marseilles last month. He feels he has been improving with every match and Schüttler was certainly no match for him.

The German dropped his serve in the first game and although he broke back to level at 4-4, Nadal promptly broke again and served out the set. Schüttler rallied after Nadal took the first four games of the second set, but he was only delaying the inevitable.

However, a better player than Schüttler would surely have taken advantage of Nadal's frequent errors and the cautious half-court balls he often seemed content to play. The 19-year-old admits he will have to play differently against Federer. "I will try to play a bit more aggressively. If he feels comfortable it's very difficult because he has all the shots."

Federer has also been feeling his way back, having taken a month off after winning the Australian Open. He got into trouble in his first four service games, in which he trailed 0-40, 0-40, 0-30 and 0-30, but on each occasion he quickly recovered his poise. Federer broke in the second and eighth games to take the first set with something to spare. Moreover, there were signs in an excellent second set that the Swiss could soon be back to his best. Two shots were exquisite: a running backhand pass down the line and a high backhand lob volley after Youzhny had successfully chased down a drop shot.

Federer took mock offence when he was asked how deliberate the lob had been. "Come on, man, are you kidding me?" he said. "In practice I try it sometimes. But it's not so easy to play because it's hard to remember the dimensions of the court when you've got your back to your opponent and the net. It was a great play and I surprised myself."

The victory extended Federer's perfect record this year to 16 matches and his winning sequence on hard courts to 56. The world rankings support Nadal's claim of the No 1's overwhelming superiority - he has 4,445 points compared to Federer's 6,725 (the third-placed Andy Roddick has 2,685, an indication of the gap between the top two and the rest) - but the Spaniard has won two of their three matches.

Nadal drew first blood two years ago in Miami, Federer came back from two sets down to win at the same venue 12 months later and Nadal won in four sets in the French Open semi-finals last June. Federer knows Nadal is an opponent who deserves respect.

"There's still an unknown factor about him," the Swiss said. "We don't have many great lefties in the game. He's a great athlete and he plays fantastic tennis. That makes his combination very hard to play against."

Daniel
03-04-2006, 09:16 PM
Nadal hands Federer first defeat of year
Spaniard improves to 3-1 vs. world No. 1 after 3-set win in Dubai

Ahmed Jadallah / Reuters
Rafael Nadal celebrates after defeating Roger Federer. The Spanish star improved his record against Federer to 3-1 with a win in the Dubai Open final on Saturday.
Updated: 2:37 p.m. ET March 4, 2006
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates - Rafael Nadal, playing only his second tournament in four months, beat top-ranked Roger Federer 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 Saturday in the final of the Dubai Open.

Federer had won this event the past three years. The Swiss star had captured his two other tournaments in 2006 — the Australian Open and Doha Open.

Nadal, seeded and ranked second, ended Federer’s 56-match hardcourt winning streak. The Spaniard won in less than two hours.


“I think it is unbelievable to win against the best player in the world — perhaps the best in history of the game,” said Nadal, who broke down in tears on court. “It was also special because I was out of the game for more than three months. I cried because I was happy.”

The 19-year-old Nadal, the 2005 French Open champion, recently recovered from a foot injury that kept him out of most tournaments the last four months. He made his return in Marseille two weeks ago, where he reached the semifinals.

Completely outplayed in the first set, Nadal changed his tactics in the second set.

“He was playing too well in the first set, very aggressive. I could do nothing,” Nadal said. “In the second, I told myself just to hold my serve, and try and be aggressive on his serve and hopefully get a break.

“I also applied more topspin on my forehand. Once I won the second game after being 0-30 down, my confidence also went up.”

Federer said he was happy with his game despite his loss.

“I think Nadal deserved to win because he played so consistent. I started off really well, but sprayed a little toward the end,” Federer said. “But I am very happy with my game right now. And hopefully, I will pay him back soon.”

Federer was in sublime form in the opening set, winning it 6-2 in just 28 minutes. Federer served well and went to the net successfully on several occasions.


Then Nadal advanced to the net in the second set, and his passing shots actually got by Federer.

Nadal made the all-important break in the ninth game, passing an advancing Federer, who gave the Spaniard three break points by with two volleys in the net.

In the third set, Nadal broke Federer in the first game, capitalizing with a backhand crosscourt shot on a deep volley.

Federer evened it in the fourth with forehand down the line while on the run. Nadal converted a break point in the ninth game, when Federer hit his forehand volley wide. He then served for the match.

In the doubles final, second-seeded Paul Hanley of Australia and Kevin Ullyett of Zimbabwe beat the top-seeded Mark Knowles of the Bahamas and Daniel Nestor of Canada 1-6, 6-2, 10-1 in the tiebreaker.

© 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Daniel
03-04-2006, 09:17 PM
New King of Dubai: Nadal dethrones Federer in thrilling final
Dubai, United Arab Emirates (Sports Network) - Rafael Nadal ended Roger Federer's reign of dominance at the $1 million Dubai Tennis Championships, as the Spanish sensation rallied for a 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 victory in Sunday's marquee final.

The top-seeded/world No. 1 Federer had captured this event three straight years and entered the match with 56 consecutive wins on hardcourts, with his last loss on the surface coming against Marat Safin in the 2005 Australian Open semifinals.

Nadal, ranked second in the world, was appearing in only his second event of 2006 after being sidelined for fourth months with a foot injury.

Federer appeared on his way to his 20th straight triumph at this tournament after easily taking the first set, but Nadal recorded a huge break to take a 5-4 lead in the second en route to evening the match.

Tied 4-4 in the third set, Nadal again broke Federer before serving out the match and handing the mighty Swiss his first defeat of 2006.

Federer was playing in his first event since claiming his second career Australian Open title in January. The seven-time Grand Slam champion had been 16-0 this season coming in.

Nadal now has beaten Federer three times in four lifetime matches between the two powerhouses. The 19-year-old downed Federer in the 2005 French Open semifinals and also topped him in a third-round encounter in Miami in 2004. Federer's lone win over Nadal came in the final at Miami last year.

Since that defeat at Roland Garros, Federer had won 51 of 52 matches entering Sunday's final.

Nadal earned $187,500 for the victory, while Federer took home $98,600.

Daniel
03-04-2006, 09:19 PM
Nadal hands Federer first loss of year in DubaiReuters


DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- Roger Federer went down to his first defeat of the year when he was beaten in three sets by Rafael Nadal in the Dubai Championship final between the world's top two players on Saturday.

Nadal, playing only his fifth match of the year after recovering from a foot injury, won 2-6, 6-4, 6-4.

The Spanish teenager, taking his career record against the Swiss to 3-1, prevented Federer from taking revenge for his defeat to Nadal in last year's French Open semifinals.

World No. 1 Federer, who has won the Australian Open and Qatar titles this year, had also lost to Nadal in Miami in 2004, but he beat the 19-year-old in last year's Miami final.

Daniel
03-04-2006, 09:23 PM
Nadal digs deep to beat Federer in Dubai final


Roger Federer was denied a fourth consecutive Dubai Tennis Championship title when his arch rival Rafael Nadal fought back from a set down to win 2-6 6-4 6-4, picking up a winners cheque for $187,500 In a match watched by a beyond capacity crowd of 7,000 cheering fans crammed into a stadium designed to seat 5,000, the most eagerly awaited match of the year was graced by five-time Wimbledon champion Bjorn Borg who was given the task of spinning the coin to determine who would serve first. Nadal who with this victory has a 3-1 head-to-head lead over the world number 1, lay prostrate on the court after winning the final point to take the prestigious title in total elation, his joy complete. Few would have predicted such an outcome after the first set which was dominated by Federer who bossed his Spanish opponent with his forehand and all court play. Nadal was struggling to keep a good length on his groundstrokes which allowed the Swiss maestro to dictate in the majority of the rallies. Federer broke the opening Nadal serve with a sublime off-forehand crosscourt winner and held to take a commanding 3-0 lead. He broke the Nadal serve again, this time to love to take the opening set at a canter in just 28 minutes, with an acutely angled backhand smash which Nadal at full stretch could not return. At the start of the second set, the Spaniard decided to change his racquet because he was unhappy with the grip, and immediately began to play to a better length, hitting purposefully with heavy topspin. Despite falling behind 0-30 on his opening serve, he clung on and slowly from there the tide began to turn. At 4-4 with Federer serving, the Spaniard earnt himself three break points which he converted at the first opportunity with a spectacular forehand crosscourt pass to roars of approval from his fans. He went on to serve out the set to 30 when Federer inexplicably went well long on his forehand. The Swiss serve which was so commanding in the first set with 6 aces and 67% first serve percentage, was fading fast with only a single ace in the second set and first serve percentage falling to 59%. Nadal broke his Swiss opponent’s opening serve of the final set with a heavily whipped forehand crosscourt pass and held for a 2-0 advantage. Federer who had seemingly been in total control of the match until the last few games, found himself on the back foot. He responded as any player worthy of the world number 1 ranking would, breaking the Nadal serve in the fourth game with a huge forehand down the line, which beat Nadal for sheer pace. With both men now playing some of their best tennis at the same time, the carnival atmosphere was at a crescendo with the Nadal fans chanting, “Ole, ole, ole, ole.” The turning point would come once again at 4-4 with Federer serving. The defending three-time champion suddenly could not find a first serve, and Nadal made the most of his opportunity sensing a weakening in the Swiss defences. He broke Federer to 30 when the Swiss rushing his forehand going for a winner sent it wide. Nadal served out a famous victory to love, taking the title when Federer’s attempted backhand pass went wide. A disappointed Federer reflected on the match later; “Rafa was the better player on the day and deserved to win. He’s got a good record against me, but I enjoy playing him, he has a different style and I look forward to playing him again.” How he lost this match after such a commanding first set was something that gave the world number 1 food for thought; “We all knew that I was going to be the aggressive player, and him the consistent player. My serve came down a bit at the end, gave him too many second serves. He broke at just the right time. He was more consistent and played better in the end.” For Nadal, to have won a tournament so soon after a three month lay-off, beating the world number 1 in the process was like a dream come true; “This is very important, very special for me after three months from the court.” “In the first set, he’s playing very well, much better than me, very easy first set for him. In the second set I was down 0-30 but held my serve, and then I just concentrated on winning my serve every time to make it 3-3, then 4-4. Then he missed one shot, and I played two good points. His level in the third set was going down, and mine going up. When I broke him, it gave me a lot of confidence. Even when he broke back, I was still playing very well.” Nadal still considers Federer not just to be the best tennis player in the world, but the best sportsman; “I admire him a lot, he is the best sportsman in the world. He is unbelievable.” By Andre Jones (in Dubai)

Daniel
03-04-2006, 09:25 PM
Federer, a man for all seasons
By Cherian Thomas

2 March 2006



DUBAI — There's something about Federer that evokes nice thoughts. Images of the mighty Alps; of Heidi and other gentle folks, the tinkling of cowbells, snow-capped mountains, Nestle chocolates.


All wholesome things, just like Roger Federer, the Swiss world No.1 with a tennis racket. He's the kind of guy your daughter could bring and you wouldn't tell your wife: Guess what the cat dragged in!

Did you know that Federer speaks six languages? ATP's official guide to professional tennis says Federer speaks English, German, Swiss German, French and some Swedish and some Italian. Americans, in general, speak just one language.

That Federer's mother Lynette is South African and his father Robert is Swiss and that they met on a business trip when they both worked for a pharmaceutical company.

That Federer is involved in the Tsunami and Hurricane Katrina relief works. That in 2003 he initiated the Roger Federer Foundation, which supports disadvantaged children in South Africa.

That he gathered together the world's top 10 male and female players for an exhibition to aid ATP and Unicef in their joint venture ACE, Assisting Children Everywhere. One thing we all do know is that he's fabulous tennis player. Yet in his opening round at the $1 million Dubai Open championships he was everything but the world No.1 against his Swiss compatriot Stanislas Wawrinka.

"I always struggle in the early rounds," he admitted later. "I don't care how many bad shots I hit. It's the end result that matters. Coming back after three weeks (a lay-off after the Australian Open) is tough.

"I thought my game was coming and going. My serve wasn't good. I'm focussed on winning, not the way I play. I'm not playing to please."

The Swiss icon also admitted that he has a bad record against some players. "(Rafael) Nadal (of Spain to whom Federer has lost twice in three meetings), (Argentina's David) Nalbandian, (Britian's Tim) Henman."

Who would he like to face in the title clash here? "Once I'm in the final I don't care who I face," said Federer and then added: "(Andre) Agassi would be nice." Later on Tuesday, Federer took some time out to enjoy the very best Dubai has to offer at night. The three-time Dubai champion enjoyed a relaxing night cruise on a luxury speed boat on the Dubai Creek.

Taking in the beautiful Dubai skyline, Federer said: “Dubai at night is such a special sight, it really is good fun.”

Federer, who also got to pilot the speed boat, is chasing his fourth consecutive Dubai title. Only some one truly foolhardy would bet against that.

lunahielo
03-05-2006, 03:29 AM
Thank you, Daniel.

Daniel
03-05-2006, 04:19 AM
The Sunday Times Magazine


The Sunday Times March 05, 2006

Interview


Game, upset and match
Scott Athorne, the first writer to play Roger Federer at his own game, reveals the vulnerable side of Mr Invincible


Roger Federer, it is said, has the perfect tennis game. “The best I’ve ever seen,” says John McEnroe. “A magician,” says the former world No 1 Marat Safin. “An inspiration, the best I’ve ever played against,” says Andre Agassi. Even Pete Sampras, who holds a record 14 Grand Slam titles, has conceded that “there is no one who can play with him [Federer] today. For the next four or five years, his competition will be the record books”.



Which makes my present position daunting, to say the least. I am standing on centre court at the Khalifa tennis stadium in Doha, Qatar. At the opposite end, hunched, knees bent, ready to return my serve, is the man with “the perfect game”. It is a desperate situation. Genuinely frightening. I keep telling myself I have a plan. During a trip to Federer’s home tennis club in Basel, Switzerland, one of his old tennis pals, Jon La Roche, who played in the same junior team between the ages of 12 and 14, revealed a possible weakness. “Those who won against Roger always played high bouncing balls to his backhand,” he said. “It used to restrict his play. Now I don’t know, but I remember he hated it. The tactic annoyed him quite a bit.”


It is the previous day, and Federer is waiting for me inside the foyer of his five-star hotel. He is an impressive figure in the flesh – athletic and instantly recognisable, well dressed in casual blue trousers and beige shoes, both by Prada, and a fitted white T-shirt by Christian Dior. His arms are strong and sinewy, with bulging veins, especially his right-hand tennis arm, as though carved from oak; his eyes, alert and watchful, crowned by straight low-set eyebrows, which give his face a permanent look of concentration.

Introductions are made and warm smiles exchanged. “Should we do it?” he asks, sounding brave. He leads me to a quiet corner of “the tea room”, a grandiose space completely devoid of people, and sinks into a small sofa, which makes his limbs appear long and loose. He looks around: “It’s nice in here, don’t you think?” I resist the urge to disagree, knowing that he has chosen this spot specially in advance because it is private, well away from the rest of the hotel guests having lunch outside by the sea. Privacy, I will learn, is important to Federer. And rare. The Qatar Open may be a low-key tournament, but even here, in the middle of the Gulf, where few people play tennis, the spotlight on the world No 1 is unrelenting.

To promote the event, which will be beamed to millions, posters of Federer serving a ball in traditional Arab robes are displayed all over the city streets. At the Khalifa tennis stadium, I will see him mobbed by fans and by the world’s media, hungry for quotes. Even Federer’s fellow pros, inside the rarefied confines of the players’ lounge, will eyeball him deferentially when he crosses the room. Is he aware of all those eyes on him? He draws a deep breath. “It’s true, the players tend to look at everything I do. Every step I take. I don’t want to be going to breakfast and going, ‘Hey, how are you? How are you, How are you?’ ” He laughs, then pretends to high-five a line of people, making the sound of hands on flesh with his tongue. “Sometimes I just want to go sit down alone with Mirka [his girlfriend] and just have a coffee.” He shrugs his shoulders. “This is a big hotel; you can hide…”

Hiding is a nice idea, but of course he can’t: a group of American tourists decide to sit nearby, ogling and earwigging our conversation. And besides, how do you hide from the spotlight if you are a giant of the game, when you are being described as “the greatest tennis player that ever lived”? At just 24, Roger Federer is playing a brand of tennis that has never been seen before. He is combining the classic grace and artistry of yesteryear with the modern power game. His brain is as wily as McEnroe’s; his stroke play as powerful as Sampras’s; his exquisite footwork leaves the impression that he always has more time, more space, in which to react. Technically, he is perfect. He can serve and volley, as well as play from the back of the court, dictating the pace of the game at will. And he makes it look easy, which is the true mark of sporting genius. The stats don’t lie. The week of this interview marks his 100th consecutive week as the world’s No 1. He has won 162 of his last 171 tournament matches. He has won seven Grand Slam titles, Wimbledon for the past three years, and the US and Australian Opens twice. He has beaten Andre Agassi in their last eight meetings, Andy Roddick in their last six, and Lleyton Hewitt in their last nine – all players who have been his biggest threats in recent times. And he has won 26 of his last 27 finals matches – the only loss being in November, against David Nalbandian in the Masters Cup, when he was still recovering from an ankle injury.

The giant moves restlessly in his seat before responding. “Look, it’s definitely nice to hear all that stuff. Not just from experts, but also from former players who have played me.” He stops. “But I don’t know. They always seem to say that about the current No 1, because tennis moves on. Gets better.” Oh, Roger, please – your game is completely dominant! “It’s true, I’ve been really dominant over the last couple of years. It’s correct to talk like this, but I have to back it up with results. One match at a time, then when you’re on the court, it’s one point at a time. And it’s not easy.

There’s still a long way to go. I’m still not even halfway. You’ve got to keep it up for years to come because that’s where the records go.” Is he afraid of anybody? “No, not any more. But there were guys around who I didn’t used to like to play – Henman, Agassi, Ferrero. But now I’ve beaten them all, which is good, and important to know.”

Federer is a laid-back character, likable too, but to begin with he is a challenging interviewee. He sounds flat, speaks factually, and rarely emotes. It could be a habit he has picked up from press conferences, which he is required to do after every match, in three languages. Or because English is his third language. In his first press conference of the Qatar Open, I watched him become ever more distant and vague when repeatedly asked about doping in tennis – a popular subject since the Argentine player Mariano Puerta, 27, was banned for eight years for failing a drugs test after he lost the men’s singles final in the French Open. Federer acknowledges this: “Maybe I was on autopilot, but in a way I don’t want to face obviously stupid or difficult questions.

I also feel I’m obliged to answer them. For tennis, for sport, to protect the sport, to say what I don’t like, what I like. My opinion is very strong now, being No 1 in the world. And when I first became No 1, I wasn’t aware of all this… Then, I was being influenced much more, because people wouldn’t know me, and then I would read the article and I wouldn’t be happy, and I’d go, ‘Doesn’t this guy know who I am? Doesn’t he understand what my character is or anything?’ ”


Roger Federer, or Rogie, as some call him, was born in Basel, in the German-speaking quarter of Switzerland. His South African mother, Lynette, and Swiss father, Robert, met while working for the same chemical company in South Africa. He also has an older sister, Diana, a nurse. He started playing tennis at the age of eight, at a small club in Basel, the Old Boys Tennis Club, encouraged by his tennis-playing parents. His boyhood hero was Boris Becker. “I always loved to play against the garage door or against the cupboard doors inside,” he recalls. “My mum got fed up because it was bang, bang, bang all day.” His excellent hand-to-eye co-ordination also made him a natural at other ball sports, but at 12 he decided to focus on tennis.

Frau Bärlocher, a tennis coach who oversees the juniors at the Old Boys Tennis Club, has fond memories of young Rogie. “He was a really easy-going guy,” she remembers. “He was well-liked, fun-loving and polite. He was always very polite.” Is she surprised by his success? “Oh yes, nobody thought he would come up like this, and become so good, when he was small. He just wanted to play. He didn’t really like practising, especially condition training. He just wanted to have fun, and to win, of course.” She shows me the club’s clay courts, including court No 1, which has been renamed Roger Federer Centre Court in honour of his Wimbledon triumphs, and court No 6, where he received his first tennis lessons. Then she surprises me by saying Rogie was an emotional, sometimes volatile player. “When he was about 11, we had some umpire chairs, and he was sitting underneath a chair for 10 minutes, just crying.” Why? “Because he lost. It just made him furious. He’s a different player now. Now he cries when he wins,” she laughs.



“It’s true,” admits Federer. “I used to have a very bad temper on court. I would become very sad if I was losing, crying all the time, during matches sometimes too. You can not believe how much I cried. I would never be the angry guy who would smash rackets and then say, ‘Oh, I hate this sport.’ I was like, ‘I’m so disappointed with the way I play, I can’t play any more.’ I’m sort of like a crybaby, you know. And it was hard, because I was getting so down on myself. And everyone would say, ‘Oh, don’t worry, Roger. It’s going to get better.’ Even my opponents, sometimes, would comfort me, saying, ‘It’s not so bad; there’s worse than this.’ ”

And it’s still true today. Beneath the composed facade and the on-court poker face, Federer is a sensitive and emotional man. You glimpse it when he wins big titles and the tears fall uncontrollably, and when journalists pester him with difficult questions and he retreats into his shell. He learnt to internalise his emotions when he decided to leave home to live at the National Tennis Centre in the French-speaking part of Switzerland. “It was hard at the start,” he says. “I was very homesick. I couldn’t understand the language, so I felt like a foreigner. I almost wanted to leave, but I got over it. I became stronger, mentally and physically. My game became more powerful, and my serve and forehand really started working. All of a sudden I was No 1 junior in the world, and then on the senior tour.”



“Roger made a lot of important decisions himself when he was younger,” says his mother, Lynette. “That was the key to his success, because he had to learn how to do things for himself. Those struggles were good for him, a challenge. He learnt to be independent, and to develop as a person.” In other words, he shed his brattish ways. He did not weep during matches any more, or throw his racket, or scream so loudly after mistakes. He became courteous on court, never berating umpires or linespeople, always in control. And in 2003, at 22, his awesome natural talent and new disciplined approach to the game won him his first Wimbledon title. (“Wimbledon means the most to me: this is where I’ve cried the most, been most emotional.”) It changed everything. Suddenly promoters, sportswear-makers, tournament directors and the press were beating a path to his door. “It was phone call after phone call, and I’m like, ‘Is this how it’s supposed to be?’ ”

Calls are now fielded by “Team Federer”: his mum, who helps to run his charity, supporting disadvantaged children in South Africa; his dad, Robert, who arranges his tournament schedule; and his Swiss girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec, a former professional player herself, and now his media manager and personal assistant.

They met at the Sydney Olympics in 2000; two years later she was forced to retire from the game after a foot injury. Nowadays she prefers to stay out of the media spotlight, shying away from an interview when I spot her looking bored at one of Federer’s post-match press conferences.

“I asked her to be there,” he says. “She also gives me a little bit of advice, because she’s heard me talk so much. We talk together, you know. I say, ‘What do you think of that answer?’ And she says, ‘Yeah, that was a good answer’ or ‘Maybe next time you could say it differently.’ ” He smiles to himself. “It’s just funny when we talk sometimes. I like her to be around. She knows what I’m going through, and how things are. She helps me a great deal – not just as a girlfriend. I really like to have people around me who I trust.”

Mirka also makes a fine shopping companion, it turns out. Before meeting her, Federer could not care less about fashion. Now his favourite labels are Prada and Gucci and he has become a self-confessed fashion junkie. He raves about the womenswear at Alexander McQueen, and mentions a special basement outlet in Milan where he shops. “I almost met the designers Miuccia Prada and Giorgio Armani once,” he says, in the same exalted tones a teenager might use when talking about a pop star. Shopping has also become a way for him and Mirka to escape the daily hotel-and-courts routine, one of the few non-tennis-related activities they can enjoy together while on the road. On the rare occasions they are at home, in their modern apartment in a leafy area of Basel, Federer wishes there was more time to “chill out”, to play ping pong and cards with friends, and go for long drives with Mirka through the Alps. He recalls a recent trip home, in December. “I was in Switzerland for 10 days. I had to pick up an award, then I was practising hard with my conditioning trainer, then I had to meet my friends, my family, and I realised I didn’t have much time for myself. I started to plan my time carefully, and it was terrible. I had to tell my friend, ‘Look, in three days, we will meet at 10.45 in the morning in this place, and we will have exactly an hour and a half.’ That was awful. I feel I’m not being true to myself, which isn’t right. I have to watch that tennis doesn’t dominate my life.”

Starting a family is also on hold. “Obviously that is becoming more and more a subject, but with the busy lifestyle it’s difficult to put it in. I don’t want to say I calculate everything, it’s got to come naturally and that’s how a relationship has got to be. So maybe I will wake up one day and say, ‘It’s time for all this.’ But at the moment, erm, it doesn’t seem like it, you know. But again, maybe in a month’s time it will be very different.”

For now, he wants to remain firmly focused on tennis. More specifically, on securing a fourth consecutive Wimbledon title, and on winning his first French Open. There is also the Grand Slam – winning all four majors in the same year – which was last achieved by the Australian Rod Laver in 1969. In January, Federer won the Australian Open title, the first of the four Grand Slams, keeping his prospects of the Grand Slam in 2006 alive. “For the record books, I’ve got to play extremely well. Just ‘well’ is not good enough. I’ve broken records, I’ve equalled records, but I’m still only halfway to the very best. I hope it’s going to work, but I’m not playing to break the records, I’m playing to enjoy myself, to have no regrets. If it will be 15 [majors], or 300 weeks at No 1, great; if I finish the year at No 1 eight times in a row, great. But I love the game, no matter how it turns out. If I’m never going to win a match again, I’ll walk away and love the sport, and I think that’s what matters most in the end.” He dismisses the notion, aired recently by Pat Cash, that his greatest threat is not Lleyton Hewitt or Andy Roddick, or any other player, but the far more insidious opponent of boredom.

“I mean, sometimes it is hard to get up in the morning and say, ‘Okay, let’s do it all over again,’ but I think every player lives through that, So for me, my dream came true by becoming No 1 in the world, and I think once you’ve sniffed a little bit of that air out there on the big stages, you always want more of it. I enjoy it so much, and I think for me to now just say, ‘Okay, now it’s getting a little boring,’ that would be a totally wrong approach.” Federer’s coach, the Australian Tony Roache, sees no sign of boredom either. “Unbelievable talent,” he says. “Some of the stuff he can do is mind-boggling. You think, ‘Wow, did that happen?’ He’s good fun, he’s very relaxed and that’s a big part of why he’s so successful. And he can do it all. He can play strong from the back and he’s a good volleyer: he’s the complete player. He plays the way the game should be played.” Does he think Federer will win all four Grand Slams, like Laver? “Time will tell. I think if he can win the French championship, he’s up there with the all-time greats. That’s the ultimate test, to win all the slams, and it’s harder today. Not taking anything away from Rod, but in those days three of the tournaments were on grass and one on clay. Now it’s on four different surfaces – and the depth in men’s tennis is also much greater.”






Back to centre court, and the Sunday Times Magazine game against Roger Federer – his first competitive match of 2006. My preparations are thorough. I practise my service beforehand, and warm up with a pro called Simone Bolelli, 20, ranked about 200 in the world. Everything seems in good working order. I am timing and striking the ball well, and feel composed. Then the giant appears, and everything changes. My heart starts racing, tunnel vision kicks in, and the initial excitement is replaced by a kind of crazed panic. My racket becomes heavy, the simplest strokes awkward. Anyway, it’s The Sunday Times Magazine to serve… Federer wins the first point when I attempt to hit a looping topspin forehand to his backhand side – his “weak” spot – and it goes long. The second point, a long baseline rally, ends when I hit a forehand off the racket frame and it flies into the stands, causing laughter among the pros on the sideline. The third point I win, when Federer hits a tame-looking forehand into the net. Later, he’ll tell me he did not mean it, which I like to believe. Then... I make two more backhand errors, and Federer wins the game.

I’d rather not mention my two double faults, which he allowed me to take again, or that he sometimes dinked the ball back to me like I was a kid. And as for targeting his backhand, that was always doomed; after all, not even his fellow pros can exploit it. I mention my game plan to Federer when we shake hands at the net. “I know,” he laughs. “That’s why I kept it low with my slice.”

SUKTUEN
03-05-2006, 10:12 AM
thanks , bu I don't have a mood to read

Minnie
03-05-2006, 11:52 PM
Daniel - thank you for the articles you've posted. I was going to buy The Sunday Times this morning to read on a nice, lazy day, but didn't. Now wished I had seeing how Rogi was featured in the mag. I'm sure I'm going to enjoy reading that long article. I may try to get a back copy of the mag. Not so sure that I liked reading in one of the other articles that Roger says he doesn't care how he wins - he doesn't play to please... that's not the kind of thing I like to know that my favourite player thinks.

SUKTUEN
03-07-2006, 07:28 AM
yes. she is hard work

RogiFan88
03-07-2006, 03:37 PM
Daniel - thank you for the articles you've posted. I was going to buy The Sunday Times this morning to read on a nice, lazy day, but didn't. Now wished I had seeing how Rogi was featured in the mag. I'm sure I'm going to enjoy reading that long article. I may try to get a back copy of the mag. Not so sure that I liked reading in one of the other articles that Roger says he doesn't care how he wins - he doesn't play to please... that's not the kind of thing I like to know that my favourite player thinks.

I want to know if there were any photos -- we get the Sunday Times but NOT The Magazine... charming... :(

bokehlicious
03-07-2006, 09:13 PM
Bodo's too funny sometimes :o

http://www.tennis.com/Tennis_World_Blog/entry.asp?ENTRY_ID=820

The Mighty Fed Fans

"I was going to post a comment below on this issue, but then I had this lightbulb-over-head moment and realized, “Dude! It’s your blog. You can put it anywhere you want!”

So I’m doing this post in homage to fans of The Mighty Fed.

Most of you know that I’m partial to describing fans whom I consider unreasonably infatuated with their heroes and heroines as “Kool-Aid Drinkers.” I had expected that after my most recent post on Federer and Rafael Nadal (“Bye, Bye, Doo, Bye, Part 2”) that the Federer KADs would come, well, pouring out of the woodwork.

Yet despite the fact that the topic generated 65 comments (and still counting), not a single fan of TMF called me, in the manner of Nadal or Mauersmo or Serena Williams KADs, stupid, inarticulate, old, racist, myopic, xenophobic, sexist, ugly, irresponsible, perverted, deranged, etc. etc.

It appears that Fed fans, in a curious echo of the personality of their Main Man, are civil, reasonable, respectful and temperate. What on earth are you people trying to do, ruin my reputation?

What’s next, are you going to note that exaggeration and humor are great ways to stimulate debate? That overstatement is a good way to get someone’s attention? Are you going to blow my cover and reveal that my mug shot is a fraud, and I'm really a 22-year old, 6-1 Nigerian female supermodel?

Cut it out folks. If you don’t have any Kool-Aid handy, I’ll ship you a packet if you send me 300 dollars cash and a self-addressed envelope.

As a special tribute, I’m digging up the nicest recent picture I can find of TMF and posting it.

That'll fix your wagons"

rofe
03-07-2006, 10:05 PM
It appears that Fed fans, in a curious echo of the personality of their Main Man, are civil, reasonable, respectful and temperate. What on earth are you people trying to do, ruin my reputation?


There might be a ring of truth to it. Most fans are also attracted by his personality on and off court. Maybe his fans are calm themselves or aspire to be calm.

Minnie
03-07-2006, 11:50 PM
There might be a ring of truth to it. Most fans are also attracted by his personality on and off court. Maybe his fans are calm themselves or aspire to be calm.

Roger must be having a calming effect on me as I was surprised at how quickly I got over his loss in Dubai ...

lunahielo
03-08-2006, 12:41 AM
Great article, Daniel Thanks. :hug:

WF4EVER
03-08-2006, 01:54 PM
Roger must be having a calming effect on me as I was surprised at how quickly I got over his loss in Dubai ...


I feel very much the same as you do. I suppose some of Fed's calmness, class and control has worn off on some of his fans. I'm not happy that he lost, not in the least but I believe in him. I adore Roger. I can't think of a current sports figure with so many positive attributes. I thought I wanted to meet Venus in the flesh but she's been greatly overshadowed by my desire to behold this man. Lucky for all of you who have.

He' s special, he's blessed, truly blessed to have attained all he has and I believe there is much more to come.

yanchr
03-08-2006, 02:43 PM
I feel very much the same as you do. I suppose some of Fed's calmness, class and control has worn off on some of his fans. I'm not happy that he lost, not in the least but I believe in him. I adore Roger. I can't think of a current sports figure with so many positive attributes. I thought I wanted to meet Venus in the flesh but she's been greatly overshadowed by my desire to behold this man. Lucky for all of you who have.

He' s special, he's blessed, truly blessed to have attained all he has and I believe there is much more to come.
Sorry I don't mean to be anything negative or offensive but I just have to :lol: at your words here :p But I totally agree. Yes, he is special, he is blessed, he is worthy of every bit of your effort to try to meet, I mean the man himself, tennis just being a very limited part :wavey:

RogiFan88
03-08-2006, 03:12 PM
Well, I think many Rogi fans are drawn to him in the first place because they are like him -- calm, classy, you know, all those :cool: characteristics. ;)

SUKTUEN
03-08-2006, 03:13 PM
thanks~!!

RogiFan88
03-09-2006, 02:35 AM
Federer quietly dominating the world of tennis
By ANDREW KRUMME
Staff Writer
sports@louisvillecardinal.com
February 06, 2006

All the hype right now is surrounding the Super Bowl, college basketball and the outstanding play of the NBA’s Kobe Bryant, but one story has gone unnoticed: the epic saga of Roger Federer.

You might ask, “Why are you writing about tennis?” Well, I have a unique background in and appreciation for the sport. I played the game religiously for six years, spending countless weekends at tennis clubs around the Ohio Valley, practicing at least three hours a day. Let’s just say I did not make it in tennis, despite the pressure from my mom’s side of the family, which sent seven of 12 kids to college on full-ride tennis scholarships.

Outside of boxing, I don’t think there is any tougher sport in the world to compete in, much less dominate, than tennis. Tennis players top the list when it comes to people who are overall athletes. They have the perfect combination of strength, speed, agility, hand-eye coordination, stamina and intelligence. And while nobody will ever give Federer the credit he deserves as one of the greatest athletes on the planet, he is well on his way to becoming the greatest tennis player ever to walk the earth.

The 24-year-old Switzerland native captured his seventh Grand Slam title just over two weeks ago in the Australian Open. Number seven for Federer puts him half way to the all-time Grand Slam record held by my childhood idol, Pete Sampras. Beginning with Federer’s first Grand Slam win at the 2003 Wimbledon Championships, he has won seven of the last 11 slams, rivaling Tiger Woods’ run of seven of 11 majors within a three-year span on the PGA Tour.

Federer will go for his eighth in May as he looks for his first French Open title, and if successful, he will hold all four major titles at the same time. That accomplishment would put him in a league of his own as the first men’s player ever to hold all four. Quite possibly the only feat to top this in all of tennis was Steffi Graf’s “Golden Grand Slam” in 1988 when she won all four majors while also taking home the Gold Medal in the 1988 Seoul Olympics.

Federer looks like a great tennis player on paper, but you have to see him on the court to truly realize why he may go down as the all-time greatest. He is a jack of all trades. He owns one of the most dangerous serves on the tour, has blistering ground strokes from both sides, moves like the wind and can beat people in any number of ways.

His poise is what carries him. While many of the past greats on the men’s tour dominated as Federer has, none were ever so composed in doing so. McEnroe and Connors were always known for their tempers. Sampras was easily flustered. What made Sampras great was his ability to get through those moments and still pull out a win, à la his five-set epic win in the 1996 U.S. Open Quarterfinal against Alex Corretja, where Sampras puked in the middle of the fifth set tiebreak. Andre Agassi had spurts of greatness but would disappear for years at a time. Federer is downright as close as you can get to being a robot when he is on the court, and if all his parts stay together, there is no limit to what he can do.

http://www.louisvillecardinal.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2006/02/06/43e80808e3c9b

Rog1
03-09-2006, 10:48 AM
I just got Roger's Aussie interview on the TTC on tape. He's so cute in the interview. In the beginning when he opens the hotel room door and Murphy is standing there with flowers and chocolate, Roger laughs and says sth like 'oh no, don't give me flowers' like he's a bit creeped out by a guy giving him flowers. Then Murphy says 'they're for the room'. :lol: At the very end of the interview Murphy gives him an AC/DC t-shirt and says 'I never lost in this shirt' and Roger looks at him kind of surprised and says 'You used to play in this shirt?', and then of course gets the joke when Murphy says 'I never won in it either'. :lol: There were a couple shots of Mirka. The camera panned over to her when Roger said she sometimes gets upset because he watches too much tennis on TV. The shot was not so flattering - she's lying on the bed on her stomach reading or sth and you can actually see a dip in the mattress. :tape: Overall though it was a good little interview and you can understand why people like interviewing him. He came across like such a cool guy that would just hang with you and chat all day.

Wow, I'd love to see some screencaps

Linda (Luton-UK)

nobama
03-09-2006, 11:51 AM
Looks like Roger's going to be making a slight detour after Miami....

http://inhome.rediff.com/cricket/2006/mar/09un.htm
UN to honour Dravid, Inzamam

March 09, 2006 14:30 IST

Indian cricket captain Rahul Dravid and his Pakistani counterpart Inzamam-ul Haq have been selected to become spokesmen for 'Sport for Development and Peace' at the United Nations.

The duo have been invited to the UN Headquarters in New York to attend a special event aimed at building on the momentum generated by the International Year of Sport and Physical Education, among a galaxy of top sportsmen from around the world on April 3.

"Secretary General Kofi Annan will designate the two cricket captains as Spokesmen for Sport for Development and Peace," Djibril Diallo, Director in the UN Office of Sport for development and peace, said.

Diallo said cricket had played a major role in easing tensions between the two sub continental nations leading to a summit meeting between their Prime Ministers.

"They [the two cricket teams] have, therefore, made a contribution to peace," he said.

Other sportsmen on the occasion will be Brazil's legendary football player Pele, top-ranked tennis star Roger Federer and New York Marathon winner Tegla Loroupe of Kenya.

The UN is making sport a key component in its efforts to achieve Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) aimed at halving poverty by 2015.

The UN General Assembly designated 2005 the International Year of Sport and Physical Education, which was commemorated by activities worldwide, and the UN is now entering a new phase of more action, more co-operation and more implementation of Sport for Development and Peace initiatives.

SUKTUEN
03-09-2006, 03:39 PM
thanks

RogiFan88
03-11-2006, 04:22 AM
Link to this Rafa-Rogi cartoon:
http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=3187320&postcount=2819

SUKTUEN
03-11-2006, 10:03 AM
thanks

World Beater
03-12-2006, 01:30 AM
Link to this Rafa-Rogi cartoon:
http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=3187320&postcount=2819

somebody please send federer this cartoon...he needs some fire

RogiFan88
03-12-2006, 02:00 AM
Good one, Wbeater... ;)

SUKTUEN
03-12-2006, 04:31 PM
somebody please send federer this cartoon...he needs some fire
yes, Fight Nadal Roger~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:

Daniel
03-13-2006, 02:16 AM
Is Federer the best ever?
Tennis greats debate current No. 1’s place in history

Roger Federer — seven-time Grand Slam winner at age 24

Complete coverage of the Pacific Life Open

Ex-pros on Federer


Pete Sampras: Even when Roger isn’t at the top of his game, he’s getting through those matches. That tells me he should be around for a while. At the end of the day, Roger is head and shoulders above everyone else playing, so I see him dominating for as long as he wants too.
John McEnroe: It was nice to see how hard he was trying to beat my record because perhaps now people will realize that it’s not as easy as it looks to go 82-3. Roger had a phenomenal year (going 81-4). He came up one short, but while it would have been nice to be tied with him, it is sort of cool that I still have one record. It puts in perspective how good my year was in ’84, that he put in that sort of effort when he probably shouldn’t have played. He might have done himself some damage by playing — he clearly wasn’t moving as well as he normally does, and yet he made a run in the fifth set when it seemed he was down and out.”
Jose Higueras: I don’t think I would put him in that class (with Sampras and Laver) yet, but he’s very close. Obviously, he’s got the tools to be there and I believe he will be there.”
Jimmy Connors: “He’s head and shoulders above everyone else right now. And I say that by looking at his record the last three years. Anyone who has that kind of record and that many wins in Grand Slams in a three or four year period of time is certainly the dominant figure.”
Larry Stefanki: I’m a Roger liker. Actually, I mean I’m a Roger lover. He’s so multidimensional. Other guys don’t want to create other dimensions to become a threat to him.
FEDERER BY THE NUMBERS

7: Grand Slam titles (Australian Open ’04, ’06, Wimbledon ’03, ’04, ’05, U.S. Open ’04, ’05). It ties Federer for 11th all time with Grand Slam titles. Those with more Slams are Pete Sampras (14), Roy Emerson (12), Bjorn Borg (11), Rod Laver (11), Bill Tilden (10), Fred Perry (8), Andre Agassi (8), Jimmy Connors (8), Ken Rosewall (8), and Ivan Lendl (8).
81-4: Federer’s match record in 2005, the finest season since John McEnroe’s record 82-3 mark in 1984.
7-0: Record in Grand Slam finals.
171-11: Federer’s record since 2004, for a winning percentage of 94 percent. Federer also has not gone two consecutive tournaments without a title since 2004.
111: Weeks at No. 1 in the world as of Monday. Federer ranks fifth all time for weeks at No. 1 trailing John McEnroe (170), Jimmy Connors (268), Ivan Lendl (270), and Pete Sampras (286).
56: Federer’s winning streak on hardcourts, an Open era record, which was snapped last week in a loss to Rafael Nadal in Dubai.

Leighton Ginn
The Desert Sun
March 12, 2006

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
INDIAN WELLS - Greatness in tennis is defined differently by various players.
Rod Laver, the only man to win the Grand Slam twice, said greatness begins simply by winning.

Pete Sampras, the winner of a record 14 Grand Slam titles, said it's excellence over a long period of time, where a player wins majors, big matches and defend titles.

"If you do all those things and do it for a long period of time, I think that makes you a legend," said Sampras, a Palm Desert resident and investor in the Pacific Life Open.

One thing many of the greatest players in history agree with is that Roger Federer appears on his way to placing himself among the greatest ever.

"If he stays healthy, and doesn't make so much money where he does not want to stay on track, he'll establish records to show he might be the best we've seen to date," said Hall of Famer Jack Kramer. "He's a great, great champion and he's still a kid."

At 24, Federer has won seven Grand Slam titles, including the last three. Federer was so dominant last year that he went 81-4, falling short of John McEnroe's single-season record at 82-3.

"I think he's already up there with his results," Sampras said. "I don't see anyone pushing him. There's a couple of guys playing better, but at the end of the day, Roger is head and shoulders above everyone else playing, so I see him dominating for as long as he wants too."

When Kramer talks about the greatest players in each era, he qualifies his answer by the fact the game has changed so much during each eras.


There's also a hint of skepticism in Kramer's voice as he talks about how the game has changed because of the racket technology. With the lighter rackets, players can generate so much power from the baseline that it's harder for players to come to the net.
"I've always felt that champions would be champions of any age," Kramer said. "If (the older champions) had modern equipment, they're so light, they could do more than we could with heavy rackets.

"Now, seeing Roger play, I've never seen someone do so much of all the people I've watched."

Looking for a rival

Federer has been so dominant for the past three years that no one has really stood up to him for any extended period of time.
"As good as Roger is, people want to see him tested," said Andy Roddick, who lost to Federer in the finals of Wimbledon the last two years. "You want there to be the Boston Celtics for the Lakers, you want there to be Red Sox for the Yankees."

Jimmy Connors, who had his own legendary battles with John McEnroe and Bjorn Borg, said rivalries are the lifeblood of the sport.

The player who has emerged as a possible rival is Rafael Nadal, the 19-year-old French Open champion who is No. 2 in the rankings.

Nadal owns a 3-1 record against Federer and could be a road block to the glaring omission on Federer's resume, a French Open title.

If Federer could win at Roland Garros, he would become the sixth player to win all four Grand Slam tournaments. And if Federer can win the French Open this year, he would complete a calendar-year Grand Slam.

"I saw him at the French and he has what it takes on the clay - the heart and the grit and the determination - to do well there," Sampras said. "He has the game and he's going to be a threat there for years to come. For Roger, that will be his biggest challenge, the French, even though he grew up on the clay. There's so many good clay court players that things will really have to fall in place for him to win there."

Roddick has a chance to be Federer's biggest rival on tennis' grandest stage, Wimbledon. The two have met in the last two finals at Wimbledon.

Despite having one of the best serves and a dominating forehand, Roddick has not found a way to put pressure on Federer as his 1-10 record indicates.

Roddick said Federer might be in his head, which might have set back the top American.

"I made adjustments with him in mind," Roddick said. "You have to make adjustments in mind and apply them to (Federer) and not lose what you're doing against other people. I still have to find a way to get there. (The adjustments) wasn't solely for him, but a lot of it was done with him in mind. I think that's the pressure, to his credit, that he has put on all of the guys."

Sampras agrees.

"I think there are guys who can push him, but on a consistent level, I don't know," said Sampras, who had a legendary rivalry with Andre Agassi. "There's not really anyone I see that's 'Wow, this is going to be a tough match for Roger.' They're just guys who can push him, but at the end of the day he'll come through and will probably win more of these matches than he's going to lose them."

Steady focus

Not only will Federer have to worry about rivals coming up, he might also have to worry about himself.
Larry Stefanki, who coached Yevgeny Kafelnikov and Marcelo Rios to the No. 1 ranking, thought Federer looked off at the Australian Open.

"Roger can be lackadaisical and doesn't want to move, and he can fall into a trap," Stefanki said. "I don't think he can play worse than Australia and he got away with a lot. It was shocking.

"I think he's on cruise control at the moment. He also has the aura of Roger, so everyone has bought into that scene. It's a double plus for him."

However, Sampras, who set the record for most weeks at No. 1 at 286, sees similarities between himself and Federer.

"I think he has a great attitude. He doesn't get too high or too low on wins or losses," Sampras said. "He has a pretty stoic attitude, a lot like I had, where it's easier to maintain that level of play, keeping it simple. He just goes out there and gets that job done.

"Being from Switzerland, he doesn't have that American media pressure that I faced a little bit or what Tim Henman faced in Great Britain. He's under the radar screen when it comes to the media and feeling that (pressure)."

Daniel
03-13-2006, 02:18 AM
Nadal emerges as Federer's foil

Ramon Mena Owens, The Desert Sun
Rafael Nadal, of Spain, is the No. 2-ranked player in the world and has a 3-1 record in three matches against Roger Federer.

Powered by Topix.net
Leighton Ginn
The Desert Sun
March 12, 2006

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
INDIAN WELLS - In a sport that is desperately looking for rivals, 19-year-old Rafael Nadal is not quite ready for that role, even though the world's No. 2 has a 3-1 record over Roger Federer.
In the one loss to Federer, Nadal had a two-sets-to-none lead on Federer on the hardcourts of Miami last year. Nadal went on to win the next three matches against the world's No. 1, including the semifinal of the French Open and last week at Dubai to snap Federer's 56-match winning streak on hardcourts.

"I am very young. He's unbelievable player. For me, he's the best, for sure. One of the best in history and he's the best player now, by far," Nadal said. "If you look at the rankings, and the points and the Grand Slams leads, we don't have comparison."

As far as Federer is concerned, four matches is not a rivalry.

"I guess we'll have to see how it progresses," Federer said. "But I always said, there are more players than just Nadal, and I still believe that.

"I don't think we can call it yet a rivalry. There are just too many other great players around."

However, Nadal tied Federer last year with 11 titles, including the French Open and four Masters Series titles.

And starting the year off at No. 2, Nadal could be in position to pass Federer for the top spot. But that's not what Nadal thinks, who is coming off a foot injury. The Pacific Life Open is Nadal's third tournament of the year.

"I begin late, that's important factor," Nadal said. "And the most important factor, he is better than me."


However, Andre Agassi doesn't buy it.
He thinks the big thing Nadal has to his advantage is being left-handed.

"Nadal can hit the one shot that everyone wishes they could hit to Roger, and that's the ball up and get it over his backhand side," Agassi said. "That's not brain surgery. Nobody likes it up here.

"You've got to look at the facts. Nadal is one of the fastest guys out there, one of the strongest guys out there. The fact that he's a lefty does pose the one possible possibility. I mean, if he's right-handed, Roger is winning that 10 out of 10 times because it's just hard to get that ball to Roger because he can move so well and hurt you in so many ways."

Federer concedes the southpaw jinx has been a factor in Nadal's success against him.

"He's a terrific scrambler and he brings something else to the game," Federer said. "We don't have many (left handers). To play against a good lefty really matters."

Nadal has been most dominant on clay, compiling a 50-2 record last year. While most clay courters struggle making the transition to faster surfaces, that doesn't seem to be the case with Nadal.

"He hits the ball bigger than your average guy we call clay courters," Roddick said. "He can hit the ball through the court as well and not relying on depth, and placement, touch and feel. He can bully the ball.

"I think he's still most vulnerable on quicker surfaces, but especially on a slow hard court, his movement is great."

Daniel
03-13-2006, 02:21 AM
By Matthew Cronin

INDIAN WELLS, March 10 (Reuters) - World number one Roger Federer said it was too early to tell whether he and Rafael Nadal will establish a major rivalry.

Spanish teenager Nadal broke Federer's 56-match hard court winning streak with a 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 victory in Dubai last Sunday and boasts a 3-1 record against the Swiss

But Federer said the competition was too fierce to develop a rivalry in the fashion of Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras.

"I've played him only four times and obviously we are number one and number two, but we'll have to see how it progresses," said Federer, the top seed at this week's Pacific Life Open.

"There are more players than just Nadal. The other players will play well here too at Indian Wells.

"I don't think we can call it a rivalry yet. There's just to many great players around."

But eight-times grand slam champion Agassi think the pairing has the makings of a classic and said that the left-handed Nadal, who is seeded second at Indian Wells, has the game to challenge Federer.

"I think it would be impossible for anybody to dominate in the past two years the way Roger did," Agassi said.

"It's great to see that the one person that closes to him in the rankings is his most difficult matchup. Nadal can hit that one shot that everybody wishes they can hit against Roger and that's getting the ball up to his backhand side.

"It's isn't brain surgery. Nobody likes it up there. That's the only area that Roger doesn't hurt you with. So it's great to see a matchup that lends for a rivalry for a long time to come."

Swiss Federer believes the more he plays the Spaniard, the more success he'll have against him.

"He's a big guy," Federer said. "He moves very well for his height and he's got strong legs. He gets back many balls and he's got a great forehand, great spin.

"He reads the dimension of the court very well. He's got a good all round game. We don't have to many of those, but I enjoy playing him. I'm at the top of my game so, when I win or lose, I don't freak out." ((SPORT-TENNIS-FEDERER. Editing by Miles Evans, Asia Sports Desk; +65 6870-3971))

Daniel
03-13-2006, 02:24 AM
By Jerry Magee
UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER
March 12, 2006

INDIAN WELLS – Everything Rafael Nadal says in English (which is not a lot) winds up as a question, no?

Yes. Some samples:

“Today I am the No. 2, no?

“I like a lot to play always. If you are winning, you have a good time, no?

“Improving is good for the tennis, no?”

What is good for the tennis is Nadal's presence in it. With the muscular 19-year-old from Spain positioning himself to challenge Roger Federer for supremacy, the men's game has its first potential rivalry since Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi were around together.

At a Pacific Life Open beset by rain, cold and high winds, the possibility of a Nadal-Federer final is the one encouraging factor near the close of what has been a trying first week for the tournament. The players' meeting last week in the final of the Dubai Duty Free Open had the stamp of a classic, with Nadal winning 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 and enlarging his career advantage over Federer to 3-1.

One person who does not view Nadal as a threat to supplant Federer as the No. 1 player on the ATP Tour is Nadal himself. No, he said – that word again – there is no rivalry.

“I am young player,” he said. “He an unbelievable player, for now and one of the best for history.”

Nadal was reminded of his 3-1 advantage over the Swiss star.

“The important thing is he is better than me,” said Nadal.

Nadal's judgment aside, it arguably was a measure of how closely he is pressing Federer that he should have been able to outplay him at Dubai in only his third tournament after being idled for 14 weeks by an injury to his left foot.
“Was another one for me, no?” said Nadal.

He won after Federer played at the very top of his game in the first set. “I think it's hard to keep it up, to play really, really aggressively, like I did in the first set,” said Federer. “I've got to find a way where I don't overdo it. It was even all the way, but he won the crucial points at the end and that was a pity, but I was still pleased by the way I played.”

Federer's judgment of Nadal: “He's just a good player, simple as that. But I enjoy the challenge with him. He's a terrific scrambler and he brings something else to the game as a great left-hander. We don't have many of those.”

His left-handedness is responsible for the threat Nadal can mount to Federer, in Andre Agassi's thinking. “Nadal can hit the one shot that everybody wishes they could hit to Roger, and that's getting the ball up and to his backhand,” Agassi said. “That's no brain surgery. Nobody likes it up there. But it's unfortunately the only area where Roger can't hurt you. So it's great to see the matchup that lends to a rivalry that might continue for a long time.”

Marat Safin echoed Agassi's point – that Nadal being left-handed is an advantage to him when he opposes Federer.

“If he wasn't a lefty, Federer would beat him 10 times out of 10,” said the Russian. “Not many players on the tour are lefty, so every time you play against a lefty, it's completely different, with opposite spin. Also, he (Nadal) is very fast and he's a big fighter. The whole combination.”

To Lleyton Hewitt, Federer is a different player at the Grand Slams than he is at Dubai or even here. “When Roger has played in big matches in big tournaments, he hasn't put too many feet wrong,” noted the Australian. “Whether Roger is a bit more vulnerable, we'll wait and see. But he's still the man to beat.”

RogiFan88
03-13-2006, 03:58 PM
INDIAN WELLS06 R2
Federer d Massu 63 76(4)

ROGER FEDERER
THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Roger as sort of first matches go, that's about as tough as it can get, isn't it?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I knew beforehand it's going to be a tough match, because he's been playing well -- okay, maybe on a different surface, but after all, you know, he won the Olympics, you know, on surface like this. I wasn't too pleased when I saw the draw because he beat me one time before. I don't remember actually how many times we played, but I know he's a tough competitor and I'm happy to be through because it was a good match.

Q. Roger, it appears as though you've lowered your service toss considerably resulting in a little more continuous fluid motion. Is that something you've been working on consciously?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't even know about it, to be honest. It's not something I've been working on. The game evolves, doesn't it? Seriously, I haven't worked on it.

Q. Is it good to get a tough match like that?

ROGER FEDERER: Seriously, I don't care how tough it is, as long as I get through. You know, I'm always worried about crashing out in the early rounds, you know, and to sit here and explain why, you know, but I'm happy I don't have to do that. So especially as, you know, I go to so many tournaments as a titleholder, you know, and always to back it up, it's never easy. So I'm happy the way it went tonight.

Q. Roger, this is your fourth tournament this year. The previous three you were in the finals against players that were four years younger than you. Is this starting to make you feel old?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not quite. Right in the middle of things, which is good, you know. I've got the older guys, the younger guys, been around now for, what, seven, eight years. I feel very comfortable on tour. I know many of the guys you know the up-and-coming. I catch them and say hello early. No, it's a very good situation I'm in right now. I enjoy seeing the young ones come and the older ones getting older and trying to fight for their spot, so it's good fun.

Q. When you say you look out for the young ones, you catch them and say hello, are they sort of taken aback at that moment when the World No. 1 goes up to them and says, in other words, "Welcome to the tour, hello"?

ROGER FEDERER: No, it's more like, you know, they cannot hide, you know, because I always have to pay attention, you know, who's coming along. And I've had some tough losses against youngsters, you know, and everybody knows that. So I try to see them as early as I can, and that's what I meant more than just, you know, having a handshake, you know.

Q. Roger, could you just talk a little bit about the conditions regardless of the temperature. Is it cold here? Are the balls slow? Heavy? Do you feel as though there's a gradual slowless, a slowing down of this sport?

ROGER FEDERER: To be honest, not quite, you know. I think if you ask many of the players, they all think this is a great court to play on. It's my feeling because, to move on it, it's fantastic. I think it's the best out there. The color, I think it's very nice to see the ball - so not just on TV, but also playing yourself. I have the feeling, you know, the court gives you bounce, you know, on the kick serve. The slice stays low, which is true for everyone, and if you hit it flat, you know, it's sort of -- you've got to really hit it hard. But you get -- especially the serve because the air is a little thinner here, so the ball goes through the air quicker, you know. And I think that makes it a very fair court to play for everyone, you know, for every style.

So this is maybe why I -- these are one of my favorite conditions to play on, to be honest, and I don't mind the slowness of the court because you can play with great angles here and really construct the point, which is a lot of fun.

Q. With all the controversy with the slowness of the courts in Melbourne during the Australian Open, do you think this is slow or equal speed or what?

ROGER FEDERER: Hard to say. I would think this is a little slower, to be honest. Just plays different, you know, because of the feeling of your movement, this and the Australian Open. I really don't know to be honest. It feels like this is a little bit slower.

Q. I have an offcourt question, so to speak. I saw the picture of Lindsay Lohan, the actress, published. I wonder how is it working these days? Do the movie celebrities want pictures with you or what's the situation now?

ROGER FEDERER: Some like it. Some don't. I don't know. You know, I just met her at a party and I was host of the Men's Vogue launch back in New York and she attended. So I was polite to welcome her and took a picture and, you know, all of a sudden, it's everywhere.

So, you know, I don't think -- we might meet each other, you know. I like to meet musicians maybe more than actors, you know, but it's good fun, you know, I think for everyone. I think from both sides, sometimes you want to meet and you don't want to meet, so depends on the situation, on the persons.

Q. How do you deal with tough pressure situations?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I guess you get used to it, you know, over time. I always say the more you put yourself in that position, you know, the easier it's going to get after a while. Even though, you know, the -- you never get really rid of all the nerves, but you feel more confident, you know, when it comes down to the crunch. When you've been there many times before on big courts and when your break points, match points, the finals and so on, you learn about that.

Rogiman
03-13-2006, 04:25 PM
INDIAN WELLS06 R2
Federer d Massu 63 76(4)

ROGER FEDERER
THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Roger as sort of first matches go, that's about as tough as it can get, isn't it?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I knew beforehand it's going to be a tough match, because he's been playing well -- okay, maybe on a different surface, but after all, you know, he won the Olympics, you know, on surface like this. I wasn't too pleased when I saw the draw because he beat me one time before. I don't remember actually how many times we played, but I know he's a tough competitor and I'm happy to be through because it was a good match.

Q. Roger, it appears as though you've lowered your service toss considerably resulting in a little more continuous fluid motion. Is that something you've been working on consciously?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't even know about it, to be honest. It's not something I've been working on. The game evolves, doesn't it? Seriously, I haven't worked on it.

Q. Is it good to get a tough match like that?

ROGER FEDERER: Seriously, I don't care how tough it is, as long as I get through. You know, I'm always worried about crashing out in the early rounds, you know, and to sit here and explain why, you know, but I'm happy I don't have to do that. So especially as, you know, I go to so many tournaments as a titleholder, you know, and always to back it up, it's never easy. So I'm happy the way it went tonight.

Q. Roger, this is your fourth tournament this year. The previous three you were in the finals against players that were four years younger than you. Is this starting to make you feel old?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not quite. Right in the middle of things, which is good, you know. I've got the older guys, the younger guys, been around now for, what, seven, eight years. I feel very comfortable on tour. I know many of the guys you know the up-and-coming. I catch them and say hello early. No, it's a very good situation I'm in right now. I enjoy seeing the young ones come and the older ones getting older and trying to fight for their spot, so it's good fun.

Q. When you say you look out for the young ones, you catch them and say hello, are they sort of taken aback at that moment when the World No. 1 goes up to them and says, in other words, "Welcome to the tour, hello"?

ROGER FEDERER: No, it's more like, you know, they cannot hide, you know, because I always have to pay attention, you know, who's coming along. And I've had some tough losses against youngsters, you know, and everybody knows that. So I try to see them as early as I can, and that's what I meant more than just, you know, having a handshake, you know.

Q. Roger, could you just talk a little bit about the conditions regardless of the temperature. Is it cold here? Are the balls slow? Heavy? Do you feel as though there's a gradual slowless, a slowing down of this sport?

ROGER FEDERER: To be honest, not quite, you know. I think if you ask many of the players, they all think this is a great court to play on. It's my feeling because, to move on it, it's fantastic. I think it's the best out there. The color, I think it's very nice to see the ball - so not just on TV, but also playing yourself. I have the feeling, you know, the court gives you bounce, you know, on the kick serve. The slice stays low, which is true for everyone, and if you hit it flat, you know, it's sort of -- you've got to really hit it hard. But you get -- especially the serve because the air is a little thinner here, so the ball goes through the air quicker, you know. And I think that makes it a very fair court to play for everyone, you know, for every style.

So this is maybe why I -- these are one of my favorite conditions to play on, to be honest, and I don't mind the slowness of the court because you can play with great angles here and really construct the point, which is a lot of fun.

Q. With all the controversy with the slowness of the courts in Melbourne during the Australian Open, do you think this is slow or equal speed or what?

ROGER FEDERER: Hard to say. I would think this is a little slower, to be honest. Just plays different, you know, because of the feeling of your movement, this and the Australian Open. I really don't know to be honest. It feels like this is a little bit slower.

Q. I have an offcourt question, so to speak. I saw the picture of Lindsay Lohan, the actress, published. I wonder how is it working these days? Do the movie celebrities want pictures with you or what's the situation now?

ROGER FEDERER: Some like it. Some don't. I don't know. You know, I just met her at a party and I was host of the Men's Vogue launch back in New York and she attended. So I was polite to welcome her and took a picture and, you know, all of a sudden, it's everywhere.

So, you know, I don't think -- we might meet each other, you know. I like to meet musicians maybe more than actors, you know, but it's good fun, you know, I think for everyone. I think from both sides, sometimes you want to meet and you don't want to meet, so depends on the situation, on the persons.

Q. How do you deal with tough pressure situations?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I guess you get used to it, you know, over time. I always say the more you put yourself in that position, you know, the easier it's going to get after a while. Even though, you know, the -- you never get really rid of all the nerves, but you feel more confident, you know, when it comes down to the crunch. When you've been there many times before on big courts and when your break points, match points, the finals and so on, you learn about that.

:haha:
30 "you know"s

RogiFan88
03-13-2006, 04:50 PM
:lol:!!

peripheral
03-13-2006, 05:17 PM
:haha:
30 "you know"s

That's just, you know, hilarious!! :lol: :lol: :lol:

tonia9
03-13-2006, 06:03 PM
Oh, now I know :cool:

:lol: :lol:

RogiFan88
03-13-2006, 09:01 PM
Daniel, great article: Is Federer the best ever?

;)

Rogiman
03-14-2006, 09:41 AM
Daniel, great article: Is Federer the best ever?

;)
Not until he beats the shit out of the spanish crap! :mad:

nobama
03-14-2006, 12:29 PM
Not until he beats the shit out of the spanish crap! :mad:You are truely obsessed with Nadal, aren't you?

Rogiman
03-14-2006, 12:32 PM
You are truely obsessed with Nadal, aren't you?
yes! :D

SUKTUEN
03-14-2006, 04:03 PM
thanks for the interview

tonia9
03-16-2006, 10:20 AM
March 15, 2006

An interview with: ROGER FEDERER

R. FEDERER /R. Gasquet

6-3, 6-4

Q. A little more routine today?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I think from the start, it was a good match today. I was very pleased. Never in doubt on the serve. You know, really I thought I played a little better from the baseline.
All in all, it was very good.

Q. Is that a reflection that your level went up or Gasquet was not playing as well?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, hard to say. He definitely hasn't had the best of starts to the season. So maybe still struggling with that a little bit. I thought maybe on my own serve, I never allowed him to play that much, I played aggressive.

Obviously, I think I'll find a way into his service games. I think, you know, the score was reflected really also how the game was. Maybe I lifted my game up a little bit. Maybe he allowed me to play a little bit more. Who knows. I think it's a combination of many things.

Q. What is the difference playing him on a hard court compared to clay court?

ROGER FEDERER: Obviously, he has more time on clay to get really into those rallies, where on hard court he gets rushed quite a bit. He has to play more offensive. Maybe that's not what he quite likes too much.

It was a quick match, only 55 minutes or so, an hour. You don't get to see enough, to be honest. I would have to play him I think another time on hard court.

Q. How much more did you get yourself up for this match?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, I prepare the same way for every match. I'm not concerned going into the match at all. I just try to sort of feel well, always try to play better every match I play. I'm lucky enough I always play on the same court, which makes it a little bit easier for me. I know what's coming. Maybe for him it's a little bit more difficult.

The head-to-head, I'm not really too interested about. I always look back usually at the last match that has been played. But, again, that was on clay. You can't take too much out of it either.

Just take it as it comes and try to play well.

Q. Ljubicic is fairly close to closing out his match. If you do face him, you've had some good results, including Shanghai. What has been your key to success in the match-up with him?

ROGER FEDERER: I think better on key occasions. Really, I played him many times last year. Beat him every time. I've also played quite a few times before that actually. We've played each other on a number of occasions. I have a feeling he definitely changed his game a little bit. Plays even more patiently. His forehand definitely improved. I think he's more confident now overall. I think it's a very tough, tough match for me to play against him.
We've had many close ones, like the one, for instance, in Shanghai. So I expect the same.

Q. You brought lots of spectators here to the doubles. What did that do to your net game?

ROGER FEDERER: Not much really. Played terrible (smiling). But that happens. I was very disappointed with my performance. But we almost won anyhow, but we lost.

Don't play doubles very often. The last match on tour I won was in Halle last year. Of course, I won the Davis Cup match which was a good win. I enjoy playing it. Especially with the new rules, you don't get much of a confidence going because the games are over quickly. But I enjoy that contest, too.

Yeah, it's a pity, but it's not going to keep me away from playing doubles.

Q. Are you playing in Miami together?

ROGER FEDERER: It's not the plan, no.

Q. Can you relate at all to the problems that Andy is having?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't think he's in a hole like you might think he is. He's had enough success to know what he needs to do to bounce back. Obviously, I think for him it's disappointing, you know, not to win tournaments, especially in the States. People maybe jump on him a little bit. I don't think he's too concerned. I think he needs to get his game right. That's maybe not been the case too much lately.

I think he'll finish the year strong. Sort of hope he keeps his ranking so I'm not going to face off too early with him in the draw.

Q. When you played Nadal recently, do you feel he's physically stronger than he was before?

ROGER FEDERER: Before and after his injury?

Q. Yes.

ROGER FEDERER: No, I would say about the same. I thought he looked a little smaller. Not as big, maybe like as he was playing the end of last year. Maybe that's because he lost a little bit. I might be wrong, too, there.

But he looks fit. Played excellent in Dubai, also here again. No, I feel he's the same way. That's a very good sign for him. I think he should be very happy.


http://www.pacificlifeopen.com/en/players/interviews/2006/federer315.asp

RogiFan88
03-16-2006, 02:02 PM
Hingis on Federer:

Q. Did you hear or read about the comments that Roger Federer made about you yesterday?

MARTINA HINGIS: No. Tell me.

Q. He said he was thrilled obviously that you'd made this return, but he didn't think you'd make the top 30 till the end of the year. He's very happily surprised at the way you've played and that you should really now be challenging for Grand Slams as you did in Australia.

MARTINA HINGIS: Well, I think so, too, now. I just saw him after the match. He congratulated me. That's nice. On the men's side, he's the one to beat right now. He has some challenges to come up against. You know, I have mine. We've always been good friends, yeah.

...

Q. We were talking about Roger earlier. Do you remember the circumstances of when you first met him?

MARTINA HINGIS: Like when he was like really little?

Q. The first time you became aware of who he was.

MARTINA HINGIS: Just watching him. I think he made first finals in Milan. I watched it on TV. Then he made another couple finals indoors. I don't know whether Marseille, somewhere else. I really don't know. Then Hopman Cup for sure when we teamed up together, won that thing finally.

Q. Are you close enough to where you would have talked to him before deciding to come back for advice or words of wisdom?

MARTINA HINGIS: No. He just sent me a message that he thinks it's great that I'm coming back, very encouraging. But not, "Hey, you think like I should be coming back or not?" No, I think that's more up to the supportive crew you have within the family, really the people who can help you. It's not like he's going to be my hitting partner next week.

Q. Why not?

MARTINA HINGIS: I wish (smiling).

lunahielo
03-16-2006, 03:33 PM
Thanks, RogiFan
Interesting, ¿No? ;)

RogiFan88
03-16-2006, 04:41 PM
Hmm... yes! ;) I love that "Tell me." Hingis can't wait to hear what Rogi has to say about her.

SUKTUEN
03-16-2006, 04:44 PM
Roger is happy of this won~

TenHound
03-17-2006, 01:04 AM
They gave her the short version - the full version was seriously laudatory :)

Silvy, why don't you mention it to Roger's people - that Hingis would love to hit w/him? Too bad there's no XD 'cept @Majors - be fun to watch them team up for that!

RogiFan88
03-17-2006, 04:28 AM
No Rogi interview yet??

yanchr
03-17-2006, 05:49 AM
Not until he beats the shit out of the spanish crap! :mad:
Maybe this has nothing to do with his being the best ever, but now I couldn't care less about his being the best ever, I want him to beat piggy if they meet here again, plain and simple! :o

nobama
03-17-2006, 07:36 AM
So now being the best ever doesn't matter, only beating Nadal does? Huh? :confused:

Actually I think it would be good for Roger mentally if Baggy or Blake took Nadal out. Of course playing him in the finals and beating him would too. My concern is Roger keeping his #1 ranking and winning slams and masters shields. His record against Nadal doesn't matter to me whatsoever so long as he can stay #1.

World Beater
03-17-2006, 07:37 AM
Maybe this has nothing to do with his being the best ever, but now I couldn't care less about his being the best ever, I want him to beat piggy if they meet here again, plain and simple! :o

careful, now!

or catastrophe(castafiore) will call you out because you called nadal a pig! :rolleyes:

ToanNguyen
03-17-2006, 01:58 PM
I am not sure if anyone has posted this but I loved it. Kind of old news but this guy is right on. It's time that Roger should become the sport hero that he truely is.


Federer Redux: More Than a Household Name
[17 March 2006]
Technical perfection blended with human emotional actualization.

by John Mitchell

Last year in this forum, David Marchese wrote an article for PopMatters about Roger Federer and how both his genius and success were largely occurring "under the radar." His conclusion was to suggest a quiet revolution of sorts, one in which we privately acknowledge Federer's greatness to others in the know.

Since then, Roger Federer has won many more tennis matches, including the U.S. Open and just recently, the Australian Open. While Federer continues to dominate his sport and display the consistent grace and genius with a tennis racquet that Michael Jordan once did with a basketball, his relative obscurity appears to have remained just as consistent. Perhaps this quiet revolution idea was not enough. I, for one, am ready to declare that I have a new sports hero, and that Roger Federer is it. In fact, I believe that Roger Federer can one day save our world (though more on that later).

I have been involved in sports all my life, and in tennis since I was in junior high school. I remain an avid sports junkie (although if I don't log onto ESPN.com for a day or two, I can still manage to function and take care of my and my children's basic needs). However, it has been a long time -- until I witnessed this year's Australian Open (Federer's 7th Grand Slam title, halfway to Pete Sampras' once-thought-untouchable record) -- since I was actually moved by sports. I speak not of the emotional excitement of sports, but of the kind of human emotion that is usually only on display in college athletics or within the Olympic realm -- the type of pure emotion when someone without pretension (this effectively rules out most professional athletes) realizes the utter joy and nirvana of reaching a crowning achievement, when it dawns on them how all of their hard work, persistence, and hope have now become realized into a singular moment of success. I saw great tennis from Roger Federer during the Australian Open, and I've always admired him for his great skills; what I wasn't expecting was how he would win me over with his humanity.

Roger Federer is typically characterized in the same way as many Teutonic and Scandinavian athletes: stoic, cool, unemotional, unflinching, and calculating. It is as if Sweden, Switzerland, or Norway were breeding grounds for the world's professional killers. Think about it, what other personality profile describes the "assassin-like" coldness and determination that so many attribute to Federer as he disposes of each successive victim of his racquet? And yet here Federer was, fumbling for words as he accepted the Australian Open trophy from Rod Laver, one of his childhood heroes.

Millions (at least thousands of viewers, I doubt millions of Americans were awake at 6 in the morning to catch the live broadcast) like me were probably expecting a short, curt speech whereby Roger would say, with his usual grace, aplomb, and brevity, "thank you to my family, to Marcos, a worthy opponent," etc., then maybe adding some Terminator-like epilogue of "anyone who continues to resist my perfect tennis game will be terminated in Paris." What I didn't expect was Roger fumbling for words, falling silent, and then starting to cry like a schoolgirl. And I loved it! Now I'm crying as I watch him pour out all of his heart in the realization of how great this moment is and, maybe slightly, how great Federer himself is becoming. I thought to myself, "this is what sports is about." It's about stretching yourself, about striving for perfection of form and function, day in and day out, and maybe, just maybe, reaching that state of perfection -- whether it's with a golf club, a basketball, a tennis racquet -- and enough of those perfect moments coagulate into a winning streak, then a tournament win, then a Grand Slam win, and then you're accepting a trophy from your childhood hero. Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you Roger Federer.

For both his success and his humanity, Federer should not only be a household name, he should be a sports hero. I don't care that he's not flashy, I don't care that he's a foreigner, I don't care that his game more resembles Edberg's surgeon-like precision than Becker's dramatic athleticism. Well, actually, I do care! I like that he's humble, I like that he's not American, I like that his game is fluid rather than grandiose. Sports fans, we are seeing perfection on display in his game! Somewhere in the tennis universe there is a template for what tennis is supposed to look like in its perfect essence, and Roger Federer is that. On top of that, the guy is a decent human being to boot, someone who is just now only realizing his earning potential as a sports (or at least tennis) icon. Part of me grieves for this, for I fear Federer might be swallowed up by that "other" side of sports, the side that's flashy, full of dollar signs, full of lights and glow and neon, but I doubt that he will. It is like fearing he might lose, it's just not bound to happen.

I have not seen the likes of Federer in any sport. Certainly Michael Jordan and Tiger Woods come to mind in terms of individuals who have achieved a similar perfection of their sport, but there's something different with Federer. And I think it gets back to his humility, to his quiet grace. Federer embodies not only athletic greatness in his sport, but also human greatness in athletics -- something that's not often found hand-in-hand. I've seen ugliness from Jordan and Woods, and while it does nothing to de-emphasize their athletic greatness, I must admit it didn't make me want to emulate them in any personal way. It is Federer's human qualities on display that make him such an admirable champion, one that I want to emulate -- especially after the emotional Australian Open finale. Technical perfection blended with human emotional actualization: it was a wonder to behold. Roger Federer has inspired me to play better tennis, but I also think he is inspiring me to be a better athlete, to conduct myself athletically with more joy, more humility, more love for the game and its competitors, maybe even inspiring me to be a better person. This, perhaps, is how he can save us all. A silly idea, yes, but let's at least recognize the Zen-like qualities he brings to his business as he does it under an international microscope. I think more people, not just athletes, should emulate such an approach to life. He's got my support and admiration, and if there's any justice, he'll soon find the recognition he deserves.


I loved this part:
"Roger would say, with his usual grace, aplomb, and brevity, "thank you to my family, to Marcos, a worthy opponent," etc., then maybe adding some Terminator-like epilogue of "anyone who continues to resist my perfect tennis game will be terminated in Paris." " :worship: :worship: :worship:

tonia9
03-17-2006, 02:11 PM
Even Federer impressed by this one
World No. 1 sweeps into semis with easy victory over Ljubicic

Thomas St. Myer
The Desert Sun
March 17, 2006

INDIAN WELLS - Fresh off a lopsided loss at the hands of Roger Federer, sixth-seeded Ivan Ljubicic refused to mince words.
"I really consider myself a top-five player in the world, which it doesn't mean that I am close to Roger. He's really much better than I am, and then probably anyone else," Ljubicic said. "The only player who can give him some trouble at the moment, it's Rafael Nadal. But I think just because he's lefty, nothing else.

"But we'll see. I mean, when he's on top of his game, there's no one out there who can give him any trouble. It depends mainly on him."

The two-time defending Pacific Life Open champion, Federer (20-1) cemented his spot in the semifinals with a dominant 6-2, 6-3 victory Thursday afternoon on Center Court. Two victories away from an unprecedented third consecutive Pacific Life Open title, the top-ranked Swiss player faces Paradorn Srichaphan, who beat Jarkko Nieminen 7-6 (3), 3-6, 7-5 late Thursday night, on Saturday in one semifinal match.

Fresh off a loss to Spaniard Rafael Nadal at the Dubai finals and a sluggish three-set victory over Richard Gasquet in the third round of this tournament, Federer responded with what he considers his best match thus far in 2006.

"I've had some good matches this year, too, but this was against a top-quality player," Federer said. "Really, everything I really wanted to work really worked. I also had a great feeling out there. You don't always get that, even though maybe if you win 6-4, 6-2, you walk off the court, you feel like the opponent maybe gave it to you a little bit. Today, I had to earn it. This against a great player is a great result for me."

Ahead 2-0 before the crowd settled into their seats, Federer seized control in the opening minutes when he won eight of 10 points. He and Ljubicic held serves over the next three games before Federer wrapped up the set with spectacular play in the eighth game. Ahead 40-30 with Ljubicic serving, Federer chased the ball down, reached out and hit a remarkable forehand volley cross-court for the winner. On his walk back to the service line, Federer froze when he heard a few choice Italian words from Ljubicic.

"He might have said something, yeah," Federer said with a sheepish grin. "It's something between him and me. We get along well. His girlfriend, my girlfriend, we hang out a lot. Yeah, so it was all good."

Ljubicic (20-3) put up a better fight in the second set. Federer served to open the set and he faced his lone break point of the match, but at 30-40 he strung together three straight points to hold serve and maintain momentum.

Ahead three games to two with the Croatian serving, Federer pounced on his opportunity. He won three straight points for a 40-love advantage. Ljubicic answered back with two points of his own before Federer broke him to close in on victory. The top-ranked player converted only one of four break points in the second set but that one translated in victory.
"He played quite well and he was the one who was pushing me over the limits," Ljubicic said. "When it's like that, it's very difficult to make a statement out there, to make a decent match."

Federer extended his win streak over Ljubicic to six and took a 9-3 advantage in the overall series. The Croatian last beat him in 2003 at Basel. The two faced off in the fourth round of the 2005 Pacific Life Open where Ljubicic pushed him to the limits before Federer pulled out a 7-6, 7-6 victory.

"Played him here last year. It was much tougher," Federer said. "So this was an excellent match for me - maybe the best of the season."

http://www.thedesertsun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060317/EVENTS10/603170332/1120/events10

yanchr
03-17-2006, 02:15 PM
careful, now!

or catastrophe(castafiore) will call you out because you called nadal a pig! :rolleyes:
As true as that :D Great one :yeah:

yanchr
03-17-2006, 02:18 PM
Thanks for all the articles :)

ToanNguyen, that is ONE piece of article! I love the way the author is writing. A heart-felt read.

tonia9
03-17-2006, 02:23 PM
Press Conference - short video

http://www.tennis.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?sid=&type=gen&mod=Core+Pages&gid=A7B03363F8DC445B96F364255AF411FA

bokehlicious
03-17-2006, 02:51 PM
Maybe this has nothing to do with his being the best ever, but now I couldn't care less about his being the best ever, I want him to beat piggy if they meet here again, plain and simple! :o

:worship: :worship:

I'm tired of those piggy's suckers everywhere in GM :o that would shut their mouth up ! :)

SUKTUEN
03-17-2006, 03:14 PM
The sound of roger's fans

ToanNguyen
03-17-2006, 03:20 PM
Thanks for all the articles :)

ToanNguyen, that is ONE piece of article! I love the way the author is writing. A heart-felt read.

I agree 100%. Very hear-felt and the author expressed into words exactly how I felt when I stayed up that night to watch Roger accept the Australian trophy. I will always remember that moment. (And your avatar helps too. :) :) )

peripheral
03-17-2006, 03:26 PM
ToanNguyen, thank you for that absolutely gorgeous article! It's so, so well-written and so, so true!! :worship: :worship:

SUKTUEN
03-17-2006, 03:26 PM
I not yet watch Roger match last night, I want to know How Great is Roger is~~ :D :D

Doris Loeffel
03-17-2006, 04:14 PM
"Fresh off a loss to Spaniard Rafael Nadal at the Dubai finals and a sluggish three-set victory over Richard Gasquet in the third round of this tournament, Federer responded with what he considers his best match thus far in 2006."


Well as far as I remember Roger strugled agaisnt Ollie and had Richard pretty much under control from the very begining but what do I know I'm ony a tennis fan....



Thanks for the articles especially the one from Toan Nyguyen

TenHound
03-17-2006, 06:54 PM
Toan, where was that published?

Minnie
03-18-2006, 12:47 AM
Very moving article posted by ToanNguyen - exactly the reasons why I'm such a fan of Roger's ... he's one class act on and off the court. Thanks TN.

lsy
03-18-2006, 03:05 AM
http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=14947&bannerregion=

Gavin and Gwen Show Support For Roger and Mirka At Indian Wells


Photo By Angelo Tonelli By Tennis Week
03/17/2006



The action off the court at Indian Wells has been almost as entertaining as some of the match play as celebrity tennis friends have been spectators — and practice partners — at the Pacific Life Open. Rock star Gavin Rossdale, former lead singer of the band Bush who currently heads his new band, Institute, and his wife, pregnant pop star Gwen Stefani, were on hand to watch their friend, Roger Federer, defeat Ivan Ljubicic on Thursday.

Rossdale and Stefani, who arrived from Los Angeles to watch the tournament, are good friends with Federer and his girlfriend, former WTA Tour pro Mirka Vavrinec. Rossdale, who was an accomplished soccer player growing up in England, has grown into a tennis junkie, playing nearly every day. The tireless Rossdale nearly wore out his racquet strings in hitting with Mirka for nearly three hours earlier this week (for those of you who think Mirka doesn't exercise enough :ras: :p . Federer's IMG agent, Tony Godsick, his wife, former Grand Slam finalist and current ESPN tennis analyst Mary Joe Fernandez, and Lindsay Davenport, were also on hand to watch Federer beat Ljubicic.

While the two-time defending Indian Wells champion has been all business on the court, a relaxed Federer has flashed his sense of humor off court, bestowing the nickname "Pat Rafter" on coach Tony Roche, who formerly coached both Ivan Lendl and two-time U.S. Open champion Patrick Rafter.

Clad in his ever-present Optus baseball cap, Roche, widely regarded as one of the finest volleyers in tennis history, has been working with Federer on refining his volley. Federer displayed fine form in volleying decisively in the opening set of his 6-2, 4-6, 4-6, setback to second-ranked Rafael Nadal in the Dubai final earlier this month. But Nadal's speed created slight concentration cracks during the final two sets of that final as Federer occasionally took his eye off the ball while preparing to volley to view his intended target on court or sneak a peak at the streaking Nadal and even the World No. 1 can sometimes suffer the same consequences club players experience when taking their eyes off the ball. (Interesting...)

Typically, Roche reveals little emotion during Federer's matches, but in the latter stages of the seven-time Grand Slam champion's 3-6, 6-2, 7-5 victory over Olivier Rochus, Roche could be heard exhorting Federer with a motivational "Come on Mate!" :lol:

SUKTUEN
03-18-2006, 05:20 PM
Thank lsy

ToanNguyen
03-19-2006, 07:41 PM
Toan, where was that published?

It is an article for an online website: PopMatters.com

R.Federer
03-19-2006, 09:21 PM
Q. A little more on Blake, outside the comeback thing, about how much he's actually improved on court, whether you can see that maybe he does have top 5 potential.

ROGER FEDERER: I think if you go top 10, all you need is maybe -- it takes maybe one win more or less sometimes to maybe make it in the top 5, isn't it? If he would win here, he's close to top 5, I guess. Doesn't take much all of a sudden. You got to put yourself in a good position like I did a couple years ago. I was 12 years old -- I wish I was (smiling). :lol: I was ranked 12 and I won Hamburg, which made me really jump into the top 10. That was my move.
From then on, I was very close, good-seeded. That sort of made it easier for me. Hope it's going to do the same for him

TenHound
03-20-2006, 04:59 AM
there's an article on protennisfan.com (from L.A. Times - The Major West Coast Newspaper) by their primary writer - it referred to Roger as the "poet laureate of tennis" :) :) :)

SUKTUEN
03-20-2006, 07:03 AM
"poet laureate of tennis"????

what's that mean? :confused: :wavey:

peripheral
03-20-2006, 07:21 AM
Typically, Roche reveals little emotion during Federer's matches, but in the latter stages of the seven-time Grand Slam champion's 3-6, 6-2, 7-5 victory over Olivier Rochus, Roche could be heard exhorting Federer with a motivational "Come on Mate!" :lol:

:lol: :lol: Awww Rochey :hug:

SUKTUEN
03-20-2006, 07:24 AM
what is that mean?

tonia9
03-20-2006, 10:15 AM
March 19, 2006


R. FEDERER/J. Blake

7-5, 6-3, 6-0

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions.

Q. How does that feel? Third one in a row.
ROGER FEDERER: Excellent. It was a hard-fought battle in the beginning. Really got the better of me in the beginning, so I had to react and not panic. I did a good job there.
In the end, I played fantastic tennis with some great shots once again. You know, to pull them off in a final, it's always a nice feeling. I really had great matches back-to-back on a few occasions now. The form is excellent right now.

Q. Early in the first set, were you having trouble getting a rhythm?
ROGER FEDERER: No. I just thought he played better, as simple as that. He played aggressive, took the ball early, put away his forehands when he could, didn't miss on the backhand, made me run around. That's usually what I do. He gave me a little bit of my own medicine.
I didn't really play poor, I thought, you know. , so there was no need to sort of be frightened by that. I just hoped, you know, I get maybe at least one break back in that first set. So I was surprised obviously coming back all the way and winning the set. Obviously, that was tough to handle for him after.

Q. At what point do you think you got on top of James?
ROGER FEDERER: After getting the second break back when I leveled the score, I knew it was going to be a tough one for him now.

Q. When it's 1-4, do you say to yourself, "I guess I'll get him in four"?
ROGER FEDERER: That's my sort of point of view, yeah. If this first set is gone, let's sort of try to get the rhythm at least a little bit, you know, so you feel better in the second set.
Obviously, I was already, you know, getting ready for a long day. That was absolutely my thinking. Hopefully I win in four.

Q. Did you think he was capable of playing at that level throughout four or five sets, the level he showed in the first five games?
ROGER FEDERER: He didn't need it for four or five. Three would have been enough playing at that rhythm.
So, no, I absolutely thought so because I saw the match with Nadal last night. He played excellent. In the wind, it was tough conditions, against Nadal. I knew if you can already put him away in two sets, he's very dangerous for me, too.
These wins against top players like him yesterday obviously can lift his game up a gear and he can play even better tennis against me in the finals. What a great opportunity not only to beat the second best and then also the best back to back, then also on top of that win the tournament, that can really give you wings. The people were behind him. I was expecting that he was going too play really well today.

Q. When you're playing as well as you can, do you get the sense certain crowds aren't quite sure to take it? There are lulls, quiet moments. They're up when he's playing well. When you're playing well, there's not quite the level of appreciation for what you do that perhaps certain people think there should be.
ROGER FEDERER: You think that's the case (smiling)?

Q. My point of view. I'm saying the crowd is almost not quite sure how to react. Do you get that sense on the court as well?
ROGER FEDERER: Sort of sometimes maybe. But you have to understand, you know, they were really backing up, you know, James. Obviously, they're a little bit more quiet when it's not really going his way. It was really close in the beginning. It really looked like an upset early.
I guess once you get on top of it, all of a sudden, as the big favorite, things sort of calm down. Then your best shots are not all of a sudden applauded the way they should be, they're only applauded when it gets tight. When domination sets in, that's really where they don't clap as much as they could.
But I still believe they do appreciate it, yeah.

Q. You really seemed to take him out of his rhythm on his service games. He didn't even win half of the points on his own serve. Can you talk about that.
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I remember I played him not too long ago in Cincinnati in the first round. I had a tough one there. I remember he really impressed me how he served. I knew that it was important to get the first serve back, sort of get into play, not let him dominate all the time.
On the second serve I knew anyway I've got a chance against anybody. But the first serve is sometimes key to really get those important points. That's what I really did well today. I mean, of course, he didn't serve that great in the second and the third, like in the first. But I think that was definitely key to success today, also returning his serve and make him work hard on each and every service game, not give him some easy games where he can relax.

Q. What kind of improvement have you seen in James game since Cincinnati?
ROGER FEDERER: I think already there he was playing better. I really have the feeling his backhand got much more consistent, especially on the return. He doesn't give away that many returns any more. I think that's really helped him to improve.
I think, like I said, his first serve has also improved. His forehand was always good. His movement, too. I think those are the key things.

Q. Talk about your resiliency, never having lost back-to-back finals.
ROGER FEDERER: I didn't know that. I have in the beginning of my career.

Q. You haven't.
ROGER FEDERER: Are you sure? Didn't I lose in the first two finals (smiling)? Marseille, Rotterdam maybe. 7-6 in the third. I think I did. Anyway, happy nobody knows.
For me very special is to play 10 tournaments entered, 10 finals in a row. That is for me quite impressive. That's what I like (smiling).

Q. Because you tend to win more than you don't, is it sometimes hard to rate them almost in terms of which is of importance and not so much importance to you? Where does this one rate?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, you can't sort of compare them to other tournament victories you have or whatever. You look in the moment itself. I think beginning of the season, winning the first Masters Series is huge for me really. Even though I don't fall on my knees and cry and everything, it still means a lot to me.
Sometimes really the big satisfaction comes later on, you know, maybe a few months down the road where I go like, "Wow, I did really well in Indian Wells. What a great week I had." I remember coming here, I was extremely tense looking at the draw, thinking, "Wow, I've got Indian Wells, Key Biscayne to defend." It really got me worried.
Now that I won, I'm pretty relaxed, very happy. I don't know. It's a hard question to answer really because every tournament you win could be your last, so you try to enjoy it the most you can.

Q. When you were saying earlier in the week you were actually really calm, you were fibbing; you weren't really calm?
ROGER FEDERER: I was calm on the court. I mean, I felt good, but I was just worried about crashing out early and then having all the pressure on me also in Miami. Now by playing so well here, it obviously takes a lot of pressure off Miami, which is nice.

Q. You were saying coming into the tournament when everyone was asking about playing Nadal in the final, that he actually had to get there and get through the draw. You get through to the final consistently, which might separate you from Nadal, and even Blake today.
ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, I've gotten sort of used to playing on big occasions, too. I have that advantage, being so used to any situation. Being 4-1 down, double break, there's no need for me to panic, whereas others maybe think, "I've already lost." For me, that doesn't count.
I think the more you put yourself in the position, the more you learn from it, the stronger you get. I have that advantage over James, especially over James, but also over Nadal.

Q. Have you thought about a calendar year Grand Slam yet? Has it crossed your mind yet?
ROGER FEDERER: Yes and no. But I think more of winning four Grand Slams in a row, which is the French for me. I am preparing mentally for the tough times over there because the pressure will be huge on me from myself and everything. I really hope I can play a good French Open this year.

Q. Can you talk more about the quality to get to all these finals, giving you an advantage? Is it confidence, ease?
ROGER FEDERER: Experience, I guess. It's got a lot to do with experience. I always thought when I came up and about, they said the other guy has more experience. I said, "Well, that doesn't matter because I'm dangerous," whatever. Dangerous is just not good enough sometimes. You got to know the tough moments, how to handle them, I think. That's really what I've gotten to learn over all the years, that you can use your experience very well, too. This I do now sometimes, which is nice.

Q. When there's a tough moment, you step back and just put it in a little bit of perspective?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. Analyze it very clearly. I think I never get carried away in a way emotionally, in a good or a bad way. I'm always in control of how I need to play, what's been happening, what I've got to do. I think that's a good strength of mine.

Q. You hit so many extraordinary shots, were stealing points a lot of times, that backhand drop. Does something come over you that says, "God, I'm flying again"?
ROGER FEDERER: Today, absolutely. I felt that for a while. Like I said, in the beginning, once I came back to 5-All, I knew this could be another great final for me because I was really starting to feel good. Second set I felt actually better all the way. Just couldn't convert some of the early opportunities I had. I really felt very, very confident on the court. At some moments obviously I knew this is almost impossible that I'm going to lose this final.

Q. When you watched Blake beat Nadal, did you think it was going to be even tougher than you thought?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, I knew it's going to be a tough match for Raf. He beat him at the US Open, that was already over five sets. That's when you can show how good you are. I knew it was going to be a tough one. I thought James played extremely well in that match yesterday. Rafa had tough times with James game. When I saw James still won, I was a little bit surprised because Rafa has been playing so well.
I knew this is a very different match, actually, I was looking forward to. I had to adapt, sort of keep my mindset right, my tactics. I'm happy I was able to achieve that.

Q. What will it take for you to wear the type of shirt that Nadal wears or even Andre the other night on a course against Haas?
ROGER FEDERER: Practice, it's okay, but not in the match for me.

Q. Why is that?
ROGER FEDERER: It's not me.

Q. Talking about the pressure of coming into Indian Wells, Miami, defending all these points, is that because maintaining the No. 1 ranking has become real important to you?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, maybe that, but then also I think if you lose early year, you know you got so many -- in a way it's good -- to practice, but also think about your loss. Then if you crash again out early in Miami, you have sort of one month and you only play two matches, let's say. You got to really -- it's perfect if you play well, but it's a tough one if you don't play well. I think I was more scared of that, not having enough matches going into the clay.
Now that I played here, we don't need to talk about it any more.

Q. What is it like to become the first one to win three times in a row?
ROGER FEDERER: Special. Obviously I like records once in a while. Happy I've made one here.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports

http://www.pacificlifeopen.com/en/players/interviews/2006/federer319.asp

Video
http://www.tennis.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?sid=&type=gen&mod=Core+Pages&gid=0D390200A8EF4BBFAC4C9509D2948B2D

http://www.tennis.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?sid=&type=gen&mod=Core+Pages&gid=554FC70E0CD74C7E90E3DBD0D577EE81

http://www.tennis.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?sid=&type=gen&mod=Core+Pages&gid=353290AD9E8E4DC79F7CB28713A40967
Rogi's face in the 3rd video hihihi

Minnie
03-20-2006, 11:54 AM
"poet laureate of tennis"????

what's that mean? :confused: :wavey:

Its another way of saying Rogi is the most supremely gifted tennis player in the world. He certainly creates wonderful "poetry" with his game Suktuen - don't you agree?

SUKTUEN
03-20-2006, 04:29 PM
Its another way of saying Rogi is the most supremely gifted tennis player in the world. He certainly creates wonderful "poetry" with his game Suktuen - don't you agree?
:confused: :confused: :confused: :confused: :confused:

RogiFan88
03-20-2006, 06:01 PM
I think Minnie means that Rogi being the greatest tennis player is like being the greatest poet. He's just the best!

RogiFan88
03-20-2006, 06:04 PM
Did I post this already??

Water works

March 18, 2006
WHEN all-time great tennis player Roger Federer recently broke down and cried in humility after his amazing win at the finals of the Australian Open, it caused quite a stir – largely because of the rawness of his self-expression.

The women I spoke to were absolutely smitten: "Oh, what an amazing man. How wonderful. He must be sooooo sensitive," said one friend. "I love it when a man shows emotion like that. It was very inspiring. His vulnerability made me cry," said another.

But at least three men commented to me that seeing Federer's outpouring was too confronting. As one man summed up: "Seeing all that sobbing on TV made me uncomfortable. I don't like watching grown men lose it, even if it's because they're happy. A few tears on a man is fine but if snot starts coming out, or jaws start quivering, it's ... yuck. It shows a total lack of self-control."

Perhaps it's a chick thing to love male tears and quivering jaws – all that female heart openness looking for a reflection in a gender that is taught to keep emotions in zip-locked bags, and tears plunged down so deep that grief is often expressed as anger and joy as drunken misbehaviour.

As a liberationist, I was proud of Federer. I've fought hard all my life to make people feel comfortable expressing feelings we're taught are wrong or dangerous.

Wellness experts agree that it's not healthy to suppress feelings any more than it is to hold any bodily excrement inside. It plays havoc with hormones, unbalances our delicate internal ecology and leads to stress and immune deficiency. As my mama taught me: "Better out than in."

Sad, then, that men – more so than women – are forced to put time limits on grief, urged to "get over it" or "stop being so maudlin" in times of crisis, and are still not free to open their souls to joy or pain. But the more that male icons like "Mr Cool" Federer do it, the more we as a society will adapt.

It's a matter of leadership. I remember Bob Hawke crying after the Tiananmen Square massacre and over his infidelities. As a nation, we were strangely comforted by our leader's compassion, vulnerability and flawed humanity. There seemed to be something we all got from it – permission to let go. Be real. I hope that, in time, more macho men, sportsmen and cultural leaders show us their deeper sides. It's high time we understood the consequences of repressing the voice of the soul.

Otherwise, I'm going to (hiccup) ... cry.
www.ruthostrow.com

ToanNguyen
03-20-2006, 11:53 PM
Hot Federer is eyeing big picture
From Neil Harman, Tennis Correspondent in Indian Wells, California


AMONG the handwritten notes that arrived at James Blake’s bedside two years ago as he recovered from a condition that affected his hearing and caused a facial paralysis brought on by the death of his father was one from Roger Federer. He had been the No 1 player for six months but was already aware of the responsibilities he believed it carried.

Unless they are bosom buddies, the welfare of the opposition does not often come top of a player’s agenda, given the self-interest at the heart of sporting success, but Federer is, and will always be, a cut above your regular superstar. “I heard about James and said to Mirka (his girlfriend) we’ve got to do something about this,” Federer said. “So we got in touch.”

It was not a gesture meant to change the world, but by the manner of the way he plays and the impeccability of his behaviour away from the courts, that is exactly what he is capable of doing. The tennis world, that is. It is hard to recall a No 1 from any era so perfectly connected with his status, so totally in control, so extraordinarily talented, so aware of those talents and so able to bring them to the fore when he has to.

Federer said that he did not know when it would dawn on him how significant his victory at the Pacific Life Open on Sunday might be. “Winning the first Masters Series is huge for me, really,” he said. “Even though I don’t fall on my knees and cry and everything, it still means so much. Sometimes, the big satisfaction comes later, maybe some time down the road when I say, ‘Wow, I did really well in Indian Wells. What a great week I had.’ I was extremely tense looking at the draw, thinking I had back-to-back Masters titles to defend.

“It got me worried. Now I’ve won, I’m pretty relaxed, really happy. If I had lost early here and then I crash out early in Key Biscayne, you have one month and you have only played two matches. It’s perfect if you play well but tough if you don’t. I was more scared of that, not having enough matches going into the clay. Now I played a week here, we don’t have to talk about it any more.”

But he knows the situation will crop up regularly between now and the French Open, the only one of the four grand-slam events he has yet to win. Tony Roche, Federer’s Australian coaching consultant, will fly to the Italian Open in Rome in early May, a week earlier than the pair teamed up last year. Even now, with a second successive hard-court title to defend in Florida, the Swiss is slowly, surely, preparing himself for the onslaught on Europe’s red clay. “I’m getting ready, mentally, for the tough times because the pressure on me there will be huge,” he said.

So, overcoming all that was required of him here, responding with such certainty when he was pegged back in the opening shots of the final by Blake’s hell-for-leather attacking intentions, is part of a grander scheme. He knows that he cannot afford to start a French Open final as slackly as he did both in the Australian Open against Marcos Baghdatis, of Cyprus, and here when Blake had him two breaks down but got a little bit ahead of himself.

What the rest fear — and Federer knows it — is that when he begins to play well, it is beyond all of their scopes to stop him. He does not have to worry about his touch, his forehand cross-court, his backhand slice, his serve, his returns, not a shot, really. Nor does he worry about himself.

“I analyse very clearly,” he said. “I never get carried away emotionally, in a good or bad way. I’m always in control of how I need to play, what’s been happening, what I’ve got to do. I think that’s a good strength of mine.”


I am so happy that Roger win this title again for the third time. Now let's defend your title in Miami. You can do it.

TenHound
03-21-2006, 02:23 AM
thanks. Neil Harman is Excellent.

avocadoe
03-21-2006, 01:32 PM
ditto and thanks...

SUKTUEN
03-21-2006, 04:10 PM
many wonderful articles, thankyou~!

GonzoFan
03-21-2006, 05:26 PM
Hi everyone :wavey:
First time I post here, I think and I just thought maybe you could be interested in reading what other players think about Roger and well, Gonzo writes a column for a chilean newspaper every Monday and this time he wrote about Roger.

-Thanks to enqvistfan for the translation-

A real Swiss machine
by Fernando Gonzalez

It's not a mystery that Roger Federer is dominating everything. Today, I don't see who can do the weight against him. He is a player who has a game that does not show any weak points.

What has Federer, that makes him to be one of the best players of the history?

He is a complete tennis player, who gains the points easily, as if he did not make an effort within the court. Although it does not seem, he is very fast and one of his greatest strength is his defense. He always makes you play a pair of balls more.

Today each shot that he tries, he succeeds. Some people say that Rafael Nadal is the unique one who can do the weight against him. Nadal is a great player, but I believe that he's still to a few kilometers of distance. Although many things can happen, Federer is directed to be the best player of history.

Memory, when Pete Sampras gained everything and was almost invincible. Today it happens something similar with Federer.

Another winner in Indian Wells was James Blake, surely we will have to face in Davis Cup. He has gained four tournaments in the last six months and I remember that in Roland Garros last year, he was outside the top 100. Blake is a player who is known to be a great athlete, more than for his strokes. And he has lived many problems in the past : two years ago, a vertebra of the neck was broken, later his dad died and then he had a virus that paralyzed part of his face. At the moment, he recovered and he's within the 10 best ones of the world. Surely that today is happy with his return.

Rogiman
03-21-2006, 06:48 PM
“I analyse very clearly,” he said. “I never get carried away emotionally, in a good or bad way. I’m always in control of how I need to play, what’s been happening, what I’ve got to do.”
Like in those 4:4 situations in the Dubai final, right...? :rolleyes:

Dirk
03-21-2006, 06:51 PM
Like in those 4:4 situations in the Dubai final, right...? :rolleyes:

I know it is hurts Rogiman but come on let it go. Roger will keep his cool next time.

Rogiman
03-21-2006, 06:59 PM
I know it is hurts Rogiman but come on let it go. Roger will keep his cool next time.
I'm afraid I'll only get over that loss (and the other one in Paris, and those 2.5 sets in Miami :rolleyes: ) when Roger rips him a new one next time they meet! :D

nobama
03-21-2006, 07:42 PM
Like in those 4:4 situations in the Dubai final, right...? :rolleyes:Good grief. :rolleyes:

Minnie
03-21-2006, 09:29 PM
I think Minnie means that Rogi being the greatest tennis player is like being the greatest poet. He's just the best!

Thanks Rogifan88 for putting it better than I did. Roger is like "poetry in motion" to me!

RogiFan88
03-22-2006, 12:04 AM
Thanks Rogifan88 for putting it better than I did. Roger is like "poetry in motion" to me!


He certainly is -- that's Mrs. B.'s favourite description of Rogi! :angel:

SUKTUEN
03-22-2006, 04:25 PM
thanks

Daniel
03-22-2006, 10:12 PM
Roger Federer, Kim Clijsters ranked top
Reuters
23mar06

WORLD No. 1 Roger Federer and US Open champion Kim Clijsters were yesterday named professional tennis players of the year for 2005.

The 24-year-old Federer had a remarkable season, compiling an 81-4 record and capturing a circuit-leading 11 titles including Wimbledon and the US Open.
The Swiss became only the fifth player in the 32-year history of the Association of Tennis Professionals rankings to hold the top spot every week during the calendar year.

Clijsters, who rose to No. 2 in the rankings after a wrist injury sidelined her for most of 2004, was named the Women's Tennis Association's player of the year.

The 22-year-old Belgian, who won nine titles and captured her first grand slam singles crown at the US Open, was also named comeback player of the year.

Doubles team of the year was Californian twins Bob and Mike Bryan, while American Lisa Raymond and Australian Samantha Stosur took women's doubles honours.

Daniel
03-22-2006, 10:14 PM
Clijsters, Federer highlight 2005 award winners

Miami, FL (Sports Network) - Kim Clijsters and Roger Federer received player of the year awards at the annual tennis awards banquet on Tuesday.

Clijsters won the 2005 WTA Tour player of the year and comeback player of the year awards. She took home nine championship trophies in 2005, including winning her first career Grand Slam event at the U.S. Open, after battling a wrist injury.

Federer was simply the most dominant player men's tennis has seen in some time. The reigning top-ranked player in the world won 11 tournaments in 2005. He steamrolled through the field on the hardcourts at Flushing Meadows to win the U.S. Open and dominated on the grass of the All-England Club to take home Wimbledon.

American James Blake won the ATP Tour comeback player of the year award. The 26-year-old Blake recovered from a broken neck and a bout with Zoster to win an event in New Haven, Connecticut while making the quarterfinals of the U.S. Open in 2005. Blake moved from No. 210 in the world to No.24 by year's end.

Daniel
03-22-2006, 10:14 PM
Style & substanceNo. 1 Roger Federer dominates other top players, but a genuine rivalry exists with flashy No. 2 Rafael Nadal.BY MICHELLE [email]KAUFMANmkaufman@MiamiHerald.com

The first sign Roger Federer might have met his nemesis came two years ago, in a third-round match in Key Biscayne. Rafael Nadal, 17 years old at the time and ranked No. 34, biceps bulging from his red sleeveless shirt, left world No. 1 Federer's head spinning with a 6-3, 6-3 victory that took just more than an hour.

It wasn't just Nadal's strength and quickness that unsettled Federer, it was his blistering, left-handed shots loaded with topspin -- especially his crosscourt forehand, bouncing way up on Federer's shoulder, the one spot that exposes the tiniest of holes in Federer's game.
Federer and Nadal met again on that same Crandon Park court for the NASDAQ-100 Open final last March, and the swashbuckling Spaniard nearly pulled off another shocker, going up two sets to one and 4-1 in the third before Federer rallied for a 2-6, 6-7 (4-7), 7-6 (7-5), 6-3, 6-1 victory.
Nadal went on to beat Federer in the French Open semifinals and again last month in Dubai, ensuring the men are bona fide rivals as they enter the 2006 NASDAQ-100 Open, which begins today.
Federer is 10-1 against Andy Roddick and has won nine straight against Lleyton Hewitt, but he is 1-3 against Nadal, which makes for the kind of rivalry tennis has been starving for since Pete Sampras took his final bow after beating Andre Agassi in the 2002 U.S. Open final.
In the past 15 months, Federer and Nadal have separated themselves from the rest of the men on tour, combining for four of five Grand Slam titles and nine of 10 Masters Series titles.

''I think the potential is there for this to become a great rivalry, because Nadal has gotten somewhat into Federer's head by winning three of their four matches, and almost winning at NASDAQ last year,'' TV analyst Patrick McEnroe said. ``But for it to become a big rivalry like Sampras-Agassi or my brother [John] and [Jimmy] Connors, Nadal needs to do something outside the French. He needs to make a major run at Wimbledon or the U.S. Open. Federer has won seven majors and Nadal has won one.''
Said Agassi: ``I think it would be nearly impossible for anybody to dominate in the nature that Roger has over the last few years. It's great to see that the one person that's probably closest to him is actually a difficult matchup for Roger. Nadal can hit the one shot that everybody wishes they could hit to Roger, and that's the ball up and get it over his backhand side. I mean, that's not brain surgery. Nobody likes it up here. So, it's great to see the matchup that lends for a rivalry that might continue for a long time.''

OPPOSITES ATTRACT
It is still far too early to compare Federer-Nadal with the Bjorn Borg vs. John McEnroe rivalry, or Connors-McEnroe, or Sampras-Agassi, who played each other 34 times, including in five major finals. But there is no question the court sizzles when Nadal takes on Federer.
The contrast in personalities and styles are the stuff rivalries are made of. Federer is clean-cut, and his every move is measured and precise. When Nadal steps on the Crandon Park courts, it looks like he just walked over from the beach with his Coppertone tan, calf-length pirate pants, muscle shirt and bandanna. Nadal plays with reckless abandon, chasing down everything and sending dizzying shots into the places Federer prefers not to go.
''This is a pure, sweet growing rivalry, and the beauty of it is that their games are so different,'' TV analyst Mary Carillo said. ``Nadal gets after Federer's backhand, and the ball bounces up at Federer's shoulder, which is a problem for him. Federer is going to have to come in more and take it to him at the net, and Nadal wants long rallies. Not since Borg-McEnroe have we seen, stylistically, such a fun matchup. It's going to be great.
``Last year's NASDAQ final was really when it started. We all knew Nadal was a clay-court specialist, but here he was, taking on a great hard courter and the No. 1 player in the world, and that match was Nadal's declaration that, `Hey, if you think I'm just a teenager who's good on clay, think again.''

SPECIAL PROBLEM
Federer, always diplomatic, insisted he respects many players on tour but admitted that Nadal presents unique obstacles.
''I enjoy the challenge with him,'' Federer said. ``He's a terrific scrambler, and he brings something else to the game as a great left-hander, and we don't have many of those. I consider that a tough thing to do, to play against a good lefty. The more matches I play against him, also it's going to be easier for both of us to know.''
Despite his winning record against the world No. 1, Nadal remains humble and insists theirs is not yet a true rivalry.
''I don't think so,'' Nadal said. ``I am very young, and he is an unbelievable player, one of the best in history and the best player now by far. If you look at the ranking, if you look at the points, if you look at the grand slam titles, we don't have competition.''

Daniel
03-22-2006, 10:19 PM
Federer is opposed to using TV replays
Posted at 5:46am on 23 Mar 2006

World tennis number one Roger Federer, is vehemently oppose the planned introduction of television replays to judge close line calls during matches.

Instant replays will be used to determine tight calls for the first time on the professional tour in the dual men's and women's event in Miami this week. Players will be allowed to dispute two calls per set.

Wimbledon, U.S. and Australian Open champion Federer said he could not understand "the incredible effort" undertaken to correct decisions, adding that mistakes were evened out in the course of a match, a tournament or a season.

Daniel
03-22-2006, 10:25 PM
Foes just can't fluster Federer
Posted March 22 2006


In addition to the five subtle edges Roger Federer brings to court, there's one other you should know about.

He was completely unflustered, even amused, by a shaving cream prank a half-hour before the final of a major tournament last year, and that, perhaps more than anything, defines the fully composed temperament of the best player in the world and how he uses that to enhance his tennis.

The joke was perpetrated on Sunday, Aug. 21, before the start of the Federer-Andy Roddick final at the Masters Series tournament in Cincinnati.

Roddick and his coach at the time, Dean Goldfine, squirted shaving cream onto the earpiece of a telephone in the trainer's room in the clubhouse. When Federer entered the locker room, Roddick signaled Goldfine to phone the trainer's line and told Federer, "I think that's for you, Roger. Someone has been trying to reach you."

The gag almost didn't work because the cream wound up on Federer's long hair over his ear, and he didn't realize he'd been the butt of a joke until someone asked about the white stuff on his hair. He laughed it off.

Any other player would have been infuriated by a "distraction" like that before a final. Not Federer. And it's that coolness that helps him remain calm and in control at the crisis moments of his matches.

Charles Bricker can be reached at cbricker@sun-sentinel.com

Minnie
03-22-2006, 10:51 PM
Federer is opposed to using TV replays
Posted at 5:46am on 23 Mar 2006

World tennis number one Roger Federer, is vehemently oppose the planned introduction of television replays to judge close line calls during matches.

Instant replays will be used to determine tight calls for the first time on the professional tour in the dual men's and women's event in Miami this week. Players will be allowed to dispute two calls per set.

Wimbledon, U.S. and Australian Open champion Federer said he could not understand "the incredible effort" undertaken to correct decisions, adding that mistakes were evened out in the course of a match, a tournament or a season.

I actually agree with Roger on this - but perhaps for different reasons. Having sat through matches on the seniors tour that used this technology last December here, I just thought how much it detracted from the spectators' ability to get really into matches. I sat there feeling removed from the match as they replayed the point on the screen - it kinda took away some of the atmosphere. Having said that though, no doubt if the technology had been used at IW, it would have corrected the umpire's incorrect call on Roger's blistering return in the 3rd set which flashed by so fast, the umpire must have thought "impossible"!! Still, personally, I'm not keen - and side more with Marat Safin's comments ..

"Who was the genius who came up with this idiotic idea?", Die Welt quoted the former U.S. and Australian Open winner as saying.

"(There are) a thousand ways of making tennis more lively and attractive, but video evidence is definitely not one of them," he said.

TenHound
03-23-2006, 02:46 AM
re the replay system - Roger also thght. it was a waste of money. Figure I saw today was $80k/wk for one court I think. So, it's only for the show courts, or perhaps only center court - anything on tv probably.

SUKTUEN
03-23-2006, 03:27 AM
Roger hate the system~~ he think it is waste the time of the match too

lsy
03-23-2006, 04:48 AM
I can understand where he comes from for being so against it with the few points he made but is there a need to still speak so loudly vs it now that it's a must go?

All eyes on him if he's going to use that for his matches for sure and I don't see why he shouldn't when his opponents obviously will and the system is now there for you to make use, but if he does, only makes him look rather awkward perharps?

But now nobody can say Rogi is always being "diplomatic" (like in a hypocrite way :rolleyes: ) trying to please everybody whenever giving his opinions :p

Skyward
03-23-2006, 06:28 AM
But now nobody can say Rogi is always being "diplomatic" (like in a hypocrite way :rolleyes: ) trying to please everybody whenever giving his opinions :p

Now he's a bastard who is afraid to lose his advantage because all the calls usually go in his favor (see the thread in GM) :rolleyes:

lsy
03-23-2006, 07:00 AM
Now he's a bastard who is afraid to lose his advantage because all the calls usually go in his favor (see the thread in GM) :rolleyes:

:haha: :haha:

Calls usually go in his favour??? Why coz he's the no.1? Exactly how much more stupid can it get in GM?

I just took a quick look at that thread, and I won't be surprise at least one or two who'd been so actively posting there would be singing a whole different tune if it's their favourite player who said the same as Rogi did ;) That's what makes reading GM funny for me always ;)

I can't wait to see their response the second Rogi uses the hawkeye though :scared: :lol:

yanchr
03-23-2006, 07:46 AM
I can't wait to see their response the second Rogi uses the hawkeye though :scared: :lol:
Me too :retard: ;)

Daniel
03-23-2006, 08:01 AM
Federer and Safin oppose using TV replays
Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:11 PM GMT
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BERLIN, March 22 (Reuters) - World number one Roger Federer and Marat Safin vehemently oppose the planned introduction of television replays to judge close line calls during matches, Die Welt newspaper reported on Wednesday.

"It is madness what is happening. A pure waste of money," Swiss Federer told the paper.

Instant replays will be used to determine tight calls for the first time on the professional tour in the dual men's and women's event in Miami this week. Players will be allowed to dispute two calls per set.

Wimbledon, U.S. and Australian Open champion Federer said he could not understand "the incredible effort" undertaken to correct decisions, adding that mistakes were evened out in the course of a match, a tournament or a season.

Russian Safin, who along with Federer is competing in Miami, also criticised the change, arguing it would slow the game and deaden the spectacle.

"Who was the genius who came up with this idiotic idea?", Die Welt quoted the former U.S. and Australian Open winner as saying.

"(There are) a thousand ways of making tennis more lively and attractive, but video evidence is definitely not one of them," he said.

Daniel
03-23-2006, 08:07 AM
ATP Miami Preview: Video Replay Gets Top Seed

The strongest men's field of the year begins Wednesday at the Masters Series-Miami, the NASDAQ-100 Open, where technology rather than the players will take center stage.

For the first time in professional tennis, the Hawk-Eye line-calling technology will be employed on the stadium court where players will receive two challenges per set (and an extra challenge in the case of a tiebreak) to overrule the chair umpire's or a lineperson's call. A correct challenge and the player retains their previous number of challenges, an incorrect challenge and they lose one. The stadium's giant video screen will show the animated replay, which tournament organizers hope will get crowds into the match.

"It's 10 years overdue," said Gene Scott, publisher of Tennis Week magazine, speaking with Fox Sports on the video replay system tennis television commentators have been using for years. "It's amazing how TV forced the game's governors to do it."


Veteran ESPN commentator and tennis icon Cliff Drysdale says not only will the Hawk-Eye technology be good for the game, but in big matches will change it.

"The scale between players is so easily tipped, that one call, one point does make a huge difference," said Drysdale speaking with Fox Sports. "And there are so many more beside those where replays would have made a huge difference. I absolutely think some big matches would have gone the other way."

Big matches will be on the mind of top seed Roger Federer, who is on a mission to pull away from No. 2 Rafael Nadal in Miami, last week winning a third consecutive Indian Wells title after claiming the first Slam of the year at the Australian Open.

Federer is no stranger to Miami this week as the defending champion, setting a seemingly untouchable pace in 2006 -- and it's only March.

Other "storylines" in Miami include the resurgence of Tommy Haas who could face Federer in the third round, the coming-out party for James Blake who is also in Club Fed's quarter, the ongoing struggles and unending IMG-supported wildcards to IMG clients Donald Young and the confidence-challenged Mark Philippoussis at the IMG-owned event, the ongoing one-man drama club that is Andy Roddick, injury-ravaged former-greats Marat Safin and Tim Henman squaring off in the first round, Guillermo Coria resurfacing with a new coach and hopefully some game after a poor 2006 start, new world No. 3 David Nalbandian trying to show he is fully recovered from an ab injury, Nadal trying to bounce back from shockingly being kept from a final last week at IW, and Americans Andre Agassi and Robby Ginepri trying to show they have the mindset to compete, with a potential early-round meeting looming.

Lots going on at the "fifth slam," the last hardcourt stop before the all-dirt run-up to the French Open.

Here's the breakdown of the four quarters of the 2006 Masters Series-Miami:

Top Quarter
Seeds: (1) Roger Federer, (8) Gaston Gaudio, (9) James Blake, (14) Juan Carlos Ferrero, (23) Jarkko Nieminen, (24) Igor Andreev, (27) Tommy Haas, (32) Juan Ignacio Chela

Floaters: Arnaud Clement, Mark Philippoussis, Greg Rusedski

A lot of land mines early on for world No. 1 Roger Federer in the top quarter at Miami, including the former No. 2 and on-task Haas, and Blake who had en early advantage over the Swiss in last Sunday's Indian Wells final.

After an opening-round bye Federer could open against the Frenchman Clement, who has beaten Nadal this year and owned the Swiss in his pre-No. 1 days, winning three of their first round encounters. Haas would be the Swiss' likely opponent in the 3rd round, and the formerly-fearsome No. 1 Ferrero or Andreev in the fourth.

With Gaudio a mess since his shoulder problem arose, tip Blake to meet Federer in the quarters if the American can bypass the upset-maker Nieminen in the 3rd round.

Philippoussis is a floater only in terms of watch him float out of this event early -- same with under-cooked wildcard "The" Donald Young, who opens against Argentine Carlos Berlocq, winner to face Blake.

Second Quarter
Seeds: (4) Andy Roddick, (7) Guillermo Coria, (11) Dave Ferrer, (13) Lleyton Hewitt, (17) Dominik Hrbaty, (19) Sebastien Grosjean, (29) Olivier Rochus, (31) Fernando Verdasco

Floaters: Andrei Pavel, "Rappin'" Vince Spadea, Paradorn "The Thai Fighter" Srichaphan, Marat Safin, Tim Henman, Max "The Beast" Mirnyi, Novak Djokovic

Turn back the clock a few years and this is one rough section -- but this is 2006, when Roddick and Hewitt are struggling, and Coria was tapped to not even play Miami after bailing from Indian Wells to bond with new coach Jose Higueras after an awful start this year.

Roddick's opener could be a Davis Cup rematch against the Romanian Pavel, who beat the American in five sets when Andy shot his lunch into a courtside bucket mid-match.

Hewitt's opener couldn't be any rougher, meeting the winner of Safin and Henman in the floater-crazy second quarter of the draw. The fast-rising Serb Djokovic meets Frenchman Paul-Henri Mathieu in the first round, and either could take out the confidence-challenged Coria in the next meeting.

Look for something strange to come out of the bottom half of this quarter (Grosjean? Mirnyi? O.Rochus?) to meet either Roddick, Hewitt, or Safin for a spot in the quarterfinals.

Third Quarter
Seeds: (3) David Nalbandian, (5) Nikolay Davydenko, (12) Richard Gasquet, (15) Radek Stepanek, (21) Tommy Robredo, (22) Mario "Baby Goran" Ancic, (25) Marcos Baghdatis, (26) Tomas Berdych

Floaters: Paul Goldstein, Nicolas Massu, Xavier "X-Man" Malisse

Nalbandian should have his feet under him after his return at Indian Wells from an abdominal injury, and will be tested likely first by the pesky American Goldstein, then by the whaling power of Berdych in the 3rd round.

There are few holes in Masters Series draws, and Davydenko, the second-highest seed in the quarter, also doesn't have it easy with Baghdatis in the 3rd round then either Gasquet or Ancic.

Watch the seeds here as this is the floater-weak quarter of the draw. Lots of middling players like Stepanek, who has already won a title this year at Rotterdam, and Ancic and Berdych, who have run hot and cold, make this mostly personality-less Euro-section a coin flip beginning in the third round.

Bottom Quarter
Seeds: (2) Rafael Nadal, (6) Ivan Ljubicic, (10) Andre Agassi, (16) Nicolas Kiefer, (18) Fernando Gonzalez, (20) Robby Ginepri, (28) Gael "Force" Monfils, (30) Filippo Volandri

Floaters: Fabrice "The Magician" Santoro, "Dr." Ivo Karlovic, Andy Murray, Stan Wawrinka, Carlos Moya

Throw A-Rod into this section and you could call it the "Confident-less American Quarter." Agassi and Ginepri have navigation-able openers, which would result in a third-round meeting.

How about Nadal vs. his former No. 1 countryman and mentor Carlos Moya in the second round for fans looking for some straight-out-of-the-box competition? You don't see much of that at the Slams.

Other tough openers for seeds are Gonzalez vs. the Murray-Wawrinka winner (don't underestimate Stan), and Kiefer vs. The Magician-Dr. Ivo winner.

Ljubicic has the easiest draw of the lot, and will need to merely hold his standard until fighting the U.S. partisan fans and likely navigating the video replay in a fourth-round encounter with Agassi or Ginepri.

Look for Nadal to grind through the tough draw of Moya, Monfils, and Kiefer or Gonzalez to face Ljubicic or Agassi for the quarterfinals berth.

Returning champs in the field are Federer (2005), Roddick (2004), and the six-time winner Agassi (2003-01,'96-95,'90). Jonas Bjorkman and The Beast won the 2005 doubles title.

X-CORRECT
ESPN did not show either of the Indian Wells men's semifinals matches live or on tape Saturday in the U.S. on the East Coast, but one semifinal was shown on tape Saturday beginning before midnight on the West Coast.

ESPN responds: "We noted with interest your comment about the scheduling of the Pacific Life Open men's semifinals. You should know: 1) You say we did not air either men's semi...we did in fact air the Blake-Nadal match as scheduled on tape later Saturday night. 2) the tournament agreed to this schedule when they changed the women's final from Sunday to Saturday (we used to show a men's semi live). They moved the women's final for reasons relating to ticket sales. 3) the billiards show you cite was only a half-hour show before ESPN2 resumed its extensive coverage of the NCAA Women's Basketball tournament with two telecasts Saturday night. It's an especially busy time of year on our networks, even by our standards, and we do our best to serve all sports fans. Thanks, --Dave (Nagle) ESPN Communications Dept."

DAILY TENNIS-X E-NEWSLETTER
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TENNIS-X NEWS, NOTES, QUOTES AND BARBS
Lindsay Davenport pulled from Miami Monday, citing her back injury that flared up in Indian Wells... U.S. Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe writing for ESPN: "(James) Blake's play is great for the United States Davis Cup team, and it's great that Andre Agassi is interested in playing again. After Blake's performance at the Pacific Life Open, three Americans are in the Top 10 for the first time since 2000 (Andy Roddick is ranked No. 4 and Agassi is No. 10). That's great for American tennis. James has brought a lot to the table in Davis Cup, and obviously what he did in Indian Wells has been a major statement. I'm excited, and we'll get Roddick on track. We're feeling pretty good about our chances this year."...Mardy Fish is experiencing how his management company "Special Effects" (SFX) has little pull at the IMG-run Masters Series-Miami this week, with the former Top 20-ranked American forced to play the qualifying. Fish won his first-round qualifying match Monday over Frenchman Julien "United Colors of" Benneteau...Lleyton Hewitt drops from the Top 10 to No. 14 after his early Indian Wells exit, and Tim Henman plunges out of the Top 50...From the ATP: "Sir Richard Branson, the world-renowned British entrepreneur behind the Virgin Brand, and Florida Marlins starting pitcher Jason Vargas, and tennis legends Billie Jean King and Jim Courier will join with tennis stars Roger Federer, Maria Sharapova, James Blake and Venus Williams at "Stars for Stars," the Official Awards Party for Professional Tennis on Tuesday at the Four Seasons Hotel Miami. The event, which sold out over the weekend, will feature sumptuous food prepared by Miami's most-renowned chefs following the presentation of the awards to honor the achievements from 2005. Nominees include Kim Clijsters, Rafael Nadal, Sania Mirza, Marcos Baghdatis, Justine Henin-Hardenne, Andy Murray, Maria Kirilenko and the Bryan Brothers among others."...From Charlie "The Blogging Brick" Bricker: "OK fan, get involved: I'm going to be on the stadium court Wednesday for the opening match of the Nasdaq-100 and I don't care who's playing because I want to be there when the first player challenge is issued and the first replay aired on the big screens above the court showing whether the ball was in or out. What would feel particularly pleasant is if the fans got into, screaming "Challenge!" down to the involved player. Do you suppose we need those NFL red flags so the offended player can reach into his back pocket and throw it on the court?"...From AndyRoddick.com: "The Nasdaq-100 has released it's draw for the 1st Round of Men's Singles. Many have been looking forward to the first round draw of the Nasdaq 100. There are many interesting matchups. As expected, Andy will be awaiting the results of the match between Andrei Pavel (ROM) and Alberto Martin (ESP)." -- Besides the see-spot-run writing style, can we ask how Andy was expecting to be waiting for the Pavel-Martin winner before the draw came out Monday? Is Andy psychic?...In Miami, what happens when some prick such as (fill in the blank) gets so pissed off during a match that he calls for a video replay for the hell of it, like when his opponent hits a passing shot that clips the tape then lands five feet in? That will be good theater, and likely elicit some good booing from the crowd...Hawk-Eye inventor Paul Hawkins speaking with The Independent demonstrating why he doesn't understand PR or marketing: "With unlimited challenges they can say 'Hey, that was close. I was wrong, but no harm in looking,' whereas if it's limited they are saying, 'I am sure you are wrong.' If it is then shown the line judge was correct, it puts the player in an uncomfortable position. Why should a player need to become involved in the officiating anyway? Why doesn't the umpire have a little screen by his chair? If he is not sure of the call, he can look at our system and decide whether to overrule or not. So the player doesn't need to challenge." -- Yes, cool clinical technology without player or fan involvement, wouldn't that be great for the game...From Tennis Week: "If it seems (Maria) Sharapova is everywhere at Crandon Park that's because the Sports Illustrated swim suit model will be showing multiple sides of herself. Actually, there will be six Sharapova's appearing around the grounds at Crandon Park as Canon, an endorsee of the 2004 Wimbledon winner, will have six Sharapova look-alikes placed throughout the tournament grounds taking photos with fans from Friday, March 24th through Tuesday March 28th."...Elena Dementieva is 1-4 vs. Russians in finals...Jason Dasey writing for ESPN: "As for Elena (Dementieva), she's more girl-next-door than pin-up girl, yet has won many admirers with her natural beauty, charm and grace. Her tennis attire is sporty rather than sexy: instead of the (Maria) Sharapova-style baby-doll nighties, Elena's outfits are geared for on-court comfort, although she still cuts a striking figure in her preferred colour of red. She also has a strong, intellectual side that comes across with her thoughtful and measured answers during media conferences and interviews." -- Stalker alert!...Martina Hingis is 2-6 vs. Top 10 opponents in 2006...Amelie Mauresmo says now that she is back on top of the WTA Rankings, there's no reason she can't finish the year No. 1: "The first time, I had the feeling it would not last whereas now, things are much more under control," she told the sports daily L'Equipe. "And if I have things under control, it means it's going to last much longer. My main target is now to still be at this place at the end of the year. I now feel I really dominate women's tennis. It makes a big difference."

ytben
03-23-2006, 08:37 AM
Calls usually go in his favour??? Why coz he's the no.1? Exactly how much more stupid can it get in GM?

I just took a quick look at that thread, and I won't be surprise at least one or two who'd been so actively posting there would be singing a whole different tune if it's their favourite player who said the same as Rogi did ;) That's what makes reading GM funny for me always ;)

I can't wait to see their response the second Rogi uses the hawkeye though :scared: :lol:

:devil: I know exactly what you meant, I have the same thoughts when I read that thread.

lsy
03-23-2006, 08:49 AM
:devil: I know exactly what you meant, I have the same thoughts when I read that thread.

;)

Good to know you're still alive btw :rolleyes:

Actually I can't wait to see Rogi's expression too if his opponent starts to request for the replay :lol:

ytben
03-23-2006, 08:55 AM
Actually I can't wait to see Rogi's expression too if his opponent starts to request for the replay :lol:

Me too actually :lol:

My computer got virus, only got fixed recently :mad:

lsy
03-23-2006, 09:02 AM
Me too actually :lol:

My computer got virus, only got fixed recently :mad:

I suppose that virus spread to your handphone too, that's why I couldn't get you last week :rolleyes: ;)

ytben
03-23-2006, 10:18 AM
I suppose that virus spread to your handphone too, that's why I couldn't get you last week :rolleyes: ;)

I have no access to internet dear so don't know the answer to your quesion. So I thought I just went ahead and saved some $$$ from texting you :p

Sorry for the off topic chitchat guys :cool:

nobama
03-23-2006, 01:39 PM
FYI, the names of the Laureus world sport award nominees will be announced on Thursday, April 6, 2006. I've no doubt that Roger will be nominated again. Let's hope he can win back to back awards!

lsy
03-23-2006, 02:12 PM
Rogi signed lifetime contract with Wilson! wow

http://www.rogerfederer.com/en/rogers/news/newsdetail.cfm?uNewsID=304

ytben
03-23-2006, 03:27 PM
Lifetime contract.....holly molly....he must get a lot of $$$$ out of it :D

tonia9
03-23-2006, 08:26 PM
Thursday, March 23, 2006

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Can you talk about coming back to the NASDAQ and what you're looking forward to this year.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I'm very happy to be back here healthy, you know. That's always my main concern after winning a tournament, that I can come back the following year and at least try to defend.

Feels like I got this opportunity here now, you know, especially playing so well since the beginning of the year. Indian Wells was definitely my best tournament of the year so far, even though the Australian Open was fantastic, too.

Winning, you know, the first Grand Slam and first Masters Series of the year really makes me come into this tournament confident.

Q. Talk about the field and you trying to repeat as champion, how difficult that's going to be, the challenge you have.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think Masters Series in general are really hard, you know, to win because you get really tough draws from the opening rounds on. Makes it hard, you know.

But I think best‑of‑three sets also is a danger, you know, because very quickly you can be out, you know. So, you have to always be on top of your game.

Q. What is your reaction to your video game? Are you pleased with the way you play?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, it's nice. Nice design, absolutely. Top Spin 2 seems nice game to me. I'm happy to be in a video game, you know. I never thought I'll be in one, but I was always hoping ‑‑ I remember back when I was playing a lot, that I could play with my favorite players, you know. So now I hope, you know, for my fans, they enjoy that I'm in a game, too. They can either play with me or against me, which I think is good fun.

Q. Did you take it easy on Sharapova or Venus?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, we took it easy on each other. It was a relaxed atmosphere. We all tried to figure out the game, and in the end actually we all played pretty well.

Q. After one day of the HawkEye, what is your opinion now in terms of how you feel about it?

ROGER FEDERER: I didn't see it, to be honest. I actually didn't hear anything about it, so I got to wait for my match, I guess.

Q. How will you approach the replay? Are you looking forward to it? Is it something you've wanted, a lot of men have wanted?

ROGER FEDERER: You know, there's been much talk about it. Let me just wait out my day, when it comes with the HawkEye. I can tell you what I think. Beforehand, it's all just speculation.

Yeah, I mean, I'll just really use it as a , I think, when there's a horrible call, you know, for either one of us. I hope that's how it's going to be used.

Q. Are you still philosophically unsure about what place electronic line calling has in tennis anyway?

ROGER FEDERER: We'll see now, after my first match. After that, you know, obviously it's not something you can say it's great or bad after one day, you know. It's got to have a consistency, you know, for a long time. It's not allowed to have any mistakes in it.

So I think we'll know more after this tournament, but then also more at the end of this year.

Q. Andre Agassi has won this tournament six times. He's obviously struggling right now. What are your thoughts about the state of his game and whether he can dig out of this latest rut he's in?

ROGER FEDERER: I hope for him he's feeling all right physically after sort of a similar injury we had at the end of last year. He's been struggling a little bit with it, you know, not playing in Australia, then not maybe winning too many matches at the beginning of the season now.

To be honest, somebody that's won this tournament six times, you can never count him out. I think usually when he plays a tournament, he's ready usually. So I expect him to come far in this event and be very tough to beat.

Q. Looking ahead the next two months, will you prepare any differently for the French Open, the next Grand Slam coming up, than you have in previous years?

ROGER FEDERER: Maybe a little bit. I'll try to play the three Masters Series instead of only two, meaning Monte‑Carlo, Rome and Hamburg, whereas the last few years either I missed out on Rome or Monte‑Carlo two years in a row. I think that's going to be a change for me.

I've got no Davis Cup after Miami so maybe that's going to give me a little bit more time to rest and get ready as well. But other than that, I think I'm not going to change too much. I'm going to go early to Paris, get ready, and hopefully be fine for Paris.

Q. Do you think playing center court most of the time in all the tournaments for the rest of the years and the HawkEye being in center court and not on the outside court, that's going to bias your game or put you at an advantage or disadvantage to the other players who are not playing on center court all the time?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah, I play 99% of the matches on center court, so I'll see it probably the most, you know, of all the players on the men's tour. Again, you know, we'll really see how it's going to work out for us.

But if it's a disadvantage or advantage, it's impossible to answer right now. I hope it's going to be all right for everybody.

Q. A question about Davis Cup. You have played last year at Wimbledon against Gonzalez. Do you think that Chile has some chances against USA playing on grass in two weeks?

ROGER FEDERER: I think Fernando played excellent on grass last year. It was a little bit of a surprise, but I think these days, you know, there's not many like really dangerous serve and volley players, so you always get a chance playing from the baseline.

I think Fernando definitely can make it really difficult for the United States, you know, to win. I think the doubles is good, too, you know, with Gonzalez‑Massu. Nicolas, I think, on any given day he can beat many players. On grass, I am not sure how good he is. I think the Americans are definitely the favorites, but not to count out the Chileans.

Q. Are you looking to change anything in your game?

ROGER FEDERER: Not really. I mean, you know, I always adapt to my opponents and I usually also adapt to my, to the surface I play on. So I always do it, you know. It's something automatically that happens. Obviously, I try to be in my best shape physically. I'll try to be mentally prepared for long and matches and rallies and everything. I think that's, maybe for my game, the key, you know, to success.

Then obviously, you know, you got to hope a little bit on day form and hope you play right at the right moment.

So, no, I don't really prepare any different.

Q. Paris became such a medal hurdle for so many great players ‑ McEnroe, Boris Becker, Edberg, Sampras obviously. Do you resist being put into that group? Do you think it's a different situation for you even though it's the only Grand Slam you haven't won?

ROGER FEDERER: Hard to say, huh? I mean, came close last year, so I'm obviously optimistic about my chances at the French. I've grown up on the surface, you know. Maybe not like others, but, again, you know, every player was different. There was always a time where some people did it and shouldn't and some people didn't and should have. Maybe it's going to be the same for me, I don't know. I'll try not to make it happen, try to win the French for the first time. Obviously, the earlier I can win it, I don't have to talk about it. The more it keeps on dragging on, maybe the more difficult it's going to be for me.

At the same time, I don't let myself be influenced too much by the press and the pressure. I'm just getting ready for myself, giving myself the best opportunity. That's really all I can do.

Q. In assessing the greatest players of all time, ranking them, comparing them, how much of an emphasis do you think should be put on the idea of winning all four Slams on the different surfaces? Does that elevate a person to a different level, do you think?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it definitely adds something special, you know, to your career. I mean, I've won an entire season on different surfaces, but then obviously the Grand Slam is something else, you know. There's only so many few players who did it.

You feel like whoever does it, I mean, it means something special. I think it definitely does.

Q. Just to follow up on that question. Could you ever foresee you doing something like Lendl did with skipping the French and prepared for grass? Could you see yourself doing something like that with the clay?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, thank God the French is before Wimbledon, so don't need to tank the Australian Open to get ready (smiling). So still got enough...

Q. I know, but really throw yourself into it.

ROGER FEDERER: I understand what you're saying. I mean, the only way maybe is going on clay right after the Australian Open and not really returning on hard courts for Indian Wells, Key Biscayne, you know, sort of.

I'm not sure if that's the right preparation, too. I think what you want, too, is matches and feel confident. For this reason, I always believe you should be playing well while you're healthy.

No, I mean, certain sacrifice, but not a sacrifice towards a point where it's like to the point where I think Ivan went to.

Q. I want to ask you about James Blake and how he's playing right now. He's obviously playing the best of his career. How do you see him as a player, and how good can he be, do you think?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, he's playing excellent. He played very good all last week, you know. He's had a very consistent start to the season. He impressed me in the finals, you know. He played very aggressive, very consistent. Obviously, you know, got to him maybe a little bit mentally, losing that first set after being up with a double break obviously. That's not an easy thing to do.

I did well to come back, but I thought he played, obviously, a great tournament. I think it's going to give him great motivation now that he's in the Top 10, to, you know, being in a shot maybe also for a better chance at Grand Slams after seeing how close he was already at the US Open against Agassi and so on, then maybe looking ahead in the draw and everything. Maybe great times ahead for James, I hope for him.

Q. I know you all respect everybody. Is he a player who's considered now someone that is a contender for big tournaments, you would say?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, he's got to back it up now, obviously. But if he keeps on playing like he did the last six months, absolutely.

Q. Do you see any of the Latin Americans having the possibility to be a champion? What do you think about all the Latin Americans that are now in the tournament?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, there's many South Americans around since a long time, you know. I think the best ones are obviously Coria and Nalbandian. I mean, Nalbandian, he's won his really big tournament in Shanghai where he beat me in the final. I always consider him one of the biggest threats from South America, you know, on any surface really because he's done well at the French, at Wimbledon. I think he's played semis in all four Grand Slams. He's always a threat.

Coria, he should have won the French back then, but I think Gaudio did an incredible job. Since he won the French Open, he's also become a much better player.

So there's many good players out there, and they're tough to beat, absolutely. So if one doesn't win matches in one tournament, you have five other guys who do it, so it's not easy (smiling).

RogiFan88
03-23-2006, 09:36 PM
Nice of Rogi to recognize Gaston's achievement at RG -- he already mentioned him last yr at Miami I believe when Cliff asked him about slams in 05, etc. and he reminded him that it wasn't just himself, but also Gaudio! ;)

RonE
03-23-2006, 09:47 PM
Q. Looking ahead the next two months, will you prepare any differently for the French Open, the next Grand Slam coming up, than you have in previous years?

ROGER FEDERER: Maybe a little bit. I'll try to play the three Masters Series instead of only two, meaning Monte‑Carlo, Rome and Hamburg, whereas the last few years either I missed out on Rome or Monte‑Carlo two years in a row. I think that's going to be a change for me.


:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :yeah: :yeah: :yeah: :yeah: :yeah: :yeah: :yeah:

TenHound
03-24-2006, 12:48 AM
Does Roger have an ethical dilemma using HawkEye that other players don't have - or any top player perhaps has playing a significantly inferior player?

For a recent example, when Roger got that obviously bad call on his return of service when he was crushing James in 3rd set @ love in IW, should he have resorted to the machine to rectify if?

SUKTUEN
03-24-2006, 07:35 AM
Thanks

nobama
03-24-2006, 01:23 PM
The Wilson deal is cool, but I want him to do something sweet with Nike. Right now he's just another player, wears the same clothes as every one else. That's so not right, especially when someone like Andy Roddick can get $25M and his own Lacoste clothing line. If Tiger Woods can have his own Nike line, Roger should too.

tonia9
03-26-2006, 08:43 AM
March 25, 2006

R. FEDERER/A. Clement
6‑2, 6‑7, 6‑0
An interview with:


ROGER FEDERER

Q. You just trying to make it interesting with that second set? I mean, obviously, the wind was a problem. I know Arnaud has beaten you in the past. What happened in the end of that second set?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, everything was going fine till 4‑Love in the tiebreaker so. I mean, conditions were tough in the end because sun was very low and wind was ‑‑ there was quite a breeze out there. The one end was definitely an advantage, you know, the one end I actually was up 4‑Love and 4‑2. Obviously, he had the better side after that, but I was hoping to have a big enough lead to sort of take advantage of it.

Again, I thought he played pretty well to come back there, and he really guessed well on a few returns. It was already close, I thought, in the first set, you know. So it looked everything could have gone, you know ‑‑ the match could have been over very quickly. But, you know, he hung in there and he played well, I thought.

The beginning of the third set, obviously, it was like a really open match, and I was obviously hoping for a good start. I'm really happy I got it.

Q. Did the challenge system ‑‑ what did you think of the challenge system? Did it bother you? Were you into it?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's there, right? It's always in your mind at the moment, especially the more you talk about it.

But I'm sort of neutral. I like to give it some time because at one stage it wasn't working, you know, for a game, and then it was working again. Obviously, that's something that is not acceptable, you know, for us players, playing with our minds, I think, you know.

Then, obviously, I was happy. I got the one call for me. I felt a little bit embarrassed I didn't get the other call, you know, because I don't like challenging. If a ball is out, I challenge it. It happened.

So, anyway, got to give it time, I guess.

Q. Is there a time limit on the challenge? It looked like he wanted to call it on the changeover.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, well, that's exactly when it gets a little complicated. We're both sitting down, he's challenging a call? I mean, that's a little bit awkward, isn't it?

Q. That second one, it turned out you were wrong. Did you feel you were definitely going to be right? Were you surprised?

ROGER FEDERER: I was surprised, yes.

Q. You felt good about the third set. You turned it up a notch?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, absolutely. Especially at the mid through and then at the end played well. Obviously, I could play a bit more freely because I was up a break or up a double break. Also, then it was easier to play, honestly, because the sun was gone, we were playing in the shade. It was perfect conditions then.

So I was very pleased with actually my all‑around performance, you know, because I've had some tough matches with Arnaud in the past.

Q. Your next opponent is Tommy Haas. Obviously, playing really well this year. You've had some good battles. Talk about that.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I've had some good ones with Tommy, especially at the beginning of the year, especially the Australian Open. So looking forward to that challenge against him. He always usually plays good on the American hard courts. He won a couple tournaments here.

So definitely got to, you know, be ready for a good match. And, again, you know, he's a good player, especially this year.

Q. What happened in the tiebreak? You were up 4‑0, dropped seven points in a row. Was there anything...

ROGER FEDERER: I think in the end, deciding point was the one I think I was serving at. I think it was ‑‑ I was serving at 4‑Love, I think, and I lose that point. On serve, I think with the wind I shouldn't lose that point. I think if I do, if I lead 5‑1 instead of 4‑2 at the change of ends, I think I will win the tiebreaker.

But, you know, he did well to hang in there. In the end, obviously, it didn't go my way. I didn't serve like I should have, and he didn't miss. It was a good performance in the breaker in the end for him.

Q. Roger, do you feel over the last four or five years that the hard court surfaces have been made to play slower as well as the balls? Do you feel that's been a factor in your game at all?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I feel like the conditions have been pretty much the same since I came on tour. They had some ‑‑ I thought they had some issues with the balls at one stage where they were really flat and I really couldn't get the spin on the ball, but that's been gone for a while now.

No, other than that, it's been pretty much the same. It's just my game has become better, and by becoming better, I have the feeling, you know, the conditions have slowed down because I have more time, because I am more sure about my own game, which in the beginning, soon as there was wind and sun and everything, I always felt like I couldn't play from the baseline. That's changed over the years.

Q. Coming on to the court today, was there anything in your mind thinking, "Clijsters lost here," "Hewitt lost here," "Nadal lost here," "Henin lost here." "Maybe I'm next"?

ROGER FEDERER: A little bit maybe. Yeah, because Kim was the defending champion after all. With Rafael losing, he was in the finals last year. I thought, "Have conditions changed here or what?" I didn't feel it, like they did. It's good to see upsets, too, sometimes as long as it doesn't hit you.

I was pleased with the performance. Yeah, I was ready for a tough match today with Arnaud. Like I said, he's been a tough competitor for me.

Q. Getting back to the challenges for a minute, would you ever challenge if you weren't completely sure, like if it was late in the set and you had one left and it was a close call, but you weren't sure? Would you challenge anyway?

ROGER FEDERER: Probably not, no. I think you should really only use them when you're 100% sure.

Q. You think it's going to prevent chair umpires from overruling because why should they, they'll think?

ROGER FEDERER: Little bit maybe, yeah. I mean, my big wish from this whole thing is that the fans sort of don't take this as a game, you know, because it happens so rarely that they shouldn't be screaming you know, like, "Oh, challenge that," or, "Challenge this." Like when there is close calls, they don't applaud anymore because they think there is going to be a challenge. I feel like that's sometimes a little bit of a problem right now.

For this reason I'm saying let's wait and see how it goes. If the people wait too much for the calls, you know, and don't really care about the shots anymore, this is when I tend to get a little bit pessimistic about the whole thing.

Q. Roger, everybody seems to be respecting you a lot, all the other players. What do you feel about that?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's good to be respected, you know.

Q. Like a special thing?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, it's a normal thing, you know. We all have respect for each other, you know. It's not like ‑‑

Q. Like your game.

ROGER FEDERER: The game, I guess, you know, when you're up at the rankings ‑ it's not only for me, it's for all the guys ‑ they feel like they achieved something good, you know, and maybe other players admire things you do. I also admire other things in other players. So I think that's just the way it goes. We all love the sport, so I think we all happy we all compete so we can really see who is the best in the game.

tonia9
03-26-2006, 09:37 AM
Mar. 26, 2006
20 QUESTIONS WITH . . . ROGER FEDERER A happy champion: `I'm living my dream'
By DAN LE BATARD

Twenty questions with Roger Federer, the world's greatest tennis player:

1) Who do you look at anywhere in sports and say, `That person is better at what he does for a living than I am at what I do'?

``Tough call. Always hard to compare different sports. There are a lot of guys who have been doing incredible things for a longer time than I've had success in tennis. Tiger Woods. [Motorcycle champion] Valentino Rossi. [Race-car driver] Michael Schumacher.''

2) Five adjectives you'd use to describe yourself to a stranger?

``Honest. Positive. Open. Laid-back. Happy. No negative adjectives. I'll leave that to others. I'm positive.''

3) Is it hard to keep motivated given that tennis is so boring and repetitive and alone, especially the preparation?

``Yeah, I wonder about that on a daily basis. But you make everything a challenge. So many areas to work on -- speed, balance, mental strength -- that you can tackle something new and different every day with a good schedule plan for improvement. Center Court in front of thousands of fans is easy, but the tough thing is what leads up to the tournament.''

4) You speak four languages. You are smart. Do you ever question the worth of hitting a ball for a living?

``Never. My dream was always to be an athlete, in either soccer or tennis, and I'm living my dream.''

5) Do you ever talk to God?

``No, I don't.''

6) Give me an example that illustrates how irrationally competitive you are?

``I'm a horrible loser, and I used to be really bad about losing in card games or board games. When I would lose at chess to my father, I'd knock all the pieces to the floor. But I don't do things like that anymore. I've mellowed out. I'm much more relaxed. Success made me relax, finally. I don't mind losing much any more.''

7) Anyone you play against who you really dislike?

``Used to happen. Not anymore. I changed that. I used to think that anyone who beat me were jerks. But I've gotten to know the people I play against, and I like them.''

8) The best feeling you've ever known?

``Happiness.''

9) What would your dream doubles game look like?

``A music star, a Hollywood star and an athlete. Gwen Stefani. Sharon Stone. And Michael Jordan. That'll be fun.''

10) Worst thing about being Roger Federer?

``There's a worst thing? I only see good.''

11) Favorite Internet sites?

``I don't really surf. I go to rogerfederer.com to see what fans write. I check out newspapers and some tennis things, but not much else unless I'm looking for specific information.''

12) Someone you were awestruck meeting?

``Peter Forsberg. At the U.S. Open. My girlfriend told me someone wanted to meet me. I asked her who it was, and she surprised me. I'm a big hockey fan and a huge fan of his. I didn't know what to say. I was pretty speechless. I just said that I used to play with him on video games.''

13) Something extravagant you own that you'd show off to a stranger you had to impress?

``Fancy cars. I have a few. They are sort of trophies. I've won a lot of cars in my life in tournaments. My Mercedes CLS-65. Not too many miles on any of them because I get a lot of new ones after a few miles.''

14) Life's most underrated pleasure?

``Sleeping.''

15) The one trait most responsible for making you better than everyone else?
``My will.''

16) Last time you cried?

``Watching a movie a couple of weeks ago. An American movie. I can't remember the name, but it wasn't even a sad movie. It caught me off guard. I was on an airplane.''

17) Your last pinch-me moment?

``It happens time and time again. I'm having so much success that I can't believe it myself. I'm always meeting new people and finding myself in interesting places. I'll be in a hotel in Dubai or on a nice island in the Indian Ocean. It's crazy, the life I'm living.''

18) Best show on TV?

``I travel too much to follow any one show. I'm in too many different countries. I don't watch shows. I watch movies and sports. I'm always watching documentaries and National Geographic.''

19) Hardest thing you've ever had to read about yourself?

``I don't like that people write something that they don't know about and go sniffing around in my personal life, but you take the good with the bad.''

20) How often are you on the court thinking about things outside of tennis?

'Quite a bit. I'm always telling myself, `Can't you wait and think about that another time?' It is impossible to focus for an entire match. You are wandering around, sitting, looking into the crowd and seeing someone that reminds you of something. It isn't a bad thing. You get tired of your mind always [being] in one place all the time. I try to block something out, but it always comes back.''

mezu
03-26-2006, 10:44 AM
20) How often are you on the court thinking about things outside of tennis?

'Quite a bit. I'm always telling myself, `Can't you wait and think about that another time?' It is impossible to focus for an entire match. You are wandering around, sitting, looking into the crowd and seeing someone that reminds you of something. It isn't a bad thing. You get tired of your mind always [being] in one place all the time. I try to block something out, but it always comes back.''

Wonder what he thinks about? During exams I always think of Homer Simpson. Maybe Roger does too :D

Rogiman
03-26-2006, 02:39 PM
3) Is it hard to keep motivated given that tennis is so boring and repetitive and alone, especially the preparation?
Nice :rolleyes:

SUKTUEN
03-26-2006, 04:00 PM
Roger is cute~!

RogiFan88
03-27-2006, 01:15 AM
Rogi, such a cool guy! :cool:

Stevens Point
03-27-2006, 10:57 AM
Has this been posted before? It is nothing new, but anyway.... good luck for RG quest!!

Updated: March 23, 2006, 6:30 PM ET
Federer to play more clay court tourneys

Reuters

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. -- Top-ranked Roger Federer is planning a full clay-court schedule ahead of the French Open, the only Grand Slam title he has yet to win.

The Swiss player said he will compete in the three Masters Series tournaments on clay in Monte Carlo (April 17-23), Rome (May 8-14) and Hamburg (May 15-21).

"I'll try to play the three events ... the last few years either I missed out on Rome or Monte Carlo," Federer told reporters at the Nasdaq-100 on Thursday.

"I think that's going to be a change for me."

Federer will start his title challenge in Florida with a second-round match against France's Arnaud Clement.

"I'm going to go early to Paris, get ready and hopefully be fine for Paris," he said.

The Wimbledon, U.S. and Australian Open champion was beaten by Spain's Rafael Nadal in the semifinals at Roland Garros in 2005.

"I came close last year, so I'm obviously optimistic about my chances at the French," said Federer. "I've grown up on the surface, you know.

"I'm just getting ready, giving myself the best opportunity. That's really all I can do."

The French Open starts on May 28.

SUKTUEN
03-27-2006, 03:40 PM
thanks

Daniel
03-27-2006, 09:51 PM
thanks

Daniel
03-28-2006, 02:21 AM
March 25, 2006
Federer's ridiculous complaint
OK, so we now know that Roger Federer is feeling a little hostile toward the electronic line calling system.

"I'm sort of neutral," he began after his second-round win over Arnaud Clement, in which he challenged two calls, getting one replay in his favor. But in fact he sounded anything but neutral.

"At one stage it wasn't working. Obviously, that's something that is not acceptable, you know, for us players, playing with our minds, I think you know."

Then Federer laid into the fans on the stadium court. "My big wish from this whole thing is that the fans sort of don't take this as a game, because it happens so rarely that they shouldn't be screaming, 'Oh, challenge that' or 'Challenge this.' Like when there are close calls, they don't applaud anymore because they think there is going to be a challenge. I feel like that's sometimes a little bit of a problem right now."

Federer's position on electronic line calling is no surprise. He expressed his doubts a year ago, when USTA officials came to the French Open to sound out players on its use at the 2005 U.S. Open.

And that's fine. It's OK to be opposed. But it's difficult to understand what he's talking about when he rails against the fans getting involved in the match. That's exactly what we all want to happen.

As for the glitch in the second set, for parts of one game the computer system wasn't working and chair umpire Fergus Murphy made an announcement to the audience. Let's make two points here. First, this tournament is a shakedown cruise for Hawk-Eye. It's entirely reasonable that there will be burps. Second, the Cyclops system that calls services at the U.S. Open gets shut down several times during the fortnight. Have you ever heard Federer complain that that "plays with the players minds?" No, I haven't either.

Electronic line calling is one of the best things to happen to tennis since, well, since Federer. It's too bad he can't see that.


Posted by Charles Bricker at 07:46 PM | Permalink
Comments
I don't agree with you, Mr.Bricker, about the electric line calling system. And I sympathize with Federer because I felt the same as what Federer said while I was watching the Federer/Clement match on TV yesterday.

Although the challenges don't take too much time, they were enough to distract my focus on the game. Besides it got annoyed when the umpire announced that the computer system didn't work temporarily.

It's definitely wrong and not fair to players having them play without a chance of challenges at a certain stage during a match. What if there was a significant wrong call on breakpoint or game point in that game and a player could't challenge it and lost the game and eventually the match because of 'system malfuction'? Now that's the very "playing with players' mind", isn't that?

This is neither an exhibition nor minor tournament. This is Masters and Nasdaq-100 which is called the '5th Slam'. If you want to start a new system in big tournaments like this or US open, it should be perfectly prepared and "burps" are not acceptable. PERIOD. Authorities even haven't set a rule for the time limit of the challenges yet. Having said that, Federer's complaints are totally understandable.

Electronic line calling has several definite flaws and is YET "one of the best things to happen to tennis". I hope that media people don't be over-enthusiastic about it and will keep a more objective position.

Posted by: Suzie | March 26, 2006 at 09:28 AM

Mr. Bricker, I do agree with you. It was really disappointing to see Federer live on ESPN Complaining about fan interaction. Just because the game was working perfectly for him before doesn't mean we shouldn't explore and introduce ways to improve it. Get off your high horse, Fed!

Posted by: Jane | March 26, 2006 at 11:01 AM

I think Federer has a valid point. The point of watching a tennis match is for the fans to admire and applaud the quality of tennis and get involved in the match.... rather than get involved in the quality of the line calls.

Posted by: JH | March 26, 2006 at 06:09 PM

Sorry, but i must agree with Mr. Federer here. I too watched that match, it was a little strange with all the disruptions, and the ohhh's and ahhh's of the crowd. Federer is the most under contol player on tour, and rarely argues a call. He is great for tennis and a role model for many, on and off the court. Where is your outrage of a certain Amercian player screaming F-U to the umpire at Indian Wells . Be mad about that please.

Posted by: Chris | March 26, 2006 at 10:46 PM

E-line calling is not the best thing to happen to tennis. I have no problems with the technology, but the 2 call limit is somewhat dubious. Why not use it if it is there. I have seen just in this few days that players dont challange it because they think they are wrong, an miss their allowed challange request of 2. For example, todays match kutzy vs. hingis, first set kutzy should have challanged a call she thought was in, but she was not that sure but the rule played a part and she missed an opportunity which cost her a set. I also think that federer is correct in saying that fans are going to be drawn to see what call is in or out instead of admiring a winner shop. I would not change that moment for anything.

Posted by: shawel | March 26, 2006 at 11:58 PM

I don't see where anyone's complaining about Fed here.

He's concerned because fans will be more focused on calls than on the game. Duh.

Posted by: David J. Heinrich | March 27, 2006 at 12:28 AM

It's difficult to know what YOU are talking about, Mr. Bricker, when you accuse Federer of railing against the fans. I saw that interview, and he expressed himself temperately, as he always does. He also raised a valid concern. More fan involvement isn't always a positive thing: Take, for example, the way Sebastian Grosjean cynically incited fan involvement in his match against Rafael Nadal in last year's French Open. Yes, the fans got really involved in that match, for all the wrong reasons. Now, you might look at that situation and say, the more fan involvement the better. I looked at that and saw a raging mob and a total lack of fair play.

Electronic line-calling might be the best thing to happen to tennis if we had the umpire (or other official) automatically review every close line call. But the current system of two challenges per set and the big video board is, and seems intended to be, a circus; it does nothing to promote the integrity of the game. Federer is a tennis purist; the fact that you would clearly prefer a showman is no excuse for abusing him and his views. It would be great if the Sun-Sentinel had a tennis writer who actually understood tennis and had thoughtful commentary about the sport.

Posted by: Hannah | March 27, 2006 at 12:48 PM

I think everyone is right...to a certain extent. I can see Federer's point about fans, rather than cheering a nice winning shot that catches the line, instead start yelling for a challenge just for challenge's sake.

But I'm a fan, and I like the use of technology. If a ball is in, and we have the technology to show that, then it should count as in. Change is good. And trying to avoid change is like trying to stop the future from happening.

Posted by: Mr. Topspin | March 27, 2006 at 02:24 PM

I'm afraid you have missed Federer's point completely, and have (rather ridiculously) said that he "laid into the fans". The guy has an ego of course, and he will try to protect himself and anything that spoils his rythm, but what he said about HawkEye is quite logical from his frame of reference - and, as it happens, from mine.

All he meant was that tennis ought to be appreciated for the beauty of the shot-making, technique, athletic ability etc. Shot spot will draw attention away from that. It will be more "theater" but the fans will be watching the wrong thing - at least according to Federer.

I wonder whether your difference of opinion with Federer is merely a result of the fact that you and Federer have different views about tennis, how it should be played and appreciated.

Posted by: Anon | March 27, 2006 at 09:16 PM

SUKTUEN
03-28-2006, 04:45 PM
Roger is always said " you know"

ToanNguyen
03-31-2006, 03:23 PM
He has perfect timing
Federer outlasts Blake at Nasdaq
By Bud Collins, Globe Correspondent | March 31, 2006

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. -- When tunesmith Johnny Green composed the ballad ''Out of Nowhere," and it appeared in the Broadway show, ''The Rose Tattoo," he couldn't have seen Roger Federer tattooing foes on a tennis court. That was 1955, and Federer didn't arrive on earth until 1981. But he would become the out-of-nowhere man.
It is an earth he owns in a sporting sense, and out-of-nowhere describes him perfectly. You can bang the ball beautifully as James Blake did last night, again and again, sending the rubber lemon to places well beyond anyone's reach, or belief, and . . .

And Federer swoops from out of nowhere to turn the point around, steal it, transforming himself from defense to offense instantly.

Make no mistake. The guy out of the Harvard Yard, James Blake, was threatening. Threatening all the way for 86 minutes as they jabbed and punched each other under the lights with every shot imaginable in a quarterfinal of the Nasdaq-100 Open. Two weeks before, Blake had been a thorn in Federer's side for the first 20 minutes, and a 4-1 lead, before losing the Indian Wells final in straight sets.

''I'm learning every time I play him," Blake says of his three losses in the asphalt classroom, flunking this one, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4. Barely. Not until Federer ripped a huge forehand on a second match point was the Swiss maestro assured that he had escaped Blake's assaults and the crowd of 12,169 baying at the moon and for his blood.

''It was tough to get hold of him," says Federer. ''But it was an important win for me. Important to back up the last win. You don't want to beat somebody in a final, and then lose to him the next time in the quarters."

That gives the other guy ideas, but as Blake's older brother, Tom, says, ''Federer's the only guy who can beat James now." A nice maybe.

Blake and Federer formed the piece de resistance of a sunny day that went against two of the favorites. ''Who's on first," the old Abbott and Costello shtick, seems to apply to the women in this young season. Three of them -- Lindsay Davenport, Kim Clijsters, and Amelie Mauresmo -- have momentarily graced the throne room at No. 1. Maybe it's a curse because Mauresmo, looking as though she'd taken Ambien -- asleep, yet playing -- was just the opponent Russian Svetlana Kuznetsova has been looking for. Kuznetsova, almost useless since winning the US Open of 2004, had tumbled to No. 14. Nevertheless, her heavy forehand blasts took out Mauresmo, 6-1, 6-4, putting Kuznetsova in tomorrow's final against countrywoman Maria Sharapova.

Then there was the staggering No. 4 Andy Roddick, looking a little better, sounding a little more confident, but outgunned by a nearly-24-year-old Spaniard to watch this year, David Ferrer, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4. At least Roddick, suffering his sixth loss of the campaign, fell to a better class of adversary. In winning, the road-running man from Valencia replaced Andre Agassi at No. 10. Roddick's other defeats have been by nowhere guys.

Ferrer, though no relation to the great actor, Jose Ferrer, stuck his nose into Roddick's business forcefully as the thespian Ferrer did in his famous role as Cyrano de Bergerac. Ferrer's incredible returns took a lot of steam out of Roddick's thunderbolt serves.

But it will take a nose for a monumental upset if Ferrer is to get the better of the out-of-nowhere Federer in today's semis.

Blake gave his all, firing stronger and more accurate backhands than ever, resurrecting points with his tremendous speed, breaking Federer for a 3-2 lead in the first. Federer curiously bungled a routine volley to lose the game, and the customers went berserk. But this is what Federer does. He broke right back, and withstood Blake's attack in perhaps the most critical game of the match, the ninth.

''Frustrating" is Blake's definition of what happened. He pushed Federer to six deuces after being down, 40-0, pried out two break points -- only to see the resident champ appear from nowhere to cancel each with an untouchable winner. All this despite Federer missing 14 first serves.

Hopeful for the home gathering was the tiebreaker. Swiftly Federer was Federer -- all nasty business seizing the first five points.

Slashing a backhand on a sideline, Federer punctured Blake's serve and was off to a catch-me-if-you-can 2-0 lead. Blake couldn't.

Buoyed by incredible anticipation, Federer seems a mind reader. ''Wonderful dreams, wonderful schemes out of nowhere . . ." is one of Johnny Green's lyrics that fits Federer so well.

Anybody beating him deserves a choir singing another Green tune: ''Over the Rainbow."

ToanNguyen
03-31-2006, 03:25 PM
:worship: King Roger. 2 more matches to go. You can definitely do this. :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:

SUKTUEN
03-31-2006, 04:33 PM
Roger is very polite,

lsy
04-01-2006, 05:12 AM
Anybody posted this here?

Good to know more and more people come to know about Rogi ;)

================================================== =======

During any big tennis tournament, most eyes focus on the court. At the Nasdaq-100 Open, Sun-Sentinel Staff Writer Ian Katz explored behind the scenes and uncovered another world.

The practice courts are a kind of stock market of professional tennis. You can see whose shares are rising and whose are falling by the number of fans who watch them practice. They line up three or four deep to catch a glimpse of Sharapova. Of the women players, she gets by far the biggest crowds.

A year ago, Roger Federer drew about the same number of people to his practices as American idol Andy Roddick.

This year, on the first day of the tournament, Roddick is hitting on Court 9 with maybe 75 to 100 people watching, by most standards a good crowd. On the very next court, about three times as many people are gawking at Federer.

Fans now react to Federer, who has won the last three Grand Slams, like he were a rock star. It doesn't matter that he is perhaps the world's most undermarketed athlete. People know something special when they see it.

"Oh my God, it's him!" shouts a man with gray hair. Almost in unison, fans pick up their cell phones and start dialing friends and loved ones to report they are in the presence of The Great Federer.

The contrast between Sharapova's and Federer's practices is extreme. Federer's session with friend and sometimes doubles partner Yves Allegro is uncoached. His part-time adviser, Tony Roche, only attends a handful of tournaments a year. It's difficult to overstate how unusual that is. For most players, their coach is an appendage.

But then you watch Federer hitting impossibly angled backhand passing shots, and it all makes sense. Federer needs a coach like Mozart needed a music teacher.

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/sports/tennis/sfl-nasscene30mar30,0,7776045.story?page=2&coll=sfla-sports-tennis

lsy
04-01-2006, 05:47 AM
4) You speak four languages. You are smart. Do you ever question the worth of hitting a ball for a living?

``Never. My dream was always to be an athlete, in either soccer or tennis, and I'm living my dream.''

worth of hitting a ball for living? :o is this a funny question or what...it's the most fortunate if anybody can realise their strongest strength/talents and make the best out of it.


12) Someone you were awestruck meeting?

``Peter Forsberg. At the U.S. Open. My girlfriend told me someone wanted to meet me. I asked her who it was, and she surprised me. I'm a big hockey fan and a huge fan of his. I didn't know what to say. I was pretty speechless. I just said that I used to play with him on video games.''

:haha: I shouldn't laugh at him, if he suddenly appears in front of me...I wonder if I wouldn't end up saying "hi, I used to curse and swear at you to the computer screen when you play like shit at times and still wins" :tape:


14) Life's most underrated pleasure? ``Sleeping.''

:spit: :rolls: I so agree with this :haha:


20) How often are you on the court thinking about things outside of tennis?

'Quite a bit. I'm always telling myself, `Can't you wait and think about that another time?' It is impossible to focus for an entire match. You are wandering around, sitting, looking into the crowd and seeing someone that reminds you of something. It isn't a bad thing. You get tired of your mind always [being] in one place all the time. I try to block something out, but it always comes back.''

:lol: That must always happen during the 2nd set brain fart or when he fails to serve out the match :tape:

=================================================

Thanks for posting this Tonia, funny read!

Mrs. B
04-01-2006, 10:08 AM
Thanks for all the articles! :wavey:

SUKTUEN
04-01-2006, 10:47 AM
Thanks

lunahielo
04-01-2006, 10:58 AM
Thanks for the terrific articles, everyone. :hug:

SUKTUEN
04-01-2006, 10:59 AM
lunahielo when is your birthday?

oneandonlyhsn
04-01-2006, 12:02 PM
Hey Guys I found this at BBC SPORT

Federer 'far better than Sampras'

Former French Open champion Sergi Bruguera believes Roger Federer is "10 times better" than Pete Sampras, who won a record 14 career Grand Slams.
And Bruguera, twice a winner at Roland Garros, is certain Federer will win in Paris, a feat that was beyond Sampras.

"Federer has a better forehand, better backhand, better returning, touch and feel," the Spaniard told BBC Sport.

"He has the perfect game for winning in Paris. But maybe he isn't as confident on clay as he is on other surfaces."

Bruguera predicted a Federer-Rafael Nadal final at this year's French Open, and said it would be almost too close to call.

"Maybe Nadal would have a slight advantage, so I say 60-40 to him," said Bruguera, who now plies his trade on the Merrill Lynch Tour of Champions.

"Nadal is young, unbelievably fit and he has a great game on clay. It's very difficult to beat him on that surface."

Last year, Nadal beat Federer in four sets in the last four of the tournament.

Switzerland's Federer, who has amassed seven Grand Slam titles, has won a number of tournaments on clay but, like Sampras, has never made the final at Roland Garros.

Federer plays Ivan Ljubicic in the final of the Nasdaq-100 Open Masters Series event in Miami on Sunday.

Billabong
04-01-2006, 12:58 PM
Hey Guys I found this at BBC SPORT

Federer 'far better than Sampras'

Former French Open champion Sergi Bruguera believes Roger Federer is "10 times better" than Pete Sampras, who won a record 14 career Grand Slams.
And Bruguera, twice a winner at Roland Garros, is certain Federer will win in Paris, a feat that was beyond Sampras.

"Federer has a better forehand, better backhand, better returning, touch and feel," the Spaniard told BBC Sport.

"He has the perfect game for winning in Paris. But maybe he isn't as confident on clay as he is on other surfaces."

Bruguera predicted a Federer-Rafael Nadal final at this year's French Open, and said it would be almost too close to call.

"Maybe Nadal would have a slight advantage, so I say 60-40 to him," said Bruguera, who now plies his trade on the Merrill Lynch Tour of Champions.

"Nadal is young, unbelievably fit and he has a great game on clay. It's very difficult to beat him on that surface."

Last year, Nadal beat Federer in four sets in the last four of the tournament.

Switzerland's Federer, who has amassed seven Grand Slam titles, has won a number of tournaments on clay but, like Sampras, has never made the final at Roland Garros.

Federer plays Ivan Ljubicic in the final of the Nasdaq-100 Open Masters Series event in Miami on Sunday.

Sergi:yeah:

avocadoe
04-01-2006, 02:34 PM
always loved Sergei!!!!!!!

Dirk
04-02-2006, 04:47 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/02/sports/tennis/02tennis.html


Roger and Woods are trying to meet each other. Excellent article.

RogiFan88
04-02-2006, 05:27 AM
Federer Is Sharing a Parallel Universe
By KAREN CROUSE
Published: April 2, 2006

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla., April 1 — The parallel career paths of Roger Federer and Tiger Woods crisscrossed in Shanghai last November. Federer, the world's best tennis player, and Woods, the world's best golfer, wanted to meet but never did, time being one of the few things that neither can bend to his will.

Matthew Stockman/Getty Images
A French Open title would give Roger Federer a noncalendar-year Grand Slam at age 24.

"Our schedules never worked out," Federer said Friday night after earning a place in the Nasdaq-100 Open final Sunday against Ivan Ljubicic with a 6-1, 6-3 victory over David Ferrer in the semifinals. Federer, who is 27-1 this year, has not lost on United States soil since Dominik Hrbaty dispatched him in the final of an ATP Tour event in August 2004.

Next month the 24-year-old Federer will begin to chase down the only major championship to have eluded him. If he wins the French Open at Roland Garros, Federer, the reigning champion at Wimbledon and the United States and Australian Opens, will complete a noncalendar-year Grand Slam.

Woods was 25 in 2001 when he held all four of golf's major titles simultaneously, winning the Masters in April to complete the so-called Tiger Slam. Federer, then 19, watched Woods's fabled run in slack-jawed awe.

"I followed him a lot back then," Federer said. "It was such a big hype around Tiger and having such an impact on golf and getting it where it is today."

Federer never presumed that Woods's dominance was offering him a peek into his own future.

"Absolutely not," he said. "If you look at Tiger's story and my story, they're so very different. His goal was always to beat Jack Nicklaus's record from an early, early age. I hoped and dreamt of meeting Boris Becker or maybe playing in Wimbledon one day."

Federer said his potential revealed itself "little by little, where with Tiger you could see from an early age that he was going to be maybe one of the greatest players in history."

Federer won his first ATP title in 2001. The gears of the hype machine started turning for him that summer after he pulled off a fourth-round upset of Pete Sampras at Wimbledon which snapped Sampras's 31-match winning streak there.

It took Federer time to grow into Sampras's shoes. When Federer won at Wimbledon in 2003, it was as if some wall in his psyche came tumbling down. He has won 6 of the ensuing 10 majors.

Woods won five major championships before turning 25. He was three months past his 26th birthday when he earned his seventh. Federer was nearly two years younger when he won his seventh major championship this January in Australia.

Like Woods, Federer can summon shots as if out of a magician's hat. In the second set against Ferrer, Federer punctuated a long point with a running, no-look, crosscourt backhand winner that was pure genius. It was a very difficult shot, Ferrer said afterward, adding, "Obviously being Federer he's used to those kind of shots."

The reverence with which other players speak of Federer, who has never lost a Grand Slam final, is reminiscent of how golfers speak about Woods, who has won 34 of 37 PGA Tour events in which he has taken a lead into the final round. A favorite parlor game on both tours is debating which player is more dominant in his sport.

"Tiger would probably be a lot like Roger if all the golf tournaments were match play," said Brad Gilbert, a coach and tennis commentator. "Tiger is phenomenal, but he can't stop somebody from doing something. Besides the guys hoping that Federer loses, he's always got the opportunity to stop the other guy."

Federer is looking forward to catching Woods at rest. "It would just be interesting to sort of meet and see what kind of personality is a person who does such great things on the golf course," Federer said.

He suspects Woods is a lot like himself: as mellow away from the athletic arena as he is merciless on it. "If we would sit down for dinner," Federer said, "I have the feeling he would be very laid-back and he would see that I am that way too."

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/02/sports/tennis/02tennis.html

MissMoJo
04-02-2006, 07:22 AM
Cool :) I wish they would do a nike commercial together- maybe rogi giving tiger a tennis lesson and vice versa

nobama
04-02-2006, 08:10 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/02/sports/tennis/02tennis.html


Roger and Woods are trying to meet each other. Excellent article.Well Roger wants to meet Tiger. I know he said that in Shanghai. My guess is it was Tiger's schedule that didn't quite work out. I suspect it would be difficult to meet Tiger. He seems like an extremely private man off court. And he doesn't do nearly as many media interviews as Roger does. I was surprised when 60 Minutes did a profile on him last week. You don't see that too often.

Stevens Point
04-02-2006, 11:09 AM
from ATP site.

NASDAQ-100 Open
Miami, FL, USA

April 1, 2006
Ljubicic, Federer Set for Fourth Title Showdown

http://www.atptennis.com/shared/photos/other/ljubicic_federer.jpg

Top seed Roger Federer of Switzerland takes on No. 6 Ivan Ljubicic of Croatia Sunday in the title match of the NASDAQ-100 Open at Miami.

Both players have dropped only one set in five matches en route to the final, both losing the middle set in a tie-break in their Miami openers.

Federer comes into the final with an advantage: The higher seed in the Miami final has won the last 10 times going back to 1996. Additionally, the Swiss holds a 9-3 career record against Ljubicic, including a 3-0 mark in finals, all played early last year in Doha, Rotterdam and Dubai. This will mark the first time, however, that the two will go head-to-head in a best-of-five sets match.

"We know our games by now," said Federer. "We've played on a few occasions now over the last couple years. I think he's doing a great job to put himself in the position over and over again. That's what you've got to do. Eventually, it's gonna work out, so I just hope it's not going to work out this time for him.

"I expect a good match really. He puts in a lot of balls. He serves extremely well. I played a fantastic match in Indian Wells to dominate him. So, if I could do the same, that would be great."

The 24-year-old Swiss sensation is attempting to claim his 10th career ATP Masters Series shield and his second consecutive title at the NASDAQ-100 Open. Federer has a 9-2 career record in Masters Series finals, winning his last eight in a row. He is also looking for his second straight Miami-Indian Wells double, having defended his Indian Wells title two weeks ago.

Federer is also appearing in his 11th straight final going back to June 2005. He won eight of the previous 10, losing only to David Nalbandian in five sets at The Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai in November and to Rafael Nadal in three sets at Dubai last month. He has won a record 23 consecutive Masters Series matches and a record three straight Masters Series titles – Indian Wells two weeks ago, Cincinnati last summer and Hamburg last spring.

The reigning World No. 1 has also won 47 straight matches in the U.S. since a 1st RD loss to Dominik Hrbaty in Cincinnati in August 2004. Since the beginning of 2004 Federer has compiled a sparkling 182-11 match record (.943) with 25 titles in a 36-tournament stretch.

Said Ljubicic: "I think the only thing what I have to do in against him is just to stick with my game, try to play my game. And if he's better, he's better, which he's probably gonna be. But I just want to keep my game plan."

The 27-year-old Ljubicic has a record of 25-3 this year, putting him second in match wins behind Federer. He won ATP titles in Chennai and Zagreb. He is the first Croat to reach the final here since Goran Ivanisevic in 1996, who retired with a sore neck against Andre Agassi.

He has reached the final in three of the last four ATP Masters Series tournaments going back to last season. Ljubicic was runner-up at Madrid in October and the runner-up at Paris in November. Both of his runner-up efforts came in five sets.

SUKTUEN
04-02-2006, 02:59 PM
thankyou~

nobama
04-02-2006, 10:26 PM
Media advisory
World No. 1 Tennis Star Roger Federer Serves ACEs for Children, Joins UNICEF as Goodwill Ambassador
EMBARGOED:
NOT FOR NEWS RELEASE BEFORE 10:30 a.m. EST APRIL 3

Who:
ATP tennis superstar Roger Federer
Ann M. Veneman, UNICEF Executive Director
Mr. Adolf Ogi, Special Advisor to the Secretary-General
on Sport for Development and Peace
Grammy award winning singer and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Shakira

What:
Press Conference to announce the appointment of Federer as UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador

Where:
UNICEF House, Labouisse Hall, 44th Street between First and Second Avenues, New York City

When:
Monday, 3 April 2006, 10:30 a.m.

Why:
ATP World No. 1 tennis player Roger Federer has been an outstanding Ambassador for children for several years both as a UNICEF supporter and as the founder of his own foundation, The Roger Federer Foundation, for disadvantaged children in South Africa. The seven-time Grand Slam champion helped the United Nations launch the “International Year of Sport and Physical Education” with Kofi Annan in 2004. Following the devastating tsunami of 2005, Federer led several fundraising initiatives including the ATP All-Star Rally for Relief, a unique fundraising exhibition event featuring ten of the top players in men’s professional tennis, and four of the top women players. UNICEF was the primary benefactor of the proceeds through the ATP-UNICEF program called ACE (Assisting Children Everywhere).


Attention broadcasters:
Please RSVP and bear in mind that all equipment must be specially screened.


For further information, please contact:
Kate Donovan, UNICEF Media, 212/326-7452
e-mail: kdonovan@unicef.org

Pete Holtermann, ATP, 904/285-8000
e-mail: pholtermann@atptennis.com

Minnie
04-03-2006, 12:37 AM
I read about this on the RF website ... wonderful news.

MariaV
04-03-2006, 02:18 PM
http://www.atptennis.com/charity/federer/#gallery

SUKTUEN
04-03-2006, 05:27 PM
thanks for the link

RogiFan88
04-03-2006, 08:41 PM
:)

Rogi on cover of L'Equipe today "A Sunday for Kings":

http://www.lequipe.fr/vp/imgopt.php?IMAGE=http://www.lequipe.fr/Quotidien/une/une03042006_hd.jpg&QUALITE=60&WIDTH=290

bokehlicious
04-03-2006, 09:04 PM
For once, Roger was not on the cover of L'Equipe after a loss :o

Stevens Point
04-03-2006, 10:50 PM
Tonight's Swiss TV news programs had a report of Roger at UNICEF today.

SF Tagesschau http://www.sf.tv/var/videoplayer.php?videourl=http%3A%2F%2Freal.sri.ch% 2Framgen%2Fsfdrs%2Fts%2F2006%2FTS_03042006.rm%3Fst art%3D0%3A17%3A12.3%26amp%3Bend%3D0%3A19%3A11.592( German)
SF 10 vor 10 http://www.sf.tv/var/videoplayer.php?videourl=http%3A%2F%2Freal.sri.ch% 2Framgen%2Fsfdrs%2F10vor10%2F2006%2F10vor10_030420 06.rm%3Fstart%3D0%3A25%3A58.137%26amp%3Bend%3D0%3A 28%3A17.292(German, Roger's interview Swiss German)
TSR le journal http://www.tsr.ch/tsr/index.html?siteSect=500002&bcid=413656&vid=6601798&format=450# (French)

nobama
04-04-2006, 03:11 AM
Goodness, you'd think there was a rock star there or something. :lol: Everybody loves Rogi. :)

lsy
04-04-2006, 05:36 AM
I went to ATPtennis.com to check the schedules on clay masters, and I thought I stumbled on to RogerFederer.com instead :o ;)

http://www.atptennis.com/en/

:yeah: Rogi. Congrats.

bokehlicious
04-04-2006, 07:54 PM
I read on some swiss papers that Roger is gonna take a week off just now (he won't have any till the end of Wimbledon then)... He'll start training on the red stuff at the beginning of next week.

He also really wishes to be able to play the 3 clay MS, he feels physically very well, and what he needs is to have a maximum of clay matches before the French.

As already known, T. Roche will join him in Rome.

Roger tells that he won't change a lot of things tactically , but he wonders if he should give more spin on his FH...

According to him, what he needs to give himself maximum chances at RG is to spend a lot of time on the clay courts before. As many matches as possible.

He's also confident that his nerves should be all right and won't let him down cause of the pressure.

A funny quote, he said that since Oz he was thinking everyday about the French. That seems definitely his main target of the year !

Go Roger !!

Minnie
04-04-2006, 11:11 PM
Interesting read JM - especially the bit about Roger saying his nerves should be ok and won't let him down because of the pressure ... as I think that could be his undoing if he gets to the semi or final of FO. He's obviously so aware of what it will do for him in terms of the "legends of the game". I think nerves were his undoing last year - he never looked like winning that semi from the moment he walked out on court - to me he looked as tight as a drum!! Anyway, I've been living in hope of seeing someone (anyone!) do The Grand Slam in my lifetime and nobody deserves to achieve that more than Roger does. But a career slam is, I guess, the next best thing.

nobama
04-05-2006, 01:02 AM
In case anyone is interested...video of Roger at the UN yesterday. This is different than the UNICEF stuff. Video is about 1 hour long. Roger's speech is about 50 minutes into the program. You can tell he's nervous. Giving speeches (outside of when he wins a tournament) is something he'll have to work on I think. He should just speak without notes and not read from paper. I think he does well off the cuff.

http://webcast.un.org/ramgen/specialevents/se060403.rm

SUKTUEN
04-05-2006, 05:16 AM
THANKS

nobama
04-05-2006, 12:15 PM
Laureus nominations tomorrow. Good luck Roger! :worship:

Four days to go...Armstrong, Federer, Sorenstam, Woods hot contenders for 2006 Laureus World Sports Awards


World’s top sports stars stand by for Laureus Media Selection Panel verdict
Spurs, Steelers, White Sox hope for triple US nomination for Laureus Team of Year
Nadal, Alonso and Liverpool coach Benitez could add strong Spanish flavour
Nominations in seven categories to be announced on April 6
7th Laureus World Sports Awards to be held in Barcelona, May 20-22

LONDON, April 3, 2006 – Four of the most famous sports stars in the world, all former winners of Laureus World Sports Awards, have just four days to wait to discover if they have been nominated again for the 2006 Awards. The annual Laureus World Sports Awards are recognised as the premier honours on the sporting calendar, paying tribute to the greatest achievements in sport each year.

Three former winners of the Laureus World Sportsman of the Year Award - American cyclist Lance Armstrong, who won a record seventh Tour de France in 2005, Swiss tennis ace Roger Federer, who won his third Wimbledon crown, plus the US and Australian Opens, and Tiger Woods, who won the US Masters and the Open Championship to re-establish himself as the world’s No.1 men’s golfer – are in line to be nominated for the prestigious Award again.

While the world’s leading women’s golfer, Sweden’s Annika Sorenstam, who won ten times on the LPGA Tour in 2005, including two major championships, will be a strong contender to be nominated for her second Laureus World Sportswoman of the Year Award.

Voting by the world’s media to select the nominees from the qualifying period February 1, 2005 – February 28, 2006 has now closed and the names of the nominees – six in each category - will be revealed on April 6. The eventual winners of the Laureus World Sports Awards will be announced during a televised Awards Ceremony staged in Barcelona, Spain, on the evening of May 22, 2006.

For the Laureus World Sportsman of the Year Award, Armstrong, Federer and Woods face a strong challenge for nomination from, among others, Spain’s new Formula One World Champion Fernando Alonso, 10,000 metres World Champion Kenenisa Bekele, England cricket’s Ashes hero Andrew Flintoff, American sprinter Justin Gatlin, who won 100 metres and 200 metres gold in the World Athletics Championships, Barcelona’s Brazilian football star Ronaldinho, named FIFA World Player of the Year for the second straight time, Italian Valentino Rossi, who won his fifth World MotoGP World Championship, and Australian cricketer Shane Warne, who became the first man to take 600 Test wickets.

In competition with Sorenstam for nomination will be four women who made the headlines in the World Athletics Championships: Ethiopia’s Tirunesh Dibaba, the first woman to win 5,000m and 10,000m gold; Russia’s Yelena Isinbayeva, who won pole vault gold and also in 2005 became the first woman to break the five metres mark; Sweden’s Carolina Kluft, who became the first woman to successfully defend the heptathlon title; and Britain’s Paula Radcliffe, who won the women’s marathon gold.

The four tennis Grand Slam titles in the qualifying year were shared out among Kim Clijsters (US Open), Justine Henin-Hardenne (French Open), Venus Williams, who won her third Wimbledon title, and Amelie Mauresmo (Australian Open). Clijsters, 22, was probably the most impressive of the four, winning the US Open in September after missing 12 months with a career-threatening wrist injury. The Winter Olympics produced potential nominees in Croatia’s Janica Kostelic, who became the most decorated women’s Alpine skier in Olympic history and Austria’s Michaela Dorfmeister, who won downhill and super-G gold medals.

The Laureus World Team of the Year Award will be one of the most competitive categories. American sport has three strong contenders for nomination - the San Antonio Spurs, who won the NBA basketball crown for the third time in seven years. Pittsburgh Steelers, who won the Super Bowl for a record-equalling fifth time, and Chicago White Sox, who won baseball’s World Series for the first time since 1917. Football offers Club World Champions Sao Paulo, who became the first Brazilian club to win the Copa Libertadores three times, English club Liverpool, coached by Spain’s Rafael Benitez, who were European Champions for the fifth time, and Egypt, who won the African Nations Cup for a record fifth time. Also in contention are the Croatia Davis Cup Team, who won the trophy for the first time in their history, the England Men’s Cricket Team, who beat rivals Australia for the first time since 1987, the German Olympic Bobsleigh Team, which won all three gold medals in Turin, the New Zealand Rugby Union Team, who won the Tri-Nations Championship and had an emphatic win over the British Lions, and the Renault Formula One Team, who won the Constructors World Championship.

Tennis provides one of the strongest contenders for nomination for the Laureus World Newcomer of the Year Award in Spain’s Rafael Nadal, who won the French Open at the age of 19. Among those who will be up against him will be Britain’s Harry Aikines-Aryeetey, 17, the first athlete to win 100m and 200m at the World Youth Games, American Paula Creamer, two-time winner on the LPGA Tour at the age of 19, American Tianna Madison, 19, who won the long jump gold medal in the World Athletics Championships, Barcelona’s Leo Messi, 18, star of Argentina’s victory in the FIFA World Youth Championships, Britain’s tennis prodigy Andrew Murray, who won his first ATP title, Danica Patrick, who finished fourth in the Indianapolis 500, the best ever finish by a woman, Pittsburgh Steelers Ben Roethlisberger, who became the youngest ever quarterback in a winning Super Bowl team, and China’s Yan Zi, 20, winner of the Guangzhou International in October when she was ranked just 163rd in the world and the Australian Open women’s doubles with Zheng Jie.

The Laureus World Comeback of the Year Award includes sportsmen and sportswomen who have fought back from illness, injury or a chronic lapse of form to succeed. Among the possible nominees are Sweden’s Kajsa Bergqvist, who came back from serious achilles tendon injury to win the World Championship high jump gold, Tedy Bruschi, New England Patriots linebacker, who returned to the team nine months after suffering a stroke, Belgium’s Kim Clijsters, who could be nominated in two categories, France’s Antoine Deneriaz, who won the Winter Olympics downhill gold after a horrific training accident, Martina Hingis, who won the Australian Open mixed doubles title after an absence of three years, New Zealand rugby player Jonah Lomu, who made a comeback with Cardiff after a rare kidney disease, Scottish golfer Colin Montgomerie, who won the European Order of Merit for the first time since 1999, and surfer Kelly Slater, who won a record seventh world title after a gap of seven years.

Laureus is a universal movement that celebrates the power of sport to bring people together as a force for good. Laureus is composed of three core elements - the Laureus World Sports Awards, the Laureus World Sports Academy and the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation - which collectively celebrate sporting excellence and harness the power of sport to promote social change.

Last year's Awards Ceremony, in the presence of His Majesty The King of Spain, was attended by members of the Laureus Academy and Hollywood stars Jackie Chan, Morgan Freeman, Teri Hatcher and Marcia Gay Harden. Among the award winners present were Roger Federer, Kelly Holmes and Greece football coach Otto Rehhagel.

Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, is a city with an enormous sporting tradition, which has staged the most important sports events. The immensely successful 1992 Olympic Games gave a new impulse to sport in the city. Sport is a part of everyday life in Barcelona and during the past few years the number of high-level international championships staged in the city has multiplied. Therefore it is no surprise that Barcelona was chosen to host the Laureus World Sports Awards in 2006.

Barcelona is a Mediterranean and metropolitan city with the most modern facilities. Its unique architecture, artistic ambience and many tourist attractions have made Barcelona one of the most visited cities in the world. A business and leisure city, it is the ideal place to organise such an important moment of the sporting year - the Laureus Awards Ceremony.

nobama
04-05-2006, 02:22 PM
Sampras thinks he could solve Federer (http://www.signonsandiego.com/sports/20060405-9999-lz1s5galry.html)

Pete's comments to me smack of sour grapes or a bit of jealousy, like it bothers him that someone is so dominant so soon after he left the scene. To me it's just not very classy. Not these comments so much but for sure the ones he made a few weeks back when he said the competition was tougher in his day. I think that's unfair to the rest of the tour. It comes across like 'you all suck, but boy if I was around I'd for sure give Roger a run for his money'. I haven't noticed many of Pete's contemporaries saying the same thing. It seems most of the former players have shied away from the whole discussion as to which era was better, who had more competition, ect.

I think Pete's comments are unfortunate because Roger has had nothing but great things to say about Pete, how much he admires him, how phenomenal his record is, ect. Roger's never suggested he thinks he's better than Pete was or that he can/will surpass Pete's records. In fact last year in an ESPN article Roger said this: "Everyone talks about me being the best ever, and I think to myself, you cannot be the best ever at 23. It's not a goal to be the best ever. We'll never know who the best ever is. Different eras, different players, technology changes, you just cannot compare. Every great has something special, but it doesn't matter. I am not great." Bottom line I think Pete is bugged by Roger's sucess and dominance....and that there are former players who think Roger is better (technique wise) than Pete was.

RonE
04-05-2006, 02:55 PM
Back in the day Pete was my favourite player but even I at some point started to get ticked off by some of his comments later in his career (eg "the difference between me and Pat Rafter is 10 slams").

I would have a very hard time believing Pete could take Roger out as easily as he claims to. He could beat him of course, but on a neutral surface I would have to look at all the componenets of each player's game:

1.) Baseline- when Pete was at his peak he had an all round baseline game, however since players started hitting harder and more consistently from the baseline, his baseline game became rather mediocre towards the end of his career and his backhand started to become a real weakness. In groundstroke exchanges I put roger head and shoulders above Pete on any surface. Roger also hits his with more margin because of the spin he applies whereas Pete's go-for-broke shots were much flatter.

2.) Serve- there is no question Pete has the superior serve- his 2nd serve is better than Roger's and the consistency with which he hits his serves into the corners and places them with so much disguise is truly amazing. Roger is, however, no slouch on his serve, and like Sampras can disguise the direction he is going to hit it with his ball toss. Pete is not as great a returner as Roger is, and that cancels out the serving advantage to some an extent as I will further elaborate on in the next point.

3.) Return of serve. There is no question Rogi wins hands down here. Pete often would chip the serve back and work his way into a rally however Roger can do that, and also take the return early and rip into it off both wings giving him immediate superiority if not outright control of the rally. Roger's serve is so effective in terms of placement and spin (addmitedly not the fastest) to be able to put him in a superior position in most of his service points against Pete, who again, does not have the deadliest of returns. With sampras serving, Roger would have a harder time returning than against most oher players, but he can definitely get enough serves back to rattle Pete and generate the breaks. Look at Ljubo- even when not playing his best against him Roger still managed to break him a couple of times despite the big 1st serve % and huge serves.

4.) Net play- people often rave about Pete's net coverage but I personally thought it was very good but not outstanding. It was not in the Edberg or Rafter category- those two would really close in tight to the net and cover it like a rash with amazing footwork. Pete would sort of saunter his way to the net and many times would make contact with the ball around the area of the service line, resulting in him having to hit many half volleys setting his opponent up for the passing shot. With that in mind and Roger's returning ability and amazing footwork and agility, Pete would get passed a fair number of times. On the reverse, Roer has a lot to improve in his net game particularly the forehand side, however Pete was not exactly the best passer- get the ball relatively deep into Sampras' backhand corner and the point is over for all intents and purposes. He cannot hit the types of passing shots that Roger can on that wing, more often than not either make the error or produce a shot which would be pretty standard to put away.

So, bearing all of the above in mind, I think Roger would be favoured to win against Pete on just about any surface, except for maybe the type of lightning fast ice-rink indoor courts they used to have in the YEC in Frankfurt in the mid-90's or the grasscourts and balls used in Wimbledon in 1994.

RogiFan88
04-05-2006, 03:39 PM
Altho it's in Spanish, here's a brief video of Rogi in NYC for UNICEF:

http://www.zoomin.tv/videoplayer/?fuseaction=videolaunch&pid=marca&id=210091&nbg=ftv

NYCtennisfan
04-05-2006, 04:22 PM
Part of what made Pete so great was his arrogance. He believed he was the best player on the court and perhaps ever. He really, truely believed it. I think this is one reason why he is finding it hard to accept how great Roger is. The game has evolved since Pete was in his prime and Roger is simply a better all-around player. That doesn't mean he will win as many slams as Pete, but Roger is still overall a better player.

As for beating Roger, they have played once and everyone will tell you that Pete was not in his prime. That may be true, but Pete played one hell of a match on grass and lost. There are not too many other times you could say that Pete played really well on grass and lost. Pete was closer to his prime (in terms of ability, not age, than Roger was) during that match than Roger was. Pete's serve was on tht day. He served 69%. Find me another match on grass where Pete serves 69% and loses. It was a glimpse of what was to come from the enormous talent of Federer and his ability to get the ball back.

Rogiman
04-05-2006, 04:33 PM
I remember articles after that historic match claiming Pete was playing "his own mirror image" - boy, has Roger abandoned serve-volley since then... :sad:

SUKTUEN
04-05-2006, 04:50 PM
I think Roger and Pete are two different players, not easy to compair

yanchr
04-05-2006, 06:01 PM
I remember articles after that historic match claiming Pete was playing "his own mirror image" - boy, has Roger abandoned serve-volley since then... :sad:
Since the mastery 03 Wimbledon--the semi still is the best one to date for me, where I remember he serve-volleyed on over 80% of his 1st serves and over 20% on his 2nd serves according to stats...

Rogiman
04-05-2006, 06:37 PM
Since the mastery 03 Wimbledon--the semi still is the best one to date for me, where I remember he serve-volleyed on over 80% of his 1st serves and over 20% on his 2nd serves according to stats...
Amazing how many fans Roger won that day...
I haven't watched a tape of that match yet, so I always wonder if it's because that match has really been his best to date or I've just gotten used to him playing so well that my breath hasn't been taken away watching him play again like on that day.

Let's be fair and say Duck wasn't really a sophisticated player back then (not that he is now) and that allowed Roger, who was definitely on, to do whatever spectacular stuff he had in his mind, not being worried about being passed etc....

nobama
04-05-2006, 07:24 PM
I remember articles after that historic match claiming Pete was playing "his own mirror image" - boy, has Roger abandoned serve-volley since then... :sad:I guess he figures if he can beat guys bashing away from the baseline who needs to s/v? Although I thought he s/v quite well during IW and Miami.

nobama
04-05-2006, 07:31 PM
Part of what made Pete so great was his arrogance. He believed he was the best player on the court and perhaps ever. He really, truely believed it. I think this is one reason why he is finding it hard to accept how great Roger is. The game has evolved since Pete was in his prime and Roger is simply a better all-around player. That doesn't mean he will win as many slams as Pete, but Roger is still overall a better player.I've often wondered what Sampras thinks about some of these comments from other players. Like Agassi after USO final last year saying Roger was the best he's played against. Or during the Wimbledon finals last year JMac saying Roger was the "greatest natural talent" he's ever seen. Jim Courier has said Roger's the only player he would pay to watch play, and I think Lendl once said he would pay to watch Roger practice. Even the great Rocket saying this year that he believes Roger has a shot to break Pete's GS record. I'm sure Pete hears about/reads this stuff and you have to wonder what he thinks. Especially Andre's comments considering how often he and Pete played each other. I don't think these comments make him look that great, but I'm sure he doesn't care.

RogiFan88
04-05-2006, 08:54 PM
Part of what made Pete so great was his arrogance. He believed he was the best player on the court and perhaps ever. He really, truely believed it. I think this is one reason why he is finding it hard to accept how great Roger is. The game has evolved since Pete was in his prime and Roger is simply a better all-around player. That doesn't mean he will win as many slams as Pete, but Roger is still overall a better player.

As for beating Roger, they have played once and everyone will tell you that Pete was not in his prime. That may be true, but Pete played one hell of a match on grass and lost. There are not too many other times you could say that Pete played really well on grass and lost. Pete was closer to his prime (in terms of ability, not age, than Roger was) during that match than Roger was. Pete's serve was on tht day. He served 69%. Find me another match on grass where Pete serves 69% and loses. It was a glimpse of what was to come from the enormous talent of Federer and his ability to get the ball back.

I agree that Pete was arrogant. This is what made him so successful. Players were intimidated by him and feared him. [I w say the same about AA until now.] When players had to face Pete, they probably thought there was no way they could ever beat him [until 2000 after Marat upset him at USO] and he never thought he w ever lose to them. Of course he had an ego, still has and no doubt it's tough for him to accept Rogi's success. But the fact that Pete has actually praised Rogi and recognized Rogi's amazing talent and tennis, says that HE is human! ;) I find it interesting that Pete bothered to watch Wimbledon when Rogi was winning it -- he had to be curious about this young Swiss guy who upset HIM in HIS hallowed cathedral.

Has Pete ever talked so much about any other young guy besides Rogi, i.e., Pandy?? Just wondering...

Minnie
04-05-2006, 11:38 PM
I wonder whether it still rankles a bit with Pete that the Swiss kid ruined his dream of equalling Borg's 5 consecutive Wimby wins? Now he looks round and sees this kid has become the man who could quite easily not only equal that record, but surpass it! Added to which, there are times when it seems the whole world has taken Roger to its heart in a way it never did with Pete. Apart from anything else, there's no question in my mind that the way Roger moves across the court and plays his shots is more aesthetically pleasing than Pete.

Daniel
04-06-2006, 12:19 AM
Federer has no rivals - Sampras

Federer has dominated the game since Sampras retired
Former world number one Pete Sampras says he cannot see anyone in the game capable of challenging the supremacy of current number one Roger Federer.
Since Sampras retired four years ago, the 24-year-old Swiss player has won seven Grand Slams and been world number one for two years.

"I don't see anyone with a big enough weapon to hurt him," said Sampras.

"They're just staying back and Roger is able to dictate well enough. You just have to serve well and attack him."

Sampras, 34, retired in 2002 after winning a record 14th Grand Slam title, and has spent much of the intervening period playing golf and poker.

Having scarcely picked up a racket for three years, he will play Robby Ginepri in an exhibition match in Houston on Thursday and aims to play World Team Tennis, but insisted a tour comeback is not on the cards.

"When you retire you want to get as far away as possible from the game for a few years," he said.

"I'm just getting in shape and having some fun. I've been hitting some balls for the past month. Hopefully I won't embarrass myself."

Daniel
04-06-2006, 12:20 AM
Sports and social work: Federer is Unicef envoy
Sports are one of the few activities that thrill and enhance at the same time. First your physical and mental faculties are tested through arduous practice sessions, then you have to perform well under immense pressure, and then also you have to emerge a victor. It's all petty tough but it's all worth it if you are doing it for the love of the game. The entire struggle comes together in the making of a champion. A disciplined dedicated sportsman pushing his limits and trying to do better than his best. And they get better in every way. They become the saviours of the world. Tennis champion Roger Federer is trying to conquer another territory. Roger Federer has been appointed a goodwill ambassador for global children's charity Unicef. Roger will bring extraordinary energy and talents to improving the lives of children across the world. The world number one joins fellow sportsman David Beckham, along with a host of actors and musicians, as international figureheads for Unicef. Federer set up his own children's charity in 2003 to fund projects benefiting disadvantaged children in South Africa - his mother's native country. Last year, Federer instigated the ATP All-Star Rally for Relief, a fundraising event to help those affected by the Asian tsunami. It's important to me to help the many children throughout the world who do not have the basic resources they need said Federer. One can only say that he is a gift to the world. It's a pleasure watching him play winning shots but its even more wonderful seeing him play a humanitarian.

Daniel
04-06-2006, 12:22 AM
Stosur aspires to be like Roger



Samantha Stosur has taken the title of Australia’s highest ranked female player to great heights as she is now beginning to aspire to the monumental achievements of Swiss maestro Roger Federer.

So what sort of comparisons can be made between Stosur and Federer?

Like Federer, Stosur is No.1 in the world.

Federer’s 2006 win-loss record is 28-1. Stosur’s is 25-2.

Federer has four 2006 titles to his name, including the Australian Open and two ATP Masters Series events in the past month. Stosur also has four Tour titles to her name in 2006, which also includes the combined ATP Masters Series-WTA Tier I events at Indian Wells and Miami in the past month. For the record, Stosur fell short of the Australian Open crown after holding three championship points in the final.

Both Federer and Stosur were winners at the recent official awards party of professional tennis, the “Stars for Stars” at Miami in March.

Both play right-handed ...

OK, so maybe the comparisons end there, but that hasn’t stopped Australia’s Stosur from announcing her intentions to keep motivated, keep improving and to keep winning – just like Federer.

After teaming up with regular partner Lisa Raymond to defeat one of the greats of the women’s game, Martina Navratilova, in the NASDAQ-100 Open women’s doubles final last Sunday, Stosur indicated a desire to continue to develop her game.

“It’s great,” said Stosur. “You go into every tournament hoping you can continue getting through it and winning it in the end. Four in a row, it’s great.

“(We’ve) just got to keep trying and be like Roger.”

Indeed the pair’s latest win in Miami was their fourth in as many attempts. The victory also meant that Stosur and Raymond became the first team since 2002 to have won the first three WTA Tour Tier I doubles titles of the year. Raymond and another Aussie, Rennae Stubbs, were the last pair to accomplish the impressive feat.

“I think we work hard as a team,” Raymond added. “We don’t just go out there and take it for granted.

“On our days off, we go out there, as well as our singles, if we’re still in the doubles tournament we have at least 45 minutes to an hour where we practice certain things that we need to do for our next match.”

So maybe Stosur’s impressive 2006 feats don’t lie in the more prestigious singles event, but just like in the individual form of the game, doubles is a specialist event that takes great practice, court craft and understanding of not just your own game, but also that of your partner’s.

Stosur’s 2006 singles results are less inspiring, with her best result being a quarterfinal appearance in Tokyo in February. But unlike Federer’s record in doubles, at least the Australian has a positive 7-6 win-loss singles record. Federer has yet to win a doubles match in two attempts.

What is clear is that Stosur, in doubles, will continue to aspire towards a similar success that Federer has tasted over the past two years, and that healthier results on the singles circuit would be welcomed with open arms.

Daniel
04-06-2006, 12:23 AM
Federer Is Sharing a Parallel Universe
By KAREN CROUSE
Published: April 2, 2006
KEY BISCAYNE, Fla., April 1 — The parallel career paths of Roger Federer and Tiger Woods crisscrossed in Shanghai last November. Federer, the world's best tennis player, and Woods, the world's best golfer, wanted to meet but never did, time being one of the few things that neither can bend to his will.

"Our schedules never worked out," Federer said Friday night after earning a place in the Nasdaq-100 Open final Sunday against Ivan Ljubicic with a 6-1, 6-3 victory over David Ferrer in the semifinals. Federer, who is 27-1 this year, has not lost on United States soil since Dominik Hrbaty dispatched him in the final of an ATP Tour event in August 2004.

Next month the 24-year-old Federer will begin to chase down the only major championship to have eluded him. If he wins the French Open at Roland Garros, Federer, the reigning champion at Wimbledon and the United States and Australian Opens, will complete a noncalendar-year Grand Slam.

Woods was 25 in 2001 when he held all four of golf's major titles simultaneously, winning the Masters in April to complete the so-called Tiger Slam. Federer, then 19, watched Woods's fabled run in slack-jawed awe.

"I followed him a lot back then," Federer said. "It was such a big hype around Tiger and having such an impact on golf and getting it where it is today."

Federer never presumed that Woods's dominance was offering him a peek into his own future.

"Absolutely not," he said. "If you look at Tiger's story and my story, they're so very different. His goal was always to beat Jack Nicklaus's record from an early, early age. I hoped and dreamt of meeting Boris Becker or maybe playing in Wimbledon one day."

Federer said his potential revealed itself "little by little, where with Tiger you could see from an early age that he was going to be maybe one of the greatest players in history."

Federer won his first ATP title in 2001. The gears of the hype machine started turning for him that summer after he pulled off a fourth-round upset of Pete Sampras at Wimbledon which snapped Sampras's 31-match winning streak there.

It took Federer time to grow into Sampras's shoes. When Federer won at Wimbledon in 2003, it was as if some wall in his psyche came tumbling down. He has won 6 of the ensuing 10 majors.

Woods won five major championships before turning 25. He was three months past his 26th birthday when he earned his seventh. Federer was nearly two years younger when he won his seventh major championship this January in Australia.

Like Woods, Federer can summon shots as if out of a magician's hat. In the second set against Ferrer, Federer punctuated a long point with a running, no-look, crosscourt backhand winner that was pure genius. It was a very difficult shot, Ferrer said afterward, adding, "Obviously being Federer he's used to those kind of shots."

The reverence with which other players speak of Federer, who has never lost a Grand Slam final, is reminiscent of how golfers speak about Woods, who has won 34 of 37 PGA Tour events in which he has taken a lead into the final round. A favorite parlor game on both tours is debating which player is more dominant in his sport.

"Tiger would probably be a lot like Roger if all the golf tournaments were match play," said Brad Gilbert, a coach and tennis commentator. "Tiger is phenomenal, but he can't stop somebody from doing something. Besides the guys hoping that Federer loses, he's always got the opportunity to stop the other guy."

Federer is looking forward to catching Woods at rest. "It would just be interesting to sort of meet and see what kind of personality is a person who does such great things on the golf course," Federer said.

He suspects Woods is a lot like himself: as mellow away from the athletic arena as he is merciless on it. "If we would sit down for dinner," Federer said, "I have the feeling he would be very laid-back and he would see that I am that way too."

NYCtennisfan
04-06-2006, 01:42 AM
I've often wondered what Sampras thinks about some of these comments from other players. Like Agassi after USO final last year saying Roger was the best he's played against. Or during the Wimbledon finals last year JMac saying Roger was the "greatest natural talent" he's ever seen. Jim Courier has said Roger's the only player he would pay to watch play, and I think Lendl once said he would pay to watch Roger practice. Even the great Rocket saying this year that he believes Roger has a shot to break Pete's GS record. I'm sure Pete hears about/reads this stuff and you have to wonder what he thinks. Especially Andre's comments considering how often he and Pete played each other. I don't think these comments make him look that great, but I'm sure he doesn't care.

He has heard them and it would be very hard to convince me that he doesn't care about these comments, especially the ones by Agassi who he owned in big matches. Remember, just a few years ago, Pete was hailed as tthe greatest by many. It would be hard for anyone wha has been in that position to swallow.

nobama
04-06-2006, 02:12 AM
I wonder whether it still rankles a bit with Pete that the Swiss kid ruined his dream of equalling Borg's 5 consecutive Wimby wins? Now he looks round and sees this kid has become the man who could quite easily not only equal that record, but surpass it! Added to which, there are times when it seems the whole world has taken Roger to its heart in a way it never did with Pete. Apart from anything else, there's no question in my mind that the way Roger moves across the court and plays his shots is more aesthetically pleasing than Pete.There's no doubt in my mind the players like Roger as a person in a way players never did with Pete. Roger won the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship award twice, something Pete never won. You've got many players on the tour going on about what a great guy Roger is. How often did players say that about Pete? I also think Roger has cultivated a better relationship with the media and fans. For instance after Wimbledon Roger invited journalists to the house he was staying at to do interviews. That's something Pete never did. Look at all the time he spent with officials and dignitaries when he opened the new stadium in Shanghai. According to someone who works for the ATP Roger requested to meet the all the workers involved with the tournament to personally thank them for all their hard work. He ended up spending 11 hours there. And spending a day at the UN in New York after a grueling couple of weeks where he won two big tournaments (and then I heard spending the next day filming spots for ESPN in Connecticut), I can't imagine Pete (or most players on the tour for that matter) doing stuff like this.

mangoes
04-06-2006, 02:17 AM
He has heard them and it would be very hard to convince me that he doesn't care about these comments, especially the ones by Agassi who he owned in big matches. Remember, just a few years ago, Pete was hailed as tthe greatest by many. It would be hard for anyone wha has been in that position to swallow.

Agree completely..............and I think it would be a bitter pill for any of us to swallow in Pete's position......he didn't retire too long ago.

PaulieM
04-06-2006, 02:54 AM
i don't know if this was posted, it's from wertheim's mailbag:So a few hours after he wins his fourth event of the year, Federer flies to New York, where he is appointed a Goodwill Ambassador for UNICEF, the United Nations Children's Fund. Beyond the pro forma posing for photo ops, he delivers a five-minute address that went well beyond "Thanks, this is a real honor." He shakes hands with U.N. dignitaries, meets Kofi Annan and meets with the press. The next day he travels to Bristol, Conn., to tape SportsCenter ads. If there's a more desirable athlete in sports to market globally, I'd sure like to know who it is.
Roger's going to be in a u.s. commercial! :woohoo: i can't wait to see it, the SportsCenter ads are usually pretty funny. :)

MissMoJo
04-06-2006, 03:24 AM
:banana: :banana:
roddick's 'a-rod' thing was pretty funny, hope rogi's is even better

PamV
04-06-2006, 04:02 AM
There's no doubt in my mind the players like Roger as a person in a way players never did with Pete. Roger won the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship award twice, something Pete never won. You've got many players on the tour going on about what a great guy Roger is. How often did players say that about Pete?

Roger not only won "Player of the Year" and "Stefan Edberg Sportsman of the Year".......he also won "Fan Favorite". Did Sampras ever win the "Fan Favorite" Award?

TenHound
04-06-2006, 04:09 AM
Prob. everyone saying Roger's a much better player rankles him...it sho nicks up his pedestal.

We see the same thing w/the Goliath of Grime coming up. (thuggy) No one would say he's a better player than Roger, but he could end up breaking all his records. Wasn't it Twain who said something about "there's lies, damn lies, and statistics"...

Daniel
04-06-2006, 04:44 AM
Roger not only won "Player of the Year" and "Stefan Edberg Sportsman of the Year".......he also won "Fan Favorite". Did Sampras ever win the "Fan Favorite" Award?


Sampras wasnt very popular , i mean his personality wasnt very friednly, lacked charisma (spelling?) . He looked like a robot on the court :o

Puschkin
04-06-2006, 06:45 AM
Sampras wasnt very popular , i mean his personality wasnt very friednly, lacked charisma (spelling?) . He looked like a robot on the court :o

I never met Pete Sampras, personally, so I would not dare to speak about his personality, but he was a great tennis player and certainly no robot on court, at least not to me. I am sick of the comparisons between him and Roger, each of them is great in his own way. What is really surprising, though, is the fact that only a few years after Pete's retirement, there is a player who challenges (and surpasses) many of his achievements which have been considered as the ultimate benchmark in tennis.

nobama
04-06-2006, 07:24 AM
Roger not only won "Player of the Year" and "Stefan Edberg Sportsman of the Year".......he also won "Fan Favorite". Did Sampras ever win the "Fan Favorite" Award?I don't think there was such an award as that one is internet based.

nobama
04-06-2006, 08:03 AM
Here's another quote from Sampras. Roger isn't mentioned but it's clear he thinks s/v players produced the best tennis. I agree with him about the contrast, but it seems like he's diminishing baseliners as just guys trading groundies. Honestly now when I watch old matches from the 80s and 90s and the rallies are like 3 balls or less I get bored. Just the other day TTC was replaying a DC match between Edberg and Becker. There were hardly any rallies. Both players came in on practically every shot and the points were over so quick.

"The art...is pretty much extinct. You have some guys that do a little bit of it, but across the board, everyone stays back and just trades groundies. I miss the contrast. I miss one guy coming in and the other guy defending. I think that's the best tennis. But that's just a sign of the times. It's just the kind of direction it was at Wimbledon the last couple years. The part of the court that's worn out is the baseline, not the net. So, you know, if I'd be playing today, I'd be licking my chops on grass."

lsy
04-06-2006, 08:47 AM
I am sick of the comparisons between him and Roger, each of them is great in his own way. What is really surprising, though, is the fact that only a few years after Pete's retirement, there is a player who challenges (and surpasses) many of his achievements which have been considered as the ultimate benchmark in tennis.

:yeah: Maybe Pete could have probably answered such questions in a better way, but just put yourself in his situation, esp as Pushkin said, it's only a few yrs since he had retired with amazing achievements, and people are already raving on this new guy saying he will achieve more or that he's a better player...

You have to be a saint to not get even a bit upset/sour if you're in Pete's situation to be honest. Besides it's not like he initiated all these discussions, the medias just threw it to him...I bet they told him about what Sergi said that "Roger is 10 times better than him" :o

I'm glad Rogi still have his feet firm on the ground and understand there's much more he needs to do for his career still.

Mrs. B
04-06-2006, 09:46 AM
i look forward to the day when Roger wins 14 GS titles, including a French, :devil: *keeps fingers and toes crossed*

then let's see what Pete has to say then... :angel:

Rogiman
04-06-2006, 09:59 AM
Funny thing is, I've always thought Federer fans would, for the large part, be Sampras fans and vice-versa, even though the two don't necessarily play the exact same kind of tennis.

I don't think one must be a Sampras fan in order to be a Fed fan, but I would at least expect Fed fans to respect Sampras even more than the casual fan (not sure why but that's how I would imagine it), I'm kinda disappointed when Fed fans diminish Sampras' game and achievements to make Roger's look better.

bokehlicious
04-06-2006, 10:23 AM
Funny thing is, I've always thought Federer fans would, for the large part, be Sampras fans and vice-versa

Die-hard Pete's fans fear that Roger goes over Pete's records, so that's why they mainly don't root for Roger...

Concerning Roger's fans, I guess some are just annoyed by some Pete's arrogant comments towards current ATP players :shrug:

yanchr
04-06-2006, 12:15 PM
Die-hard Pete's fans fear that Roger goes over Pete's records, so that's why they mainly don't root for Roger...
That's true. I see quite some Pete fans downplay Roger like he is shit...

Concerning Roger's fans, I guess some are just annoyed by some Pete's arrogant comments towards current ATP players :shrug:
Actually I like a player to be a bit arrogant, esp sb like Pete really affords to be arrogant. Same with Roger. Roger seems more diplomatic than Pete, but sometimes he also does strike me as a bit arrogant, which doesn't mean I don't like.

I for one think there is nothing to blame Pete for saying what he did. That's typically Pete. Roger also doesn't need to respond in words, just respond to it with actions, eg winning RG.

I was a Pete fan before Roger came on board, but not as big as a Roger fan now. I'll be happy if Roger can surpass Pete after his career ends, but I won't mind if he doesn't. Pete is already a well-established legend. It is Roger who has to catch up and follow Pete's step. But I always think Roger is better, with his game more beautiful to watch.

mangoes
04-06-2006, 03:01 PM
Funny thing is, I've always thought Federer fans would, for the large part, be Sampras fans and vice-versa, even though the two don't necessarily play the exact same kind of tennis.

I don't think one must be a Sampras fan in order to be a Fed fan, but I would at least expect Fed fans to respect Sampras even more than the casual fan (not sure why but that's how I would imagine it), I'm kinda disappointed when Fed fans diminish Sampras' game and achievements to make Roger's look better.

I respect Pete and what he has accomplished, but I've never been a fan. I was and still am a HUGE Agassi fan. Plus, I enjoyed Rafter, Guga and a couple other guys more than Sampras. Nevertheless, back to Sampras...........I also do understand on some level that watching Roger reach the half mark of a standard that is defined for the most part by his (Sampras) career must be a bit nostaglic. In addition, it would be quite understandable if he is a bit defensive. He worked very hard to be the best and here comes this "kid", well man :lol:, who people are already saying is better than him.........people including his long time rival Agassi. Personally, my opinion, however laced with bias, is that Roger is a better player than Sampras. However, I won't call Roger the best to have played the game until he closes in some more on Pete's record...............I think that's being fair and showing a little respect for Pete's accomplishments.

RogiFan88
04-06-2006, 03:11 PM
I have only seen Pete live once at a night match and I have to say that he was electric -- the atmosphere was fantastic! I'm glad to have seen him play even tho it was the last year of his career. And he even showed some emotion! ;)

Like Puschkin, I'm sick of the comparisons also... let Pete and Rogi stand on their own, w their respective accomplishments. I find it hard to believe that ANYONE can win 14 slams now. In fact, I w be surprised if any of the "Generation of 2000" [Safin, Ferrero, Hewitt, Federer, Nalbandian, Coria, Roddick] will be playing competitive tennis when they're 30. The game has changed so much and takes such a toll on the body these days. But if anyone can still play on at 30, it w be Rogi. As for the following gen, the Berdych, Baggy, Nadal, Gasquet, Monfils, Murray, Djokovic et al. -- they'll be lucky to be playing in their late 20s.

WF4EVER
04-06-2006, 05:37 PM
i look forward to the day when Roger wins 14 GS titles, including a French, :devil: *keeps fingers and toes crossed*

then let's see what Pete has to say then... :angel:

I've love for Fed to pass his 14 but IMO to just win a few RGs would be enough. We all know he's capable of it.

Furthermore a true (calendar) GS would do it for me.

nobama
04-06-2006, 07:18 PM
Pete just comes across as not very classy. I can't imagine Jack Nicklaus speaking like this about Tiger and his generation. Seems to me Pete is worried that his record(s) may not stand whereas someone like Nicklaus knows records are made to be broken. It's quite obvious that Roger is respected off-court more than Pete ever was so maybe that bothers him too. If Pete's generation had better players how come other players of that generation aren't saying the same thing? Agassi isn't out there saying the competition was tougher 10-15 years ago.

mangoes
04-06-2006, 07:35 PM
I've love for Fed to pass his 14 but IMO to just win a few RGs would be enough. We all know he's capable of it.

Furthermore a true (calendar) GS would do it for me.

Same here........... :D

TenHound
04-08-2006, 06:59 AM
Don't worry so much about the numbers. Just enjoy Every Single Moment of his Maestro Period, because it will be gone in the blink of an eye.

By contrast, Jack Nicklaus, the greatest Golfer ever, won Augusta - most revered tournament - @46. Gary Player, also way up on the list of the greatest ever, entered it this yr. @70 years of age. In the first round yesterday, Player shot 79, just 8 strokes more than Tiger.

Tennis is sooo cruel. 3-5 years most at peak and then it's all downhill. It's no accident that Lendl put all his children in golf rather than tennis - they all have scholarships to Nicky B's Academy. And AA's father said he'd put his kids into golf as well, as tennis demands way too much for too fleeting a time.

SUKTUEN
04-08-2006, 07:02 AM
thanks

World Beater
04-08-2006, 07:13 AM
to be honest with everyone, what pete has said isnt anything truly terrible.

The only comment i disagree with was his depth comment, but other than that, who can fault him for thinking he could have beaten federer in his prime. if anyone can do it, its sampras.

nobama
04-08-2006, 08:25 AM
Someone posted this on Roger's website. Not sure where it came from.

World No. 1 Roger Federer took time after a grueling few weeks of tennis to spend a day at the ESPN headquarters to film two commercials. It was an early wake-up call for the seven-time Grand Slam champion. Federer, who left New York City at 7:30 a.m. ET on Tuesday, filmed his first commercial with Neil Everett and the second with Stuart Scott.

Said Everett after the taping: "Where was the entourage? Where was the attitude? Roger Federer brought none of that to the taping. He could not have been a more unassuming and gracious individual -- who just happens to be the greatest tennis player on the planet. You know where he was the day before the taping? Federer was at the United Nations accepting an award for his humanitarian efforts. This guy could run the UN someday. Under the radar, Roger Federer was instantly likeable and became an easy player to root for -- even though we're not supposed to have favorites."

SUKTUEN
04-08-2006, 09:53 AM
thanks

RonE
04-08-2006, 10:55 AM
Mirkaland- your signature :tape:

I'm sorry but there is no way in hell the bloody U.N deserves someone like Roger heading it :mad:

avocadoe
04-08-2006, 02:26 PM
watching Pete slog around the clay, after an interminably booooooooring interview before the Ginepri exo, is all this Federer fan needs to set the story right, lol. Just so good to see the guy I didn't like struggling mightily. He was always an unpleasant person to listen to, no matter how well he played, in the past. Roger did beat him at Wimbledon before Roger was at his best, so nya nya!!!

nobama
04-08-2006, 02:50 PM
Mirkaland- your signature :tape:

I'm sorry but there is no way in hell the bloody U.N deserves someone like Roger heading it :mad::lol: I agree with you. But I still like the quote. Shows once again that people are awestruck not just by Roger's abilities on court but how he acts off court. I watched some of the video of him at the UN and I must say he was a trooper for sitting through all that and being able to look interested. It was the most boring thing I've ever watched.

Gulliver
04-08-2006, 09:04 PM
I watched some of the video of him at the UN and I must say he was a trooper for sitting through all that and being able to look interested. It was the most boring thing I've ever watched.

He probably won't do it a second time :)

He turned up for the BBC Sports Personality of the Year in, I think, 2003, and didn't win the Overseas Personality. It was completely and unutterably boring (dominated by Rugby) but both he and Mirka looked interested the whole time. He hasn't been back since, even though he won the Overseas Personality :) :) He was shown on video accepting it. Great invention - video!

nobama
04-09-2006, 05:08 AM
I didn't know Roger was a member of this club. :D

http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/living/14294989.htm

Admiring art of a different kind at Casa Casuarina was tennis star Roger Federer, who was at the former Versace mansion for a birthday party for fellow ace Miroslava Vavrinec.

nobama
04-09-2006, 05:52 AM
You can have Roger's autograph....for $300!

http://www.steinersports.com/ssm/control/category/~browseCats=11175

SUKTUEN
04-09-2006, 08:13 AM
$300 ~~very exspenive :eek:

nobama
04-09-2006, 04:51 PM
Federer Uses Media Spotlight to Help Children through UNICEF

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Liza Horan
330 Third Ave.
New York,
212-682-6829
liza@tenniswire.org

04/03/06 - New York--You never see Roger Federer sweat--figuratively. Certainly over the past 114 weeks as the world’s No. 1 tennis player, he’s dropped gallons of fluid slogging it out from the baseline or cutting razor-sharp angles from the net, but any nerves have been hidden from view.

Yet today, on a stage far removed from the familiar grass of Wimbledon or bellowing crowds of the U.S. Open, with no opponent to stare down or outplay, the Swiss champ seemed--could it be--a little nervous?

“Yes, today I am nervous,” the champion said with a laugh, just after signing an agreement to become a Goodwill Ambassador for UNICEF. “Can you tell?”

Less than 24 hours after hoisting the singles trophy at the Nasdaq-100 Open in Key Biscayne, Fla., Federer had arrived on the dais of Labouisse Hall at UNICEF headquarters to make official his global effort to improve the lives of needy children.

He was welcomed with a standing ovation by an unprecedented crowd of media, United Nations personnel, and UNICEF staff.

“It is a great day for the children of the world,” announced Mr. Adolph Ogi, a fellow Swiss who is Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Sport for Development and Peace and is affectionately referred to as Federer’s “godfather” at UNICEF.

The dapper Federer, who said he was “inspired and humbled at the same time,” joins such figures as former “James Bond” actor Sir Roger Moore, actress Vanessa Redgrave, soccer star David Beckham and singer Shakira in the effort to improve the lives of underprivileged children.

“It’s important to me to help the children of the world who do not have the basic resources,” said Federer, who went on to describe the emotions he experienced while visiting HIV-positive in South African hospitals. “I may have achieved a lot on the court, but I would also like to try to achieve more now off the court. That's one of my big goals in the future, and it's really a privilege for me to continue this great tradition of UNICEF.”

Federer was invited to serve as a Goodwill Ambassador because of his visibility, special talents, experience, and “his strong sense of personal responsibility,” said the organization’s executive director, Ann M. Veneman. She noted that Federer’s record in humanitarian affairs was lengthy, particularly for someone at the age of 24. In addition to creating his own foundation in South Africa to help children participate in sports, in 2004, Federer helped the United Nations launch the "International Year of Sport and Physical Education" with Kofi Annan. In 2005 he led several fundraising efforts for the victims of the tsunami, and took part in the ATP-UNICEF program called Assisting Children Everywhere (ACE).

“There is a tsunami every day,” said Federer, referring to the emergency situations that exist in so many parts of the world. “I hope to work with UNICEF and ATP to call attention to these problems.”

Federer said his childhood goal was to compete at Wimbledon and meet heroes like Boris Becker. He always hoped that after a breakthrough he would be in a position to improve the lives of others.

If his manner with two junior reporters at the press event was any indication, Federer has a innate gift of relating to people. For his one-on-one interviews with 11-year-old Emily, who was writing for Time for Kids, and 12-year-old Julietta, who was filing a report for Junior Scholastic TV, the 6-foot-1 player asked for chairs so they could do the interviews seated, lest he tower over them.

While the challenge would appear to be how he will find time for UNICEF duties on top of his full-time job, Federer is undaunted.

“I travel the world 11 months of the year so I’ll get an opportunity. My first priority now is to raise awareness, then go touch the hearts of the kids,” said Federer, who is aided by a small team to manage all his concerns.

"We take as much off his back as possible so he can concentrate on tennis,” said Mirka Vavrinec, who is Federer’s girlfriend and handles his media requests. Agent Tony Godsick handles business concerns and Federer’s parents manage the Roger Federer Foundation. “Everything is coordinated.”

Federer projects qualities true to his homeland. As Switzerland has remained neutral, Federer sets aside partisanship for humanitarianism. And his manner of cool, calm organization never appears coldly calculating, but steadfast and consistent, like the elegant timepieces for which the country is renowned.

“I am very proud to be a Goodwill Ambassador,” Federer said. “I hope it is a long-term relationship.”

Loyalty seems to suit him. In a world where endorsement deals often go to the highest bidders, Federer stands apart. Ten days ago he turned his business relationship with Wilson into more of a marriage by making it a "lifetime agreement."

http://tenniswire.org/bulletin/federermontage.jpg

SUKTUEN
04-10-2006, 06:02 AM
thanks

nobama
04-11-2006, 06:46 PM
I had to laugh at this article on tennis-x.com. But what they say is so true. And I don't think it was meant to show Roger as being arrogant, but rather having confidence, believing in himself. And that confidence and belief translates into wins on the court.

Time for Roddick, U.S. Men to Act Like They Belong (http://www.tennis-x.com/xblog/2006-04-11/53.php)

The U.S. team could as a whole take a page from Federer’s playbook. During and after a Federer win, he gives you the indication that yes, this was supposed to happen, and it did. When a call doesn’t go his way he doesn’t turn red and have a complete meltdown and start screaming f-bombs as some poor lineswoman. When he takes the ball into the endzone, he doesn’t act surpised, he doesn’t do a wacky endzone dance or whip out a Sharpie — he acts like, ‘Yes, this is what is supposed to happen, this is where I’m supposed to be.’

Tennis is such a pressure cooker of expectation, and whether it’s Roddick dropping read-my-lips after read-my-lips f-bombs on ESPN, or Andy Murray delivering a shocking live “blue” stand-up performance with a chair umpire while going down in Davis Cup doubles flames, or Gonzalez looking like he is about to body slam a female linesperson, it reminds you why the “boring” artistry and demeanor of Federer has him standing in the winner’s circle time and time again.

R.Federer
04-11-2006, 07:03 PM
Did everyone see ? They changed Roge picture on ATP.com to this very nice one:



http://www.atptennis.com/en/players/playerprofiles/default2.asp?playersearch=Federer,+R

oneandonlyhsn
04-11-2006, 08:37 PM
Nice pic, thanks

lunahielo
04-12-2006, 12:30 AM
Great pic. :)

RogiFan88
04-12-2006, 02:14 AM
Roger's doing a Nike clinic before MC...with Rafa!! :D

http://www.nice.fr/ressources/les_combes_nike_clinic_tour2.jpg

http://www.nice.fr/mairie_nice_285.html

nobama
04-12-2006, 03:55 AM
Uh oh, some people here won't be too happy. I know what people thought when they did that little photo shoot before the FO SF. :tape:

Junes
04-12-2006, 04:20 AM
why with rafa?...Nike,OH

TenHound
04-12-2006, 06:35 AM
That's Great that he was sent up to espn in Conn. to seduce the male corporate jock sniffers up there. Maybe they'll care more about & play more of his matches. I hope a meeting was arranged w/the clown who actually decides what matches are played :)

Speaking of things like that, does anyone happen to know anything about the entourage pandy travels w/?

SUKTUEN
04-12-2006, 09:08 AM
Oh Thanks , this cover is nice :wavey:
but I also worry about Nadal ,Roger be careful~ :p

nobama
04-12-2006, 11:49 AM
That's Great that he was sent up to espn in Conn. to seduce the male corporate jock sniffers up there. Maybe they'll care more about & play more of his matches. I hope a meeting was arranged w/the clown who actually decides what matches are played :)

Speaking of things like that, does anyone happen to know anything about the entourage pandy travels w/?Can you tell me the last time during a tournament shown on ESPN that Roger was playing live and they chose to show someone else instead? In Australia, for instance, the matches we didn't see were because of the time they put him on court, NOT because ESPN refused to show him. During the US Open he played mostly night matches and every one of them was on TV. OK he didn't get the "prime time" on CBS on the weekend but that's because they scheduled him to play at night and CBS coverage was during the day. I think Roger's a bad example of who the networks don't show. Because he and Sharapova are shown on tv. And Roddick would be more too if he didn't loose in the early rounds.

mangoes
04-12-2006, 05:07 PM
Can you tell me the last time during a tournament shown on ESPN that Roger was playing live and they chose to show someone else instead? In Australia, for instance, the matches we didn't see were because of the time they put him on court, NOT because ESPN refused to show him. During the US Open he played mostly night matches and every one of them was on TV. OK he didn't get the "prime time" on CBS on the weekend but that's because they scheduled him to play at night and CBS coverage was during the day. I think Roger's a bad example of who the networks don't show. Because he and Sharapova are shown on tv. And Roddick would be more too if he didn't loose in the early rounds.


Agree with you Mirkaland............I'd also like to add to this because I had a friend who was complaining about the same thing until I pointed out to her that when ESPN promotes it's line up for weekend tennis during a tournament, Roger is usually the one promoted on Saturday or Sunday during ESPN's peak time slots. While some people will find this hard to believe, Andy does not receive higher priority over Roger to fill peak ESPN time slots. For those of you that can do a little mental backtracking, you'd realize that for the last couple of tournaments, ESPN has shown Roger's matches either on Saturday or Sunday afternoons. Those are the highest earning timeslots for ESPN during the entire week. Saturday afternoon even pulls more revenue than Saturday night when Andy's matches are usually shown. ESPN gives Roger's matches priority unless the time he is playing is to benefit the European markets making it impossible for ESPN to carry his match live.

As for Sharapova, no need to get into her hold on espn :rolleyes: especially with the no show of the Williams sisters. But this I will say with amusement, I have learnt that Martina Hingis matches get a higher priority than Sharapova's on ESPN :lol: :lol: So, another positive with the return of Hingis. However, even though Sharapova may consider herself to be the golden goose of tennis for ESPN, her viewership numbers aren't anywhere close to Serena's numbers when she dominated the WTA. There are so many corporate entities that would love to see the return of Serena to her prime form.

nobama
04-12-2006, 06:58 PM
Roger got especially good treatment in IW and Miami. I don't think he played a night match in IW (which was great because it was so damn cold :mad: ) and weren't most (if not all) of his matches in Miami covered on ESPN/CBS? During the US Open he got three night matches in a row. That's huge, because during the week the night matches are the best crowds. And if I remember correctly his night matches had record crowds. The crowd during the Santoro match was incredible. Just as electrifying as during the Agassi/Blake match. And in Cincy after the final I swear it seemed like the crowd applauded more for Roger than they did Andy. I was surprised what a great reception he got considering it was a fellow American he beat (same thing in IW).

mangoes
04-12-2006, 11:37 PM
Roger got especially good treatment in IW and Miami..

Very true. IW and especially Miami did their schedule to allow Roger's matches to be shown live during peak ESPN time slots.

When I was in Miami, what I found interesting was that more people were excited to see Blake vs seeing Andy. The Roger vs Blake match was the best night match I attended. The stadium was packed, the crowd was lively and while it was pro Blake, it was more than obvious the appreciation the crowd had for Roger. I don't think there was anyone in my section that expected Blake to win, they just wanted Blake to give Roger a solid match.

RogiFan88
04-13-2006, 02:31 AM
So SUI vs. Serbia-Montenegro in the DC06 World Group Playoffs Sep 22-24. Not an easy team to beat, even at home w guys like Djokovic, Pashanski, Tipsarevic! Will be interesting to see what surface SUI chooses and if Rogi will play. ;)

Too bad ESP got ITA AGAIN... duh but at least it will be in ESP! ;)

Sjengster
04-13-2006, 02:50 AM
I can't believe that if we had beaten the Serbs we would have drawn Switzerland again in the playoffs - I mean, we're now playing Israel to try and stay in Zone 1, having played them in that zone last year.... all just a little bit of history repeating!

Should be very interesting, I assume the Swiss will choose clay, and the one rubber that seems hard to call to me is Djokovic v Stan the Man on the first day. I think Federer does need to play, and I'm pretty sure he will, bearing in mind the Serbs have Zimonjic in their doubles squad and will most likely win that point. I wish Federer could be as reliable in the doubles as he is in singles, but when you're playing about three or four doubles events a year on the tour and losing in the first round of most of them you don't exactly have the matchplay needed to be truly successful at this level.

fightclubber
04-13-2006, 02:57 AM
hey they put the espn interview on air. so ashamed
but luna, its on espn + in tennis 2006, will repeat it tonight, wednesday 1 am argentine time.

silvy

Longshot
04-13-2006, 03:18 AM
I think Roger should play against the Serbs. This round is 2 weeks after the US open, and 2 weeks before he's due to play in Tokyo. The Slams will be over for the year, and its unlikely his ranking will be in any danger.

artlinkletter
04-13-2006, 04:24 AM
Mirkaland, what has got Roger giggling like a little school girl in that clip?

TenHound
04-13-2006, 05:43 AM
Part of my comment is historically based. I cannot tell you how much time I have spent over the past couple of yrs. calling espn to see if they were going to show Roger, then getting on the phone & email to get people to contact them to beg them to show his matches. It didn't come naturally for them, I can assure you. And still they have a huge AR tilt. You know they'll show all his matches, and if we're lucky Roger. I'm not saying they don't show Roger. I'm saying that it's not automatic by any stretch - and it should be. And heaven help us if for some reason he fell to number 2....Priority would go AR, RN then Roger...so my only point is that the more Roger gets those guys up their to have a real attachment to him, the easier it makes it for those of us who care deeply about seeing his matches.

TenHound
04-13-2006, 05:47 AM
P.S. Mangoes, I can't really comment on priorities during the last couple of tournaments, since I moved in Feb, and was so fed up w/the disappointment of espn's scheduling that I haven't decided yet whether to pay the $400/yr to subscribe to it. For me it was an endless round of getting excited about a tournament, only to discover day in and day out that the matches I wanted to see were given short shrift - whether men or women.
(Yes, they have gotten much much better.)

Daniel
04-13-2006, 06:33 AM
SERBS TO FACE FEDERER AND CO
Click here for full 2006 draw and results


Great Britain's Davis Cup conquerors Serbia and Montenegro will face the might of Roger Federer in the World Group play-offs.

The world number one is likely to lead Switzerland's bid to remain in the world's elite group of 16 teams when the countries clash on September 22-24.

The play-off draw was made in London on Wednesday and it paired the 2004 winners Spain with Italy. The Spaniards will have home advantage for their bid to stay in the World Group.

Last year's runners-up Slovakia will entertain Belgium.

Great Britain's defeat means they will instead play Israel next in the Euro-Africa Zone I. That tie will take place in July

Minnie
04-13-2006, 10:28 AM
I'd be rooting for Switzerland anyway - but more than ever now!

SUKTUEN
04-13-2006, 10:41 AM
will Roger go to play DC next time???

Stevens Point
04-13-2006, 10:55 AM
will Roger go to play DC next time???
We don't know yet, and probably he doesn't know yet, either..

SUKTUEN
04-13-2006, 10:59 AM
We don't know yet, and probably he doesn't know yet, either..

Roger will not deciedes yet? :devil: