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Roger news and articles

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tangerine_dream
06-11-2004, 08:31 PM
Sometimes I wonder if this recent spate of over-praise from Andy and Roger might be just a ploy to put Tim under even more enormous pressure and expectations at Wimbledon this year. After all, Tim's the only one who can take them both out. So sly! :devil:

Federer hails Henman

Roger Federer insists Tim Henman is one of the main threats in the draw ahead of his defence of the Wimbledon title.

"With a new coach and new ideas and a new game plan Henman definitely has a chance," Federer told BBC Sport.

"I think he's a great player with an unbelievable knowledge about the game and I believe he can win.

"He's the best volley player in the game right now and maybe of all-time. I never played Stefan Edberg or Pat Rafter enough but he's right up there."

Henman has been playing some of the best tennis of his career in the last six months and has benefited from teaming up with Paul Annacone, former coach to seven-time Wimbledon champion Pete Sampras.

But Federer, who is playing without the support of a coach since splitting with Sweden's Peter Lundgren in December, is in no mood to relinquish his Wimbledon crown.

The Swiss player has stated his ambition for the year is to retain top spot in the rankings and his Wimbledon title after enjoying a "complete season" in 2003.

"It was a consistent, solid season with points spread out all over the year," he added.

"There was one bad tournament, the French Open, and other than that I basically won a tournament every three or four weeks or so which was incredible.

"Hopefully I can stick where I am right now, but to be number one I have to play well again at Wimbledon and I'm ready for that."

Fedex
06-12-2004, 12:39 AM
Whats Roger talking about. He played Rafter atleast a couple of times! I certainly dont think Henmans the best volleyer ALL TIME, but is the best right now, which is'nt saying much.

WyveN
06-12-2004, 04:06 AM
i think he is just being diplomatic, being in england it is smart of him to praise tim and get the crowd on his side ;)

tim is far below edberg in terms of volleying

LCeh
06-12-2004, 04:26 AM
i think he is just being diplomatic, being in england it is smart of him to praise tim and get the crowd on his side ;)

:devil:

Yeah, I think Roger is just trying to be nice overall, and lay off some of his pressure as the favorite. But Tim really doesn't have the best volleys. Maybe next he would say Andy has the best serve of all time. ;)

LCeh
06-12-2004, 06:14 AM
Roger related article: :)

Becker: Henman's Hopes For Wimbledon Win Are Slim

British bookmaker Ladbrokes rates Tim Henman as a 5/1 shot to win Wimbledon.
Three-time Wimbledon winner Boris Becker says don't bet on it.

The seven-time Wimbledon finalist said on Henman's "very, very best day" the final four will be his final stop. From his position in the BBC broadcast booth, Becker has watched Henman advance to the All England Club's final four on four occasions. But Becker believes Britain's best hope to claim the country's first men's singles title since Fred Perry captured his third consecutive crown in 1936 has overachieved at the grass-court Grand Slam.

"He’s not number one player in the world, but he plays above his level every year when Wimbledon comes," Becker told a group of students at Oxford Union. "On his very very best day, he’s going to reach the semifinal."

The semifinal statement seem to contradict a comment Becker made last December.

"Of course (Henman) can win a Grand Slam," Becker said at a December press conference to promote the Honda Challenge senior event staged in London's Royal Albert Hall.

Henman's inspired run to the Roland Garros semifinals where he held a one-set, 4-2 lead over third-seeded Guillermo Coria raised hopes Henman can break through to his first Wimbledon final. The fact that Henman has beaten defending champion Roger Federer in six of their eight meetings, including a four-set quarterfinal conquest of the world No. 1 in their lone grass-court clash at Wimbledon in 2001, provides his supporters with cause for optimism.

U.S. Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe was highly impressed with Henman's Roland Garros run and McEnroe told Tennis Week he believes a Henman can win Wimbledon — provided he doesn't have to face Federer during the fortnight.

"Henman can win Wimbledon. I think it's possible, but I do not think it's likely if Federer gets into the semis and Henman has to play him," McEnroe said. "Yes, he has a winning record against Federer, but he got drilled by Federer the last time they played (Federer scored a 6-3, 6-3 victory in the Indian Wells final in March). I definitely think Federer is the favorite and I think it's less likely Federer's going to get upset early as he did against Guga in the French Open. I said in Paris if Federer made it through the first week, he'd win it. To me, as he gets deeper in the draw, Federer is even more confident and more dangerous."

Ladbrokes.com has installed the Swiss stylist as a 6/5 favorite to raise his third career Grand Slam trophy followed by 2003 semifinalist Andy Roddick at 4/1, Henman at 5/1 and 2002 champion Lleyton Hewitt at 10/1. McEnroe said the odds makers offer an even-handed assessment of the outcome.

"Henman's going in as the third favorite and I think that's totally accurate," McEnroe said. "I do think Andy has a better chance because he can serve so big and hold serve comfortably. If Roddick is in the zone on his serve he can beat anyone on grass. The key for Henman is he's got more pop on his serve than he did a year ago. He's got a little more strength now and he's confident, but I don't see him beating Federer at Wimbledon."

The 29-year-old Henman's grass-court game is rooted in his backyard. The competitive clashes Henman had with his older brothers, Michael and Richard, on the court built in his family's backyard shaped his style of play while he was growing up. Though Henman grew up on grass, he has never won a grass-court title, but he has proven his grass-court prowess by reaching the Queen's Club final three times in addition to registering a 36-10 record at Wimbledon.

In the past, Henman has been criticized in the British press as lacking the killer instinct necessary to prevail beneath the pressure of Grand Slam play. Dismissing the depiction of Henman as too soft to win a Grand Slam, Becker believes Henman is under appreciated in his home country.

"I believe Tim is one of the greatest sportsman Britain has ever produced — especially in tennis," Becker said. "I hope he gets the respect he deserves when he retires. He has achieved great things every year, with his four Wimbledon semifinals and winning a Masters Series title. He has two or three years to win a Grand Slam. People in Britain should appreciate that because there is not much young talent coming up behind him."

moonlight
06-13-2004, 06:09 PM
Federer routs Fish to win Gerry Weber Open

ROY KAMMERER, Associated Press Writer
Sunday, June 13, 2004

(06-13) 08:44 PDT HALLE, Germany (AP) --

Wimbledon champion Roger Federer routed Mardy Fish 6-0, 6-3 Sunday to retain his Gerry Weber Open title and run his winning streak on grass to 17 matches.

The top-ranked Swiss took just 57 minutes to beat the hard-serving American in the final and win his fifth title this year.

"The way I played this week is fantastic -- its unbelievable," Federer said.

He didn't drop a set and lost his serve just twice. His victory here last year propelled him to his breakthrough grand slam title at Wimbledon.

"This is where it all started. I just hope it stays this way. You shouldn't change a winning formula," said Federer, whose string of wins on grass is tied for the seventh longest in ATP tour history.

Federer slammed his serves at Fish's knees when he tried to rush the net, didn't give him a single chance to break, and won points with everything from slice drop shots to winners that nicked the line.

"He's unusual because he returns so well. Most players who serve well don't do both. He doesn't have any weaknesses," Fish said. "I just tried to go out and make him beat me with his backhand -- and he did it convincingly."

After Federer raced through the first set in just 22 minutes, the 8,000 fans began yelling, "Go, Mardy, go," despite Federer's popularity at the event.

"He played amazing today -- he didn't let me do anything I wanted to do," Fish said.

The 22-year-old Fish, who had the most aces behind Andy Roddick last year, said reaching his sixth career final at the Wimbledon warmup was encouraging.

"I'm feeling good about my game on my favorite surface," Fish said. "I just want to reach the second week and then see how it goes."

Bjorn Borg has the longest grass winning streak at 41 matches.

LCeh
06-13-2004, 07:53 PM
Thanks for the article moonlight!

Bjorn Borg has the longest grass winning streak at 41 matches.

:eek:

Argh... 17 down, 24 more to go. :lol:

Fedex
06-13-2004, 09:54 PM
Um, that article has a mistake ;) It say FISH had the most aces behind Roddick last year, when i know that Phillippousis did, followec by Roger.

mitalidas
06-14-2004, 02:48 PM
Martin in awe of Federer
By Piers Newbery

Todd Martin believes Roger Federer has the game to surpass Pete Sampras.
Wimbledon champion Federer heads to SW19 looking to hold on to his title and claim a third Grand Slam crown, having won January's Australian Open.

But Martin urges caution in making comparisons with the seven-time Wimbledon champion - for now at least.

"It's going to be hard to ever compare somebody truly to Pete because of what he possessed in his mind," Martin told BBC Sport.


Such has been the Swiss player's form for much of the last 12 months that some experts, including John McEnroe, have hailed him the best player ever.

Martin remains adamant that Federer can only really be compared with Sampras when he starts winning "tournament upon tournament and major upon major".

However, he admits that a simple comparison between their respective games would favour Federer.

"If you take them out to the practice court and just examine what their skills are, what their level of athleticism is, Federer definitely has the potential to be better," said Martin.

"I think he's every bit the athlete that Pete was, possibly better.

"He's got a much better backhand than Pete had and probably a better forehand - as scary as that sounds.


There's room for more grass court tournaments but it's difficult because of the limit on how many places we can play
Todd Martin
"Pete served way better than Roger does, but that's not to discredit what Roger can do with the serve. And they both volley very well, Pete probably a little bit better."
Martin, who at 33 years old admits this may be his last year on the tour, is not worried by the apparent lack of serve-volleyers in the game.

"I think an attacking player, playing effectively and with good decision-making, should always have a fair shot, if not an advantage, against a player who doesn't attack.

"That being said there is certainly a trend. If Andy Roddick, with his serve, wanted to he could serve and volley, so that potential is there."

A Wimbledon semi-finalist in 1994 and 1996, Martin is a fan of the grass court season but does not envisage any extension to the current four-week schedule.

"There's room for more grass court tournaments but it's difficult because of the limit on how many places we can play on grass.

"Some of the challenges that the elements provide for grass courts can make the weeks really long if we get a bit of rain.

"It's a different game that guys don't grow up playing but I do think it would be good to have a little more balance on the schedule, but grass will invariably always be third on the list."


Story from BBC SPORT:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/sport2/hi/tennis/3802949.stm

Published: 2004/06/14 13:37:50 GMT

© BBC MMIV

tangerine_dream
06-20-2004, 12:49 AM
Aaaah! Wimbledon in full swing mode now. Nothing but Roger and Andy and Timmy in all the British papers. Can it get any better than this? ;)

Shadow of Sampras hovers over Federer

LONDON: World number one and top seed Roger Federer opens the defence of his Wimbledon title here on Monday determined to play down expectations that he has the game and grace to emulate legendary seven-time winner Pete Sampras.

Ever since Federer finally converted raw potential into historic silverware at the All England Club last year, comparisons have been made with the American who serve-and-volleyed his way to 14 Grand Slam titles before calling it quits last year. “I’m maybe the most natural ball-striker, but just for me, my game feels natural,” said the Swiss 22-year-old who has since added the Australian Open and Masters Cup to take his career singles titles tally to 17. I feel like I’m living the game when I’m out there. I feel when a guy is going to hit the ball, I know exactly with the angles and spins, I just feel that I’ve got that figured out. And that is just a huge advantage.”

Federer, who opens his Wimbledon campaign against British wildcard Alex Bogdanovic, has the grace and elegance on court which has spectators, exhausted by the slam-bang of the world’s baseliners, swooning. After years of knocking on the door, last year’s 7-6 (7/5), 6-2, 6-4 final triumph over mark Philippoussis came as a relief.

“I proved it to everybody,” Federer said. “It was a big relief because there was pressure from all the sides and also from myself. In the end when I held the trophy up it was very tough with the emotions. It took me a long time because I was rather crazy when I was young,” added Federer who has built up a 17-match winning run on grass stretching back to his shock first round defeat to Croatia’s Mario Ancic in 2001.

“I was using too much energy with all the negative thoughts and all of it would make me very tired at the end of a tournament. I would get to the quarters or the semis and I was very tired already and I couldn’t imagine myself playing two or three weeks in a row. But that Wimbledon victory was such a dream. Now it still gets me all emotional inside.”

Federer, however, has his work cut out if he is to feel really at home in the pantheon of the greats. Sampras was a seven-time winner, Bjorn Borg five while John McEnroe and Boris Becker lifted the famous trophy on three occasions. This year, he is seeded to face US Open winner Andy Roddick in the final with the American 21-year-old fresh from a successful defence of his Queen’s Club where he fired down more world record setting service howitzers. “I felt I was playing really good tennis last year,” said Roddick who has former Andre Agassi coach, Brad Gilbert in his corner. Now I feel that it’s not surprising if I’m playing that well whereas, last year at Wimbledon, I was kind of like: OK, I’m playing great, let’s keep going. This year I might go in and I could be playing badly but still think that I could pull it together.”

Roddick was beaten in the semi-finals by Federer last year but was in awesome form at Queen’s where he set a new record for ther world’s fastest serve timed at 246.2 kph. Roddick, who faces Taiwan qualifier Yeu-Tzuoo Wang in his opener, also put out 2002 Wimbledon champion and triple Queen’s champion Lleyton Hewitt in the semi-finals. “I don’t try for the record serves, they just happen,” said the American.

Britain’s Tim Henman, four times a semi-finalist and seeded five this year, could be the biggest threat to a Federer-Roddick showdown on July 4 as he tries to become the first home men’s winner since Fred Perry in 1936. “At this time of year, there are so many opinions out there and the fact is there is very few I am worried about or interested in,” said the 29-year-old Henman. “I am pretty good at taking care of the things I can control and all these exteriors things which are out of my control are really not worth worrying about.” Henman, who could run into Philippoussis in the fourth round, became the first British man in 41 years to reach the last four of the French Open last month but then had a disastrous opening to his grass court season losing to Karol Beck of Slovakia in the first round at Queen’s. With Andre Agassi, the 1992 winner, not playing because of a hip injury, the crowd’s sympathy vote will be with Goran Ivanisevic who won in 2001 but has been unable to return since because of a series of injuries. The Croatian opens up against Mikhail Youzhny of Russia. Whatever happens, the tournament will be the end of the road for Ivanisevic. Hewitt, seeded seven, has the disadvantage of being lumped into Federer’s quarter of the draw while third seed Guillermo Coria, who had never won a match on grass until the sHertogenbosch event last week, has been given a kind draw and could face fellow clay court devotee Juan Carlos Ferrero in the quarter-finals.

-------------------------

Federer fulfilling his talent through the power of one

Will Buckley on the Swiss star who relishes being top of the rankings

Sunday June 20, 2004
The Observer

Roger Federer is 11-10 against to win Wimbledon. This is a good bet because he should be odds-on. His victory last year was both emotional and significant, for it marked the moment when Federer finally overcame his doubts. 'It was a moment of disbelief,' he says, lounging around at Wimbledon, looking relaxed yet focused, feline.

It was not always the case. Ever since he won Junior Wimbledon as a 16-year-old in 1998, the pressure has been on Federer. He was so obviously better than everyone else, so obviously the most sublime player of his generation, that grand-slam victories had been predicted to follow before 2003.

But with such talent came doubts over whether he might ever fully express it. 'Before, at the very start of my career,' says Federer, 'when I received my first praises, I enjoyed it. Then I had the feeling that the experts were expecting my success too early. And now I have achieved it I take it as a compliment and enjoy it.'

The difficulty with being so gifted is that Federer, who can play any shot, has a multitude of options on every stroke. A lesser player would have had no option but to do his limited best. Federer could do everything. And, like Bill Clinton, because he could, he did. Federer would go out and play what he describes as the 'miracle shot'. His preference would be for playing the shot of the tournament rather than going through the arduous business of winning the thing.

He might have remained too gifted to win anything, had tragedy not intervened. In 2002, his mentor, Peter Carter, died in a car crash in South Africa. The funeral of his first coach was the first he had attended. A few months later, playing for Switzerland in a Davis Cup side that Carter would have captained, against Morocco in Casablanca, he comfortably beat Hicham Arazi and Younes El Aynaoui. 'That was when I got my fire back,' he has said.

Federer's game was ignited. The one-shot-makes-a-summer player was replaced by a player who might win all summer. When he won Wimbledon he proved to himself that he was as good as everyone had said he was. Little wonder he cried. The moment of disbelief founded a new sense of self belief. 'I feel better than last year because I know what I am capable of,' he says. If he played as well as he did then he can only win. If he plays better it is not a question of whether he wins but by how much. Success has bred success.

'You could already see at the Australian Open that I was not as surprised as I had been at the Masters and Wimbledon,' he says. 'I felt so good on court that I was not even surprised.'

It is a sign of his prowess that he is already being compared, and often favourably, with Pete Sampras. 'I would love to win it again,' he says. 'But I wouldn't say lots of times. You have to win it two or three times to want to win it many many times.'

In the past year, Federer has also become the world's number one. An achievement he ranks above his Wimbledon victory. 'I would say the Wimbledon championship made me a different person and a different player,' he says. 'But as world number one you are given more respect. It is something for life. Something magical around you if you go through life as number one in anything.'

Whereas tennis is a fortnightly affair for the watching British, for the players it is a year-long grind. To be ranked number one is a special elixir that, once tasted, has to be drunk again. It was an achievement that means so much to him that he readily admits to choking in his pursuit of it, as happened during the Roddick match at the Montreal Masters last August.

'Because I had the chance to be number one in the world, I found it impossible to control my emotions. I couldn't believe the situation I was in and, yes, I choked.' There is, as he says, 'a little bit of the downside' to everything. 'I always felt with my game that I challenge my opponent and my opponent finds it very interesting to beat me. So even if they don't win a grand slam they can, at least, say they beat the number-one player in the world.'

Everyone will be gunning for him, and the quickest in the draw - and the most dangerous - is Tim Henman. Federer sees similarities between the two. 'I have an admiration of his attitude both on and off the court. He is classy. He knows his potential and what he can do and because of this he has become a better player. This happened to me early on and I was lucky. He has realised his potential a bit later.'

A potential-filled final between the pair of them looks the most likely eventuality in two weeks' time. It is an occasion that Federer would relish. The last time he played Henman at Wimbledon he was fatigued, having beaten Sampras in his pomp on his favourite surface, and he lost. This time, and despite Henman's resurgence, one would expect Federer to prevail. The main danger from his half of the draw will probably come from the manic bundle of Aussie energy that is Leyton Hewitt, whom he is seeded to meet in the quarter-finals.

It is hard to see how the limited baseliner can outwit the complete player. In the semi-finals, he is seeded to meet Guillermo Coria, but the Argentine has to overcome a Wesley and a Wayne (the South African Moodie and the Australian Arthurs) just to make the third round.

Federer's likeliest semi-final opponent is therefore Sébastien Grosjean, the Frenchman who is decorative rather than threatening. Henman's draw starts easily and became a little less tricky in the latter stages yesterday when David Nalbandian pulled out. If he comes through, he is expected to play Andy Roddick in the semi-final. A possibly daunting prospect, but he should, at the fifth attempt, win a Wimbledon semi-final - a victory that would send the nation into a state of heightened expectation, to be swiftly followed by disappointment.

It has to be Federer.

Billabong
06-20-2004, 03:08 AM
Thanks for the article :worship:!
GOOOOOO FEDDDDDDD:banana:!!!

LCeh
06-20-2004, 03:08 AM
Gosh, Roger hasn't played a single match yet, what "swiftly followed by disappointment." for Henman? :rolleyes:

These reporters, I swear they are up to something. First they make Roger sound arrogant, and that he dislikes Andy, and now he has won Wimbly again...

rue
06-20-2004, 03:34 AM
That was a really interesting article and nice to hear some of the things that Roger had to say. I will be cheering for him and I know that he can win it again.

Ketchup
06-20-2004, 03:40 AM
Thanx for the articles Tangerine_dream :D :D :D :D
BTW like ur avatar!!! :yeah:

lsy
06-20-2004, 05:46 AM
These reporters, I swear they are up to something. First they make Roger sound arrogant, and that he dislikes Andy, and now he has won Wimbly again...

LCeh, after reading so many articles which took out of context of a whole interview, apparently that's how most of them work :

- have a pre-concepture impression or pre-fixed the big title before the interview;
- position their questions to lure players towards the answers they "want";
- take few answers or worse just lines out of context from the whole interview and add in many other words of their own;
- then walah...an article created to achieve the effect they want to have :rolleyes:

It's obvious that some medias are trying to stir up Andy and Rogi's rivalries, making Andy as the bashful but warm, easy going one while Rogi as the icy cool, calm but arrogant one. It's easy to buy into those stories unless you get to read the whole interview.

And people wonder why these top players never get along or why so many just refuse to talk too much to some irresponsible reporters... :rolleyes:

Dirk
06-20-2004, 07:47 PM
Rogi is warm and sunny off the court, but a cold blooded Ninja on the court. :) The media loves him and I don't think they made him sound arrogant. I'm glad to read that Rogi knows what he is capable of. IF THAT IS ARROGANT THEN GIVE ME WHAT ROGI IS HAVING FOR DIN DIN!!!!!!!!!!!! http://instagiber.net/smiliesdotcom/otn/blobs/multi.gif

rue
06-20-2004, 08:07 PM
R. Federer Interview - Pre-Event
Sunday, June 20, 2004


THE MODERATOR: My great pleasure to introduce Roger Federer, our reigning Wimbledon Champion. Who would like to ask the first question?

Q. You look as if you're pleased to be back. Welcome back.

ROGER FEDERER: I am. Now it's a few days ago since I arrived, but it's very nice every time I step on the grounds and can play a little bit on grass. It's a very nice feeling.

Q. You had a good workout on grass the other week, didn't you?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. Well, it was the best preparation I could have hoped for. Obviously, a little bit surprising always because, you know, French Open was tough. Then to get the motivation right away, you know, it's easier said than done.

But went good really from the first match on, and also in the practice I've been feeling well. So I'm really well prepared.

Q. How different do you feel this time around coming back as champion?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's different. Different kind of a pressure, I feel, because last year it was more about, you know, trying to make that first breakthrough in a Grand Slam really, go further than a quarters or a semis.

And this year it's trying to defend the title. All the focus I feel is on me. Also from my own side, I put a lot of pressure on myself. When I step on court on Monday, it's going to be strange feelings.

Q. Winning the Australian obviously has had a big effect on you, as well.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. I mean, everything I've achieved since Wimbledon has only helped my career because I've become much more ‑‑ I have much more experience now. I feel more secure on the court. So this will definitely help for Wimbledon. But I've never been in a position where I could defend a Grand Slam title.

So this is a new situation for me, too.

Q. Do you feel the players' attitude towards you has changed since you became champion last year?

ROGER FEDERER: Not really. Maybe players do less jokes about me now than before, I don't know (smiling). I don't know if that's really the case. But I have to say, I get along well with a lot of, you know, the players because I speak three languages. That makes it easier.

Q. Coming in here last year, people had been saying, "When is Roger Federer going to win a big one?" Well, since then you've won two big ones, The Masters Cup. So you put that behind you already, well behind you. You're not coming in here with anything to prove except maybe to yourself.

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, that's also the way I feel. And I think, you know, I'm very happy that this last year has been so great to me. So I don't have again such enormous pressure on my shoulders coming back to Wimbledon.

I'm happy I've, you know, really done some really great results in this time. Yeah, and so now it's ‑‑ yeah, it's about Wimbledon, and trying to do well here, because this is really my favorite place to play tennis. Hopefully I'm going to do well here.

Q. Interesting first game for you, isn't it, with the British interest?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, of course. It's going to be, you know, special to see how the crowd's going to be. His side, my side, I don't know. But it doesn't really matter for me. It's a very special moment, which, you know, is obviously a moment I've been really looking for since a long time because I know since a long time when I'm going to play.

I don't really know my opponent. You know, I know more about him now than a few days ago. Yeah, so it's going to be interesting to see how well he can play.

Q. How conscious are you of what happened to Lleyton in the first round when he was defending last year?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, very. I was watching that match. I was like, well, I think Lleyton ‑‑ you know, it's going to be difficult match, but I think he will go through. I think he won that first set quite comfortable, then he couldn't control the serve anymore.

Obviously, I hope the same is not going to happen to me. You never know, all I can do is just try a hundred percent and hopefully it's going to be enough.

Q. After last year win, you already came back here in December, I think, with BBC special. What exactly was the reason?

ROGER FEDERER: I was invited by the chairman, Tim Phillips, because I was coming here in the evenings for the BBC sports award, Sports Gallery, I don't know what it was. I was here, you know, in the afternoon for lunch. I came back. You know, while I was here, I also did some TV stations, some Swiss, some British. It was nice to come back because it was very quiet and very calm. Because I left in such a hurry, you know, after this tournament.

So to come back, you know, kind of just relax, I don't know, get the atmosphere in, was very important for me.

Q. Did you go to the Centre Court or not?

ROGER FEDERER: I did.

Q. What about feeling?

ROGER FEDERER: It was very nice. It was unbelievable. I'm happy I did it because only coming back one year later, I think it would have been a pity. I could have kind of in a way already prepare for December what's coming up for me now. This was special moment for me, too. There was no lines, no net, nothing. But there was a fence around the court because of the foxes. Not even I could step on Centre Court.

Q. What about weather? London is always raining almost. Do you think can change something?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I don't think the weather has an effect. Last year I think against Fish, I came off the court two or three times because of rain. Also against Lopez I couldn't even warm up. I'm used to rain breaks and all these kinds of things.

They shouldn't play any role in the end score.

Q. But it works in Paris for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. Paris is more of an effect of the rain, or of the weather.

Q. When did it sink in that you were Wimbledon Champion? It was emotional at the moment you won the title. Did it take weeks? Months?

ROGER FEDERER: No, to me it seemed ‑‑ of course, you realize what you have achieved right away. But you speak to all the people. You cannot still believe it. It kind of goes on and on and on and you never know when it stops because everybody asks you, "How is it? How was it? How does it feel? Tell us a little bit about it."

But of course for me the moment, I think, when I shook, you know, my opponent's hand and the umpire's hand, I sat down in the chair, I could not control my emotions anymore and I really realized this is reality.

Q. Tim Henman said on the verge of these championships that, whereas some people may look further ahead, look to see who you might meet in a semifinal, in a quarterfinal, is that really something that you ever look at or do you just concentrate on getting through the first game?

ROGER FEDERER: Obviously, I look at the draw, you know, at what is possible for some of the seeds. But then again, you know, both seeds have to win a certain amount of matches against tough players, which is always difficult.

I don't even know who I might play in the semis. I think Coria is ‑‑ is he? Yeah, I think he is. I'm not even sure, you know.

But normally I only look at maybe where my first seed is, you know, the first one, two, three matches at the most, just to know a little bit. If I win, at least I know against who I will play. But not more than that.

Q. In terms of recognition coming back here, have you noticed anything different this year? Have more people been recognizing you at all, maybe at the airport?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, at the airport, of course, some people saw me because I was waiting for my physio.

But other than that, on the grounds, there were no spectators so far, only players. There's a lot of greeting, of course, because you don't see each other all the time. I saw Tim Phillips. You know, he showed me around again a little bit. We had tea together. It's nice. I feel very welcome here. This is a nice feeling.

Q. Are you staying in the same place? Keep your routine the same?

ROGER FEDERER: Staying in a different place. I don't know if that's good or bad. I'm not very ‑‑

Q. Somewhere a little more expensive?

ROGER FEDERER: No, because last year's place was a little bit tight, you know, so I wanted something just a little bit bigger. Yeah, we'll see. But everything is fine, so...

Q. He asked you about some of the outside influences. But after winning a Grand Slam here, winning the Australian Open, how do you feel different within yourself?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, kind of I know what I have to do leading up to Grand Slams, because this is a thing I was not sure in the past, because I would come to grand slams and just prepare the way I would do for a regular tournament or any other tournament. This is ‑‑ I don't think that's the right approach to do it, because it is a very big change. You know, it's going to be a tournament over two weeks, best‑of‑five sets. If you're knot ready for that, somehow I think, you know, you could ‑‑ I've experienced that, you know, I failed in the first round. I lose in straight sets. The road is way too long to make it to the finals, whatever, once you're down.

So I've changed a little bit my preparations for Grand Slams. That's really a thing I've learned over this past year.

Q. As a player you cannot bet, do any betting. You know things because you are inside. You are the champion. If you can put some money on a new name, a young player, a specialist on grass, which could be the biggest surprise?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know if there is a person which is very unknown to the people who can win this tournament. I think it will be more or less on Roddick or Henman. For me, they're the most ‑‑ biggest threats in this tournament to anybody and to me. So that's the way I see it.

Q. How have you changed your preparation? You mentioned you've done a few things different.

ROGER FEDERER: It's more of a mental preparation, too, and getting earlier to Grand Slams, because years before I would always play the week leading up to Grand Slams because most important is that I have confidence that I play matches because I'm a match player, not too much of a practice guy.

I found the way also to have motivation in practice and not let it influence me that I'm not playing the week before, and that already has changed many things for me.

Q. How has your preparation changed? You say it's different at the majors compared to some of the other events. How has it changed? What was it like before you won your first major? What was your preparation like?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, now because I'm not playing the week before the Grand Slam, I'm coming very early already to the venue. I'm already arrived on Tuesday, which is six days before. It's basically like a Davis Cup preparation in a way. You know, you have a few days where you can work on some things, and then the last few days I play a lot of points, sets, so on.

This is I think maybe a thing I wasn't doing until one or two years ago. I would only play tournaments because I would get in because I was not sure what my ranking was like. I would need points and this kind of stuff.

But since, you know, I'm up in the Top 10, obviously it makes it easier to schedule, you know, the tournaments.

Q. Are you aware a little bit of the nuances or the specific things with playing on a brand‑new grass court, as it will be for your first match?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I don't know.

Q. It's a little more slippery, takes the slice better. Did you know that?

ROGER FEDERER: No. Thanks for telling me (smiling). I'm happy I attend the press conferences, I get to know something about the court.

I didn't quite know that, no. When I arrived Tuesday, Wednesday, and I played my first time on the outside courts, you know, I assume that it's very similar to the Centre Court. They were brand‑new. Yeah, so, I'm used to it I think.

Q. You said you felt Tim Henman was a big threat. Do you think sometimes that pressure that Tim Henman ‑‑ do you feel a similar thing now as a champion, people have said you have the ability to go on and be one of the great Wimbledon champions of all time, is that something that ever weighs on your mind?

ROGER FEDERER: No. I think the pressure he has is totally different to the pressure the other players have here at this tournament. First of all, I think he's coped very well under the pressure he's had because he's the only maybe British player, men's and women's side, who has a real chance to win the tournament. This is why the focus is so much on him, which is absolutely normal. And I think he has done really well under these circumstances.

For me, you know, the pressure comes more from myself to perform well. Yeah, so it's a different kind of pressure. You know, he has all the fans. He knows they're all behind him if he walks on court. For me, they come to see nice tennis. But of course, maybe some will be behind me, but maybe some will be behind my opponent. It's a very different kind of pressure.

I think it's a little bit more difficult for him because he's playing in his own home country. But in a way it can also help him, you know, at very important stages of the match. Then the opponent could become very nervous and so on.

Q. His performance on clay in France did that surprise you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, after the first two rounds, he won in five sets, then to make it to the semis is obviously a very good effort because, I mean, he was looking like he's not going to make it there.

But, you know, I know how well Tim can play. I wasn't surprised once he got through those rounds, that he really went so far. I didn't see anything of the semis, but he almost made it to the final. So it's a great effort. Of course, there's maybe more talk about him now in Wimbledon because of that. But he deserves it. He played well. And I think it's going to give him even more confidence knowing if he played semis at the French, that he can do even better here.

Q. Have you got plans to watch the France game tomorrow night?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know. France against Switzerland, yeah. I hope Switzerland wins because we still have a chance to qualify. Are they playing at 7?

Q. 7:45.

ROGER FEDERER: We'll see how long a five‑setter will take (smiling). If I can, I will watch.

Q. Nice thoughts about Mats Wilander, Todd Martin, former players. Can you say to us how many former players, how many coaches offer to you to become your coach?

ROGER FEDERER: Not too many. Honestly, really few former, let's say, players or top players who play on the senior tour have offered their help. There's not much I can say about that.

Q. You have Davis Cup where you can represent your country. Of course, you've got the Grand Slams. But you've been very clear how important the Olympics are to you. What makes the Olympics special beyond the other things that tennis players have?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, the combination to be there with other athletes and to be in a team, you know, for a week. You know, representing your country is very different to basically representing your name in a tournament.

You know, what I experienced in Sydney in 2000, was for me one of the best two weeks I've ever had in my career. So this is also why I'm going back to Athens. And hopefully I can enjoy a similar, you know, good time over there. Because it's really such a special place in that village, then the atmosphere around the grounds, it's also very nice to see other sports. Somehow that really hit me; it was a really nice experience.

Q. You said you know more about Bogdanovic than you did on Thursday. How have you done that?

ROGER FEDERER: It's very easy. You just ask a few people, few players, few coaches. Well, you get to know a few things. A little bit of his results, obviously I could do that myself.

Q. Anybody in particular you've spoken to that's been useful?

ROGER FEDERER: No. You know, maybe ‑‑ no, not really. I've just asked around a little bit, if they know him, how does he play, these kind of things.

Q. Can you ever prepare yourself for the X factor, the unknown ability of someone like Bogdanovic to suddenly raise their game against the champion?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, that's going to be there anyway. You know, that little bit of doubt, how well he's going to be. I think I will have to, you know, find out as fast as I can during the first set, I would say. And, you know, at the latest I should know after one set. If I'm up or down, doesn't really matter, but there I should know how he's going to play, on his shots, on his serve. Yeah, it will be interesting to see how I will handle that.

Q. What have people told you about Alex Bogdanovic?

ROGER FEDERER: Won't tell you (smiling). I'll keep it for myself. Maybe he's listening. I don't know.

Q. What can you come to expect from him then?

ROGER FEDERER: You know, I expect a tough match. Of course, it's important to know what he can do, the way he plays. But then again, I'm at such a level that I can really just concentrate on my own game. And I think, you know, it should be good enough if I'm playing well and I'm really focused and staying calm, because this is, like I said, a new situation for me to come to a Grand Slam and defend this title.

We'll see. He's a lefty. You know, I don't play very often against left‑handers. So this already makes a change to everything . Yeah, we'll see how it goes really.

Q. This match could really set the tone for your whole defense of the title?

ROGER FEDERER: It could. It's very important. Every first round in every tournament. I think last time I lost in the first round was at the French Open last year. So it's a long time ago. I hope I can keep it up.

Q. Roddick hit a 153 miles an hour serve at Queen's. Can you talk about how power and speed, the ever increasing power and speed in the game is affecting certain shots, the way that you play?

ROGER FEDERER: Wonder if those speed guns are right, really. I've heard players who say the speed gun was all over the place in Queen's. But I think he even hit it wide on the ad side. How is that possible?

I know he hits the serve very hard. Well, I think it will only ‑‑ the game will only get faster from here. I don't think you can do much to slow it down. Of course, you can increase the size of the balls and stuff, but I think that's not what we want. There is enough good return players out there who can handle a serve like that. This is why I think nothing needs to be changed right now.

Q. Sampras often talked about how much he enjoyed that moment, walking out on Centre Court, first match, first day of the tournament. How much have you thought about that and what do you expect that to be like?

ROGER FEDERER: I've put a lot of thought into that, how is that going to feel. But I can really only tell you after the match really how it felt and how it was. Because now I'm still also preparing myself mentally for that.

You know, physically I'm fit and everything, so it's going to be interesting to see.

Q. Players always talk about improving. How do you feel you've improved since this time last year? Are there aspects of your game that you're happier with or is it more a mental thing?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's not only since a year, I would say it's more over the last two or three years now I've been really playing with confidence since a long time. I had very little of dips, you know, where I wasn't playing well for a long time.

So I think a lot came when I started to improve really much was my condition, my physical strength, and then at the same time, you know, the mental part of my game also start to really become much more of an advantage because it used to be a disadvantage ‑ and I know that. I think this has made the biggest improvement in my game.

I think my backhand is much more consistent than it used to be. And I think this has just increased the whole level of game for me. I can play very consistent now. I'm not in a rush when I'm playing like I used to be sometimes.

Q. Have you watched last year's final?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, yeah. Many times (smiling).

Q. When was the last time you watched it?

ROGER FEDERER: This I don't remember. I think beginning maybe of this year or so, yeah.

Q. Do you look at it for strokes and strategy or more motivation?

ROGER FEDERER: No, more for enjoyment. No, obviously, because everybody was saying how well I played in that match, how unbelievable it was, the semis and the final. Actually, right after the match, I wasn't conscious actually how close he was in the first set, third set and everything. So, yeah, I was happy I came through that first set last year.

It's more for me important to live through those kind of moments again and to see how it really felt. It's definitely, you know, a tape I want to keep forever.

Q. When you watch that tape, do you marvel at how well you played?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't understand.

Q. Do you look at that and are you amazed at some of the shots you hit in that final?

ROGER FEDERER: Sometimes I am, but sometimes I'm also disappointed that I see shots that, "How in the world did I miss that shot?" Or, you know, "How in the world did I make that shot?" Both ways.

I think I'm living through that kind of match again like as if I was playing. Even if everything is going the way I want, I miss a shot where I'm not happy with, I am disappointed, the same if I watch the tape again. This is the way I feel also.

Q. Can you be surprised about yourself on a tennis court?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, sometimes I can be, especially, you know, in a match situation where I hit a shot which I would only, you know, tend to do in a practice because it's such a low‑percentage shot and you make it. Sometimes it happens in important stages of the match. This is incredible. Then also I'm surprised, you know, I could pull it off.

Normally I'm playing very much with the percentage. I've learned to do that, and it's working, so I don't have to change it.

Q. Obviously Wimbledon is very special to all the British players. It's called The Championships. What is it for anyone around the world to play and win here?

ROGER FEDERER: I think ‑‑ no, I'm sure, it's a tradition. The grass court, everything around it, the whole atmosphere, Centre Court, these are the things which make this tournament very special. Grass court season is so short. When you come here, you know, it's so special.

It's very difficult to imagine if you have never been here. Once you've been on Centre Court and you've seen a match or you've played a match there, somehow you fall in love with this place. This is also what happened to me.

The first time I played here against Sampras, the first time I stepped on court as a junior in '98, I remember those memories like it was yesterday. This is I think for any player around the world a very special moment.

LCeh
06-29-2004, 05:14 AM
This is a really long article, but I find a lot of stuff that I have never read before, unlike other articles where they all steal from each other. ;)

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Federer aims for greatness
By Clive White (Filed: 20/06/2004)
Five months after his triumph at Wimbledon last year, Roger Federer returned to the All England Club for lunch at the invitation of Tim Phillips, the chairman. Afterwards, he and his girlfriend were asked if they would like to walk over the Centre Court where, those few months earlier, he had ground into its hallowed turf with almost contemptuous ease the challenges of Andy Roddick and Mark Philippoussis in the semi-final and final.

"It was a strange atmosphere because it was so quiet," said Federer. "No lines, no net posts, no spectators. It was a beautiful day, really nice. He showed us around, showed us the picture, the trophy. It was a strange feeling. It feels like home there already. They say I did it the easy way to become a member there, but it's the best way to do it and I feel very welcome at that club."

At home enough to win seven singles titles, like Pete Sampras? It would be unrealistic, not to mention unfair, to throw down that particular gauntlet at his feet and yet there are many experts who believe the Swiss is capable of achieving something similar; in fact, John McEnroe believes he has the potential to become the greatest tennis player of all time. Most players, if asked if they thought they could equal the great Sampras, would probably break into nervous laughter, but not Federer. He has great belief in his own ability and self-assurance far beyond his 22 years, yet he never seems to overstep the line between confidence and arrogance.

"It's very, very difficult to do the same that he did," he said, without it sounding like an understatement. "To win is one thing but to win three in a row and then another four is quite incredible. I don't know how he did it, but I know that in every Grand Slam he had the same motivation, from the first round - the right attitude. It's the most important thing because after that the game flows automatically.

"I haven't spoken to him about it because he was very quiet. He wasn't around the court very often and he's a different generation also. My goal is not to try to do something similar to someone else but to have my own career. For me, it's not a goal to win, say, three French Opens like Guga [Gustavo Kuerten]. I know I'm an overall player on all surfaces and I think I have to use this [versatility] over my whole career."

As for becoming the greatest, he said: "I need some more success to be the best ever. I feel like I'm very good, I've won two Grand Slams and the Masters in almost the same year and become No 1 in the world and obviously there is a lot of talk about me. But I still think you've got to try to play consistent over an entire year. In fact, I think it needs more, two or three years in a row, and then if I have achieved that then I can say I've dominated."

Three memories from last year's Wimbledon stood out for him: clinching match point and falling to his knees, lifting the trophy and the back spasm that he had in his fourth-round match against Feliciano Lopez. "This is maybe why I was so emotional in the end, because I could not believe I came back after that back spasm. I'd never had it before nor since, and I hope never again.

"I rely on many things, but looking back, maybe my serve was working really well in the semi and final. I didn't lose it once against Roddick and Philippoussis and even though they're not the best returners, they're important moments. They didn't have a chance on my serve really. Also, I was volleying much better than in the whole tournament."

There is a classical beauty about Federer's game that resembles Sampras's - only it is even more refined. Unremarkable in appearance off the court, the man from Basel cuts a striking figure on it, largely, it seems, because of the bandanna which, apart from bringing a semblance of order to his unruly hair, somehow seems to enhance his looks. Above all, though, it is his serenity on court that is particularly impressive. Nothing seems to bother him, yet there was a time when things did, often at the most unlikely moments.

When Federer ended Sampras's run of 31 consecutive victories at the All England Club in 2001 we suspected that it might herald the end of an era and the beginning of a new one. While it proved to be most definitely the end of the American's extraordinary monopoly of the Wimbledon title, it was a couple of years before his young pretender got around to winning it.

In fact, far from signalling the start of the Federer Years, the fourth-round victory acted as a positive discouragement to the man who would be king. Indeed, in the quarter-finals Federer lost - neither for the first time nor the last - to Tim Henman. "After beating Sampras I felt blocked because I thought, 'Jeez, I've reached everything I wanted to reach'," said Federer. "I wanted to play on Centre Court at Wimbledon and I wanted to beat Sampras one day. I did it, and after that it was like, 'What am I playing for now?'

"But you have to set yourself short-term goals and long-term goals. And that's what I learned in all those years where I lost first round at the French Open [three times on the trot] and once back-to-back in the first round at the French and Wimbledon. It made me stronger mentally - that used to be my weakness - and that's why I can now play consistently."

And when he occasionally has an off-day, he doesn't let it affect him too much, like at the Italian Open last month when he lost in the second round to Albert Costa and was disrespectfully whistled off the court by spectators. That seemed to hurt him more than the defeat. Some journalists put it to him, in so many words, that he was facing a crisis, but Federer was unperturbed; he always knew his first tournament of the season on clay would be tough and he just needed to go back to the practice court. Eleven days later he won the Hamburg Masters, beating one of the game's leading exponents on clay, Guillermo Coria. Some crisis.

Like any great player, Federer has learned to understand his strengths and weaknesses. He has also learned that he has to peak for the Slams. "I always thought the more matches I played the better I would be prepared," he said. "I still think the same way but in the end Grand Slams are totally different events. It's over two weeks, it's over five sets and the approach mentally is much more important than the confidence you have [from playing a lot]. Next year, maybe, I will play less.

"I'm working a lot on different things that I feel I can improve. I see a lot of other players who are much better at some shots and obviously I would like to have the same ability, but I know I'm limited in different areas because of my one-hand backhand and the way I hit the ball."

He amazed himself by winning the Australian Open, but not because he won without a coach - and is still without one - but because "2003 was so tough and so long". It was the timing of his split with Peter Lundgren that surprised most people. Lundgren now coaches Federer's big rival Marat Safin. "After the US Open I started to feel that it was just not the way it used to be and the way I wanted it to be," he said, "and I spoke to him and told him that for me it felt very strange and he said the same. The communication wasn't the same, so after Houston [the Masters] - actually I had decided before Houston. It was very hard to tell him, 'That's it', but at the same time I think it was a great end to our relationship.

"Every player needs to know for themselves what they need. For me what is important is my surroundings, my family, my friends, my girlfriend - these are important people to me - then you need people who make the group feel strong, like a physio, a condition trainer, maybe a stringer, maybe a coach - whatever you need when you're in my position to make you feel better."

Consequently, "Team Federer" is now very much in-house: his girlfriend looks after the media while his parents sort out the contracts. Not that Federer is the sort who could ever feel alone. Speaking three languages, he is able to converse with more players than most and is popular among his fellow professionals. He is also more mature than most. Sometimes it's hard to believe he's only 22. "When I was 18 I felt like 30 and sometimes like 15," he said. "But now I'm much more steady, I have clear goals and I feel much more secure."

A frustrated footballer who occasionally trains with his home-town club FC Basel, he said if he ever had a son he hoped he would become a footballer rather than a tennis player, "Just because I didn't live through the soccer scene which I would have liked to". He played football until he was 12 "and then I had to decide".

Although his talent had been obvious for a few years, probably ever since he won junior Wimbledon six years ago, he believed he was not ready, mentally more than anything, to win a Slam until he eventually did. He flattered to deceive once or twice in the Australian Open, but it was only at Wimbledon last year that you knew his time had arrived. "I'm almost happy it didn't happen earlier because I really had the chance to grow into the tour, get to know the pressure, the media side," he said. "It didn't come in one big splash with me. That's why I played even better after Wimbledon, it didn't kind of stop me, my motivation was still there."

In winning the Australian Open in January he avenged his US Open quarter-final defeat to David Nalbandian, to whom he had lost in five meetings up to and including Flushing Meadows. He has a similarly poor record against Henman. In fact, it is 6-2 in the Briton's favour. He has a lot of respect for the British No 1. "He's got this dangerous game - when he's playing well, it's very tough to beat him," said Federer. "When he's serving well, he puts pressure on you and doesn't give you any rhythm, that's when he's very dangerous - actually on any surface, because he's also learned how to play on clay and he plays very aggressively.

"Either he serves and volleys or he stays back and then he comes in. You have to hit a great return to actually play aggressive yourself. I served really great at Indian Wells [where he beat Henman in the final] and I'm happy I beat him then properly because the one time I beat him before, he gave up. Maybe he prefers to play me, but he doesn't like to play Lleyton Hewitt or someone like Andre Agassi. He doesn't like guys who return really well because they put him under pressure."

And what puts Federer under pressure? "I see many different styles on the tour now, even though most of them play from the baseline," he said. "You have aggressive baseliners and less-aggressive baseliners. To me, it seems more players attack me now, play more aggressive than they used to do [the defeat to Costa was an example of that]. That's because, I think, they don't want me to attack them. It hasn't worked very well for everybody, but it might be the right game plan.

"It's tough also for them to find something different if you play a guy who's very confident, like I am right now. I also know that the time will come when my confidence might not be as high. That's the moment when they have to take advantage and beat me and make me go home and think about my game. So far, it hasn't happened."

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BTW, notice he mentioned friends before girlfriend. That says quite a lot about his character. :)

lsy
06-29-2004, 05:37 PM
Nice read. Thanks LCeh!

lol at your quotes :

"You say you're taking it one match at a time. How far do you think you can go?"
- Some interviewer...

:haha:

rue
06-29-2004, 08:09 PM
That was a nice article to read. He is such a genuine and humble person and the fact that he is the best player out there he does not boast about it as others may do.

Also the fact that he does not really want to emulate Sampras but be his own person. That is very nice to be who you were mean't to be rather than trying to be someone you are not mean't to be.

lsy
07-01-2004, 04:29 AM
I guess I need to watch the replay of this match, I didn't think it was such a great match during it, maybe I was just too nervous to be actually watching it... :o

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Federer's artistry and beauty are reminders of golden age
By Robert Philip (Filed: 01/07/2004)


It was during Ivan Lendl's reign as world No 1 that Manuel Santana, the Spanish maestro who won Wimbledon in 1966 with his lobs, spins and assorted sorcery, shook his head in sadness and mused: "John McEnroe was probably the last beautiful champion . . . " How delighted Manolo must be, therefore, to have been proved wrong. Roger Federer may possess all the physical strength of Lendl, but he is a modern-day reminder of the golden age of tennis when the game was performed with elegance, deception and sporting artistry.


Blast from the past: Roger Federer is a reminder of days gone by
As McEnroe says of the defending champion: "He could be the most talented player I've ever seen, someone who comes along only every 10 or 20 years. If you want to be a tennis player, then mould yourself of Roger Federer." The beauty of Federer lies in every beholder. Boris Becker describes him as 'poetry in motion', while Tracy Austin enthuses: "I've never enjoyed watching someone playing tennis as much as Federer; I'm just in awe. Pete Sampras was wonderful but he relied so much on his serve whereas Roger has it all, he's just so elegant, graceful and fluid - a symphony in tennis whites. Roger can produce shots that should be declared illegal."

Ah, but like precious porcelain such beauty can often prove brittle. Before the first of two rain-breaks interrupted an intriguing quarter-final against 2002 champion Lleyton Hewitt, Federer had been all those things and more but, after fleeing to the dressing room to escape the showers, the magic mysteriously vanished for a set then - hey presto! - returned, only to disappear anew before securing a semi-final berth courtesy of a 6-1, 6-7, 6-0, 6-4 victory.

Let us bask in the power and the glory of that first set, however. Hewitt, the archetypal Aussie tyke who habitually contests each and every rally as if it were match-point, battled well, very well, in fact, and certainly fiercely enough to have wiped the floor just about every other player in the world. Alas for Aussie hopes, Federer played out of this world, producing 'impossible' winner after 'impossible' winner seemingly at will. This was a re-enactment of an inspired McEnroe mesmerising Jimmy Connors for the loss of only four games in the 1984 final, an exhibition generally recognised as the greatest grasscourt display of all time.

Billed as 'The Match of the Championships', neither player disappointed; Federer, the reigning Australian Open champion, engaged Hewitt in a game of high-speed chess, both players covering every blade of grass on the Centre Court in a seemingly incessant stream of spell-binding rallies, the ball clearing the net by a millimetre. The Aussie all hustle and bustle, the languidly nonchalant Federer playing as though his tennis whites were trimmed in ermine.

With his classic single-handed backhand - which he can strike with slice, top or even side-spin - Federer is the most beautiful of champions and also the most dynamic, one ferocious forehand down-the-line struck from three feet behind the court sizzling over the high part of the net before clipping the junction of sideline and baseline. The crowd sat in stunned silence for a split-second as though disbelieving their eyes before bursting into sustained applause. Not for the first time - or the last - Federer had just made one of the most difficult shots in tennis appear outrageously easy.

Federer captured the Hewitt serve in the fourth game of the first set and achieved a second break in the sixth when he finished yet another breathtaking rally with the deftest of cross-court volleys. At 1-1 in the second set cometh the rain and the two men scampered off, Federer no doubt to wonder whether he could sustain his initial brilliance and Hewitt to ponder the conundrum, 'How, exactly, do you beat the unbeatable?'

The Australian is renowned for his never-say-die attitude - he came from two sets down and 3-5 in the third to defeat Federer in a Davis Cup semi-final rubber at the tail end of last year - and he returned to the fray with renewed vigour. Facing an early break point, Hewitt's cause looked hopeless when he was trapped a yard behind the baseline when Federer feathered an exquisitely angled stop-volley across and over the net only to see the Australian scamper half the length of the court to execute the self-same shot to even deadlier effect.

As Federer's initial brilliance dimmed in the gathering gloom, Hewitt, the 7-2 underdog (the champion was rated a 6-1 on shot by the bookies) became a golden retriever willing to run miles for every point. After another rain delay at 5-5, Hewitt seized the initiative from the very first point of the subsequent tie-break when Federer blasted an ugly forehand yards over the baseline to level the match.

Then, as the evening sun made a fleeting appearance, the Federer of old suddenly returned, capturing Hewitt's serve in the second game of the third set with a top-spin backhand worthy of the master - Rod Laver - before holding serve for a 3-0 lead, the 100th time he had successfully held serve on the lawns of Wimbledon in a run stretching back to the second game of the third set of last year's quarter-final against Dutchman Sjeng Schalken.

Hey, let us forget statistics, this was a tennis match for the purists. His beauty restored, Federer was simply irresistible throughout the third set before finally securing victory in a weary fourth set which could never match the majesty of what had gone before.

Tennis has the truly beautiful champion it craved

LCeh
07-01-2004, 04:46 AM
Just watched the highlights commentated by JMac and Mary Carillo. Once they got to Roger, the first thing JMac said was "This guy is SOOO good, he makes me SICK" :lol:

And then they showed only 1 point of the match, and John Mac said "Congratulations Lleyton, you broke Federer", and Mary started added that "Lleyton played great tennis, to only take a set from Roger."

JMac absolutely worships Roger. :lol:

moonlight
07-01-2004, 05:54 AM
R. Federer interview
Wednesday, June 30, 2004

THE MODERATOR: Could I have the first question in English for Roger.

Q. Is this one of the matches you said on TV yesterday you don't like to talk to the press because there's nothing to talk about.

ROGER FEDERER: This is rather a match where we can talk about, so let's start.

You know, very difficult match. You know, like I predicted before the match, it's going to be difficult. It's going to be a hard battle where I really have to run a lot. Of course, you know, the first and the third set don't really show how hard actually the battle was because in both sets I had to face early breakpoints. Who knows what's going to happen on those.

Other than that, you know, I'm very happy the way I played. You know, good start to the match and difficult conditions for the second set because, I mean, rain two or three times, and that's never nice. And he came out, you know, as a strong guy at 5 All. That gave him the second set. But, you know, I really had to try to hang in there. Third and fourth were as difficult.

Q. Is it very difficult for you to not think about things like when you had him two sets and a break in the Davis Cup, and he comes back? He's just one of these guys that doesn't go away. In the back of your mind, do you have a hard time putting that out and saying, "Let me finish him off"?

ROGER FEDERER: You know, I never really got the chance really to think too much of what happened in Davis Cup because now we've played two times again. You know, twice I beat him. You know, the match in Australia, I was serving for the match and he almost came back on that occasion, too. And when I served for the match in Hamburg, you know, he broke me there, too. But I was up I think a double break, but I broke him to win.

And this time, you know, I was down, I came back and I took the first chance. So I never really got into that scary moment, I would say.

Q. How important was it to get the match out of the way tonight to give yourself a free day tomorrow?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, this I wasn't too concerned about, darkness or rain or whatever. I was just hoping I would win really. If I would have to continue tomorrow, you know, that's fine. But all I really wanted was to beat him and not to go out as a loser, so...

Q. He won here of course two years ago. Today he played well; you played superb. How would you rate him compared to two years ago to now? Is he back to his best?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I definitely think, you know, it was a very high standard of play today. You know, it's unfortunate we already face each other in the quarters. I mean, he lost in Queen's to Andy. Now this week against me. It's a tough grass court season for him, you know, to accept.

But I've already felt since a long time that he's where he belongs, and that's at least in the Top 10 if not the Top 5 or Top 3. I mean, he didn't play many tournaments at the end of last year. He really focused on Davis Cup. And this is when he showed still how good he is. So just because his ranking dropped, doesn't matter, he'll not fight the same.

Q. So he's not a player you like to see in the draw to come up against?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I wish he would be in the other sections, of course, so he would play other guys. But I've always enjoyed playing against him because since actually the first time we played each other in Juniors, you know, we were 16. I faced match point and I won. You know, that was in Switzerland. I remember Darren was on their chair. We had the Swiss coach. Ever since then, we really had some nice matches from the start.

In the beginning, he was winning a lot of them, because they were all very close. And now the last three, I won them, so I'm quite happy obviously.

Q. 18 aces today. Is this your best serving effort against a player this quick? Is this your best serving effort of the tournament?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, you know, the serve alone is not enough against Lleyton because he brings back too many balls. Against Karlovic, it's a totally different match. It was important there to have good starts to the game, you know, because then you can go for more and, you know, he loses also a little bit of interest.

When you're up 30 Love against Lleyton, 30 Love doesn't mean too much really. I felt like I really had to go for a lot on my serve today, I had to really hit the ball very hard to actually get an ace. Luckily for me, I served well in the important moments because I think that saved me today.

Q. What stats do you look at to gauge how well you're serving, and are aces important?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, aces are just for really for the stats. That doesn't sometimes always show the truth. I think first serve points won, I think that's an important stat. If I look at it, if I compare it with his first serve, and this is where I dominated him really, and that gave me a lot of free points. That allowed me to actually take more chances on the return games.

Q. If you were the journalists, how would you describe Mario Ancic as a player?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, he's a youngster. You know, I've experienced him on Centre Court. I lost. So it's nice to see him finally doing well. I was a little bit disappointed, you know, that he didn't make that breakthrough earlier. But great effort today.

I thought he had a chance, but that he will beat Henman in straight sets also came for me as a surprise.

Q. How affected were you by the first error on the second point of the third set tiebreak and can you take us through what happened?

ROGER FEDERER: In the tiebreaker?

Q. Yes. The second point, you hit it long.

ROGER FEDERER: I hit it long on the forehand, very hard and long (smiling). What happened? Well, I already felt the pressure going into the breaker because he was playing better. You know, he actually deserved to win the set 7 5. But, you know, I got out of it once more because I served well.

Well, what happened is I wanted to play to the backhand side. He just wouldn't move away. He just stands still. So I thought, "Well, if I just place it there, it's not going to be enough." So I overhit it. That obviously gave him a lot of confidence for the rest.

But, you know, I was playing against the sun, and that wasn't comfortable because that didn't happen until that moment in the match. But he was the better player in the end of the second set, for sure, so he deserved it.

Q. Did you think that the rain helped him? Because the first set, the way it was going, you were just steamrolling. Did you think that the break helped him more than you, and you took a little longer to come back?

ROGER FEDERER: It's difficult. You know, we were very even, I thought, up until 5 All. Then when he came back, you know, I wouldn't say he changed some things, but I couldn't play at the same level like I was playing before. I was maybe not going for enough, especially from the baseline. I got into these long backhand cross court rallies where, you know, he's more consistent, I feel. And that, you know, kind of broke my confidence.

And he really started to get into it. Instead of me hitting the forehand winners up the line, he was doing it. So the whole momentum changed really, and he took advantage of it. But the important thing was I showed a reaction in the beginning of the third where I was lucky enough to be down a break again, and then it was a great point actually to make that break, you know, kind of gave the momentum back to me and I really took advantage of it.

Q. Next up an extremely fast, very clever young Frenchman. How do you deal with him?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I'm really looking forward to that match because we've played very seldom on the tour, maybe twice or so. Once only? Three?

Q. Three.

ROGER FEDERER: In Sydney I remember I lost to him in three sets. Where else did I play him? I don't remember.

Well, actually I was supposed to play him twice in Davis Cup and he was injured. So it's nice to play him. I think he's been going through the draw quite comfortable. And he's, like you said, a very tricky player to player against. He returns well. His first serve is very good and he moves well. And this is a dangerous combination. He has a lot of weapons.

He was already here in the past and he won in Nottingham once on grass, so he really knows and plays well on grass, so it will be a difficult match.

Q. Lleyton was saying in terms of competing, it's one of the holes in your game that you've really filled in over the last two years or so, that in the past maybe you would have gone away in certain matches, but that really mentally you're competing much better. Is that something you consciously did or is it just a matter of experience and time?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, a lot of things together really. I also feel, you know, what Lleyton says, I also feel the same thing. You know, matches before, like if I take an example, I think in 2000 when I played him in Davis Cup, it was one set all, he won the third set tiebreaker, I lost 6 1 in the fourth. Those are the kind of matches I wouldn't say happen to me regularly, because knowing he was so strong, I knew it was very difficult to come back. I would completely change my game, and it would backfire.

So now, because I have, you know, much more experience, I'm more confident, I know that I'm I have a solid base now also on the conditioning side and mental side. So for me things have really changed, and I look at tennis very different now than I used to. And I think what Lleyton is saying is correct because I also feel this way.

Q. Pete Sampras was on TV the other day and he was saying that when he looked very calm and cool, actually he was very nervous inside, and nobody really knew. Is it the same for you? To us you look very calm, serene. Inside are you boiling?

ROGER FEDERER: You know, breakpoints, the pulse always goes up, that is a fact. Obviously on some, you know, you feel like very good. If you get broken, you know, that happens. But I have to say all in all I'm very quiet, very calm also from the inside. Already before the match, you know, I was not I was always almost worried about myself because I was so calm already going into the match. I was surprised. You know, even after rain breaks I was not, "Okay, it's 1 All, it's 5 All." I really hadn't didn't have a problem of being very nervous out there today. You know, pulse does go up when you have long rallies and then you have to face tough moments in the game. But I feel like obviously now the way it's going, you know, I don't have any reason to be too nervous.

Q. It was sort of like a hard court match almost. You were both staying back so much. Would you have liked to have gone in more? Is that out of respect for Lleyton?

ROGER FEDERER: I would like to, but then I think I would lose because he's just too consistent on the return. His passing shots are just incredible. I don't remember having any easy volleys today, doesn't matter what position. He always makes you play a volley underneath the net. Just unbelievable effort from his side. Every time I play him I'm amazed actually how he gets the ball back. It's not just he gets the ball back, maybe he plays it high, keeps it low. I think that is the secret to his game.

Now I also understand a little bit why, you know, Henman loses against him, because he's such a great returner and great passing shot player.

Q. This is an international, global game. The inevitability is that you and Andy are going to be around for quite some number of years. That means to sell tennis, Andy needs to become better known in Europe and you in the United States. Can you see yourself during the hard court season going on the Jay Leno or David Letterman show? Would you be amusing and entertaining or not?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I guess we have to help each other out, you know, by playing each other more often, playing well, and consistent. Yeah, you know, I could imagine going to certain shows. But, you know, my English is not as good as Americans or English, so I would have to maybe face tougher questions, I don't know. It would be more difficult to show my humor.

But, you know, I think it would also be interesting to see how that feels for a change.

lsy
07-01-2004, 06:31 AM
Thanks moonlight!!! Where did you get the interview from?

Rogi is classy as usual, I'm sure people must have been telling him how good he was in that match yet he's still down to earth enough to give a great analysis of the match. He knew that match was tough despite the scores. I always feel like I see more truth in his interview about the match than most other articles written.

Q. How important was it to get the match out of the way tonight to give yourself a free day tomorrow?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, this I wasn't too concerned about, darkness or rain or whatever. I was just hoping I would win really. If I would have to continue tomorrow, you know, that's fine. But all I really wanted was to beat him and not to go out as a loser, so...

:clap2:

LCeh
07-01-2004, 06:57 AM
Wow, Moonlight, how did you dig up this interview? :worship:

moonlight
07-01-2004, 09:43 AM
Thanks moonlight!!! Where did you get the interview from?

I just typed Federer interview in the Google Search News, and voila found it. :)
Isn't Google great?


Rogi is classy as usual, I'm sure people must have been telling him how good he was in that match yet he's still down to earth enough to give a great analysis of the match. He knew that match was tough despite the scores. I always feel like I see more truth in his interview about the match than most other articles written.


I totally agree. Roger is :cool:

WyveN
07-01-2004, 11:04 AM
Yep, his interviews are far more interesting then by players with so called "personality"

Skyward
07-01-2004, 01:45 PM
Yep, his interviews are far more interesting then by players with so called "personality"

WyveN, exactly my thoughts. ;)

Thanks for the interview. I was desperate to find it yesterday.

yanchr
07-01-2004, 03:22 PM
yeah, thanks very much moonlight for his interview:hug:.
nowhere to find it myself:o

RogiFan88
07-01-2004, 03:28 PM
Isy, where is your article from?? Thanks!

Moonlight, thank you so much for the Rogi interview!

lsy
07-01-2004, 03:59 PM
[QUOTE=RogiFan88]Isy, where is your article from?? Thanks![QUOTE]

Rogifan...I actually can't recall now... :o Will let you know when my memory comes into place after a good sleep ;)

I'll remember to put up the link next time :)

LCeh
07-01-2004, 05:25 PM
I got it from sport telegraph, don't know if they stole it from someone else... ;)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml?xml=/sport/2004/07/01/strp01.xml&sSheet=/sport/2004/07/02/ixtenn.html

mitalidas
07-03-2004, 03:13 AM
New York times piece on Roger (about how the Tennis World has jumped on --I guess, all of us included-- on his bandwagon)
A little bit here, link enclosed

Sagging Tour Looks Toward Federer
By HARVEY ARATON

Published: July 3, 2004


Wimbledon, England

LISTEN to the voices within the greater tennis community, singing the praises of their new Swiss sultan, Roger Federer. Hear them hunger for his continued success, for him to become an iconic character they can present to the world without apology, with pride.

Hear the words the former champions John McEnroe and Boris Becker use to describe Federer while broadcasting on the BBC - brilliant, masterful, genius - or the valued opinion of Rod Laver, who hails Federer as "one of these uncanny talents whose instincts for the game don't come along too many times.''

Note how the world's best women players, unrestrained by competitive honor or fraternal envy, become starry eyed and practically tongue-tied at the mention of the name.

"I mean, as a tennis fan, I mean, Roger Federer is the most amazing thing to watch,'' gushed the normally smooth-talking Lindsay Davenport. "I mean, the way he plays, the way he moves, the way he acts. I mean, if you were to mold a perfect tennis player, that would be him.''

Perfect?

"He's just so perfect out there,'' Serena Williams agreed. "I mean, Roger is just, like, unbelievable.''

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/07/03/sports/tennis/03araton.html

mitalidas
07-03-2004, 03:15 AM
I left out a very useful, and important part of the article :-)

From the same piece:


While Tiger Woods has never done anything more charismatic than having his Nike cap surgically attached to his head, American networks may soon be asking how they can sell a European who does not throw tantrums, shave his body hair or lapse into arm-pumping convulsions upon converting a break point.

The promise of greatness, I would remind them, is in the pure performance. Just this spring, a horse proved that.

LCeh
07-03-2004, 04:33 AM
"He's just so perfect out there,'' Serena Williams agreed. "I mean, Roger is just, like, unbelievable.''

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/07/03/sports/tennis/03araton.html

Serena... :eek:

I can't believe the "cocky" Serena said that. :bolt:

Dirk
07-03-2004, 12:58 PM
Serena is not cocky but confident like Rogi. People need to stop it.

WyveN
07-03-2004, 01:27 PM
Illusionist Federer turns winning into an art form
By Simon Barnes, Sports Writer of the Year



IT WAS a horrible day and it rained all the bloody time, but it was worth
going to Wimbledon for the sake of two minutes. That was the first game of
the semi-final, as served by Sébastien Grosjean. Five points later, he was a
break down, mesmerised, spellbound, entrapped by tennis of precise and
exquisite beauty. I scarcely need to write the name of his opponent, but I
will do so out of journalistic good manners. Roger Federer, of course. No
one else spellbinds.
He carried on spellbinding for as long and as late as the weather permitted,
eventually forced off Centre Court when leading 6-2, 6-3, 4-3. It was not so
much a semi-final as a rain-soiled masterclass.


And I am reminded of stories about the trainee pilot who was so insanely
gifted that all the instructors used to come out and watch him land. Or the
music teacher who sobs to his pupil: "Go avay! I can teach you nuzzink! From
you I only learn." It is as if a Mozart symphony had been somehow translated
into sport: an expression of unapologetic genius, unreachable virtuosity,
talent of an order that it is as far beyond reach as it is beyond analysis.
Yet it is not skill for its own sake. You feel that the skill feels so
natural and so inevitable to the person behind it that he sets very little
store by it. I have just read that Mozart comparison back. It is, I think,
at the same time utterly apposite and ludicrously inappropriate. Because
sport is not art. Federer is not attempting to beguile our senses and make
us sigh with pleasure. He is not an artist. He is a businessman, and his
business is the winning of tennis matches by any means that come to hand. It
just so happens that the Federer method is stunningly beautiful.
Federer just looks like an artist and his victories look like works of art.
His victory in the previous round over Lleyton Hewitt was a minor
masterpiece, his first game against Grosjean was a perfect fragment. A
sprawling canvas, a miniature. A four-act blank-verse drama, a haiku.
Somehow, Federer demands such high-falutin' comparisons.
It is an illusion, that Federer is seeking to create art, but it is a very
appealing one. All sporting encounters have some element of drama, some
narrative line, and when these are accompanied by skill of such a beguiling
kind, it is almost impossible not to start thinking of them as art.
A dancer seeks to create beauty; Federer seeks to create game points and set
points and match points. But the way he goes about it is unquestionably
beautiful and seems to involve the illusion that he is creating for us a
spontaneous work of art. No one says that of Andy Roddick, or even for that
creator of the most twisted and tormented narrative lines in sport, Tim
Henman.
Tennis is not art. It is a duel, the opposing of one will against another.
How can that even look like art? The answer is in the illusion that Federer
creates. It is something you see at the highest levels of all forms of sport
and especially of the combat sports.
Federer somehow makes his opponent look not as if he were opposing him but
co-operating with him. Not opponents but collaborators. It is the most
extraordinary illusion. You can see it perhaps most clearly in judo, when
the person thrown seems somehow to assist his thrower, to be thrown by long
prior agreement, a matter of hard-practised teamwork. That same illusion is
sometimes to be seen in Muhammad Ali at his fastest and finest; in George
Best, in David Campese, in the Brazil football team of 1970. And if that
seems to be paying Federer a high and rare compliment, it is because that is
intended.
There is an illusion within the illusion. It is as if Federer's opponent
were moving fast, flat out, full speed while Federer himself is in slow
motion. That is because Federer's huge level of skill and touch and
deception hurry an opponent, while Federer himself always seems to have more
time than is strictly justifiable. It is an element of his easy timing of a
ball and the way his extreme level of ability so often forces his opponent
to play shots into his hitting zone.
Federer doesn't look aggressive. He seems to be playing the ball in sheer
delight at the things he can do with it, playing with a racket whose strings
are one moment cobweb, the next piano-wire. And if it is all illusion, it is
an illusion that can only be created by genius.
But beauty or no beauty, it comes down to one thing: winning tennis matches
or not winning tennis matches. Federer might have the finest hands in the
history of tennis, but tennis matches are not won by hands alone. No one
praised the art of Pete Sampras. Sampras won Wimbledon seven times, Federer
just once. So far.
We know all about his hands already - we have, I hope, years ahead to learn
about the rest of him. Starting with his mind. For at the end, it is not art
or beauty or hands that make serial champions. Such things are just merely a
method. A tool of the competitive mind.

moonlight
07-03-2004, 01:48 PM
Awesome Federer into final
By Caroline Cheese
BBC Sport at Wimbledon

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/40343000/jpg/_40343011_federerpa203.jpg

Reigning champion Roger Federer took 31 minutes on Saturday to reach his second final, completing a 6-2 6-3 7-6 (8-6) win over Sebastien Grosjean.

The top seed was leading 6-2 6-3 4-3 when play was abandoned on Friday.

The players returned to a sunny Centre Court at 1200 BST, and after saving two match points Grosjean went on to serve for the set as Federer lost focus.

But the Frenchman could not complete an unlikely comeback, and Federer came through an edgy tie-break to advance.

"I'm very relieved," Federer told BBC1.

"It was difficult to stop with the match at such a point.

"Things were looking good but you never know what can happen. On a new day, he might have turned it around."


Federer equalled Pete Sampras' record of 23 straight wins on grass with victory over Grosjean, but he insisted he did not feel invincible on the surface.

"I always feel like my opponent has a chance," said Federer, who can surpass Sampras' record in Sunday's final.

"This year has been fantastic and it's difficult to understand why I'm so dominant this year.

"But I always have the same attitude - if I don't play well I could lose," added the world number one.

The semi-final began at 1300 BST on Friday, and Federer took advantage of a shaky start from Grosjean to break serve immediately before the rain came after only 23 minutes.

It was almost five hours until play resumed, when Federer once again clicked into gear straight away, wrapping up the first set only eight minutes after the restart.

Grosjean attempted to mix up his tactics by approaching the net, but he was passed time and again and serving to stay in the second set, he netted a volley.

It took until 2-2 in the third set for Grosjean to earn his first break point of the match, but the 10th seed wasted it by netting a routine forehand.

Play was abandoned with Federer leading 4-3, and the overnight break appeared to upset the world number one's focus.

Grosjean produced two winning serves to stave off two match points at 4-5, and went on to serve for the set.

But Federer found his form when it mattered, breaking back with a majestic forehand pass before coming from 4-0 down in the tie-break to hand Grosjean a fourth Grand Slam semi-final defeat.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/3860757.stm

ytben
07-03-2004, 04:03 PM
Thanks for the article guys :)

moonlight
07-03-2004, 04:41 PM
R. Federer Interview
Saturday, July 3, 2004


THE MODERATOR: First question for Roger.

Q. How important was it to get your temper under control, as a kid, to your successes now? When you were younger, you had a bad temper. Now you've cooled down. I'm wondering how important that was?

ROGER FEDERER: It was very important for me to realise, you know, that I have to focus more on the game instead of, you know, losing energy, throwing the rackets, screaming, getting angry at mistakes, you know.

Took me a while, but finally I figured it out, and now I feel very good on the court. I feel very relaxed. Makes me play better tennis.

Q. There's a lot of interesting points in the short finish of this match. One of them was at 6‑6 in the tiebreak where you had to hit a reflex volley. Had you missed that, he would have been serving for the set. Was that a difficult shot for you to make or not?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, after not really. But if you miss it, yes (smiling). It is always one of those points where you don't have much time. You just hope, you know, you put the racket in the right angle, so it just drops over to the other net.

Really, that's the way I felt. After I hit it, I said, "That wasn't too difficult," even though I was hoping he would miss the passing shot. After I made it, it was not that difficult.

Q. Do you consider yourself sometimes unbeatable on the court?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I always feel like, you know, my opponent has a chance. Of course, this year has been fantastic for me. You know, it's still very difficult for me to understand, you know, why and how come that I'm so dominant this year. But, you know, every match I go with the same attitude out on the court. I know my opponent will try everything to beat me. If there are days where I'm not going to play well, you know, I might lose. I know that this can happen any day.

Q. Second Wimbledon finals. How does that hit you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's very nice. You know, I don't know if everybody realizes actually that this is only my third, you know, Grand Slam final. And I'm very thrilled. You know, I have to say I'm very happy, even though my matches have been rather easy, so I couldn't make summersaults because of, you know, the matches. But, you know, I'm very happy to be again in the finals and to actually do have the chance now, finally, to defend my title. I'm really looking forward to this, this next match.

Q. Can you size up a match against Mario or Andy?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, finally Mario's doing well, because he beat me here two years ago. He lost in the next round in straight sets against Vacek. Yeah, and I was very surprised. And it took him, a while to maybe get his game together a little bit. But I'm happy to see he's doing well.

Against Andy I've played many more times. It will be as difficult. They have different games. Mario follows his serve; Andy doesn't. But I don't have a favorite player I would like to play in the finals.

Q. Does Centre Court feel like your home now?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I'm still very young and I still need some time to call it "home." But I feel welcome, very welcome in this place ‑ as a member now. The chairman always says hello, we always speak a little bit. We always like to chat.

You know, I feel very warm here.

Q. Does everybody consider you so much better than every other player in the world. Don't you think you're in a risky situation, that if you win, you're just doing your job, and you have just something to lose?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, this is maybe ‑‑ I felt this way before. But now that I'm always in contention of winning big tournaments, it changes because once you won the tournament, then you're such a happy person. The people realise actually what a great job you did.

I know also for sometimes the second and third round, it's not made to become famous. I am already famous enough in tennis. These matches, I look at them like, these are the matches I have to win and this is also where I push myself almost the hardest. Because once the tournament gets under way, everything comes very natural for me.

Now that I'm again, you know, have this opportunity to win this tournament or any big tournament, is a very special feeling. And I also get very nervous before finals. And these are the moments I work hard and live for. This is going to be a great match, I hope.

Q. There was some speculation on the television the other night that you might be doing some damage to your wrist with that amazing action you have on your forehand. Is that a problem at all?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I haven't had too many wrist problems so far. But I don't know. Who said that?

Q. I think they had a viewer contacting them saying you might need an operation (laughter).

ROGER FEDERER: It's not flexible enough (smiling)?

Q. I thought it was very weird, but that's what they said.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I feel also I can give the ball an unbelievable amount of racquet speed. That saves me a lot of points. When the ball comes very fast to me, I still have enough time, you know, to get the racket around the ball, to actually be able to control it and play back with spin. I don't know where that comes from.

I love hitting half volleys. Maybe it was because I was lazy before, I had to hit too many, but now I enjoy playing them.

Q. You spoke about your calm on court, how that helps you. Could you detail that? Does it just give you less pressure at big moments? Does it let you focus on execution? How does that calm inter‑play with your success?

FEDERER: Oh, to me it just feels, also in between matches and on the court, I feel like I'm not losing too much energy. Before maybe there also was more of an unsecure (sic) feeling I had on the court, which made me become maybe more nervous, not sure of what I'm actually going to do. You know, if I would panic a few years ago, I would just start to serve and volley because I would feel like, well, my backhand's not working, so how does it work that I don't have to a backhand? Well, I come to net, so I have to hit volleys. So then I would get upset. This also wouldn't work.

So I had to just ‑‑ it's got a lot also to do with self‑confidence for me, just be able to understand the game itself.

Q. Did that happen during your Ancic loss?

ROGER FEDERER: What happened there? I lost first round French, Wimbledon back to back. I think that was in the year 2002. It made me wonder, yeah, what's going on. But I have to say the big step, I did it actually in 2001. Before the French Open, I played quarter-finals of French Open, quarter-finals Wimbledon. These were the tournaments where I realised actually I'm playing better when I'm more calm.

But then I had the problems where I was too calm for about a year or so. And that was a problem, too. So I had to get the fire, you know, back in my game, and I could work it out step by step. But, you know, it took a while.

Q. Your improvement on backhand, are you still working on something technically or do you consider yourself almost perfect technically?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I still feel, you know, room for improvement on my backhand side. I would like to hit the backhand, you know, which comes higher to my backhand better. But I think a lot had to do with my backhand was my footwork. Now I'm in better position. Before I would be really lazy. I would be happy just to play a slice. But now if I can hit a drive backhand, it's better for my game. This has been the big improvement for me.

Q. How do you consider your open‑mindedness to change? You split with Peter after winning Wimbledon. Early in your career you had a psychologist. How important is that to your success?

ROGER FEDERER: What is important, excuse me?

Q. The fact that you're open‑minded.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think it's important to listen to people you trust. But, I mean, listen to everybody is not the right thing either, because a lot of people have different opinions. For me at the moment, it's definitely the situation where a lot of people would like to tell me, "Well, shouldn't you do this or that," because they don't think I have a coach.

But I have to say people start to understand. Because in the beginning of the year, a lot of people came up to me and said, "You know, you need help. Can I do this for you?" A lot of people were writing me e‑mails that they think I'm doing this wrong and that wrong. I don't listen to everybody; I just listen to the people, you know, I really trust and believe in.

This is why also I'm taking my time with a coach, because I just don't want to take a coach to travel with me. If I want to start working again with a coach, it's to improve my game. Anything else would be wrong, I think.

Q. What do you like about Ancic's game? Do you think he's got the makeup to be a Top 5, Top 10 type player?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, difficult to say. But, I mean, he's beaten Henman here which is a very good effort. I think he needs a little bit more to prove to the top guys at the big events that he belongs in the Top 10. Top 5 is a big step.

Again, I know how hard it was for me to actually get there. I don't know what his ranking is now. But I still think he won't jump from right away into the Top 5, unless of course he wins this tournament, then he's not too far away.

The way he's playing now, for grass it's very suited. I've always thought he's a great player. Finally he's making his moves.

But we'll see how long it will take him to really go to the top.

Q. How do you feel about this incredible winning streak on grass? I think you're level with Sampras now, 23 successive victories.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I don't even think about it sometimes. People told me that he had 23. I knew I was at 22. But I don't know, it's funny. Now I have a chance actually to win my second Wimbledon, and that would also pass that winning streak from Sampras.

I mean, last year's grass season was just incredible. I thought, "Well, I've got so many points to defend, I hope I can just at least play well at Wimbledon. Hopefully Halle will work okay for me." I started. Hardly lost a serve, hardly lost a set. For me it's very difficult to explain why and how it comes.

Because, like I've said before, I just try to focus for every match. And it seems like it's really working out for me. The grass suits my game. So these are the reasons.

Q. Do you have specific targets? Obviously you want to win Wimbledon. Do you have long‑term goals?

ROGER FEDERER: I mean, the goals for this year are clearly to stay at the No. 1 position, to defend this title, and to play well at the Olympics. These are for me the three main goals. You know, after tomorrow, one goal is gone, either positive or negative.

But long‑term, I don't say I have a big plan or so to win I don't know how many Grand Slams or win so many tournaments. I will rethink my goals for the next year at the end of the year.

Q. Are you a better player this year than you were going into last year's final?

ROGER FEDERER: I didn't hear the beginning.

Q. Are you a better player going into this final than you were a year ago?

ROGER FEDERER: Am I a better player?

Q. This year than you were last year.

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, difficult to say because last year's semifinal was so incredible. You know, I thought it was one of the most exciting matches for me last year to play. This year's semis was different ‑ a lot of rain delays, a lot of very hard conditions to play in, with the wind.

But what counts I think is to be, again, in the same position, to be able to win the tournament. I think I'm a more complete player, you know, more, like I said, secure. I know what I have to do that maybe last year wasn't quite there because I never won a Grand Slam. So these are the main changes.

Q. What will you do this evening to pass the time?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, not much. I will just have treatment again and relax really because, I mean, luckily for me the match went very quickly today. Luckily I didn't have to play four or five sets. That is an advantage. I have a little bit more time than the other guys. I don't know how long they will keep waiting if it rains. But I hope we can play tomorrow.

I'm looking forward to that match. But tonight will be similar night to all the other nights.

ytben
07-03-2004, 04:56 PM
lol, I seriously can't imagine the lazy bad tempered kid Rogi used to be. Thanks for the interview moonlight :kiss:

Jazzy
07-04-2004, 08:07 AM
hey, thanx moonlight! :)

moonlight
07-04-2004, 08:37 PM
R Federer interview
Sunday, July 4, 2004

THE MODERATOR: Thank you, Ladies and Gentlemen. Could we have the first question for the Wimbledon Champion.

Q. You were waiting for the sun to play your best tennis or what?

ROGER FEDERER: It looked like it, yes. You know, I'm just very happy. You know, I came out of that rain break, you know, where I was down 4‑2 as a better player because up until then I thought Andy was playing good tennis. He was putting me under pressure. I couldn't really play, you know, the way I wanted to. So I had to change some things. I came to the net more.

You know, this is when the sunshine came at the same time. I'm happy I had such a great reaction.

Q. What are your thoughts when Andy goes to the net more, when he serves and volleys more?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I played him once, I think he was injured a little bit in Basel, he was serving and volleying first and second serve. I mean, I've played him when he was serving and volleying. I think obviously he should do it occasionally. With that great serve he has, he gets a lot of easy volleys.

I wasn't too surprised to see it because I knew that he will maybe change some things up to play me.

Q. How did it affect you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I didn't have a problem because I was actually ready for Andy to do so. You know, when he did it, you know, he was just actually serving too big. He was serving 10 miles an hour quicker in the beginning of the match than he actually was in the rest of the match. I think that was the key to success in the first set, because he was just serving too big. You know, I missed that one chance I had at Love‑40, and that was it.

Q. It seemed like it was a completely different match after you found your backhand. You had so much trouble with your backhand early in the match. Where did it go and how did you refind it?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I don't know if the backhand was really my problem, you know. I just thought it was the combination of Andy really playing well and him not allowing me actually to play the way I wanted to.

You know, he was hitting off both sides, backhand and forehand, very hard, and deep into the baseline. All I could do was actually block the ball back. I couldn't even slice. So that is a credit to him.

Definitely, you know, my backhand got better. Luckily for me, that backhand went in at 30‑All. That was important.

Q. Was there any adjustment you made in the way you hit the backhand?

ROGER FEDERER: I thought, if you look at the match also, he was serving second serves also at 120s in the beginning. In the end, he was hitting them at 100 to get more kick on them, which maybe I prefer a little bit.

But, you know, he's playing it safer, but it's also better for me obviously. I think this is why also the match turned.

Q. Can you pinpoint the moment where you decided to serve and volley more?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, after the rain break. You know, at 4‑2 I thought about what was going on. I thought maybe that will allow me to get some more free points and not to have to go every time in a rally, because that was actually the thing that was killing me. Because from the baseline, you know, on my serve he was taking a lot of risk. That was very dangerous for me. I decided to do so.

This makes me extremely, you know, happy and proud that I actually did take the right choice in such a moment.

Q. You've become such a great big‑match player. What has been the key of the development of your fighting spirit? What do you say when you're down and need to come through?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I've always told myself, and it's always been like this since I've played Juniors, that if I get to finals, you know, I just don't want to lose them. I do not accept. This is why for me in the beginning of my career on the ATP Tour, it was very difficult to actually get to know defeat in the finals because I had a bad record in the beginning of my career in finals. And really since now quite a long period of time, I've been winning a lot of the finals.

You know, maybe I lost one or the others here and there. But I have a very good wining percentage in finals. It seems like I can get my act together at the right time and even stay calm in finals where it's all about.

I've said this, you know, I think after the Australian Open, or after this win last year, that, you know, for me winners stay and losers go. I don't want to be one of them who goes.

Q. Do you think not having a coach in some way helps you and toughens you, gives you more resolve, knowing you have to do it yourself?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I wouldn't say so, no. Coach or no coach, you know, for me, I've learned so much through the last few years. I've been with Peter, obviously he helped me also in the way so I could actually travel alone. I mean, that's also to his credit.

For me, I felt already like I've been a grown‑up man already last year on the court. I was feeling ready actually to handle it on my own.

Q. How different does it feel this year than last? You were outwardly less emotional. Does it feel a lot different to your first win here?

ROGER FEDERER: I mean, I have to say very similar, you know. Both matches were down to the wire, until the end, until the last point. Of course, I was up 6‑1 in the tiebreaker last year. But still, you know, I have felt the pressure on my serve at 6‑3. This year I had to serve for the match, which is also not the most fun thing to do in a Grand Slam final, you know. I was very nervous at 30‑All.

But somehow the reactions after the match were very similar. You know, I fell to my knees and started to cry again because, you know, I couldn't believe it. I didn't cry this time in interview, because I kind of learned from what happened last year.

But it's very similar. Somehow I feel even more joy this year because I had so much pressure going into this tournament. Now to see my name on the board twice in a row, I kind of, you know, get more joy out of this. It's strange.

Q. Are you looking forward to dancing with Maria Sharapova at the ball?

ROGER FEDERER: You should know there's no more dancing going on at the Champion's Ball.

Q. A year ago if you had been sitting here having won the tournament serving and volleying on 80% of your first serves, would you have imagined that a year later you would play so dramatically different on your first serve? What's the explanation for it?

ROGER FEDERER: I think the explanation to this is what happened to me a few years ago here in Wimbledon. Remember I came here in '99. I've only played from the baseline against Novak. 2000, I came here, I was on serving and volleying against Kafelnikov. Against Ancic, you know, I was also almost only serving and volleying in the beginning, then I couldn't because he was playing too well. Also in 2001, I was serving and volleying all the time. I always felt I put myself in such difficult situations all the time, and I had to be so confident to serve and volley on second serves, on first serves all the time. And this was for me very difficult.

So I started actually last year also to play much more from the baseline on grass. Of course, I was serving and volleying more at that time. But, you know, this tournament started me playing from the baseline. So I thought, "Why change something now because I'm playing Andy?" But, you know, I had to because he's a better player than all the other others I've played. Luckily for me I actually had a rain break to realize I had to.

Q. You came very close to being broken in the fourth set at 2‑3. Two breakpoints. On the second one, Andy hit an inside‑in down the line. You made a spectacular get on the first ball. You may remember he hit wide on the second ball. Could you go over the importance of that shot in getting the first one back and saving that breakpoint?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, he had two huge chances in the fourth set really. Twice he missed a forehand which, you know, maybe normally he doesn't miss. But, I mean, I had to really, really fight hard to actually stay in the rally. Already I thought I hit a couple backhands which I was really under pressure. Forehand the same, you know, because he hit one unbelievable inside‑in forehand. These are the moments where I think I got a little lucky today, because who knows what happens again. You know it's similar to the Grosjean match. It was very close. This final has been played on a couple of points and I was lucky enough to make those.

Q. Last year you were given Juliet from your government. Would you like to expand the herd this year?

ROGER FEDERER: It wasn't from the government. It was the tournament of next week, of Gstaad.

Q. Would you like to expand the herd?

ROGER FEDERER: She got a baby. I already have two. We'll see what happens tomorrow. Tomorrow I'm getting there. Then we'll see what happens. I'm fine with two for the moment.

Q. You are going to the Olympics. How important is this tournament for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Very, very important. Yeah, I've had such a great time in Sydney already four years ago. It's always been a dream for me to represent my country, you know, to win a medal there once. I came so close four years ago. I'm really going over there to maybe do one step better.

Q. During the rain delay when you figured out you wanted to change your approach, are you pretty much by yourself or are you talking to somebody about this?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, the people who were in my box, you know, Pavel and Reitan (phonetic), one is a physio, one is my friend who also to used to play tennis a bit. I just asked them what they think. I told them, "I think I have to serve and volley," because I remember playing serve and volley the year before, and I thought Andy was just getting too many returns back. I thought he improved on the return, so this is also why I prefer to stay at the baseline in the beginning.

But I just thought, you know, I will get more free points. He will maybe feel the pressure a little bit more and cannot take as many chances from me at the baseline when I'm serving. This is exactly what happened. I had to take chances today because otherwise it wouldn't have worked.

Q. Do you feel like you're reaching your peak or do you feel you're already there?

ROGER FEDERER: If I feel like?

Q. As though you're reaching your peak.

ROGER FEDERER: I feel like I can, you know, serve and volley more. Definitely, you know, I think this is something I can improve. I've always ‑‑ it's always been my dream actually to play better at the net. I'm definitely not bad, but I still feel there is room for improvement at the net.

But it's just so hard for me to do so because I feel the opponents are so incredible tough on returns and second passing shots. This makes it hard for me.

But, you know, I think if there's really room for improvement, it's in this area.

Q. Can you update us on what the situation is with the Swiss Defence Ministry, what ‑‑ any commitment you would have to serve?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't understand.

Q. Military service.

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, military service. Well, as long as I'm in the Masters at the end of the year, you know, I have no time. They know that. So we'll see what happens when I'm not in the Masters.

Q. How much was nerves a factor at the beginning of the match? How nervous were you? You didn't seem to be playing quite as sharply as you were.

ROGER FEDERER: Cold hands walking out on the court once more. You know, excited actually to be in the finals. You know, more of that. I felt from the start it's going to be a very dangerous and difficult match for me. Like I've said, he didn't allow me to play the way I wanted to. You know, I couldn't run around my backhand because he was hitting them too hard and too deep all the time. And I was very surprised how consistent his backhand was. That put me under pressure in the beginning.

I thought also he was making a lot of returns and also playing good returns, and this is why he totally deserved that first set.

Q. Do you think you had a mental advantage today? He showed quite a bit of frustration during key points. Did that help you? Do you think in all honesty you were the stronger mental player today?

ROGER FEDERER: You know, he always shows a lot of emotions, if it's positive or negative. I mean, I think this was very similar, his emotions, to last year. Last year I thought maybe he was a little bit more frustrated because it was straight sets and I was more dominant in that match.

But it's normal he gets frustrated. Because like in the fourth set, he had so many chances, he didn't make it. I get one chance and I do so. This is very difficult mentally. I just knew that my only chance actually to win today is if I stay very calm, and if I get a little luck, I could turn it around. I knew I wasn't far away from winning.

Q. Ultimately do you think that was an advantage for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Today it was, yes.


http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/interviews/2004-07-04/200407041088966328064.html

moonlight
07-05-2004, 02:26 AM
Federer: A champion and his own man
- STEVE WILSTEIN, AP Sports Columnist
Sunday, July 4, 2004


(07-04) 15:21 PDT WIMBLEDON, England (AP) --

Without a coach, agent, business manager, publicist, personal assistant, bodyguard, cook or chauffeur, Roger Federer still manages to win championships.

He carries his own rackets, packs his own suitcases, makes his own travel plans.

Nobody plans his strategy or fiddles with his strokes.

Some players need help tying their own shoes and tucking in their shirts. Federer, a 22-year-old from Switzerland, is his own man. He has a dozen ways to hit backhands, nearly as much variety on forehands, and several disguises on serves, but Team Federer is basically a mom-and-pop affair with help from his longtime girlfriend.

That self-reliance toughened Federer and got him out of trouble Sunday when he came from a set back against Andy Roddick to win a second straight Wimbledon and third Grand Slam title, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 6-4.

While Roddick kept glancing up toward his coach, Brad Gilbert, for nods of encouragement, Federer searched within himself to find a way to win. Racket artistry wasn't enough. Federer needed a change of tactics and he came up with one: abandon the baseline and attack at the net.

Federer hasn't had a coach since splitting with Peter Lundgren last December. All Federer has done since then is win the Australian Open, four tour titles, and now Wimbledon again to reaffirm his status as No. 1. His 2004 record is 46-4.

"Roger has learned self-discipline," his mother, Lynette, said on the lawn of the players' lounge, where she shared victory champagne with her son, family and friends. "This is a very important phase in his career, that he could step back, not rely on somebody, get to know himself, get to know his own tennis and technique.

"I've got a feeling that a period without a coach -- I don't say it's ideal -- has made him take a lot of initiative. He's become a little more creative, he's worked on himself. I think he's never worked as hard since he hasn't had a coach."

She and her husband, Robert, who stayed home in Switzerland because he was too nervous to watch in person, help keep their son's business affairs humming. His longtime girlfriend, former player Mirka Vavrinec, doubles as his publicist.

"I'm very in-house," Federer says.

He may work with a coach again, but is in no rush to find one. His parents consider a coach to be important but are content to watch their son continue to make the big decisions in his career, no matter how they turn out.

Federer figured out for himself what he had to do to beat Roddick, whose imposing serves of up to 145 mph, aggressive net attacks, and strong forehands carried him to a first-set win.

"I threw the kitchen sink at him, but he went to the bathroom and got a tub," Roddick said.

After Federer evened the match in the second set, he fell behind a break at 4-2 in the third when a light rain brought the covers out for a second time. Roddick conferred with Gilbert and stayed with the strategy they had laid out before the match. Federer did his own analysis and figured it was time to switch to a serve-and-volley style.

"I thought about what was going on," Federer said. "I thought maybe that will allow me to get some more free points and not to have to go every time in a rally, because that was actually the thing that was killing me. Because from the baseline, on my serve he was taking a lot of risk. That was very dangerous for me. This makes me extremely happy and proud that I actually did take the right choice in such a moment."

Federer and his family also took pride in how coolly he handled that small crisis, the six break points he brushed away in the fourth set, and the other challenges he's faced on court the past couple of years. For a player who had a reputation as a tennis brat growing up, throwing tantrums and rackets like John McEnroe, Federer has turned into Bjorn Borg-like master of impassive play.

"When he was younger, he was very ambitious," Lynette Federer said. "When he didn't achieve what he wanted he could get a little erratic on the court. He realized he was just wasting energy. Today he proved it in the fourth set (when he was) down on his serve. Years ago, he would have thrown the racket or shouted and wasted energy. Today he's learned to get his emotions under control."

Federer's parents are happy about that, since they always cringed when they watched him act up on court as a youngster. But they're most proud of the way he's grown into a confident and independent man.

"We really respect the way he left home very young and he's taken his career into his own hands," his mother said. "He's gotten used to fighting and keeping up his level. He needed to mature."

Asked if she thought a few years ago, when he was still struggling, that the maturity might never come, she nodded.

"Yeah, I did," she said. "He just needed his time. Roger always needed to go over certain hurdles to give him a little push in his career. It happened as a child at school, it happened in sports. Every time he bumped his head he improved, he always made a big jump. Everything happened step by step. Now he's there where he wants to be."

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/news/archive/2004/07/04/sports1821EDT0265.DTL

moonlight
07-05-2004, 02:32 AM
Federer slugs it out among the greats
By Simon Barnes, Chief Sports Writer
Times online

THE past fortnight at Wimbledon has been dominated by the sound of the wise men and women of Wimbledon trying to work out just how good Roger Federer is. The most excitable have said that he is the best. The best ever. The most brilliant tennis player that ever held a racket in his hand.
Me, I measure great athletes by the number of big championships they have collected, using such things as Steve Redgrave’s five gold medals as a kind of gold standard. We won’t know how good Federer is until he has passed some kind of test of time. Yesterday, he won his second Wimbledon and his third grand-slam title, beating Andy Roddick 4-6, 7-5, 7-6, 6-4.



Brilliance is not the measure of a champion. What people mean is that Federer can play the best tennis shots they have seen. He can bring off shots that simply wouldn’t occur to anyone else. He can play points and games and matches of such pure and perfect beauty that it makes you gasp and smile and wag your head in delight.

But that doesn’t make him the greatest player of all time. If we say that great shots are the marks of greatness, then we must say that Jimmy White, serial losing finalist, is the greatest snooker player of all time. It was the less sumptuous virtues of Steve Davis and Stephen Hendry that made them great champions.

And we must say that Glenn Hoddle is the finest footballer that ever drew breath, David Gower the finest cricketer. They are nothing of the kind: gloriously gifted individuals who won some things and lost some things and gave huge pleasure whenever they played. They were, both of them, among the greatest ball-players I have seen. Neither was a great champion.

How do you examine the championship credentials, then, of a supremely gifted individual? Well, the interesting experiment would be to deprive them of their gifts and then see what they have left. And that is exactly what happened to Federer in the men’s singles finals at Wimbledon yesterday.

Blame Roddick. He came on to Centre Court in a state of such whipped-up intensity that it was uncomfortable to watch. He played in an absolute frenzy of hurry. I have never seen a server so anxious to get rid of his tennis balls. He was producing the second-serve ball from his pocket as it had turned red-hot and was threatening his privates.

He roared through the first set, blasting the defending champion out of his composure, hammering him out of his A-game. Federer found some form and touch in the second set, took a 4-0 lead — and then proceeded to play as badly as someone with his colossal gifts possibly can. He lost the next four games, mostly by means of uncertain serving and unforced errors.

Was it nerve? Was it the hurry-up Roddick had imposed on him? Was it eagerness for the title? Whatever it was, it was horrible to watch. In the space of half a dozen games, Federer had made atheists — or at least agnostics — of his new and true believers. So this was the test. Could Federer win a big championship without the protection of his incomprehensibly lofty gifts?

Federer had to go slumming into the abysmal depths of personality in order to pull out this win. He had to win not on beauty but on bloody-mindedness. He had to rise above his own poor play and win by the quality of his competitive nature. Roddick put more and more pressure on Federer’s game: and it buckled and crumpled but never quite fell apart.

A point or two would be pure Federer, a couple more would be be head-holdingly awful. Federer has never got too made up about his brilliance: we were now to see that he is not the sort to get too cast down by his lack of it. This was a plan B victory, plan B being hang in there and keep slugging.

Federer was never close to dominating the match. Roddick was too much in his face. And Federer was never close to his serene, unruffled self. He lost an awful lot of points he should have won. But he lost hardly any of the points he needed to win. That was the difference. For example, he had six break points against him in the final set and was not broken.

The margin was small and it was not to be measured in superlatives about his ball-playing skills. Yesterday, these came and went, a point of perfection, an error, a blasting effort from Roddick, another small touch of perfection from that magic racket. But magic was not the thing he relied on: magic was not what won him the title.

And you know what? Seeing him win Wimbledon in these rather sordid circumstances makes me think rather more of him than I did when dazzled by his mere brilliance. We have a great player, for sure. Yesterday, we saw genuine signs that we might have a great champion as well

ytben
07-05-2004, 02:36 AM
Great articles! Thanks moonlight, and also for the interview :)

vene
07-05-2004, 05:02 AM
Funny article, NYT

Federer's 2nd Title Just as Sweet


Agence France-Presse-Getty Images
Roger Federer took Andy Roddick's pace in stride. "I threw the kitchen sink at him," Roddick said, "but he went to the bathroom and got his tub."


By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

Published: July 5, 2004.




WIMBLEDON, England, July 4 - By letting his patchy beard grow throughout his triumphant grass-court season, Andy Roddick harked back to a less explosive tennis era, when Bjorn Borg let his whiskers fill in until he lost.

Unfortunately for Roddick, it is time for a shave. Despite all the hustle and high velocity he brought to his first Wimbledon final Sunday, he simply could not make enough big shots at the right moments against Roger Federer.

In the end, after two rain delays and a surplus of his big forehands and surprisingly precise returns, it was the smooth-faced, smooth-stroking Federer who did the best Borg imitation. He dropped to his knees with delight and relief after defending his title with an ace.

Federer, a 22-year-old from Switzerland, has many more aces to hit before he can catch Borg, who won five titles in a row here, or before he catches Pete Sampras, who won seven times at the All England Club.

But on grass, this is unquestionably his time, his era, and it was telling that on an afternoon when he was tighter and more error-prone than usual under Roddick's intense pressure, Federer still managed to lose only one set.

"Roger just played too good today,'' the second-seeded Roddick said in his remarks to the Center Court crowd after Federer's 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 6-4 victory. "I threw the kitchen sink at him, but he went to the bathroom and got his tub.''

Roddick won the battle of one-liners, but winning the battle on grass has proved too much for any man since Federer lost in the first round here to Mario Ancic in 2002. "To have won my favorite tournament already twice is just incredible,'' Federer said.

A year ago, when he won here by defeating another big-serving opponent, Mark Philippoussis, in the final, Federer shed tears on court. This year, he did the same, very briefly, as he sat in his chair after closing out the match.

But in general, he was much more composed, just as he has become much more established. A year ago, he was celebrating his first Grand Slam singles title. Since then, he has won the Australian Open and another Wimbledon. His record in Grand Slam singles finals is 3-0.

Roddick, who won his only Grand Slam title at last year's United States Open, came out swinging, making Federer work hard for his opening service game, then breaking him in his next to take a 2-1 lead.

Although former champions make a habit of bemoaning the lack of variety in contemporary tennis, Roddick and Federer are a fine contrast in style and personality.

Federer, who was seeded No. 1, makes the difficult shot look easy, but it is impossible not to sense the tremendous effort at work in Roddick's game as he explodes into his serve and forehand.

In the opening phases of the match Sunday, he produced plenty of fine passing shots and returns.

The Center Court crowd uttered a collective groan of disappointment after light rain drove the players off the court with Roddick up, 3-2. This was fine theater, and when they returned, the leading man remained the same, with Roddick closing out the first set.

Federer jumped out to a 4-0 lead in the second, breaking Roddick's serve twice. But Roddick returned the favor, evening the set at 4-4, only to lose it after Federer broke him again in the 12th game with a forehand down the line.

When the rain came again, Roddick was leading, 4-2, in the third. But when this 40-minute break ended (the last break of this very rainy Wimbledon), they walked back on court in the sunshine, with Federer determined to attack the net more.

Federer has had no official coach since splitting with Peter Lundgren last season, but he does have advisers, including Reto Staubli, a former player and a friend. They discussed the possibility of serving and volleying. "I thought maybe that will allow me to get some more free points and not to have to go every time in a rally, because that was actually the thing that was killing me,'' Federer said. "From the baseline, on my serve, he was taking a lot of risks.''

Roddick took plenty more in what remained of the match, but the dynamic had changed, and Federer rallied to win the third set in a tie breaker, then salvaged six break points on his serve in the final set on his way to 3-3. Roddick was running out of patience, and he shook the net with both hands in mock frustration in the sixth game after Federer won a point that included a let cord.

It was amusing but also seemed telling, and Roddick lost his serve at love in the next game.

Federer has a 6-1 record against Roddick, who is still only 21.

"You know, losses like this just inspire me more,'' Roddick said. "I just want to keep getting better and better. I feel like I'm on the right track.

"I proved that Roger's not quite invincible. You know, he's pretty close."

The crowd gave Roddick a long ovation as he accepted his finalist's trophy. It is rare today for a high-profile American to hear a ringing public endorsement abroad. "I see it as an opportunity when I wake up every morning to prove stereotypes wrong,'' he said. "You know, I take a lot of pride in that. But I don't really see it as American, British. They're tennis fans, and I'm a tennis player.''

A tennis player who is about to lose a beard. "You won't have to worry about it anymore,'' he said.

Record for Woodbridge

Todd Woodbridge of Australia earned a record ninth Wimbledon men's doubles title Sunday, teaming with Jonas Bjorkman for a 6-1, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4 victory over Julian Knowle and Nenad Zimonjic. Woodbridge had a chance for another title, but he and Alicia Molik lost to Cara and Wayne Black in the mixed doubles final, 4-6, 7-6 (8), 6-4. (AP)

rogicomel
07-05-2004, 07:16 AM
Thanks for the great article!

Jazzy
07-05-2004, 09:06 AM
thanx again moonlihgt and vene!

Marc Rosset is Tall
07-05-2004, 09:53 AM
www.guardian.co.uk/sport

Federer shows grit in his genius to retain the crown

Swiss who has taken grass-court tennis to new heights sees off withering early onslaught by Andy Roddick to defend title in style

Stephen Bierley at Wimbledon
Monday July 5, 2004
The Guardian

This was not the very best of Roger Federer but great players, among whom the Swiss most certainly is, find their own ways of winning in times of difficulty and indifferent form. And so it was yesterday that although his multi-faceted talents lacked their usual sparkle and gloss, the world No1 player defeated the American Andy Roddick, the world No2, to retain his Wimbledon title 4-6, 7-5, 7-6, 6-4.

Federer is normally such a delight to watch that his opponents can almost be forgotten. The sheer joyous artistry of the man is the equivalent of a Bach cello suite, with player and instrument fused into one glorious line of meditation and rapture. Enter Roddick with his Walkman turned on full blast, determined to drown out all elements of artistry with the heavy thumping beat of a pulverising serve and coruscating forehand.

Wimbledon can surely never have witnessed the sort of raw and unremitting power that Roddick, the US Open champion, produced in the opening set. He had promised he would "hit the crap out of the ball" and hit the crap out of it he did, though ultimately to no avail. "I threw the kitchen sink at him, but he went into the bathroom and got the tub," he said.

It was not that Federer was unprepared, more that the sheer early intensity rocked him, combined with a change of tactic that saw Roddick rush the net at every opportunity. Brad Gilbert, the American's coach, has talked long about the 21-year-old backing up his huge serve with the telling volley, and it was obvious that they had decided to break up Federer's limpid rhythms with brute force.

Roddick, who holds the serve world record at 153mph, was regularly hitting the 140mph mark and beyond, and his forehand brought up not so much chalk dust as sparks. His most notable weakness remains his double-fisted backhand but it has improved considerably under Gilbert's tutelage, to the point where Federer was frequently stung by its quality.

The touchstone of Federer's game, for all his multiplicity of shots, some of which he invents on the run, is his own serve. It is his comforter, allowing him to expand his improvisational skills. Roddick broke it at the second time of asking, which was enough for him to take a rain-interrupted first set in just over half an hour.

It seemed the leaden skies had also clouded Federer's mind; a hammer may be unable to smash a diamond but Roddick was having a damn good try.

The Centre Court crowd was both thrilled and concerned. The enormous force of Roddick's game was wondrous for its controlled fury, but few wished to see Federer's genius crushed into a soulless oblivion - or, at least, not until he had had the chance to cast a little magic on the proceedings.

They did not have to wait long. Having failed to break Federer's serve at the start of the second set, Roddick suddenly imploded to go 4-0 down. The champion's fans eased themselves back in their seats a touch, and waited for genius to establish itself.

Perversely, then, Federer completely lost the advantage and found himself back at 4-4, the security of a double break counting for nothing.

It was not easy to explain, save for the fact that Federer could discover little or nothing in the way of continuity. His forehand crackled, flared and then fizzled out. Similarly his backhand. Neither ever seemed to function properly at the same time, while Roddick plundered on, his eyes narrowed for the kill.

But as the American closed in for a two-set lead the champion, as if by some trick of the light (of which there was hardly any) levelled the match, striking a forehand down the line of the sort that had become routinely brilliant in his earlier matches.

Roddick had every right to feel peeved but to his credit his sense of purpose never faltered, and when play was suspended for a second time, midway through the third set, he led 4-2. The players returned to a pool of bright sunshine for the final's third take, and if the real Roger Federer did not return in his full peacock colours, there was enough iridescence glinting off his racket to down Roddick.

Serving and volleying much more, Federer levelled at 4-4, then a sumptuously chipped backhand winner extended his advantage at a critical moment in the tie-break. Suddenly the final was slipping between Roddick's fingers, despite a Herculean effort to tip the balance back in his favour in the fourth set. Four times Federer might have gone 3-1 down on his own serve, and he faltered again in the sixth game when Roddick twice and unusually missed crucial forehands for a 4-2 advantage.

Once, having seen what looked like a winner pop up in Federer's favour off the net cord, Roddick strode forward to the net and shook it vigorously. He might have wished he could get hold of Federer's neck as well. But as so often happens in tennis, having seen his opponent squeak out of the tightest of holes Roddick promptly dropped his own serve, to love, his forehand continuing to malfunction.

Federer's demeanour did not change. The walk between baseline and chair remained just as languorous, his return to the action equally calm. But it was possible, for the first time, to sense that the Swiss knew he was going to win.

Roddick, a competitor to the last, forced Federer to serve it out, holding him to 30-30. Then a final backhand down the line, followed by an ace, and the deed was done. Not with the sustained brilliance that many had hoped for, but even genius must be made to work.

Roddick has improved hugely in the past year, and will surely win this title one day. Federer may go on to win many more. Already he has lifted grass-court tennis to new heights.

Skyward
07-05-2004, 02:05 PM
" a diamond and a hammer" :lol:

Thanks for the articles.

tangerine_dream
07-05-2004, 03:48 PM
Ugh. And the Roger backlash begins. :o

Artist on court' is nothing special off it

July 5, 2004

WIMBLEDON, England - Well, they got it half right, charismatically speaking.

The happy Swiss collapsed backward, covering his unshaven face and the tears that might come and imitating the joyous Russian of the day before, Roger Federer joined Maria Sharapova for the first Wimbledon waltz.

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A well-suited match they make, both with ponytails, hers longer than his, and at eye-level, she as tall as him.

But what will come next for the two of them is more lopsided, because Sharapova is the new princess of a sport desperate for royalty, and Federer is just more of the usual yawn.

"I'm going to the ball, I can't believe I'm saying that. I'm going to the ball."

That was Sharapova the day before, every bit of 17, all bubbly giggles and wide eyes, on the brink of whatever happens next. Federer has done this dance and no one stared.

"I got lucky, I guess," is what Federer said after he had whipped Andy Roddick, and no one argued, not because it was true, but because it wasn't.

Too bad, too, because this grim piece of work is the best in the world and, at 22, could be the best for a very long time.

You thought Peter Sampras was dull, this guy makes Sampras seem like Cedric the Entertainer.

Here's what his home country did for Federer after he won Wimbledon last year. It gave him a milk cow. And he was happy to get it. What he will get this time is uncertain, but goats make a nice encore gift. If he does it enough, he can have the whole chorus from old MacDonald's farm.

Roddick, the scruffy Yank, on July 4, his baseball cap turned front to back, watched Federer tote the trophy around Centre Court with the blank interest of a bridesmaid, suddenly once again the future of tennis and not the present. He seemed not that greatly disappointed, all in all.

"I threw the kitchen sink at Roger," said Roddick, speaking pure American, "but he went to the bathroom and got his tub."

It would have been a regeneration for tennis if Roddick had managed to win from in front, or after the rain break or if he could follow his crashing serve to the net for easy volleys.

Roddick is still all thunder and no lightning, while Federer is a quiet storm that doesn't stop until it has ruined the crops.

According to fellow pro Marat Safin, "Roger has everything, and a backhand."

Certainly a backhand would help Roddick, and you root for him to get one. With Federer you must appreciate precision, almost never worth the effort.

"Roger is the one person I would pay to watch play tennis," Martina Navratilova said. "He is an artist on the court."

Beware the compliment that reaches too far. Tennis players are not artists. We do not watch tennis for the art. We do not watch tennis much at all, in fact, which is a problem that art will not cure.

A movie coming out about Wimbledon was delayed until the fall not because it is preposterous (an Englishman wins) but because it is about tennis.

When tennis has had its greatest runs it has been because of flamboyance and petulance, going back to Pancho Gonzalez, through Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe, Ilie Nastase, Andre Agassi, the early Agassi.

Tennis needs not necessarily an American at the top but it does need someone with a pulse, someone with personality. It doesn't need someone with character as much as a character, and wearing your hair like a librarian spinster doesn't count.

It needs a Roddick, and it had one briefly after the U.S. Open last year, but Wimbledon is the place that validates. All the rest are New Haven.

"I left everything out there," Roddick said. "Hopefully we'll get to do this again some time."

Federer's only concession to fame is to allow his name to be connected to some "Fell the Touch" bath products for men, cologne, after-shave, deodorant, (your basic hotel emergency pack) sold only in Switzerland.

If Sharapova can't do better than that in one phone call (on a phone that works), tennis is truly beyond rescue.

Clearly Federer's second Wimbledon title was overshadowed by Sharapova's first. She is Magical Maria Supernova and he is Roger the Steady. Which T-shirt would you wear?

She climbed into the stands to hug her father and strangers wept. She struggled with a cell phone to call her mother to tell her she had won Wimbledon. Strangers cheered. She apologized to Serena Williams for taking away her title and strangers sighed.

Serena was gracious in defeat, if admitting to being only "20 percent," and she warned Magical Maria that everything is going to change.

Sharapova swore she would be ready. "I've told people," she said, "if I change, hit me in the head, please."

Tell someone to pat Federer on the head if he does.

WyveN
07-05-2004, 03:51 PM
Whoever wrote the article Tangy posted is a moron, Federer certainly didnt "whip" Roddick yesterday and I couldnt be bothered reading past that.

Action Jackson
07-05-2004, 03:56 PM
Whoever wrote the article Tangy posted is a moron, Federer certainly didnt "whip" Roddick yesterday and I couldnt be bothered reading past that.

He was just trying to be controversial, but couldn't back up his points.

Then again he complains about a lack of personality, when the big star of tennis in England is the charismatic Tim Henman, says it all.

It goes back to the English-language bias of the media, even in good papers. Some people still haven't got over the fact that it's not the late 70s and early 80s boom time in tennis.

WyveN
07-05-2004, 04:02 PM
I think its a American that wrote that as they go on about Roddick towards the end. I posted it in GM for a laugh.

vene
07-05-2004, 07:02 PM
Another one from NYT:

The Federers Prove Masters of Their Own Destiny
By HARVEY ARATON

Published: July 5, 2004


imbledon, England

IT was during a 40-minute rain delay in the third set of the Wimbledon final yesterday that Coach Roger Federer addressed Roger Federer, defending champion, on how best to proceed in a match that was being dictated by Andy Roddick.

The sets were even at one apiece, but Roddick had secured a third-set service break, was leading, 4-2, and, as Coach Federer insightfully noted, "Andy was just getting too many returns back," hitting his supposedly vulnerable backhand surprisingly well and winning too many baseline rallies on Federer's serve.

In the locker room during the break, Roddick huddled with Brad Gilbert, typically promoted (in part by himself) as the best coach in tennis. For consultation or conversation, Federer had only a physical therapist and a buddy who "used to play tennis a bit," but guess who did most of the talking?

"I told them, I think I have to serve and volley, because I remember playing serve and volley the year before," Federer said, referring to his straight-set victory over Roddick in the 2003 semifinals. "I just thought, you know, I will get more free points. He will maybe feel the pressure a little bit more and cannot take as many chances from me at the baseline when I'm serving."

Federer continued, "This is exactly what happened, and it makes me extremely, you know, happy and proud, that I actually did take the right choice in such a moment."

On the Fourth of July, he wore down Roddick, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Gilbert, Mr. Winning Ugly, was outcoached by the mentor in the mind of a 22-year-old tennis artiste, who has now won two of three Grand Slam tournaments all on his own.

"He's never worked as hard as he has since he hasn't had a coach," said a most reliable source, Federer's mother, Lynette. "He's gotten to know himself, and his tennis."

The happy mom was off the mobile phone with her husband, Robert, who remained home in Switzerland to avoid the tension of live tennis. Now Lynette Federer was celebrating with family and friends in red Swiss caps what she called a confirmation of the coming-of-age performance Federer put on here last year.

On the most renowned of all tennis stages was a showdown of contrasting body languages - Roddick exuding unbridled energy from every pore while Federer glided around the lawn as though guided by the breeze. Except just as he transformed his tactics during the course of the match, Federer evolved to his exalted state of calm over a period of years.

His temper was once so bad, his mother confided, the family wondered if John McEnroe was a distant cousin. Other parents used to ask how she and her husband put up with such dysfunctional behavior from Roger, their youngest child.

"We'd say, 'We don't like it,' " Lynette Federer said. "He'd have his tantrums, he'd throw the rackets, waste his energy.

"But he just needed time. In his childhood, in school, in his tennis, he always learned how to go over the hurdles. Every time he banged his head, he improved. I think Roger's learned self-discipline, to step back, not rely on somebody."

The apple of her eye apparently didn't fall far from the tree. Federer has ascended to a secure place as the world's No. 1 player after parting ways with his coach, Peter Lundgren, while his parents have assumed control of his career management from the global powerhouse I.M.G.

"We are not doing everything ourselves," Lynette Federer said. "We have a lawyer, a tax attorney." Still, Team Federer stands apart from most Tour heavyweights, many of whose entourages could fill a grandstand section of Center Court.

Lynette Federer's guess is that her son will eventually hire another coach. (Might Phil Jackson be interested in this new Zen master?) "At the moment, things are going all his way," she said. "When he does have a down time, that's when he needs one."

Federer's third-set tactical switch to more serve and volley wasn't the whole story, not the way Roddick was tiring in the fourth set. Roddick's footwork and shot preparation were failing after he set a blistering pace in winning the first set and expended considerable energy rallying from 0-4 to 4-all in the second set, only to lose it. Roddick may be 21, but 145-mile-an-hour serves and one screaming forehand after another will exact a toll against an opponent who literally and figuratively does not sweat.

However canny Federer was, even Phil Jackson might admit that you can't teach talent. Though he played far more baseline tennis here this year than last and got away with it until yesterday, Federer had the serve-and-volley skills to resort to. Roddick was married to his prematch plan to (and we're paraphrasing Roddick here) hit the stuffing out of the ball. For such a strategy he needed Coach Gilbert?

Andre Agassi recast himself with Gilbert but seldom solved Pete Sampras in a big-money match. Roddick, now 1-6 for his career against Federer, admitted that Federer "has an aura about him." To beat him - on grass, at least - Roddick needs work on his volleys, or a better game plan.

What might that be? Coach Gilbert, the author of a soon-to-be-released second book, the subject of a recent magazine profile, a man who by reputation would talk to a racket if it had ears, strode silently past hopeful reporters into a waiting car.

Now that he has bumped heads with Coach Federer, let's see what Gilbert has learned. :D :D :D :D

LCeh
07-05-2004, 09:35 PM
This is a funny article :lol:

-----------------------------------------------------

Britain's Wimbledon champion

It's the news Henman Hill dwellers have been waiting to hear...Roger Federer is British!

Well, sort of.

Turns out the Swiss maestro's second cousin twice removed had a great uncle whose father's father's goldfish came from a pet shop in Hackney.

Actually, it's far simpler than that.

The truth is, Federer's great-great-grandmother was English - probably.

The Wimbledon champion's mum, Lynette, hails from South Africa - as did her mother and grandmother. But Mrs Federer is convinced the line can then be traced back to dear old Blighty.

She said: "I think there may have been an English great-great grandmother called Mabel in the family. I remember my mother mentioning her.

"We have always thought there was a British ancestor somewhere along the family tree."

In which case, Roger old bean, you should do the decent thing and immediately pledge your allegiance to the flag.

You'll be doing your people a favour - just think of the money they'll save on cows.

You can start by eating roast beef and fry-ups and you'll pick up the words to God Save The Queen as you go along.

Note to Swiss: You give us Roger and we'll throw in Greg Rusedski in return. We'll even get Urs Meier a job in the Premiership (not that we're desperate).

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Article found here (http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/funny_old_game/3867259.stm)

Mrs. B
07-05-2004, 09:47 PM
good one. thanks! nah, they can keep Rusedski. :lol:

RogiFan88
07-06-2004, 04:42 AM
that IS a good one, L Ceh!! I wondered about Rogi's Mom's background -- figured she must be of Brit heritage somewhere down the line!

they s trace their roots -- who knows, maybe Rogi and Tim are distant cousins?!!!!

don't you just love that British humour?!

ytben
07-06-2004, 07:28 AM
:lol: Thanks for the funny article LCeh. It helped me to wash the unpleasant aftertaste after reading the "article" Tangy posted. I'll bet the writer, if we can call him that, is one of those old guys who are infatuated with Sharapova.

Jazzy
07-06-2004, 08:28 AM
lol :haha: - nice article LCeh!
awwwwwwwwwwwwww :sad: no second cow for rogi!

------------------------------------------------------------------------
No second cow for Federer

Wimbledon champion Roger Federer will not be getting a cow to go with the one he received at the 2003 Swiss Open. Last year, Federer was presented with a cow to mark his first triumph at Wimbledon where he beat Australian Mark Philippoussis to become the first Swiss man to win a Grand Slam.


He repeated his Wimbledon feat with a four-set victory over American Andy Roddick at the All-England club on Sunday but the Swiss organisers will not be repeating their bovine presentation this time around.
Since last year's tournament Federer's cow, who he named Juliette, has given birth to a calf and a spokeswoman for the Gstaad Open said on Monday: "We will not be giving him a cow at the tournament this year.
"Juliette now has a calf and I don't think Roger will need another cow for the moment!"
Federer was rapturously greeted by a capacity crowd in Gstaad after he won Wimbledon in 2003 but went on to lose in the final to Czech Jiri Novak.
Until last year the best Federer had achieved in Gstaad was the second round. He is the number one seed and begins this year's challenge against German Tomas Behrend on Tuesday.

Reuters - 05/07/2004

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FrenchLouise
07-06-2004, 09:22 AM
A nice article from Swiss daily Le Temps
www.letemps.ch
I only translated a few parts. Enjoy!

Breafkast with Federer
Roger Federer, un lendemain de triomphe, la grande classe avec et sans raquette. Le désormais double champion de Wimbledon parle de son année folle et de ses projets d'avenir au cours d'un petit déjeuner
Thierry Meyer, Londres
Mardi 6 juillet 2004

La Suisse sait-elle vraiment la chance qu'elle a avec Roger Federer? Digne représentant de son sport comme de son pays, le numéro un mondial, désormais double champion de Wimbledon, a beau avoir atteint les sommets du tennis, croulant sous les louanges de ses plus illustres pairs, accumulant les victoires et les millions, il reste ce jeune homme naturel et affable, disponible et attentif, généreux et altruiste. Lundi matin, après une très courte nuit, le Bâlois s'est levé aux aurores pour partager son bonheur de vainqueur avec la presse, avant de s'envoler pour Gstaad, retrouver ses supporters, ses copains et le tournoi qui lui avait fait confiance avant que les lauriers ne fleurissent.

Does Switzwerland really know how lucky it is to have Roger Federer? Despite all his successes (...), he has remained this natural and affable young man, available and attentive, generous and altruist.

A 7 h 30, sur l'antenne de la BBC Radio, Roger Federer s'éclaircit à peine la gorge pour, d'une voix enjouée, expliquer que le plaisir d'un deuxième triomphe à Wimbledon est encore plus intense que la première fois. Il n'a dormi que deux heures, s'est couché à 4 h 30 du matin, après le dîner officiel et, juste avant de se coucher, un coup d'œil à la télévision pour enfin voir cette balle de match, cet ace qui lui a ouvert les portes du paradis, mais peu importe. «C'est tellement bon de raconter ce que je ressens ce matin, c'est si spécial», dit-il simplement à son interlocuteur.

Moins de deux heures plus tard, la presse suisse a les honneurs du patio de la belle villa blanche que le clan Federer a louée pour la quinzaine londonienne, dans les environs cossus de Wimbledon Village. La même, incidemment, où résidait, jusqu'en 2002, un certain Pete Sampras. En jeans et veste kaki, parce que le court sommeil le rend frileux dans le matin ensoleillé, le champion détaille sa soirée de la veille. «L'ambiance était excellente; j'étais à la table de Maria Sharapova, il y avait aussi les vainqueurs de double, et le président de l'All England Club. J'étais plus relax que l'an dernier parce que je savais à quoi m'attendre.» Et ce matin? S'habitue-t-on à être le vainqueur de Wimbledon? «Je me sens super bien, comme l'année passée. Ce n'est pas une matinée comme les autres. Au réveil, je me suis dit: Vraiment, c'est sympa ce que je vis. J'ai tant investi durant ces trois semaines à Wimbledon que lorsque tout est terminé, que la victoire est là, le soulagement est immense. Je rêve d'un troisième sacre, c'est sûr, mais je veux aussi savourer cette deuxième victoire.»

After the interview with the BBC, the Swiss press is allowed into the white mansion rented by the Federer clan in the outskirts of the Wimbledon village, the same rented by Sampras until 2002. Douze mois après son premier succès en Grand Chelem, ici même, celui qui désormais trône au pinacle du tennis mondial considère avec un mélange de satisfaction et d'étonnement cette année folle. «Le pas de géant, je l'ai accompli à Houston, aux Masters. Je me suis surpris à si bien jouer. J'étais parti fatigué, sans illusion, et pourtant j'ai dominé un à un tous les joueurs qui me faisaient peur et qui m'avaient battu, Ferrero, Agassi, Nalbandian... J'ai perdu si peu de matches cette saison, c'en est presque incroyable. Ce résultat est la récompense d'une préparation minutieuse pour chaque rencontre, et d'une planification méticuleuse, sur huit mois, à laquelle j'accorde beaucoup d'importance. Je veux rester numéro un mondial, et je ne veux pas, comme d'autres à cette place avant moi, ne faire que les grands tournois parce que si on les perd, on dégringole très vite au classement ATP – comme Agassi en ce moment. De plus, lorsque j'ai signé pour un tournoi, je n'aime pas déclarer forfait.»
Federer states that his major step was in Houston when he realized that despite his exhaustion he could beat all the ones he feared. According to him, it is thanks to a careful preparation before every match and a meticulous planification during eight months.

Sur la table en fer forgé, la presse anglaise du jour s'étale. Un titre, au hasard: «La puissance n'est pas de taille face au génie.» Vrai, demande un confrère? Roger Federer répond par l'affirmative, sans que personne se dise qu'il a la grosse tête. Dans la foulée, il précise: «Pas une seconde j'estime que j'ai dominé la partie, je le sais bien. L'adversaire (ndlr: Roddick) était plus fort cette année que l'an dernier (ndlr: Philippoussis), même si j'ai mieux volleyé en 2003. Cette année, c'est dans la tête que j'étais plus fort. J'ai su gérer la puissance, comme je l'ai fait face à Karlovic au quatrième tour. Je peux m'adapter à tous les styles. J'ai su rester calme dans les moments les plus difficiles.»

Les McEnroe et autres Becker le comparent déjà aux plus grands, à Sampras qui a accroché 14 Grands Chelems, dont 7 Wimbledon, à son tableau. Rêve-t-il de le dépasser? «Mon objectif de carrière, c'est d'arrêter sans avoir de regrets. Je ne me fixe aucun record à battre – tant mieux si je le fais. Je veux entrer dans chaque tournoi avec le but de le gagner, parce que je sais que j'en ai les moyens. Perdre en demi-finale ne m'intéresse plus. J'ai fixé la barre très haut.» Et le plaisir? «C'est vrai que tout ce que je fais est devenu très pro. Mais la vie du circuit, même si elle est parfois ennuyeuse, est celle que j'ai toujours désirée. J'aimerais parfois avoir plus de temps à moi, mais ma vie aujourd'hui, sans doute pour dix ans encore, c'est le tennis.» En août, c'est avec fierté et détermination qu'il ira chercher une médaille olympique. Les mêmes sentiments l'animent pour dicter son comportement sur les courts et en dehors. «Etre numéro un mondial appelle une responsabilité supplémentaire. J'aime mon sport, j'aime mon pays, je veux être un ambassadeur pour les deux.» Exemplaire.
What about pleasure? "It is true that everything I do has become very pro. But the life on tour, though sometimes boring, is the one I always wanted. I sometimes wish I had more time for myself but my life now, and probably for the decade to come, is tennis". (...) "Being number one calls for more responsability. I love my sport, I love my country, I want to be an ambassador for both". Exemplary.
Breakfast with the champion on Monday after his victory.





Gstaad, le retour en toute discrétion de l'enfant prodige
Federer va tenter d'obtenir dans l'Oberland bernois le premier succès suisse de sa carrière.
Yves Jaton, Gstaad
Comme l'an dernier, Roger Federer est arrivé à Gstaad auréolé d'un titre à Wimbledon. Comme l'an dernier encore, c'est en avion privé qu'il s'est rendu dans l'Oberland bernois, pour atterrir à 17 h 20 précisément à l'aérodrome de Saanen. Le numéro un mondial a effectué le voyage avec sa compagne Mirka Vavrinec. Il a été accueilli sur le tarmac par Jacques et Claudio Hermenjat, respectivement directeur et sous-directeur du tournoi.

Federer était naturellement très fatigué. Avant de se concentrer sur son match de premier tour contre l'Allemand Tomas Behrend, fixé aujourd'hui à 17 h 30, le Bâlois songeait surtout à récupérer. Il n'est pas impossible que la pluie lui vienne en aide. Les mauvaises conditions météorologiques perturbent le déroulement du tournoi et Federer pourrait n'effectuer son entrée en lice que mercredi. L'an dernier, il avait joué deux jours seulement après sa victoire à Wimbledon, et avait souffert mille maux pour venir à bout du qualifié Marc Lopez au premier tour.

Bien qu'il eût accédé à la finale cette même année, le Bâlois a souvent éprouvé des difficultés à évoluer à son meilleur niveau sur la terre battue de Gstaad. Avant 2003, il n'avait gagné qu'un seul match en cinq participations. Lors des quatre autres, il avait connu la défaite d'emblée, et pas toujours contre des adversaires imbattables. On ne peut qu'admirer la fidélité du gentleman vis-à-vis d'un tournoi qui ne lui réussit pas bien.

Si Roger Federer est régulièrement présent dans l'Oberland bernois, en dépit de dates peu favorables et d'un retour aussi ardu que d'une utilité peu évidente sur la terre battue, c'est pour remercier les organisateurs de lui avoir octroyé une invitation lors de ses débuts professionnels. C'est aussi parce qu'il tient beaucoup à remporter un premier tournoi sur sol helvétique, lui qui a été deux fois finaliste à Bâle et une fois à Gstaad.

En 2003, Federer s'était incliné en cinq sets face à Jiri Novak au stade ultime de la compétition. Le Tchèque devrait être, cette année encore, son rival le plus sérieux, ne serait-ce qu'en raison de la relative méforme affichée par les deux autres principales têtes de série, Juan Carlos Ferrero et Rainer Schüttler. Déjà vainqueur à deux reprises à Gstaad, Novak a fait forte impression en battant facilement, hier, l'Argentin José Acasuso. Ce n'est pas le cas du Vaudois Stanislas Wawrinka, éliminé par l'Espagnol Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo, ni du Bâlois Marco Chiudinelli, sorti par un autre Espagnol, Albert Montanes.

The article basically says how great an ambassador Federer is both for tennis and for Switzerland. The article has a funny picture of Federer and his girlfriend drinking champagne with Gstaad tournament director Jacques Hermenjatafter their landing.
One can only admire the fidelity of the ^gentleman towards a tornament with which he has little success. If Federer regularly attends the tornament, it is to thank the organisers for having granted him an invitation when he started on the professional tour. It is also because he strongly wishes to win a first tornament on Swiss grounds.

ytben
07-06-2004, 09:52 AM
Thanks for the article and the translation Louise :kiss:

After the interview with the BBC, the Swiss press is allowed into the white mansion rented by the Federer clan in the outskirts of the Wimbledon village, the same rented by Sampras until 2002.

I didn't know this tidbit, interesting. Dirk, one more thing you can add in your Sampras comparison thread.

Daniel
07-06-2004, 10:41 AM
He sure deserves all the best in his caeer andlife :kiss: :yeah:

WyveN
07-06-2004, 01:21 PM
That sounds like a great article FrenchLouise, wish it was available in English

clin
07-06-2004, 02:23 PM
What does everyone think of the snide comments about Brad Gilbert? Clearly this NYT writer has a gripe about Gilbert. :confused:

But very complimentary to Roger, no?


The Federers Prove Masters of Their Own Destiny
By HARVEY ARATON

Published: July 5, 2004


imbledon, England

IT was during a 40-minute rain delay in the third set of the Wimbledon final yesterday that Coach Roger Federer addressed Roger Federer, defending champion, on how best to proceed in a match that was being dictated by Andy Roddick.

The sets were even at one apiece, but Roddick had secured a third-set service break, was leading, 4-2, and, as Coach Federer insightfully noted, "Andy was just getting too many returns back," hitting his supposedly vulnerable backhand surprisingly well and winning too many baseline rallies on Federer's serve.

In the locker room during the break, Roddick huddled with Brad Gilbert, typically promoted (in part by himself) as the best coach in tennis. For consultation or conversation, Federer had only a physical therapist and a buddy who "used to play tennis a bit," but guess who did most of the talking?

"I told them, I think I have to serve and volley, because I remember playing serve and volley the year before," Federer said, referring to his straight-set victory over Roddick in the 2003 semifinals. "I just thought, you know, I will get more free points. He will maybe feel the pressure a little bit more and cannot take as many chances from me at the baseline when I'm serving."

Federer continued, "This is exactly what happened, and it makes me extremely, you know, happy and proud, that I actually did take the right choice in such a moment."

On the Fourth of July, he wore down Roddick, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Gilbert, Mr. Winning Ugly, was outcoached by the mentor in the mind of a 22-year-old tennis artiste, who has now won two of three Grand Slam tournaments all on his own.

"He's never worked as hard as he has since he hasn't had a coach," said a most reliable source, Federer's mother, Lynette. "He's gotten to know himself, and his tennis."

The happy mom was off the mobile phone with her husband, Robert, who remained home in Switzerland to avoid the tension of live tennis. Now Lynette Federer was celebrating with family and friends in red Swiss caps what she called a confirmation of the coming-of-age performance Federer put on here last year.

On the most renowned of all tennis stages was a showdown of contrasting body languages - Roddick exuding unbridled energy from every pore while Federer glided around the lawn as though guided by the breeze. Except just as he transformed his tactics during the course of the match, Federer evolved to his exalted state of calm over a period of years.

His temper was once so bad, his mother confided, the family wondered if John McEnroe was a distant cousin. Other parents used to ask how she and her husband put up with such dysfunctional behavior from Roger, their youngest child.

"We'd say, 'We don't like it,' " Lynette Federer said. "He'd have his tantrums, he'd throw the rackets, waste his energy.

"But he just needed time. In his childhood, in school, in his tennis, he always learned how to go over the hurdles. Every time he banged his head, he improved. I think Roger's learned self-discipline, to step back, not rely on somebody."

The apple of her eye apparently didn't fall far from the tree. Federer has ascended to a secure place as the world's No. 1 player after parting ways with his coach, Peter Lundgren, while his parents have assumed control of his career management from the global powerhouse I.M.G.

"We are not doing everything ourselves," Lynette Federer said. "We have a lawyer, a tax attorney." Still, Team Federer stands apart from most Tour heavyweights, many of whose entourages could fill a grandstand section of Center Court.

Lynette Federer's guess is that her son will eventually hire another coach. (Might Phil Jackson be interested in this new Zen master?) "At the moment, things are going all his way," she said. "When he does have a down time, that's when he needs one."

Federer's third-set tactical switch to more serve and volley wasn't the whole story, not the way Roddick was tiring in the fourth set. Roddick's footwork and shot preparation were failing after he set a blistering pace in winning the first set and expended considerable energy rallying from 0-4 to 4-all in the second set, only to lose it. Roddick may be 21, but 145-mile-an-hour serves and one screaming forehand after another will exact a toll against an opponent who literally and figuratively does not sweat.

However canny Federer was, even Phil Jackson might admit that you can't teach talent. Though he played far more baseline tennis here this year than last and got away with it until yesterday, Federer had the serve-and-volley skills to resort to. Roddick was married to his prematch plan to (and we're paraphrasing Roddick here) hit the stuffing out of the ball. For such a strategy he needed Coach Gilbert?

Andre Agassi recast himself with Gilbert but seldom solved Pete Sampras in a big-money match. Roddick, now 1-6 for his career against Federer, admitted that Federer "has an aura about him." To beat him - on grass, at least - Roddick needs work on his volleys, or a better game plan.

What might that be? Coach Gilbert, the author of a soon-to-be-released second book, the subject of a recent magazine profile, a man who by reputation would talk to a racket if it had ears, strode silently past hopeful reporters into a waiting car.

Now that he has bumped heads with Coach Federer, let's see what Gilbert has learned

lsy
07-06-2004, 06:31 PM
Thanks for all the articles!

FrenchLouise, that one you posted looks great just from that 4 translated para....unfortunately that's also the only 4 para I understand :o :lol: But thanks, will use some online translator!

"Coach Federer"?... :haha:

Also just wondering, to the long time Rogi's fans here, has anyone of you "fortunate" enough to witness this "dysfunctional distant cousin of Jmac" before? :scared: :lol:

Hagar
07-06-2004, 10:41 PM
I can't understand how anyone can say that Federer has no personality. He is so composed and mature for his age, and you just feel the pleasure he has when he's playing...

vene
07-06-2004, 11:38 PM
Neither can I.....but some people think shouting and screaming is "personality". Weird. That's why the extroverts own this world. Rogi is such a class act.

vene
07-07-2004, 10:30 PM
Opinion: Federer-Roddick Rivalry in Danger of Becoming Non-Event

By Richard Vach

Were Roger Federer not such a proper gentleman, he could regard his rivalry with Andy Roddick in the same vein that countrywoman and then-No. 1 Martina Hingis regarded her "rivalry" with Anna Kournikova.

When queried by journalists in a post-match press conference, Hingis replied, "What rivalry? I win all the matches."

Club Fed has won five of his six career meetings with Andy Roddick, his only loss coming last year in the semifinals at the ATP Masters Series-Montreal, where he later admitted he choked the three-set match at the thought of becoming No. 1 in the rankings.

"It's a pity," said Federer after the match. With the win the Swiss would have leapt from 3 to the No. 1 spot for the first time. "I've never been No. 1, but I've never been No. 2, either, and now I'm No. 2. So let's take the positive side of the story."






Later in 2003 at the year-ending Masters Cup, Fed admitted he wasn't mentally prepared to become No. 1 earlier in the year at Montreal, thinking it was too soon to assume the label of best player on the planet, that he wasn't ready. Ironically that loss made much of the difference in Andy Roddick finishing the year at No. 1 a mere handful of points ahead of Federer. Tennis purists voiced their disillusion with the year-end ranking result, especially after Federer tore through the field at the Masters Cup, with Roddick sitting on the sidelines after again losing to the Swiss in the semifinals.

Now Roddick, in his first Wimbledon final against the defending champion, faces a crossroads in his "rivalry" with the Swiss No. 1. Roddick has always been first to admit that Federer has more game, more pitches, more clubs in the bag, more balls in the bag (for those looking for a "bowling" analogy), but less power.

"He's more flash, feel, artistry. The one advantage I have over him is just hitting the crap out of the ball," said Roddick in looking forward to the final. "I mean, that's pretty much what I'm going to have to do. I'm going to have to try to play to my strengths."

That's a disconcerting confession from a player who has spent much of the last year working with coach Brad Gilbert on his volley and net transition game. Did Gilbert wince when he heard that?

There was no doubt to Roddick's fastball-only state of mind when then asked what would happen if "Plan A" failed. Would there be a "Plan B" or even a "Plan C"?

"I hope 'Plan A' works," said a smiling Roddick. Here's a question Andy, how has it worked thus far against Federer?

If it's a bluff, it's a good one. Perhaps Roddick will come out Sunday with an actual strategy, mixing in some serve-and-volley, some timely net approaches, some off-speed play, giving Fed a different look and something more to think about than blocking missiles, something he has proved adept at.

On the other hand, maybe Roddick will simply camp on the baseline and brainlessly bash away like he did against Mario "Baby Goran" Ancic in the semifinals. Roddick averaged approximately one net approach every two games during the match. So that's what the last year of working on expanding Roddick's net repertoire, working on the volley/approach with Gilbert, has produced? Baseline-bashing on grass?

Regardless of whether Roddick sticks with a losing strategy or gives Club Fed some different looks on Sunday, this meeting between the two is extremely important for the American and his psyche.

No one wants to hear in the locker room that they're someone else's bitch boy, especially a former No. 1, record service-speed holding, U.S. tennis-carrying, model-dating television-darling defending US Open champion.

Otherwise who could blame Roger Federer for tossing off a casual "What rivalry?"

Ketchup
07-08-2004, 07:14 AM
Thanx 4 the Article vene!! :)

Ketchup
07-08-2004, 07:31 AM
Here are Rogi's upcoming tournaments ....

Jul 05 Gstaad
Jul 26 Toronto Tennis Masters Series
Aug 02 Cincinnati Tennis Masters Series
Aug 16 Athens Olympic Games
Aug 30 New York US Open
Sep 20 tbd Davis Cup
Sep 27 Bangkok International Series
Oct 18 Madrid Tennis Masters Series
Oct 25 Basel International Series
Nov 01 Paris Tennis Masters Series
Nov 15 Houston ?

Daniel
07-08-2004, 08:45 AM
Good luck!!! :D

Mrs. B
07-08-2004, 08:51 AM
Martina Hingis on Kournikova: "what rivalry? i win all the matches." :lol: :haha:

Jazzy
07-08-2004, 12:33 PM
hey thanx Ketchup!

lol Mrs B!

ytben
07-08-2004, 12:48 PM
Martina Hingis on Kournikova: "what rivalry? i win all the matches." :lol: :haha:

:lol: gotta love that girl. Wish she will come back.

EHendrick
07-08-2004, 05:04 PM
gotta love that girl. Wish she will come back.

Me too! I quit watching when she quit, but Federer's got me into tennis again! :D WOO HOO! :D So much fun during the extra time I have this summer!

And hey, I thought TMC was in Shanghai this year?

rue
07-08-2004, 05:24 PM
Fear Of Failure Propels Roger Ahead:


All the great players of the past are keen to point out that nobody can be regarded as a true champion until he or she has successfully defended a grand slam title. And that was the fear that stalked Roger Federer throughout the first week of Wimbledon this year.

"Now the sense of satisfaction is unbelievable because the worst thing would have been to lose early," he said yesterday. "To defend the title is just amazing. It was all so new to me and I'm so proud I could handle all the pressure."

Federer summed up his rivalry with Andy Roddick as "Mr Service against Mr Finesse", then allowed himself a minor dig at the man who, for a set, had appeared capable of blasting the Swiss champion off the centre court on Sunday afternoon. "I hit more aces than him," Federer noted.

Roddick will be put to the test himself when he defends his United States Open title at Flushing Meadows in September. And he will know that Federer, who has not progressed beyond the last 16 in New York in four previous attempts, will be aiming to show the American public why he has won three of the past five grand slam titles and is the undisputed world No. 1.

With Federer and Roddick ranked the top two players in the world, the chance that they will meet in major finals has strengthened, although the pressure will be on the American in the US Open.

It looks all but impossible for Federer, having successfully defended his Wimbledon title, to lose the No. 1 spot this year, a position he wrenched away from Roddick at the Australian Open. That was on his way to winning what was his second slam title, one he intends to keep hold of next January.

Roddick, by comparison, was relatively stress-free over the past fortnight and had convinced himself that Federer, to whom he had lost five of his previous six encounters, could be beaten. The tennis world would love it if the Roddick-Federer rivalry developed along the lines of the sport's other great match-ups, principally because the contrast in styles and temperaments makes for such a fascinating duel.

Why all the players - men and women, the current generation and the champions of the past - love Federer so much is that, in an era when power has become so dominant, he has proved that tennis can still be played with subtlety and skill. He has become the model to aspire to, someone to link the sport with its rich past and convince others that there is still beauty in the game.

That is not to say that Federer does not use the strong arm when required, for he can hit forehands and backhands of immense power. However, it is the sheer variety that is so thrilling. Whereas Roddick paints in primary colours, the Swiss master uses the full palette. That is not to denigrate Roddick, who has added more facets over the past 12 months under the guidance of Brad Gilbert, Andre Agassi's former coach. But his extraordinary whiplash serve will always be the core of his game.

"I am never going to serve as fast as him," said Federer. "I would have to change my whole service action. But I can serve consistently and that is what it is about for me."

In fact, some critics fear that Roddick is storing up shoulder or wrist problems because of the severity of his hitting. Federer, however, seems to be playing within himself.

Appearance can be deceptive and, although Federer seemed to be cruising in the opening rounds at Wimbledon, he was inwardly in turmoil. "The pressure I put on myself was unbelievable," he said. "In the early rounds, I did not really enjoy it. Once I got to the semi-finals, the quarters even, I was thinking 'Well, OK . . . I could live with this.' It was my dream to win it again

vene
07-08-2004, 05:47 PM
And hey, I thought TMC was in Shanghai this year?
No, last time for 4 years this yr in Houston. Thanks everyone for the articles!

EHendrick
07-08-2004, 06:55 PM
Thanks, vene! :) Shanghai in 2005.

tangerine_dream
07-09-2004, 05:02 PM
I don't know why tennis-x always has to take a dig at Andy. Even Roddick himself admitted that he's gotta start winning some of their matches before it could be considered a real rivalry. Give the kid some credit; at least he's making headway into his game. :rolleyes:

Federer not flashy, just flawless

Matthew Cronin / tennisreporters.net

Roger Federer continues to defy common wisdom.

He doesn't need a coach to tell him how to play or give him a kick in the butt to fire him up.

Sunday, he didn't seem to need much of anything, save for a towel to weep tears of joy into after he repeated as Wimbledon champion with a spectacular 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 6-4 victory over an inspired Andy Roddick in the final.

He has more heart than he's been given credit for and if anyone is still questioning whether the smooth Swiss has fire in his belly, push replay on your VCR.

"The thing with Roger is that he just makes it look so easy," Roddick said. "But he's really brought it together over the last year mentally. The talent's always been there. Maybe there were some questions about that before. But if you don't buy into it now, then I have to question that."

The final was without question the best level of tennis that we've seen contested in a men's Grand Slam final since Pete Sampras overcame Andre Agassi at the U.S. Open nearly two years ago. Shot-making was at a premium where unforced errors were few and far between. It was the Swiss wizard vs. the American cowboy, and in the end Federer's magic wand burned the spurs off Roddick's Stetsons.

"Not only is he fast, but when he has no play on it he makes something out of it," Roddick said. "He's unparalleled as far as that skill goes. A couple times he picked them off his shoestrings, they're coming this far off the net, you're hitting another one. Definitely he's great at doing that and keeping himself alive in points."

The 21-year-old Roddick brought out his best and had a bunch of opportunities to crack the Swiss in the third and fourth sets, but Federer dug deep, focused hard and showed Andy that his "A" game is still missing a plus sign when he's confronting the class genius.

"I threw kitchen sink at him, but he went to the bathroom and got his tub," Roddick said.

Federer got his favorite bath toys too, like his amazing flat serve out wide to the ad court, his incredibly expanding hooking forehand, his deft volleys and blowtorch crosscourt backhand pass. He has it all and has faith that his weapons won't misfire on big points.

Roddick has improved a ton since last year and it showed against Federer. His second serve is very tough to read, he can now hit his backhand both ways for winners and he's a competent volleyer. But even though Andy was into Federer's service games time and time again, he couldn't come up with the goods when it mattered most.

Yes, the 21-year-old American was unlucky that the rains came when he was up 4-2 in the third set. But as he himself said, both men had to deal with the circumstances. Federer went into the locker room, talked to a friend about what was occurring and decided to serve and volley more. The change of strategy worked.

Federer broke back to 4-4 with a laser backhand pass that Andy couldn't scoop up. In the tiebreaker, Federer (no exaggeration) played perfectly, bombing aces and pulling off two backhand passes on the run that shook Roddick down to his Reeboks.

Roddick kept charging and swinging from the hips in the fourth set and could have broken Federer in the fourth and sixth games, but Federer was forceful with his serves and on three of Roddick's six break points, Roddick missed big forehands. After Roddick netted his final forehand and Federer held to 3-3, it was clear that the Swiss wasn't going to melt. He knew that Roddick would be unable to withdraw his money shot from the ATM and that he more in the tank.

"It's tough when you knock on the door enough times and no one answers," Roddick said. "In all honesty, I felt like I had one bad point there. He came up with some great serves. I had one look at a second serve and I flagged a backhand, which I hadn't really done for almost the whole match.

"Besides that, he came up with the goods. I made him play a couple times, and I hit the shot I wanted a couple times. So I can only really regret one of those realistically."

When Federer had his first break point opportunity, a slightly depressed Roddick missed a sitter forehand to give Federer a break to 3-4. The ultra-confident Swiss raced home, winning the match on the most eye-popping serve in the game, his flat bomb sharply angled into the ad court. Federer went into a Bjorn Borg-like backbend on Centre Court and less than a minute after, was sobbing on his chair, relieved that his title defense was over and overjoyed that he proved that his heart is just a big as his more outwardly emotional opponent.

"It's always been like this since I've played juniors, that if I get to final just don't want to lose them," said Federer, who's 3-0 in Slam finals. "I do not accept (losses)."

Federer now owns a 7-1 career record against Roddick heading into the summer hardcourt season, which this year includes the Olympics and the U.S. Open. Roddick says it's not a real rivalry because of his poor record against the Swiss but it was obvious Sunday that he's gaining significant ground.

"I proved that Roger's not quite invincible," Roddick said. "He's pretty close. I proved a lot to myself today. I thought I took it to him and I played the game the way I wanted to play it. I just came up short. ... He's a spectacular player. I can't worry so much about what he's doing when he's not across the net from me. I need to focus on what I need to do to get better, and I will. "

Of course, Roddick getting over on Federer on a consistent basis also means the 22-year-old Swiss will keep running in place. Guess what, Roger still feels like he could move up another notch at the net. If he does, we may see him challenging Pete Sampras' record of seven Wimbledon titles in 2009.

"I feel like I can serve and volley more," Federer said. "It's always been my dream to play better at the net. I'm definitely not bad, but I still feel there is room for improvement."

What he can't improve upon is his perfect record at the majors, where's he won three out of the last five titles. Federer doesn't need a coach to tell him what the bottom line is when he shows up to play the world's most storied events. It's all about the "W."

"It seems like I can get my act together at the right time and stay calm in finals where it's all about," Federer said. "For me, winners stay and losers go. I don't want to be one of them who goes."

Hingie
07-09-2004, 05:32 PM
I love Martina! If only Martina could come back, and then she and Roger could play mixed-doubles at the olympics. OMG how great would that be. Two of the most talented and smartest players ever playing together to win an olympic medal for their country. EEEEE!

ytben
07-10-2004, 12:55 AM
Take a breather there Hingie, don't want you to pass out from the excitement :p ;) Yeah I wish she will come back too. She & Becker was interviewed by VJ my commentator on TV during one of Wimbly's numerous rain delay.
VJ and Becker did their best to persuade her to come back lol, she certainly looks she want to come back if only her foot will allow her. Damn foot! She mentioned she missed the attention she got from the tour.

Thanks for the article Tangy. Andy certainly has made a lot of progress. I am sure Roddick will get his revenge if they meet on the US HC season. He will be the heavy favourite there IMHO, with the surface and the crowd behind him.

Dirk
07-10-2004, 12:46 PM
Ytben, I don't think Rogi will be iffy with Andy twice. Andy played great but was lucky Rogi wasn't sharp as he should have been. Rogi had an off day and still won, what does that tell you?

ytben
07-10-2004, 01:07 PM
Yeah sorry, maybe I didn't word it correctly. I meant Roddick's best chances to beat Rogi will be on US HC. Doesn't mean he will beat Rogi (at least I hope not). But I still think that Roddick will be the fave if they meet on US HC, unlike in Wimbly or other places where Rogi will be the fave.

Fedex
07-10-2004, 05:13 PM
Why are people making a deal about the surface?? Its a fast hardcourt, where ball stay low, so that suits Roger's game very well. It allows him more options such as serve & volley, which was tough to do at Australia. I dont give a damn about the crowd, he has delt with intense crowds before and still won (ala Hewitt Australian Open). That shouldent be much of a factor if they meet. For most of the match Roger played pretty badly compared to last years semi, which i feel was one of the best displays ive ever witnessed. :) . But he still pulled out the win. I still think Roger would be the favourite even at the US Open, against Roddick. If Roddick is the favourite (very unlikely), then he certainly wont be the heavy favourite against Federer. I mean in Wimbledon Roger was so much a favourite, you'd have to bet $400 just to win a $100. :eek: Difference is all eyes will be on Roddick to defend his title, so Federer wont have the pressure on him like at Wimbledon, so he can 'sneak' through, to the final. Like Dirk said, you cant expect Roger to have two off days against Andy in a row, so i really like his chances against Roddick. As long as its not Henman in the final :tape:

Fedex
07-10-2004, 05:54 PM
Martina Hingis on Kournikova: "what rivalry? i win all the matches." :lol: :haha:
:haha: :haha: lol, Martina :D :p . Maybe it will be safe to say that Roger can say that in the next couple matches when he has a 7-1 or 8-1 edge over Andy :) :o :devil:

mitalidas
07-10-2004, 08:27 PM
while we are on the topics of surfaces, the Olympics will be played on Decoturf. this is apparently the same thing that the US Open is played on. I think Rogi plays well on this surface (even though its not his best surface).... but its a bonus for the true hard courters

tangerine_dream
07-11-2004, 01:26 AM
For some parts of the world, this is old news, but for fans in the US: Roger is on the cover of Australian Tennis magazine (the US gets this mag a few months after everyone else :lol: ). I found my copy at Barnes & Noble.

I also picked up a copy of the new Deuce magazine for 2004. Nice four-page article on Roger inside, with some great pics. Here's one of them. :banana:

EHendrick
07-11-2004, 03:19 AM
For some parts of the world, this is old news, but for fans in the US: Roger is on the cover of Australian Tennis magazine (the US gets this mag a few months after everyone else :lol: ). I found my copy at Barnes & Noble.

I also picked up a copy of the new Deuce magazine for 2004. Nice four-page article on Roger inside, with some great pics. Here's one of them. :banana:

Awww, I'm so jealous. In my local store tennis and golf section is crammed in between soft porn (men's interest), with about 10 diff. golf magazines and no tennis mags! That's right, NONE! :rolleyes:

RogiFan88
07-11-2004, 03:29 AM
tangy [love the avatar again... ], is it worth buying the Deuce for this article on Rogi?? Also, any articles or piccies on: Juanqui, Carlos, Marat, Rafa, etc.??

why do they have Roddick on the cover? wasn't he on last yr's cover? I guess they're not interested in promoting OTHER tennis players...

I wish ESPN or NBC/CBS or whatever other US station showing tennis w just TRY and have a little background on other players, even on Rogi -- introduce the viewers to these guys and maybe people might watch tennis more... there's more to tennis than USA... it gets SO predictable... and SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO BORINGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG

and I think Mary-Jo F s do little Span-Eng interpretation for Spanish-speaking players... why not? I feel like proposing it to them but why bother, right???

Ketchup
07-11-2004, 07:42 AM
tangy [love the avatar again... ]

Yeh just love your avatar!! :D

enqvistfan
07-11-2004, 09:36 AM
Roger is on the cover of the French Tennis Mag, "court central"

http://www.courtcentral.fr

ytben
07-11-2004, 11:01 AM
Thanks for the update. Too bad I have no access to buy those magazines :mad:

BTW I keep coming across comment that Mirka thought Rogi is getting too arrogant? Anybody know what prompted this, and where she made the comment?

lsy
07-11-2004, 11:03 AM
ytben, I think it's from JMac. He said mirka asked him to stop saying so much good words about Rogi since he's starting to becoming too cocky. I'm sure it's meant for a laugh.

SUKTUEN
07-11-2004, 11:06 AM
:lol: tangerine_dream, I LOVE YOUR AVATAR ! !

IT always make me laugh ~~~~~~ :lol: :lol: :lol:

please post all photo of the mag ~~~~ PLEASE ! ! :worship: :worship:

IT IS SO GREAR ! ! :hearts: :hearts: :hearts:

ytben
07-11-2004, 11:07 AM
Ah gotcha. I thought that comment was weird myself. Some people seem to take that comment literally though. Thanks!

lsy
07-11-2004, 11:09 AM
ya...some people...

Haven't we already got used to these "some people" who love saying rogi being arrogant? ;)

ytben
07-11-2004, 11:14 AM
Too true ;)

tangerine_dream
07-11-2004, 04:41 PM
:lol: tangerine_dream, I LOVE YOUR AVATAR ! !

IT always make me laugh ~~~~~~ :lol: :lol: :lol:

please post all photo of the mag ~~~~ PLEASE ! ! :worship: :worship:

IT IS SO GREAR ! ! :hearts: :hearts: :hearts:

LOL. Thanks Suktuen. :hug:

Just for you, here are all the pics of Roger in Deuce. Enjoy. :)

RogiFan, the Deuce mag is great! Good article on Roger with great pictures; also articles on Marat Safin, JCF, Ken Rosewall, Guillermo Coria, Mardy Fish, Todd Woodbridge, Andy Roddick, Jarkko Nieminen, Rafael Nadal, David Nalbandian, Jeff Coetzee, Goran Ivanisevic, Andre Agassi, Sargis Sargsian, Leander Paes.....it's got everybody in here. :eek:

tschaeggy
07-11-2004, 11:05 PM
hi all! all these wonderfull pics you can see at the rogi's side:www.rogerfederer.com, click on "fotos", but you have to log in to look at them! siggi bucher has made them in LA last year and they are really beautyfull :)

vene
07-12-2004, 12:43 AM
Letter to the NYT for Roddick on how to beat Rogi:

Some Advice for Roddick

To the Sports Editor:

If Andy Roddick wants to raise his game to beat Roger Federer ("The Federers Prove Masters of Their Own Destiny," July 5), he would do better to listen to Bill Tilden than to Brad Gilbert.

In 1919, after losing again to Bill Johnston, Tilden took off the entire winter to rework his game. His slice backhand, adequate against lesser players, was consistently picked apart by Johnston's topspin forehand. An entire winter of hitting only backhands changed Tilden's weakness into one of the greatest strokes in tennis history.

If Roddick wants to get to the top of the game, he needs to learn how to get to the net and close out a point. Playing the net is an instinctive and athletic endeavor. The only way to learn to volley is to do it under match conditions. I would tell Roddick to spend a winter coming in on every point. Charge the net on every serve and on every one of your opponent's second serves. Take some losses but learn how to volley and broaden your game.

The mindless pursuit of hitting every ground stroke as hard as you can did not work for the most talented player I have ever seen (Andre Agassi). Tilden had the courage to make a change. Roddick would do well to follow his example.

Richard Pollara
Tampa, Fla.

SUKTUEN
07-12-2004, 01:48 PM
tangerine_dream, THANKYOU SO MUCH~~~~~ :worship: :worship:

mitalidas
07-14-2004, 06:47 PM
more goodies on Rogi
http://www.sportsnetwork.com/default.asp?c=sportsnetwork&page=tennis-m/news/BCN3359083.htm
Can the mighty Federer be stopped?

tangerine_dream
07-15-2004, 12:49 AM
You're welcome, Suktuen :wavey:

Another article....

Can the mighty Federer be stopped?
07/14/2004

Philadelphia, PA (Sports Network) - The masterful Swiss that is Roger Federer is winning just about everything in sight right now. Can he be stopped?

If you're talking about ending a year at No. 1 for the first time in his career, then I would have to say the "Fed" cannot be stopped. Obviously I don't think I'm going out on a limb when I say that he'll lose another match before 2004 concludes. But he's not going to lose many.

The world No. 1 star is a scalding 51-4 this year, including an ATP-leading seven titles on several surfaces. Throw in a perfect 4-0 singles record in Davis Cup play this season and I think you get the picture. Awesome!

The unstoppable Swiss currently holds the Wimbledon, Australian Open and Masters Cup titles and has won three of the last five Grand Slam events, dating back to his first of back-to-back Wimbledon crowns last year. He's also nailed down Tennis Masters shields in Indian Wells and Hamburg this season, and the Hamburg title came in impressive fashion when he halted Guillermo Coria's long clay-court winning streak at 31 in a marquee final.

Federer is a flawless 9-0 in his last nine finals, with his last loss coming against Czech Jiri Novak in last year's Gstaad title match (in a week that he should've taken off after prevailing at Wimby). The Swiss hero returned to Gstaad last week to capture his first title on native soil by besting young Russian Igor Andreev in a clay-court final just one week after running the table yet again on the rye grass at the All England Club. Federer became only the third player to claim Wimbledon and Gstaad titles in the same year, joining all-time greats Rod Laver (1962) and John Newcombe (1971).

The 22-year-old racquet man is currently riding a 17-match winning streak and has piled up a staggering 14 titles since the beginning of the 2003 campaign. He's also won his last 24 matches on grass, including 14 straight at Wimbledon. Federer is also running away with the ATP Champions Race, as he leads the French Open runner-up Coria by a whopping 267 points (746-479), while slugging American Andy Roddick, Federer's final victim at Wimbledon two weeks ago, is currently third, 292 points off the Swiss' frantic pace. The Fed's prize money is fast approaching $4 million for the year ($3,335,222) and his career on-court earnings are already over the $11 million mark ($11,073,230), to go along with 18 singles titles. Federer is a sizzling 16-1 in Grand Slam action this season (and 26-2 in his last five Slams), with his lone '04 major loss coming at the hands of former world No. 1 and three-time French Open champion Gustavo Kuerten at Roland Garros.

The super Swiss, however, hasn't lost a match anywhere since getting stunned by "Guga" in Paris in late May, going 17-0, with a pair of grass-court titles in Halle and Wimbledon and the clay-court victory in Gstaad. Federer could be tested by Roddick and perhaps even Coria this summer, but let's not forget that the Swiss is a laughable 6-1 lifetime against Roddick and 1-0 all-time versus Coria, making him a combined 7-1 against the world's current No. 2 and No. 3 players. I'm not gonna to sit here and anoint Federer the best-ever (just yet), but I will say that he is the most-talented performer I've ever seen. He possesses every shot and can thrive on any surface.

His combination of power (that monster forehand), flare and artistry are unmatched. He will finish the year No. 1 for the first time in his career, and don't be surprised when it's all said and done that the Fed challenges Pete Sampras' mark of 14 Grand Slam titles. Obviously, the Fed will need to stay healthy to make a run at Pete, something Sampras was able to do during his legendary career. By the way, Sampras was Federer's favorite player while growing up in Basel. Federer's next Grand Slam test will come at the U.S. Open, which will get underway late next month, immediately following the Swiss' Olympic stay (and potential gold medal run) in Athens.

Daniel
07-15-2004, 07:52 AM
I love that article . Wish Roger the best this summer :hug: :worship:

vene
07-19-2004, 11:09 PM
Federer Not-So-Quietly Secures Year-End No. 1 Ranking

By Richard Vach


Last week Roger Federer won the little ATP stop in Gstaad. Not big news on the world tennis front, but big news for the Swiss since it is a homecountry event that had eluded him, and a title he had “dreamed about winning since I was a boy.”




But a closer look at what transpired last week in Gstaad shows a glimpse of the player Federer has become, and should give a moment of pause for the other top players on the ATP.




Gstaad was Federer’s tour-leading seventh title of the year, the same number he won all of last year when Andy Roddick edged him by a mere handful of points for the year-end No. 1 ranking. This year the Swiss successfully defended his Wimbledon title, and in January won his first Australian Open title.

The No. 2-ranked Andy Roddick, already well behind the Swiss in the rankings, has a monstrous number of points to defend in the coming months after last year winning the Masters Series events in Canada and Cincinnati, and the US Open.







As of mid-July, Federer has pretty much already wrapped up the year-end No. 1 ranking, a frightening thought.


The nail in the coffin came over the last four weeks when the Swiss won the grasscourt title at Halle, won at Wimbledon, then won the Gstaad title the week after.




Federer grew up playing on clay, and despite his struggles at Roland Garros, he has beaten some of the top dirtballers and won the Master Series-Hamburg, no easy feat. Lifting the trophy at Wimbledon then two days later taking to the claycourts in Gstaad, mentally and physically exhausted, then going on to win the event should also be a bit intimidating to the handful of No. 1 wannabees in Federer’s wake.




Witness recent slam winners such as Gaston Gaudio, Anastasia Myskina and Maria Sharapova and you see the time-honored pattern on winning a slam then pulling from your commitments over the following month citing either injury or exhaustion. Club Fed not only took to the grueling claycourts for his fourth consecutive week of play, but at one point during the week won two three-setters in one day due to a rain-delayed schedule.




The physical toll taken by this whirlwind title-grab won’t be evident until two weeks from now when the Swiss heads to North America for the Masters Series-Toronto where another surface adjustment will be necessary. Judging by his results over the last eight months, you could seemingly construct a court with random patches of grass, clay, cement, and it wouldn’t deter the man many are not only comparing to Pete Sampras, but saying will overtake the greatest player of the Open Era.



Here are a few more sick stats: Since losing in last year’s Gstaad final, Federer has won his last nine finals; he has won his last 17 matches, and is 51-4 on the year in 2004; he has faced former No. 1 players 10 times thus far this year, winning nine (lost to Gustavo Kuerten at the French Open); he is 7-0 in finals this year; and against the two players even near him on the ATP Rankings, he is a dominating 6-1 career against Roddick, and is 1-0 against Guillermo Coria, beating the Argentine on his favorite clay earlier in the year.




In this year’s Wimbledon final, Roddick brought his “A”-game yet Federer still hung around despite his below-par play. In the fourth set the American’s brave attack finally started to crumble, with Roddick throwing his hands up in frustration during a couple crucial net cords and framed winners from the Swiss, with everything seemingly going the No. 1’s way.

Barring significant injury or an invasion of Earth by significantly-evolved tennis-playing beings, 2004 is in the bag for Federer. No amount of hand-throwing will bring the Swiss back to the level of his contemporaries -- it’s now up to the other players to figure out how to ramp it up a level, or face another eight years or so of Sampras-like domination.

LCeh
07-20-2004, 05:09 AM
This is from last year's wimbledon:

-----------------------------------------------------

Federer dad's get-out claws

Roger Federer's father has revealed he was not at Wimbledon to see his son's first Grand Slam triumph - because he had to feed the cat.

Robert Federer remained at the family home in Switzerland with Roger's pet moggie, Ginger, although he did manage to catch the action on TV.

"I had to feed the cat at home," sales manager Robert insisted.

"We had a few friends around and watched the match on television."

"Obviously I am very proud - although we are not a tennis family, we never told him to play. He just grew into it," Robert told The Sun.

"Not a tennis family" would appear to be understating it a bit. After all, what could possibly be more important than tending to the cat?

A few questions inevitably arise from this bizarre situation.

Do they not have pet-sitters in Switzerland?

What would have happened if Ginger had demanded his Whiskas on match point?

Is this the lamest excuse in the history of lame excuses?

And if Roger finds himself in the last two at SW19 this time next year, will the old man manage to drag himself over - or will he be washing his hair/cleaning the car/watching the decorating dry..?

-------------------------------------------

Article here (http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/funny_old_game/3053922.stm).

EHendrick
07-20-2004, 05:21 AM
lol. he was probably nervous. I just got my dvd in the mail of that match, and wow! how can you not be a Federer fan after seeing that? And the trophy presentation was so great, too. He is so likeable.

Doris Loeffel
07-21-2004, 02:51 PM
Thanks guys for posting all these articles about Roger wish I could add some...

vene
07-23-2004, 05:06 PM
TENNIS NOTEBOOK
No kidding Federer's season already among best ever
Swiss phenom would join elite with Open win
By DALE ROBERTSON
Copyright 2004 Houston Chronicle

Not only is Roger Federer the brightest light in men's tennis this year -- maybe for years to come, too -- he's also bright enough to be fluent in three languages. And, while he seems to lack Andy Roddick's ready wit, perhaps that's just his English-German side.

Speaking French, he's a hoot.

Asked by a reporter for L'Equipe why he was rushing off to play the Swiss Open in Gstaad instead of properly celebrating his second Wimbledon title at a romantic getaway with his girlfriend, Federer looked at the fellow like he had two heads.

"All my friends will be in Gstaad," he replied. "If she and I go somewhere, it's just us. We have some champagne, then we look at each other and say, `now what?' "

He was kidding ... we think.

There's nothing funny, however, about the season the 22-year-old Swiss phenom is having on the court, with a 51-4 match record, two Grand Slams tucked away and seven tournament titles, not to mention his 302-point lead as of last weekend in the ATP's points race that will determine the eight-man Masters Cup field in Houston in November.

No. 2 Guillermo Coria is closer to the 10th guy in the Masters standings than he is to Federer, whose victory over Roddick in the Wimbledon final was also his 24th in a row on grass, second in modern times only to Bjorn Borg's presumably unreachable 41.

Federer's year to date already ranks with the best of the Open Era, up there with Jimmy Connors' 1974, Borg's 1978, John McEnroe's 1984, Ivan Lendl's 1986, Mats Wilander's 1988 and Pete Sampras' 1995. His winning tournaments on grass at Wimbledon and clay at Gstaad the next week hadn't happened since John Newcombe copped the same two titles in 1971. (Borg also won successive tournaments on grass and clay in 1978-79, but he took a week off after Wimbledon before conquering the field in Bastad, Sweden.)

Federer also became the first player to win a seventh tournament before the end of July since Thomas Muster in 1995. But the Austrian Muster was a one-trick pony, dominating only on clay. Sampras owned the second half of that season.

And finally, starting with the Masters Cup last November, Federer has won eight finals in a row. A victory at the U.S. Open, a tournament he has far from mastered to date, would make him just the fourth player of the Open Era to win three Grand Slams in the same year.

Rod Laver, of course, went four-for-four in 1969, while Connors in '74 and Wilander in '88 both won three of the four majors. Connors didn't play at Roland Garros, and Wilander was beaten in the quarterfinals at Wimbledon.

Oddly, Federer's four-set victory over the Russian Igor Andreev in the Swiss Open was his first championship in Switzerland. He had been 0-for-3 in finals in his home country.

"For me, it's a dream come true," he said. "I never thought I'd win this tournament."

So it's a good thing he went, assuming his girlfriend is speaking to him again. Or maybe she doesn't understand French.


Front-runner
Roger Federer showed again in the Igor Andreev match, as he had against Andy Roddick, that he's impossibly strong as a front-runner but doesn't handle adverse patches well. He led Andreev by two sets and a break, then unraveled for a lengthy patch against a young Russian playing in his first ATP final.

"I'm tired in general," he said, blaming temporary fatigue rather than problems with his psyche. "I knew my game wouldn't be as consistent as if I would have been totally fit. I was just a little bit disappointed that I had to go four sets. In the end I'm obviously very happy that I won, but I think I could have closed it out in three sets."


Sharapova chills
If Roger Federer was eager to get back to whacking tennis balls after the Wimbledon ball, the new teen queen of Centre Court was anything but.

The wild social whirl caused Maria Shrapova to pull out of the WTA event in Los Angeles this week, meaning she won't return to the court until Acura Classic in San Diego, which starts July 26. She'll also play the Pilot Penn tournament before the U.S. Open.

Sharapova's statement on her reduced work load read as follows: "When I originally planned my ambitious summer schedule, I dreamed about -- but didn't count on -- winning Wimbledon. This has been the most unbelievable time of my life. I want to make sure that I stay strong and play at my highest level for the rest of the season and beyond. So, after talking with my advisers, including my dad and the WTA Tour, we have made the difficult decision to change my schedule to allow me to get some mandatory rest and recovery time."

A wise strategy for a 17-year-old, even if she is the Wimbledon champion.


Tennis junkies rejoice
The USTA and the Tennis Channel have signed a four-year deal to bring lots of weekday and weekend telecasts of the U.S. Open Series tournaments leading up to Flushing Meadow. Over the next seven weeks, there will be 65 hours of live coverage plus an additional 40 hours shown on a delayed basis.

Counting NBC, CBS and ESPN, more than 200 hours of tennis will be on the tube leading into the Open. As for whether fans can actually figure out how the Open Series works, that's another question. The players understand it well enough to know there's a bunch of extra bucks at stake for them.


The local scene
Kudos to Houston's Lauren Liu, an invitee to the recent International Tennis Hall of Fame festivities, where she received the Bill Talbert Award for sportsmanship, having been singled out among all the junior players in the country for the honor. She received it before Steffi Graf and Stephan Edberg were inducted into the Hall. Liu is No. 16 nationally in girls 16s and No. 1 in Texas in girls 18s, aside from being a model citizen on the court. ... Five Houston-area high school seniors have been given a total of $5,500 toward their college educations from the Houston Tennis Association. Chia-Kai Chu of Jersey Village received a $1,500 Houston Racquet Club Women's Association award. Derrick Thomas of Spring Woods and Irina Afanassieva of Lamar Consolidated each earned a $1,000 West Houston Ladies Tennis Association grant. Brian Fagala of Elkins won a $1,000 HTA/Coca-Cola scholarship. Jeannie Diep of Dobie received the $1,000 HTA/Charlie Carder scholarship. ... Lost Forest Racquet Club will host a tennis tournament for non-qualified juniors Aug. 6-8. Deadline to enter is July 23. The tournament is part of the Houston Professional Tennis Association Junior Gran Prix Singles Circuit, a series of tournaments for non-qualified juniors. Boys and girls who have never qualified to play in the USTA Texas Section's championship tournaments may enter age divisions from 10 to 18 in the HPTA Junior Gran Prix Singles Circuit. For more information, call Pam White at 281-265-3072 or pick up an entry form at the nearest tennis center or club.

Dale Robertson covers tennis for the Chronicle. He can be reached at dale.robertson@chron.com

jtipson
07-23-2004, 05:12 PM
Thanks for posting these vene :)

Note to journalists: it's nine final wins in a row - nine!

Do these guys ever do their own checking, or do they just swallow what the ATP feed them without chewing?

Skyward
07-23-2004, 06:48 PM
" Front-runner
Roger Federer showed again in the Igor Andreev match, as he had against Andy Roddick, that he's impossibly strong as a front-runner but doesn't handle adverse patches well. He led Andreev by two sets and a break, then unraveled for a lengthy patch against a young Russian playing in his first ATP final. "

Hello!! :confused: If I remember correctly, Roger came from behind to win the match against Roddick.

mitalidas
07-23-2004, 06:56 PM
Note to journalists: it's nine final wins in a row - nine!
Do these guys ever do their own checking, or do they just swallow what the ATP feed them without chewing?

correct, it is 9 finals -- they shouldn't rob Rogi of everything he has achieved!!!

however.... in fairness to the journalist, he did say "....starting with the Masters Cup last November", and in that he is correct, it is 8 with that.

But why start with the Masters Cup, and not the one before!!

jtipson
07-23-2004, 07:08 PM
correct, it is 9 finals -- they shouldn't rob Rogi of everything he has achieved!!!

however.... in fairness to the journalist, he did say "....starting with the Masters Cup last November", and in that he is correct, it is 8 with that.

But why start with the Masters Cup, and not the one before!!

Yeah, you're right, I have to give him credit for that :)

LCeh
07-23-2004, 07:44 PM
Nice bail out from the journalist. :lol:

mitalidas
07-23-2004, 08:41 PM
" Front-runner
Roger Federer showed again in the Igor Andreev match, as he had against Andy Roddick, that he's impossibly strong as a front-runner but doesn't handle adverse patches well. "

Hello!! :confused: If I remember correctly, Roger came from behind to win the match against Roddick.
:( :mad:
GRRRRR!!!! These journalists really say anything they want because apart from a minority (MTF members??), no one questions them on it. Of course, this journalist will justify by saying "Well, what I mean is... when Roger was up 2 sets to 1, he was the front-runner" when everyone knows that the key was his coming back from 1 set down.

Marc Rosset is Tall
07-24-2004, 05:28 PM
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20040724/FEDERER24/TPSports/Other


On top of the world, but still down to earth

Superlatives have been flowing Roger Federer's way for years, but a dominating 2004 has everyone talking, TOM TEBBUTT writes

TORONTO -- Superlatives are seldom spared when Roger Federer's name is raised in tennis circles these days.

He is hailed as potentially the best player and most esthetically pleasing ever, and there is even mention of genius, not an easy label to carry.

Outrageously talented individuals such as John McEnroe and Ilie Nastase achieved significant results, but both waged career-long battles to reconcile themselves with the reality that they had been so blessed.

Federer, the No. 1 seed for the Tennis Masters Canada tournament, which will begin Monday at the new Rexall Centre, seems more at ease with his extraordinary gifts.

"I enjoy watching myself because my game is so different," he said after winning Wimbledon last year. "I like my technique. Everyone tells me that, and it's true."

That was just candid opinion, not the bravado of an overgrown ego. In fact, much as it was with his Swiss compatriot Martina Hingis, Federer is one of the most unaffected, down-to-earth No. 1 players in tennis history.

"He's the best player that I've ever seen that's also a great guy," Daniel Nestor, the leading man of Canadian tennis, declared this week.

"He hasn't changed at all since he's climbed the ladder. I think he's the best all-round player I've ever seen."

The son of a South African mother, Lynette, and a Swiss father, Robert, Federer took up tennis at 8 and his natural ability gradually evolved to the point that he was the world's No. 1 junior in 1998.

In his first few years on the professional tour, he was short-tempered and petulant. Then, he went too far the other way, controlling his emotions but not being able to stoke the fire he needed to compete at his optimum.

It showed in tournament finals. From 2000 to 2002, he was 4-6. Over the past two years, he is 14-2, including 11-1 in his past 12. Federer's 51-4 record in 2004 -- which has spurred him to seven tournament titles -- is the best since Ivan Lendl started 58-4 in 1989.

Federer's dominant Wimbledon performance -- he dropped only two sets in seven matches -- along with his record this year has tennis fans comparing him with Lendl, McEnroe, Pete Sampras, Bjorn Borg and the other greats of the men's game.

"He's really brought it together mentally over the last year," the world's second-ranked player, Andy Roddick, said of the man who beat him in this year's Wimbledon final. "The talent has always been there."

"I would panic a few years ago," Federer said. "There was more of an insecure feeling on court that would make me get nervous."

He made a sensational breakthrough in 2001, beating Sampras in five sets at Wimbledon and ending the great American's four-year reign as the champion.

That was in the round of 16. Federer was beaten in the quarter-finals by Tim Henman, aggravating a groin injury during the match. He really did not get over it until the end of 2001.

In 2002, he was upset by 18-year-old Mario Ancic of Croatia in the opening round at Wimbledon, but wound up the year ranked No. 6.

Last year, after a bad loss to Luis Horna of Peru in the first round of the French Open, Federer finally realized the success long predicted for him by winning Wimbledon, beating Roddick and Mark Philippoussis in the semi-finals and final with masterful play.

This year, after victories at the Australian Open and again at Wimbledon, he has joined Borg, Jimmy Connors, Stefan Edberg and Gustavo Kuerten as the only players in the open era (post-1967) to win their first three Grand Slam finals.

Fellow Swiss Heinz Gunthardt, a former top-25 player, coach of Steffi Graf and now a television commentator, is well-acquainted with Federer's game.

"There aren't any weaknesses," said Gunthardt. "He's probably got the best forehand in the business as well as a tremendous serve -- not only the first serve, but the second serve is tremendous under pressure as well.

"It's sometimes underestimated how well he moves. But he hits as many forehands as he does because he's a great mover," he said. "He's got variety, speed, and what impresses me most is how he can turn things around from the baseline. Bang -- one big forehand -- and he goes from defence to offence."

Federer's forehand is a marvel. He almost half-volleys (hitting on the short hop) the ball so that it whips over the net and then dive-bombs with serious ferocity.

"I feel I can give the ball an unbelievable amount of racquet speed," Federer, who will turn 23 in two weeks, said recently. "When the ball comes to me fast, I still have time to get the racquet around it -- to actually control it and play it back with spin. I don't know where that comes from."

Neither do his opponents, who more and more talk of him the way other generations talked of Borg and Sampras. And praise from other champions is equally glowing.

Boris Becker said: "He's playing the game a way I haven't seen before. How fortunate we are to be able to watch it."

Federer is accustomed to rave reviews but, "it's still nice to hear," he said, "even though in the beginning, it put me under a little more pressure.

"But with everything that comes now, it's a case of 'Well, thanks very much. And I appreciate it.' ''

For many tennis fans, the feeling is mutual.

dewolv
07-24-2004, 07:14 PM
I haven't posted on this board before.It's great to see a board
devoted to such a remarkable tennis player.My other comment
pertains to the article above in mention of his forehand half volley
it amazes me whenever I see him hit it and its just another example of
what a truley great talent he his.

Keep up the good work with the postings of articles on this board.

ytben
07-24-2004, 08:34 PM
Hey dewolv :wavey:

Thanks Vene & Marc for the article :D

lsy
07-26-2004, 11:41 AM
Asked by a reporter for L'Equipe why he was rushing off to play the Swiss Open in Gstaad instead of properly celebrating his second Wimbledon title at a romantic getaway with his girlfriend, Federer looked at the fellow like he had two heads.

"All my friends will be in Gstaad," he replied. "If she and I go somewhere, it's just us. We have some champagne, then we look at each other and say, `now what?' "

:haha:

Glad to know that "famous" people also have a boring couple lifestyles just like rest of us ;)

vene
07-26-2004, 04:14 PM
This is funny:

Top 10 Ways No. 2 Andy Roddick Can Gain on No. 1 Roger Federer

By Richard Vach, Tennis-X.com Senior Writer

10. The ATP passes the rule that American players get three serves.

9. Andy goes Marat-style, filling his courtside player's box with 3-5 scantily-clad blondes to distract Fed.

8. A-Rod and Venus Williams both rocket to No. 1 after joint-authoring the book, "Losing? Hit the Ball Even Harder!"

7. Get Roddick's coach Brad Gilbert to also coach Federer, getting him to change to a two-handed backhand.

6. In a stunning press release, the ATP announces Federer will henceforth only be allowed to hit to Andy's forehand.

5. The US Open continues its policy of putting European players on during rain-forecasted days, and Americans on during the sunshine.

4. Andy and coach Brad Gilbert have another wacky skydiving adventure, this time during the 2004 US Open, unnerving the Swiss by "accidently" landing on Federer during his first round match. Attention SportsCenter.

3. Take away Roger Federer's coach...oh, nevermind.

2. Like the Gstaad tournament, give Federer a cow every time he wins a title, eventually distracting him with tending to the herd.

...and the No. 1 way Andy Roddick can gain on Roger Federer:

1. The ATP allows A-Rod to use the new gasoline-powered Babolat model.

vene
07-26-2004, 09:56 PM
Latest Roger's Newsletter:

Contents
1. Hi, tennis fans
2. To the point
3. A winning streak in Germany, but another slip on the clay of Roland
Garros
4. A look back to 1996
5. The chance to give something back
6. A new partnership with Maurice Lacroix
7. My website: your comments, please!
8. My major sporting objectives for the next few months



1 Hi, tennis fans

Well, what a few weeks it's been! First I won the Wimbledon title for a
second
time. Then, just a week later, I clinched the Swiss Open in Gstaad – at
last,
my first ever tournament victory in Switzerland. After three weeks of
non-stop
play, my battery was completely flat and there was only one thing I
wanted: a
holiday and a chance to do nothing but lie in the sun on a beach
somewhere and
get my head round the crazy events of the last few weeks.

After match point at Wimbledon I was simply overwhelmed. I would never
have expected
it, but the feeling at that moment when I realized I'd won the title
was even
more intense than first time round. The enormous weight of expectation
that I'd
been under for the past few weeks suddenly hit home. Everyone had been
expecting
me to do the double. I'd even been expecting it of myself. All the
pressure had
been like a millstone around my neck, though I didn't realize it at the
time.
When I heard the words "Game, set and match, Roger Federer", it was as
if a huge
weight had been lifted from my shoulders. Suddenly it was as if I
didn't have
a care in the world. Later, that was replaced by a deep sense of
satisfaction.

It really was a crazy couple of weeks. Yet again, the English weather
lived up
to its unenviable reputation. Over the course of the fortnight, "Play
suspended"
seemed to be all we heard. It really was nerve-wracking. Nevertheless,
I managed
to maintain my concentration throughout. To defend my title on the
hallowed turf
of Wimbledon was one of my main objectives of the season. And I never
lost sight
of that, even during the endless waiting around. And at the end of the
day, you
could almost be forgiven for thinking that the weather was on my side.
When rain
halted play that second time in the final against Andy Roddick, it gave
me a
chance to regroup mentally, switch tactics and come back out onto court
with
all guns blazing. I'm sure that if it hadn't been for that break in
play the
match would have been even tighter than it was. Early in the game in
particular,
Andy was a real powerhouse and he was putting me under a lot of
pressure. Hats
off to him for the way he played! When all's said and done, as one
British newspaper
put it, Wimbledon 2004 really did boil down to knowing "how to play the
rain"!


I've received many, many compliments from all quarters and that has
meant a lot
to me. Obviously, the British were disappointed that the title eluded
Tim Henman
again but I got the feeling that they were genuinely pleased for me
when I won.
One newspaper even wrote "Brit wins Wimbledon" – it seems that they'd
unearthed
the fact that my great, great grandmother might possibly have been
English! Personally,
I think it's great when people look beyond the national dimension and
just enjoy
the fact that they're getting to see good tennis.

No sooner had I finished celebrating my victory at Wimbledon – it
wasn't until
two o'clock in the morning that I made it to bed – then it was time for
me to
focus on the job at hand once more and make the difficult transition
from grass
to clay in Gstaad. To be perfectly honest, after two gruelling weeks of
Grand
Slam tennis, I didn't expect to come to Gstaad and win my first ever
Swiss title.
Of course, I wanted to give it my best shot and I'd reached the final
the previous
year. But I didn't seriously think that I'd be able to top last year's
performance.
That combination of a relaxed approach and the determination to do well
enabled
me to give it my all once again. Each match that I won spurred me on
and made
me more determined than ever. In the semi-final and then the final, I
had to
really dig deep to realize one of my big dreams of my professional
career: to
win a Swiss tournament. And I did it! That victory marked the end of
three fantastic
weeks for me.



2. To the point

"For me, national and cultural differences are not barriers. Instead,
they enrich
our lives."



3. A winning streak in Germany, but another slip on the clay of Roland
Garros

The run-up to Wimbledon was marked by a narrow Davis Cup defeat against
France
in Lausanne, a winning streak in Germany, with victories in the
tournaments in
Hamburg and Halle, and another disappointing defeat on the clay of
Roland Garros.

I always like playing in Germany. I feel very much at home there. Of
course,
the fact that I have a lot of German fans who come to see me live or
watch me
on the TV whenever I'm playing in their country is a special motivating
factor
for me.
As I finished my schooling in the French-speaking part of Switzerland,
not far
from the Swiss national tennis academy, I also have strong links with
the French-speaking
region. Unfortunately, my flair for French doesn't seem to have done
much so
far for my performances at Roland Garros. Although I came up against a
fantastic
opponent in Guga, who was on top form when he knocked me out – and for
whom I
have a lot of respect off court, too – I expected more of myself. But I
probably
just need to have a bit more patience with this tournament. I
definitely feel
that my time will come at Roland Garros.



4. A look back to 1996

"It's great fun, and obviously I'm also benefiting from training with
such experienced
players." Those were my words eight years ago in response to a question
from
a journalist from the Basler Zeitung the first time I got to play an
NLA (Swiss
national league) match for the top team at my tennis club, "Old Boys"
in Basel.
I thoroughly enjoyed getting to play with big names such as Vaclav
Roubicek,
Patrick Mohr, Sandro della Piana and Reto Staubli. Reto Staubli? Would
that be
the Reto Staubli who has been accompanying you to various tournaments –
most
recently Wimbledon – as your sparring partner, I hear you ask? The very
same!
We've been good friends ever since those interclub days. Even then,
Reto was
supremely composed and in control. As number four in the team, his were
one of
the safest pairs of hands in terms of delivering the points. That was
to be the
year that we won the championship. I made my first two appearances in
the NLA
that season, alongside Vaclav Roubicek in the doubles. We were playing
against
Peter Holik and Yves Allegro. That's right, the very same Yves Allegro
that I
play alongside in the Davis Cup these days and also one of my closest
friends
in tennis circles.

All in all, 1996 was a really successful year for me. The year before,
I'd joined
the national tennis academy at Ecublens in western Switzerland. That
was the
best thing I ever did. It enabled me to make a quantum leap in terms of
my performance.
Suddenly, from the relative obscurity of R1 (a Swiss regional ranking),
I was
number 88 in the Swiss national rankings in the space of a year.

Following my first couple of NLA matches, I went on to take part in the
1996
World Youth Cup. Things went extremely well for me there, too. Amongst
others,
I managed to beat Lleyton Hewitt, who was a really gritty opponent,
even back
then, returning everything I hit at him. On the whole, I was in command
of my
opponents. Unfortunately, it was a different story when it came to my
frame of
mind. Even then, I wanted to play perfectly every time I came out on
court. Of
course, that wasn't always possible and I used to get very agitated
about it.
But somewhere along the line it dawned on me that allowing myself to
get worked
up on court like that was actually doing my game more harm than good.
These days,
things are very different. In fact, I would say that the ability to
balance my
emotions during a match is one of the secrets of my success.

For the true tennis buffs among you and those who like their
statistics, here
are my ranking points from 1989 to 1997:

1989 (I am eight years old), Switzerland: 1.583 (R8)
1990, Switzerland: 2.706 (R7)
1991, Switzerland: 3.65 (R6)
1992, Switzerland: 4.926 (R5)
1993, Switzerland: 6.588 (R4)
1994, Switzerland: 8.846 (R2), Europe U14: 102
1995, Switzerland: 9.643 (R1), Europe U14: 84
1996, Switzerland: 86 (N4), Europe U16: 110
1997, Europe U16: 17



5. The chance to give something back

I'm often asked about the down side of life as a tennis star and
whether I ever
get tired of being approached by total strangers and having to give
endless interviews.
The way I look at it is this: I'm extremely fortunate in many respects
and it
would be wrong of me to complain about the obligations that go with
being famous.
I feel very privileged and I've had a lot of good luck in my life. As
such, I'd
like to be able to give something back. With that in mind, I've set up
a charitable
foundation with two aims: firstly, to give disadvantaged children and
young people
in South Africa a chance to make something of their lives, and
secondly, to promote
tennis in Switzerland. The lot of children and young people in South
Africa,
in particular, is a cause close to my heart. They are the future of the
continent.
It's heartbreaking to think that young people are being deprived of any
chance
of a future through no fault of their own. I want to do my bit to
ensure that
they get a fair chance to put whatever gifts they may possess to good
use by
helping them to help themselves. I'm sure that comes, in part at least,
from
my own experience. It was only thanks to the support I received early
on that
I was able to make the most of my talent for tennis. So, for me, it's
only right
that I should now repay that debt by helping children and young people
in South
Africa.

The reason for choosing South Africa in particular is that my mother
grew up
there, so I feel a real affinity with the country. I'll be keeping a
close eye
on the children we support in the city of Port Elizabeth and following
their
progress with particular interest. Despite my hectic tournament
schedule, I hope
to be able to find time to get out visiting the children myself at some
point
in the next few months. I'd really like to see the good work that's
being done
with my own eyes. Whatever happens, I will, of course, keep you up to
date with
developments as the project continues. And if you'd like to know more
about how
you, too, can help create a better future for the children and young
people of
Port Elizabeth, all the details are available on the IMBEWU website at
www.imbewu.org.
IMBEWU is the name of the non-profit organization set up to manage the
various
aid projects on the ground.



6. A new partnership with Maurice Lacroix

To my mind, it's important that I'm able to identify with a sponsor and
their
products if I'm to be a credible ambassador for that company. With my
new sponsor,
Maurice Lacroix – makers of fine watches – I felt from the very outset
that we
share many of the same core values: precision, aesthetics, a blend of
tradition
and innovation, and authenticity. My personal favourites are the
Masterpiece
Flyback Annuaire and the Masterpiece Réveil Globe. In the Classic
Collection
I rather like the sporty feel of the Miros, too. And I'm really excited
about
the Roger Federer Special Edition from Maurice Lacroix, planned for
this autumn.
More about that in due course, so watch this space…



7. My website: your comments, please!

I'm always keen to improve communication with you. My website is, of
course,
a vital part of that. So my question to you is this: what do you like
about the
website and what, if anything, could be improved? Is it up-to-date
enough? Can
you generally find the information you're looking for? What do you
think of the
design? If you've got any comments whatsoever on the website, we'd love
to hear
from you. Simply e-mail your feedback to: feedback@rogerfederer.com. I
look forward
to hearing what you've got to say!



8. My major sporting objectives for the next few months

First it's off to North America to compete in Toronto and Cincinnati,
and then
come the Olympics in Athens – one of the main objectives of the season
for me.
I took part in the last Olympics four years ago for the first time and
it was
an amazing experience, with thousands of athletes from all four corners
of the
earth gathering to vie for the ultimate accolade. That's what I love
about the
Olympics: for two weeks, the whole atmosphere that surrounds this epic
sporting
event is something very special indeed. Naturally, people want to win
and break
records. But despite that you can't help but feel that there's a unique
common
spirit. Which is why I'm so pleased to be competing again. According to
the old
adage, "It's not the winning but the taking part that counts".
Nevertheless,
I shall be hoping to take a medal home with me!

Another major objective for me in the coming months is to perform
better in the
US Open than I did last year. Flushing Meadow has always been a tough
nut to
crack for me. In 2003 I only made it as far as the last sixteen, which
was a
huge disappointment. But I know that I've got the right style of tennis
to be
able to win the US Open. That gives me the confidence I need to go to
New York
and give it my best shot. The forthcoming tournaments in Toronto and
Cincinnati
should give me some idea as to where I stand.

Well, that's just about all from me for now. I'll report back soon with
news
of my exploits at the Olympics.


Take care, bis bald, à bientôt
Yours Roger

ytben
07-27-2004, 01:53 AM
Thanks vene! It's really great to read, especially when he talked about his foundation. Rogi :hug:

Skyward
07-27-2004, 04:09 AM
Thanks vene!

" I definitely feel that my time at Roland Garros will come"

Glad to hear that. :)

ytben
07-27-2004, 06:04 AM
Federer hints that leisurely search for coach might end by 2005

Mon Jul 26, 6:29 PM ET


TORONTO (AFP) - World number one Roger Federer dropped the strongest hint yet that his leisurely search for a coach could end by 2005.


AFP/File Photo



"I need to think about someone who would fit my needs and personality," said the top seed, who begins play on Tuesday at the 2.56-million-dollar Masters Series here with a match against Moroccan Hicham Arazi.


"I know a bit who might fit my needs. The next question is: is he available," said the 22-year-old who is currently dominating the game with two Grand Slams and two Masters titles among his seven tournament triumphs this season.


Added the steady Swiss, who has been on his own and doing quite nicely since parting company with Swede Peter Lundgren in December: "Maybe there is someone (coming) next year.


"I'd like to have a coach next year."


The lack of a coach hasn't appeared to harm Federer, who has lost only once in his last 26 matches this red-hot season. That was to Gustavo Kuerten at Roland Garros.


Federer is aiming to make it a hat-trick of titles this week after lifting his second Wimbledon (news - web sites) on grass, winning Gstaad on clay a week later and now aiming for hardcourt success in the run-up to the Athens Games and the US Open.


Federer is also the first man to win 50 matches this year, achieving the mark after 54 matches played.


Life is looking sweet - and the Swiss knows it.


"This year has been fantastic year for me," he said. "It's even better than last year. That's difficult to understand, I thought it would be especially tough."


Federer said that his confidence took a huge leap as the won the end-of-season Masters Cup last November going undefeated and taming a few personal demons with a pair of wins over Andre Agassi and victories against Juan Carlos Ferrero, David Nalbandian and Andy Roddick.


"It was important to win the Australian Open (news - web sites) in January and carry the momentum, coming out strong right away," Federer said. "I used momentum from the Masters Cup well.


"I like being number one. You can feel stressed sometimes, but for me it's a good situation, I prefer this to being number two or three."


The superlative Swiss said that he's taking this intense and busy summer season as it comes.


He added that while beating number two Roddick for the Wimbledon title this month was satisfying, the American is just one in a string of rivals trying to knock him from his top position.


"My focus is not just to play Andy. We also have to play well in our other matches. My goals it to beat everyone around the tour.


"If he and I have a rivalry, well that's good for the game."

__________________________________________________ ______________________

Does anybody else get the same feeling as me that he is talking about Cahill?

LCeh
07-27-2004, 06:07 AM
Yes ytben, I think he is talking about Cahill too. Well, at least it has to be some player's coach, or else he wouldn't be unavailable. ;)

ytben
07-27-2004, 06:17 AM
True LCeh, and the bit where he hinted that person may be available next year put the bullseyes on Cahill's forehead IMO ;)

lsy
07-27-2004, 02:15 PM
wow...how cool is it while you're strollling down some of the boring junk/fwd mails in the inbox and then boom....there's ROGER FEDERER in your inbox :eek: ;)

I'm not "naive" enough to think he will be writing all of those newsletter to the fans, but this one really looks like it's written by Rogi himself :D


When rain halted play that second time in the final against Andy Roddick, it gave me a chance to regroup mentally, switch tactics and come back out onto court with all guns blazing. I'm sure that if it hadn't been for that break in play the match would have been even tighter than it was. Early in the game in particular, Andy was a real powerhouse and he was putting me under a lot of pressure. Hats off to him for the way he played!

How could anybody think Rogi is arrogant??? Just look at how he always tell honestly of the match situation even in his newsletter to his fans. Nice that he gave much credit to Andy too.


That combination of a relaxed approach and the determination to do well
enabled me to give it my all once again. Each match that I won spurred me on and made me more determined than ever...And I did it!

:worship: :clap2: Rogi should be really proud of himself!


"For me, national and cultural differences are not barriers. Instead,
they enrich our lives."

:hug: :clap2:


Unfortunately, my flair for French doesn't seem to have done much so far for my performances at Roland Garros.

:haha: :o


Although I came up against a fantastic opponent in Guga, who was on top form when he knocked me out – and for whom I have a lot of respect off court, too

Seb will be really happy to read this ;)


The way I look at it is this: I'm extremely fortunate in many respects and it would be wrong of me to complain about the obligations that go with being famous. I feel very privileged and I've had a lot of good luck in my life. As such, I'd like to be able to give something back.

Great attitude. So true...and some "particular players" really needs to grow up and start showing gratitude of what they have instead of keep seeing only the negative sides of it :o


According to the old adage, "It's not the winning but the taking part that counts". Nevertheless, I shall be hoping to take a medal home with me!


again...:clap2:
==========================

and I love reading him thinking back on his young career...

I know some of you had mentioned before that Rogi's fans are not the crazy bunch who posts "i love rogi etc" all the time, but can I be excused this time for just saying this :

I LOVE ROGI!!! :hearts: :inlove:

or should I say I love his attitude! ;)

WyveN
07-27-2004, 02:37 PM
Will be interesting how big Roger's input is into these newsletters, but they are fun to read either way.

I am certain the section about the sponsor was written by the sponsor themselves, didnt sound anything like Roger ;)

lsy
07-27-2004, 02:40 PM
Will be interesting how big Roger's input is into these newsletters, but they are fun to read either way.

I am certain the section about the sponsor was written by the sponsor themselves, didnt sound anything like Roger ;)

haha...that's what I thought too ;)

:wavey: WyveN...long time no "see"!

Dirk
07-27-2004, 02:52 PM
I think Rogi did write the part about which watches he does like. Rogi does write them up but he webmaster translates it to the various languages. I will be sure to ask him this in his next Q&A session. I don't get why its so hard for people to believe that it is his own writing. Not one phoney bone in that man's body but let the skeptics do their thing........

WyveN
07-27-2004, 03:19 PM
I think Rogi did write the part about which watches he does like. Rogi does write them up but he webmaster translates it to the various languages. I will be sure to ask him this in his next Q&A session. I don't get why its so hard for people to believe that it is his own writing. Not one phoney bone in that man's body but let the skeptics do their thing........

Perhaps he does write it but there is no way Roger wrote "With my
new sponsor,
Maurice Lacroix – makers of fine watches – I felt from the very outset
that we
share many of the same core values: precision, aesthetics, a blend of
tradition
and innovation, and authenticity." :lol:


Isy, been really busy lately, will try to post a bit more now that Toronto is here :wavey:

lsy
07-27-2004, 03:41 PM
Perhaps he does write it but there is no way Roger wrote "With my
new sponsor,
Maurice Lacroix – makers of fine watches – I felt from the very outset
that we
share many of the same core values: precision, aesthetics, a blend of
tradition
and innovation, and authenticity." :lol:

:haha: exactly. Relax Dirk, people always get skeptical when things are too good to be true ;) but I really believe he wrote this newsletter coz the expression of his emotions/feelings are all so real....of course except that paragraph WyveN quoted :o :lol:

I absolutely love this newsletter...it's like receiving a really long mail from a dear friend telling you how he had been all these while ;) :D


Isy, been really busy lately, will try to post a bit more now that Toronto is here :wavey:

Me too...busy busy busy...I need a holiday!!! :(

I have no doubts that many other rogi fans will be showing up here soon too ;)

ytben
07-27-2004, 04:27 PM
lsy, you are excused :p

I also think this one is written by him or a very big part of it, it feels more personal somehow. And you're right the choice of words used in the newsletter are really Rogi-esque. Well except for the paragraph Wyv quoted of course :lol:

mitalidas
07-27-2004, 05:19 PM
any guesses about who Rogi might be looking at for a coach? maybe agassi is retiring after all.... and cahill is available
what about mats wilander? it would be particularly funny if pete coached rogi!! but it will be a great pick, no matter who rogi is looking at . cant wait to find out

lsy
07-27-2004, 05:21 PM
lsy, you are excused :p

:) though I'm sure I said what's in your mind anyway ;)

You and I both should really go to bed now...I hope I can at least catch a bit of action before going to work tomorrow morning :)

lsy
07-27-2004, 05:27 PM
I also thought it's likely to be Cahill, I remembered he mentioned about Cahill in one of his interviews during Wimby too...nothing about coaching but just casually mentioned him. Anyway I'm sure we'll find out soon enough and good to hear that he knows who he wants and is taking his time to look for one that's good for him :)

Dirk
07-27-2004, 05:34 PM
Its ok, I understand. I just can't stand when people say he doesn't write them because it makes Rogi seem like he doesn't care and he is a fraud. I'm defensive of our Ninja, our holy hero, our savior of the sport. ;) I wish he would hire Pete Sampras just to piss off Brad Gilbert. Brad said shit about Pete too. Brad never took Andre's losses to him well. I hope to catch Rogi tonight on tv if the rain doesn't screw everything up.

ytben
07-27-2004, 05:58 PM
:) though I'm sure I said what's in your mind anyway ;)
:o Caught red handed. Stop reading my mind :mad: ;)


You and I both should really go to bed now...I hope I can at least catch a bit of action before going to work tomorrow morning :)

Yeah, my eyes are really heavy already. But the lineup for today is just too good to pass so I'll try to hang on for the Hewitt/Nadal if I can. Then catch some sleep and record the rest. The StarSports replay for tomorrow is only 1 1/2 hours long btw.

ytben
07-27-2004, 06:03 PM
Its ok, I understand. I just can't stand when people say he doesn't write them because it makes Rogi seem like he doesn't care and he is a fraud. I'm defensive of our Ninja, our holy hero, our savior of the sport. ;) I wish he would hire Pete Sampras just to piss off Brad Gilbert. Brad said shit about Pete too. Brad never took Andre's losses to him well. I hope to catch Rogi tonight on tv if the rain doesn't screw everything up.

Speaking of Ninja, Ron posted some nice Ninja smilies in the Toronto cheering thread just for you Dirk.
Actually it will be more interesting if Rogi hitch with Annecone methinks. They said tennis need a good rivalry. Gilbert vs Annecone will do :devil: just like in the Pete vs Agassi era.

RonE
07-27-2004, 08:08 PM
it would be particularly funny if pete coached rogi!!

That would be the dream team! With Rogi's talents, mental strength and Pete's strategies and experience he would be practically unstoppable!!!

RonE
07-27-2004, 08:11 PM
Actually it will be more interesting if Rogi hitch with Annecone methinks. They said tennis need a good rivalry. Gilbert vs Annecone will do :devil: just like in the Pete vs Agassi era.

Are you hinting at a Henman retirement? ;)

But yeah, that would be the ultimate resurrection of one of the greatest 'coaching rivalries' the sport has ever known.

ytben
07-28-2004, 01:48 AM
Are you hinting at a Henman retirement? ;)

But yeah, that would be the ultimate resurrection of one of the greatest 'coaching rivalries' the sport has ever known.

Hey hey I said no such things :p ;) Are you trying to get me burned on stake by the Henman hill residents?

I'm just saying that if Dirk want to get Gilbert pissed off, Annecone may be the better choice than so say Pete.

Action Jackson
07-28-2004, 06:14 AM
That would be the dream team! With Rogi's talents, mental strength and Pete's strategies and experience he would be practically unstoppable!!!

Pete would make a lousy coach and all the spotlight will be on him, when the coach shouldn't be the one hogging the limelight, plus he's too selfish and strategies from Sampras I don't think so, talent, ability, achievement from Sampras yet, but not strategy.

RonE
07-28-2004, 08:43 AM
Are you trying to get me burned on stake by the Henman hill residents?



Heavens forbid! ;) :p

yanchr
07-28-2004, 04:08 PM
Haven't been around for ages...busy busy busy with my work :fiery:

Roger's letter is really :worship::worship: I'm almost sure that Roger did write big parts of this newsletter, esp the 1st part, very different feeling from the previous ones, personal, emotional, and direct, not official, rational and sth expected. It's like he was eager to tell his friend all his personal feelings inside him after all those crazinesses he had gone through, just couldn't afford to keep it to himself. It's so nice for Roger to share his heart and mind with his fans. :worship: :worship: Roger is such a sweetie!

Skyward
07-28-2004, 05:39 PM
Pete would make a lousy coach and all the spotlight will be on him, when the coach shouldn't be the one hogging the limelight, plus he's too selfish and strategies from Sampras I don't think so, talent, ability, achievement from Sampras yet, but not strategy.


I got an impression from Pete's recent interview that he's not eager to find a job. But what do you think of DC as a possible choice for Roger?

Dirk
07-28-2004, 07:11 PM
How do you know George? Just because Pete is a dull guy in press conference doesn't mean he has no brain. He just doesn't like to make tennis seem like its rocket science. I think Rogi could benefit from him. Pete wouldn't be whoring himself on TV coverages and calling matches like Brad does. It won't happen because Rogi would never have the nerve to ask him and Pete would likely never call him up but I could see Pete accepting.

I have no idea what Cahill would bring to the table. I don't know what he has done for Andre but who knows. Bob Brett Becker's old coach who Mary suggested I think would be a great choice and Heinz Guinheart too.

WyveN
07-29-2004, 07:34 AM
I don't think Pete would want Roger doing to well and coming close to his own records especially as the media seems to have labeled him "the next Sampras", best coaches are almost always player who were not very succesful in their own career.

I think Mcenroe is a good tennis tactician, but again I don't think it would work out.

Lalitha
07-29-2004, 10:31 AM
I agree that good players don't make good coaches, but I don't think Pete would not like Roger coming close to his records. Records will be broken, if not sooner but for sure it will be broken.

Dirk
07-29-2004, 12:31 PM
I tend to agree but I think its unfair to say Pete would be a terrible coach when none of us know him. I am curious to see who Rogi gets in 05.

mitalidas
07-30-2004, 04:10 AM
Great timing with our discussion everyone.... I don't know about this sports-writer, and where the "Facts" are from but here it is:

Federer intensifies Cahill chase
By Leo Schlink


SEVEN months after first identifying Darren Cahill as his preferred new coach, world No.1 Roger Federer has interrupted his pre-Olympic campaign to declare he is poised to intensify efforts to secure a mentor for 2005.

Federer has not used a coach since dumping Swede Peter Lundgren after winning the Tennis Masters Cup in Houston last year.

The unorthodox move has hardly affected the beguiling Swiss, as evidenced by a season-topping seven titles including the Australian Open and Wimbledon this year.

But Federer, 22, has now decided he wants coaching direction and there is little doubt he will approach Cahill - but only if the Australian's current charge Andre Agassi retires, as is rumoured, at the end of the season.

Federer has a long and emotional connection with Cahill, whose best friend Peter Carter was the right-hander's first coach. Carter was killed in a car accident two years ago in South Africa, having parted company with Federer in 2000.

But the bond endures. Cahill, when collaborating with Lleyton Hewitt, and Carter, with Federer, took the young pair all over the world. Federer and Hewitt have both advanced to world titles and the No.1 ranking.

"I need to think about someone who would fit my needs and personality," Federer said as he prepares to descend on Athens for an assault on an Olympic gold medal.

"I know who might fit my needs - the next question is, 'Is he available?'"

Federer's comment is seen to be a direct reference to Cahill's situation with 34-year-old Agassi, who has struggled with a chronic hip problem this year and, as a result, has not impacted at the majors in characteristic fashion.

Asked in January about a possible switch to the Federer camp if Agassi were to retire, Cahill told The Advertiser he had "the best job in the world".

Cahill, a former US Open semi-finalist, has the rare distinction of guiding both Hewitt - as the youngest man in history - and Agassi - as the oldest - to the No.1 ranking.

There is no doubt Cahill would remain with Agassi if the veteran American pushes into an 18th season. There is equally no question Cahill would become the most sought coaching commodity if he became available.

Federer, rated by Australia's Wimbledon and US championship winner Neale Fraser as the best player he has seen since Lew Hoad dominated in the 1950s, would be an irresistible assignment.

Federer and Cahill have maintained a good relationship since Carter's death and it is an open secret in Swiss tennis Cahill is the coach Federer wants most.

http://foxsports.news.com.au/story/0,8659,10289683-23216,00.html

mitalidas
07-30-2004, 04:12 AM
Its interesting this guy writes "...no question Cahill would become the most sought coaching commodity if he became available."

But, which coach wouldn't want to have a prized student like Roger? I imagine that every coaching person is hoping they get picked by Rogi

WyveN
07-30-2004, 04:19 AM
I didn't know Roger has ever specificially talked about Cahill as his coach, thought it was just a rumour.

lsy
07-30-2004, 07:41 AM
I didn't know Roger has ever specificially talked about Cahill as his coach, thought it was just a rumour.

Exactly but why does the article write as though this is a "known" fact? Is there something we missed? :confused:

Lalitha
07-30-2004, 07:44 AM
I just posted this in the other thread and here is an article about it.

Actually, I don't think Roger has ever mentioned Cahill's name. Did'nt he said that it would be like asking out a girlfriend of someone else?

No, I don't think he ever mentioned Cahill.

ytben
07-30-2004, 11:23 AM
Yeah, I'm pretty sure he never named name. I think the writer probably got his research from other articles too, so thought Rogi has really chosen DC

RogiFan88
07-30-2004, 02:57 PM
all this cahill crap is speculation and rumours for now... Rogi has not mentioned him by name that I know of... and of course he'll get a coach at some point but when does he have the time to even think about it w his busy sched?? he said he was tired coming into TO too... half a yr is catching up on him, poor baby! but we LOVE you in Canada, Rogi!

LCeh
07-30-2004, 04:29 PM
Hehe, in this month's Deuce magazine, there was a page about the tennis courts, where they say something funny about each part of the court. When they got to the umpire's chair, it says:

"A lectern for the great speeches of our time: 'Quiet, please,' 'Game, set and match, Federer', and the classic tearjerker, 'Ladies and gentleman, you are kindly requested to refrain from using flash photography during points.' Beautiful. "

Also, in the ABCs of tennis, for A, it says:

"A
ALL-ROUNDER
A player who is comfortable on all surfaces and equally adept at the baseline or the net. See Roger Federer."

:yeah:

ytben
07-31-2004, 07:40 AM
Thanks LCeh for the quotes :lol:

Daniel
07-31-2004, 08:34 AM
Thanks :)

lsy
08-01-2004, 01:08 PM
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/osm/story/0,6903,1270865,00.html
==============================

It'll all end in tears...

Last month he took his second successive men's singles title at Wimbledon and cried on court - again. The morning after his victory, a tired but jubilant Roger Federer talked candidly to Tim Adams about fame, his temper, the pain he felt at the death of his coach and why he will always live in Switzerland

Interview by Tim Adams
Sunday August 1, 2004

What do you do the morning after you have won your second Wimbledon title in such glorious style? Do you sleep off a long night of champagne and celebration? Do you relive the match shot by shot in your head while your girlfriend serves you a lazy breakfast in bed? Or perhaps you wander down to the village shop and pick up the papers for posterity?
If you are Roger Federer you get up at 6.30 and start doing interviews for Swiss TV. Then you sit down, on the patio of your luxurious borrowed house in SW19, blink a little into the sun and try to put into words for the bloke from The Observer what was achieved so effortlessly without them the previous day.

Tennis players have very little time for reflection. Federer is flying home this afternoon to a hero's reception before heading on to his next tournament, the Swiss Open in Gstaad (an event he will also win). He had a drink or two at the champions' dinner, he says, but it was not like the old days and there was no dancing with the ladies' champion, Maria Sharapova. In the end he got an early night and woke up feeling what, exactly?

An intermittent grin, that comes over him unexpectedly every few minutes, betrays a weary and irrepressible satisfaction, but beyond that, well, 'it's so hard to say if it's better than last year or what. It's definitely not worse. I thought this year I had to fight much harder. In the final and in the quarters against Lleyton Hewitt. Last year I did not have to think too much to win, but this time around, against Andy [Roddick] in particular, I had to change one or two things around. So the satisfaction is immense to be able to change and still win.'

There has been a good deal of talk, I suggest, over the previous fortnight of Federer reaching a level of genius, such is the range and variety of his shots. Does it feel like that to him? 'At the moment I seem able to play with a lot of touch and, I think, a lot of natural ability,' he tells me. 'I often decide what I will do as it happens and change things instinctively, and people recognise that. But genius? It is certainly nice to hear that. It is even better in the sense that for ages people were saying about me 'this guy will be number one, this guy will win Wimbledon' and so on. But I had not done it. Now I have, so that feels good.'

As with previous successes, Federer revealed how much he cared about his victory when he burst into tears in his chair, after clinching match point. Has he always cried like this, or is it just a Wimbledon thing?

'Well,' he says, smiling, 'I don't cry at movies too often. But on the tennis court I find it hard to keep my emotions together. I used to cry a lot when I lost matches, which was a little embarrassing. As a teenager I would cry after almost every match I lost for about half an hour. Now I don't do that, thankfully. Hardly ever. I think I might have cried if I lost to Roddick yesterday. Certainly I would have been fighting the tears. But I don't usually cry after a win. And I'd rather I hadn't, particularly in front of millions and millions of people watching on television. I don't know why it happens. It is probably just because of the relief. The fact that it all paid off, all the effort, finally.' :)

The final was also the 24th consecutive match he had won on grass. It seems that it is fast becoming his favourite surface.

'Well, I love it certainly,' he says. 'It is very natural, very quiet, very soft. It suits my style in that sense. My backhand stays low. I used to think serve and volley was the only way to win on grass, but now the return is too good for that game, so I mix it up quite a bit more.'

During this year's tournament I heard Federer saying that there were still a few things he needed to work on in his game. Then, when pressed, he could only come up with one slight fault he had identified, which was an occasional inability to hit a high backhand return with full power. Was that really it, the sum of all his weaknesses?

He laughs. 'Well most of the rest of my game is pretty good. But for me it is my mental strength that I need to work on most. It used to be hard for me, being down in a match and having to come back. That's what I have learnt how to do. I was always such a good front runner, I would win the first set and then finish off my opponents quickly. But if I got a set down and a break down I would struggle. Now, I can do that thing where I say to myself, "Rog, you're not far away here, just get your act together..."' :yeah:

These days the closest Federer gets to letting off steam is playing AC/DC at full volume in his car after matches, but there was a time when he did not seem so relaxed, when it all seemed to matter too much to him. Certainly as a junior, he says, he was 'like a crazy maniac'.

That's quite hard to imagine, now.

'Honestly,' he says, the picture of calm. 'I had a very bad temper, I was very aggressive. Always testing the limits, always arguing over calls, but never cheating. :) Always upset with myself. Angry at the conditions all the time. It got to the point where my parents threatened to stop driving me to tournaments if I carried on like this. They were too embarrassed to be seen with me." :o

They get on fine now. The only child of Robert Federer, a sales manager for a pharmaceutical company, and Lynette, his South Africa-born wife, Roger was born on 8 August 1981, in Basle, Switzerland.

He first picked up a racket at the age of three when he watched his father and mother play at their local club in Basle. Afterwards, like the young Borg, he spent hours hitting the ball against a garage door, in a solitary pursuit of perfection.

If anything, sport came almost too easily to the young Federer. He was singled out from the earliest age as the kid who could do anything, the prodigy. He says he probably could have made it as a professional footballer, but he was so good at tennis that it was inconceivable he would not pursue it as a career. He developed an all-court game by playing on clay in summer and fast carpet in winter. By the time he was 10 or 11, he was already being talked of as a future champion (the junior events did indeed come thick and fast - Federer won the junior singles and doubles at Wimbledon in 1998).

As a boy, his hero was Boris Becker, whom he admired because of his will to win. 'People used to say to me, "What about Edberg, he's so classy, so cool", but for a long time I could not see that...'

Federer's fury raged for years. When he played in front of a crowd he seemed to go to pieces. 'I would lose it,' he tells me. 'I was screaming and slamming rackets... it made me feel like an idiot.' A few key incidents changed his outlook and cooled his temper. But he also responded to the influence of his Australian coach and mentor, Peter Carter.

Federer had first worked with Carter when he was 12 years old. The Australian subsequently became the Swiss Davis Cup captain. 'He is the one person who truly opened my eyes,' Federer says, 'to what I could achieve, because maybe I was not taking the game seriously enough at times. He was a very good friend and he taught me so much about technique, too. He improved my game so much.'

Until he began to listen to Carter, Federer says he did not really know how to get the most out of his game. One of his difficulties was that he had always had too much choice. 'My range of shots was a problem. You get a slow ball, and you think, "What am I going to do with this?" If your game is limited, it's simple, you have a shot for each situation and you play it. I had too many options and I had to learn to choose the right shot and the right tactics, not just the most spectacular. I have to admit that when I joined the professional tour, I liked to think I was bringing something special and I would show off...' :lol:

Carter helped to make him understand that this was not how to win tennis tournaments. Two years ago, on the eve of a Davis Cup match, Carter was killed in a car crash while on safari in South Africa. Federer was inconsolable. He had persuaded his friend to take the holiday that had resulted in his death and he felt lost without him. For a while his game disintegrated, but when he put it back together, he was stronger, more grown up, perhaps. When he won his first Wimbledon last year, he dedicated the victory to the memory of his coach.

I wonder if he still finds inspiration in that loss? 'Certainly Peter is still very strong in my heart and in my memories,' he says. 'And I still can't get over what happened. It has been very hard for me to go through this. I have not lost anyone else close to me. I had never been to a funeral before, so it was such a big shock. I still think of him every day. And whenever I win, particularly big matches like yesterday, I'm thinking of him for sure.' :sad: :sad:

Since Carter's death, Federer has been playing without a coach. :confused: :mad: :o He is unusual on the tour for going it alone, particularly in the grand slam events. But where most consider a trainer to be a necessity, he remains satisfied with this arrangement, at least for now. 'I feel so good right now, I can't see why a coach would help, but we'll see what happens later.'

Coaching is not the only area of the game in which Federer likes to do things his own way. While some players travel with retinues that would not look out of place on a state visit, Federer tries to keep his followers down to a select few. This week he has been sharing the same house in which Pete Sampras used to stay. With him are his Swiss girlfriend, Mirka, a former player and hitting partner of Martina Hingis, and his physiotherapist.

'Mirka used to play tennis and sometimes she gives me a second opinion on things.' She also takes care of all of Federer's press and PR arrangements, too, principally making sure none of it gets in the way of winning tennis tournaments.

His mum and sister were on Centre Court to see him win, but his dad stayed at home in Basle. 'I think it's too much for him,' Federer explains, smiling. 'He gets too emotional. He prefers to barbecue at home with friends and see the match on TV... Also they are all much more superstitious than me and because he did not come last year he felt he should not come this year either.' (:haha: guess the poor dad will be sitting at home bbqing again next year)

I remember a comment that John McEnroe once made about how being the number one player in the world was sometimes a lonely place to be. I wonder if Federer feels that the other players treat him differently now that he is so clearly the man to beat?

'The other players want to be where you are, certainly, but I think I'm quite an open and easy going guy. I speak three languages fluently [English, French and German] so I talk to everyone and I try not to offend anyone, so I hope there is no jealousy in the locker room. It is true it's a much more busy life as number one. I certainly had to get used to that.' Unlike many of the great European players of the recent past he has resisted the temptation to move to Monte Carlo. 'I like to be at home in Basle. I just bought a place with Mirka there. And I don't see the point of moving just to avoid tax.'

The money itself is important, he says, but it has already long since ceased to be a distraction. 'As a young Swiss man, of course,' he says, smiling, 'it is always satisfying to know that you have a healthy bank balance. And of course that you can meet your dreams in terms of cars and the homes that you have. The places you can stay.' But that is about as far as his material wish-fulfilment extends. 'My fantasies now are all about tennis,' he says. :yeah:

For now, he is concentrating on the rest of the year. One major goal is an Olympic medal. He was fourth in Sydney, so he does not want to miss out again.

'It's great for tennis players, because it is so different from the regular tour. It is really a thrill for me to talk with other athletes from other sports and see what they have to say.' And, yes, he will stay in the Olympic village. (That should take away all doubts of him playing Olympic again? ;) )

'After all,' he says, 'it's probably the closest I will ever come to being a student, to living the life of an average 22-year-old...' (:hug: Rogi...missing the hanging out with friends/simple life)

He smiles and goes off to get ready for his next flight, his next tournament, his next triumph. Federer is many things, but average will never be one of them.

· Tim Adams is the author of Being John McEnroe (Yellow Jersey Press)

Mrs. B
08-01-2004, 02:03 PM
Hi Isy! :wavey: apakabar?

thanks for posting this, but the writer says that Roger is the only child of Robert & Lynette,

They get on fine now. The only child of Robert Federer, a sales manager for a pharmaceutical company, and Lynette, his South Africa-born wife, Roger was born on 8 August 1981, in Basle, Switzerland.


...then writes about his mum and sister Diana watching his match:

His mum and sister were on Centre Court to see him win, but his dad stayed at home in Basle. 'I think it's too much for him,' Federer explains, smiling. 'He gets too emotional. He prefers to barbecue at home with friends and see the match on TV...

hmmm...

dewolv
08-01-2004, 02:27 PM
Another mistake was about his coach.
Peter Lundgren was his coach during
or after Carter's death.They of course
splitted last year.

lsy
08-01-2004, 02:35 PM
Hi Isy! :wavey: apakabar?

:wavey: Mrs. B! Khabar tak berapa baik, tak cukup tidur dan Roger main tennis banyak crappy semalam....(as crappy as my Malay :haha: :o )


thanks for posting this, but the writer says that Roger is the only child of Robert & Lynette,

...then writes about his mum and sister Diana watching his match:

hmmm...

What's new? They can't write an article without mistakes on it and yes dewolv, that's a stupid mistake about Rogi's coach too.

mitalidas
08-01-2004, 02:54 PM
Isy and Mrs. B!!!! saya malum bhasa indonesia, not very well of course, but saya tingal Djakarta sejack 1979 untuk 1985.

lsy
08-01-2004, 03:06 PM
Isy and Mrs. B!!!! saya malum bhasa indonesia, not very well of course, but saya tingal Djakarta sejack 1979 untuk 1985.

Hi mitalidas! :wavey:

I think it's better for 3 of us to forget about Malay/B.Indonesia and stick with English, coz I sense it's just similarly teruk among us. To think that I used to be pretty good at it during high shool ;)

ytben will probably show up and laugh at all of us soon ;)

Mrs. B
08-01-2004, 05:53 PM
Hi mitalidas! :wavey:

I think it's better for 3 of us to forget about Malay/B.Indonesia and stick with English, coz I sense it's just similarly teruk among us. To think that I used to be pretty good at it during high shool ;)

ytben will probably show up and laugh at all of us soon ;)

:haha:

indeed, girls!

Malayo saya tak bagus. bagi saya masa...i'll prolly catch up in a year. ;)

rogicomel
08-02-2004, 02:03 AM
WOW! Mrs B! Ur Malay impressed me!!!!!! Bagus!!!! Keep learning, i'm sure u will master it over the course of one year period!!!

Dana
08-02-2004, 02:41 PM
From http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20040802/TENNIS02/TPSports/TopStories

Federer dedicates win to ex-coach

It was an emotional day for the Swiss ace, whose mentor died in crash two years ago

By TOM TEBBUTT
Special to The Globe and Mail
Monday, August 2, 2004 - Page S1

TORONTO -- Roger Federer played with the awesome lightness of being tennis's supreme player, but also with a heavy heart yesterday, when he defeated Andy Roddick 7-5, 6-3 to win the Tennis Masters Canada title.

Two years ago while in Toronto, after losing in the first round to eventual champion Guillermo Canas, the Swiss player learned that the primary influence on his tennis career, Peter Carter, had been killed in a vehicle accident in South Africa.

Carter had coached Federer from his earliest days in tennis until his late teens, before passing him on to Peter Lundgren due to additional responsibilities with the Swiss tennis federation.

Federer, who wore a black shirt for the final, experienced a flood of emotions yesterday.

"It's special to have won on the [Swiss] national day," the world's No. 1-ranked men's player said, "but for me, it's kind of a bittersweet moment because my former coach died two years ago. On this day, I got the news.

"This victory is really for him because I still think about him every day. It was a hard moment and to have won here two years later is nice."

Federer, 22, considered the 36-year-old Australian his best friend, and that could influence whom he selects as his next coach after splitting with Lundgren and going it alone since late in 2003.

Darren Cahill, Andre Agassi's coach and former coach of Lleyton Hewitt, is from the same city as Carter -- Adelaide -- and they were great mates. If, as is widely speculated, Agassi retires later this year, Cahill would be available to take over Federer for 2005.

That Federer was able to mark the second anniversary of Carter's death with a win was partly due to a sensational serving performance. He out-aced the hard-serving Roddick 14-4, hitting three in a row when trailing love-40, triple-break point, at 4-4 in the opening set.

Those aces enabled him to escape to deuce, and he went on to hold serve. The Swiss player won the set three games later when Roddick misfired with a forehand over the baseline.

"I keep trying to tell myself 'that's hard luck,' " Roddick said about Federer's uncanny ability to hit timely shots. "But it happens a lot when I play Roger for some reason. It's frustrating."

It was Roddick's seventh loss in eight meetings against Federer, but he was able to make light of the fact that while he has a coach, his opponent was only accompanied by girlfriend Miroslava Vavrinec, 26, who ranked in the top-100 on the women's tour before knee surgeries ended her career.

"Maybe his girlfriend is a better coach than we think," the American joked, "and knows something you and I don't."

Federer finished the match with a flourish, directing a beautiful, uncontested backhand winner down the line into an open court after breaking Roddick in the previous game.

The victory extended the world No. 1's winning streak to 23, giving him his eighth title of the year and 10th consecutive win in a final. It also enabled Federer to equal Swedish legend Bjorn Borg's 1979 feat of winning successive events on grass (Wimbledon), clay (Gstaad, Switzerland) and hard court (Toronto).

"I think everyone on the tour knows how difficult it is to win on three surfaces in one year, let alone back-to-back," Federer said.

"[Borg] was before my time, but I was lucky enough to meet him. I hope I can meet him again and chat about it. This is our history books and this means a lot to me."

Federer, who turns 23 next Sunday, said he was so tired after winning Wimbledon and then at Gstaad, that he contemplated, while holidaying in Dubai, skipping the Toronto event. He decided to play after talking to his trainer.

Once in Toronto, Federer kept himself well-nourished. "I only ate in Japanese and Italian restaurants," he said, before asking: "Are there Canadian restaurants here?"

Federer's presence helped attract a Toronto-record 165,508 spectators to the event at the new Rexall Centre, just short of the Canadian record of 165,611 set in Montreal in 2002.

[...]

Federer, voted Swiss of the Year in 2003, is the prime candidate to carry his nation's flag in the Games' opening ceremonies.

ytben
08-02-2004, 05:42 PM
WOW! Mrs B! Ur Malay impressed me!!!!!! Bagus!!!! Keep learning, i'm sure u will master it over the course of one year period!!!

How did I miss this one. Probably because I was too nervous about the final. As rogicomel said, nice job Mrs. B mitalidas and lsy! :clap2: Your Malay/b. Indonesia is good. lsy, how can you think I will laugh at you guys I am an :angel: afterall.

Thanks for the article lsy & Dana. I really enjoyed them both despite some incorrect facts.

As a teenager I would cry after almost every match I lost for about half an hour. Now I don't do that, thankfully.

:lol: As much as I love Rogi's beautiful tears, I am glad he passed this phase too.

I have to admit that when I joined the professional tour, I liked to think I was bringing something special and I would show off...'

:lol: Another good example of Rogi's refreshing honesty & humour. Although others probably took it for arrogant comment.

"It's special to have won on the [Swiss] national day," the world's No. 1-ranked men's player said, "but for me, it's kind of a bittersweet moment because my former coach died two years ago. On this day, I got the news.

"This victory is really for him because I still think about him every day. It was a hard moment and to have won here two years later is nice."

:sad: :sad: Rogi :hug: Now the black shirt he wore in the final has taken a new meaning for me.

Federer, voted Swiss of the Year in 2003, is the prime candidate to carry his nation's flag in the Games' opening ceremonies.

I hope he will be selected. I will be taping the ceremony for sure :D

RogiFan88
08-03-2004, 04:03 AM
Hey, Rogi, why didn't you ask me for some resto recommendations, Japanese, Italian or Canadian... silly boy!

LCeh
08-03-2004, 05:13 AM
Some impressive stats on the ATP site:
5th in total number of aces
1st in 2nd serve points won, at 58%
1st in service games won, at 92%
1st in break points saved, at 74%
4th in first serve points won, at 78%
6th in points won returning first serve, at 35% (1st was 37%, only 2% higher than Roger)
9th in return games won, at 31%

Some stuff off the top of my head:
Rogi has won his last 64 of 65 matches when he wins the first set.
Only lost 4 out of the last 29 sets in final.

tangerine_dream
08-03-2004, 04:02 PM
Welcome back, LCeh! :hug: Hope you had a nice trip! Did you tape the final? If not, I can send it to you if you'd like. :)

mitalidas
08-03-2004, 05:31 PM
Official Olympics Profile for Roger
(at least, official for the US)

Roger Federer
Complete package
While men's tennis becomes increasingly one-dimensional, Federer stands out with his versatility. With so many weapons, the general consensus is that it took Federer some time to harness them and settle on a winning formula. Now that he has, he figures to pile up the major prizes. Andre Agassi says Federer is, "the kind of guy that can really win a lot of Slams based on the fact that his game has the ability to be played different ways." Marat Safin, whom Federer beat in this year's Australian Open final, adds, "Pete Sampras ... had the biggest serve in the world. He had an unbelievable forehand and very good hands ... But he was sometimes missing a little bit on the backhand. Roger has everything -- and a backhand."

and more....at http://www.nbcolympics.com/athleteb...992/detail.html

Mrs. B
08-03-2004, 05:41 PM
i'll translate this when i have time...i'm off to play tennis in a few minutes! ;)
this was on today's paper, the Berner Zeitung.

Roger Federer, Tennis-WeltNummer 1
«Mein Selbstvertrauen ist extrem gross»

Mit dem Turniersieg am Wochenende in Toronto hat Roger Federer auch das zweite grosse Saisonziel praktisch erreicht: Die Nummer 1 kann dem Schweizer in diesem Jahr kaum mehr ein anderer Profi streitig machen.

Roger Federer, man weiss fast nicht mehr, zu was man Ihnen alles gratulieren soll ...

Roger Federer: Meine Serie ist wirklich fast unglaublich. Dass ich eine Leistung von Björn Borg egalisierte (drei Titel hintereinander auf Rasen, Sand und Hartplatz, Red.), bedeutet mir extrem viel. Ich hoffe, ich kann mit Borg mal einen Kaffee trinken gehen und über diese Serie diskutieren. Dennoch bleiben auch gemischte Gefühle. Als ich vor zwei Jahren letztmals in Toronto war, verstarb in Südafrika mein Freund und früherer Coach Peter Carter. Ganz alleine ihm widme ich diesen Turniersieg.

Vor dem Turnier in Toronto waren Sie in Dubai in den Ferien. Weshalb gerade Dubai?

Weil es dort nur fünf Tage im Jahr regnet. Ich sah in Halle, London und Gstaad so viel schlechtes Wetter, ich musste unbedingt an die Sonne. In Dubai war es 45 Grad warm und immer schön. Ich bin vor allem am Strand gelegen.

Kann Roger Federer noch einfach so am Strand liegen, ohne stets belästigt zu werden?

Ja, ja! Im Hotel wussten alle Gäste, dass ich da bin und Ferien mache. Aber ich konnte mich dennoch eine Woche lang sehr gut erholen.

Sie sind nach wie vor ohne Coach unterwegs. Bleibt das so, weil es eigentlich gar nicht besser laufen könnte?

Im Moment gibt es an dieser Front nichts Neues. Vielleicht habe ich nächstes Jahr einen Coach, vielleicht geht es noch ein Jahr so weiter wie momentan. Meine Absicht ist es, im Lauf des nächsten Jahres wieder mit jemandem zusammenzuarbeiten. Aber alles muss passen: Der Coach muss zu mir passen und mir helfen können. Ich habe Ideen, wer es sein könnte. Die zweite Frage ist: Sind diese Leute verfügbar? Im Moment wäre es eine höchst undankbare Aufgabe für einen neuen Coach. Man stelle sich bloss vor, ich engagiere jemanden und beginne plötzlich zu verlieren.

Was ist denn Ihr Erfolgsgeheimnis?

Mein Selbstvertrauen ist extrem gross. Ich bewege mich sehr gut, und wenn ich mich gut bewege, fühle ich mich auch sehr gut. Extrem wichtig für mein Selbstvertrauen waren das Masters in Houston, das Australian Open und das Turnier in Indian Wells. Innerhalb von drei Monaten habe ich an diesen Turnieren meine Angstgegner alle mindestens einmal geschlagen. Wenn ich jetzt an Turnieren die Auslosungen studiere, bin ich nicht mehr entsetzt, wenn ich früh auf Nalbandian, Hewitt oder Henman treffe. Schon vor einem Jahr war nach Wimbledon mein Selbstvertrauen riesig. Dann verlor ich aber in Kanada im Halbfinal gegen Roddick, ich glaube sogar an meinem Geburtstag, und wurde deshalb nicht die Nummer 1. Damals konnte ich die Situation nicht bewältigen, heuer gelingt mir das.

Sie haben den Wimbledon-Titel verteidigt, bleiben bis Ende Jahr die Nummer 1 - zwei Saisonziele sind erreicht. Ihr drittes grosses Ziel heisst Olympische Spiele in Athen.

Das ist richtig. Ich freue mich seit vier Jahren auf Athen, nachdem ich in Sydney knapp eine Medaille verpasst habe. Das primäre Ziel ist jetzt eine Olympiamedaille. Aber an Sydney habe ich dennoch viele schöne Erinnerungen. Dort habe ich meine Freundin Mirka kennen gelernt. Ich kann in Athen für die Schweiz spielen, was ich sonst nur im Davis Cup kann.

Diese Woche treten Sie auch noch in Cincinnati an. Wird da die Vorbereitung für Athen nicht zu kurz?

Nein, denn Siege sind die beste Vorbereitung, die es nur geben kann. Ausserdem ist das Masters-Series-Turnier von Cincinnati ein zu wichtiges Turnier, als dass ich jetzt einfach absagen könnte. Das wäre auch nicht gut für den Sport. Und selbst wenn ich auch in Cincinnati bis zum Final dabei bin, bleibt mir eine Woche bis zum Beginn der Spiele in Athen. Ausserdem bin ich überzeugt, dass der Weg zu den grossen Siegen über Turniere wie Toronto und Cincinnati führt.In Toronto gewann ich mein viertes Masters-Series-Turnier. Und hoffentlich gewinne ich bald mein viertes Grand-Slam-Turnier.

Interview: Rolf Bichsel Toronto




BZ-Sport, 03. August 2004

mitalidas
08-03-2004, 05:47 PM
This is an awesome piece for us RF-Fans.


I don't know how to post movies, but this is a really nice "movie" that Jim Courier gives a talk-over on.

Go to: http://www.nbcolympics.com/tennis/index.html

and click on

" NBC's Jim Courier offers an in-depth comparison." I also post this on Pete's forum

dewolv
08-03-2004, 05:53 PM
Thanks, that was a great find.

jtipson
08-03-2004, 06:06 PM
Wow, what an interview, and what confidence! Thanks Mrs. B :)

I just love the last bit: "In Toronto I won my fourth Masters Series tournament. And hopefully I'll soon win my fourth Grand Slam tournament."

And he doesn't worry about whether he gets Henman, Hewitt or Nalbandian in his draws any more. I still do, but not so much!

ytben
08-03-2004, 06:15 PM
Cool slideshow mitalidas! I am usually not big on the Pete/Rogi comparison. Too many bickering over a non issue imo. But I really enjoyed this one, especially the commentary from Jim.

Thanks, terima kasih ;)

mitalidas
08-03-2004, 06:30 PM
welcome, Ytben (tida apa) :-)

mitalidas
08-03-2004, 06:33 PM
Wow, another record!!! :worship:


Federer sets Masters record

Federer beat Andre Agassi in last year's Masters Cup final
Roger Federer has booked his place at the end-of-season Masters Cup, the earliest a player has qualified in the 15-year history of the event.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/3532668.stm

Seraphim
08-03-2004, 11:36 PM
Federer First To Qualifying for Houston 2004

INDESIT ATP 2004 Race leader Roger Federer already has clinched a berth in the Tennis Masters Cup Houston, marking the earliest announced qualification for the year-end championships in ATP history (from 1990). Federer is the defending Tennis Masters Cup Houston champion.




Today's announcement is a clear testament to Federer's remarkable run of success in 2004, which includes two Grand Slam victories (Australian Open and Wimbledon), three ATP Masters Series titles (Indian Wells, Hamburg and Toronto) and an incredible 23-match, four-tournament winning streak that he puts on the line at 1 p.m. EST today at the ATP Masters Series tournament in Cincinnati.

Federer also is seeking at the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters this week to become the first player in history to win three consecutive ATP Masters Series titles, and the first player to ever win four ATP Masters Series titles in a single year. He's the first player since Bjorn Borg in 1979 to win consecutive tournament titles on grass, clay and hard courts.

“I'm very happy to qualify for the Tennis Masters Cup for the third time in succession,” Federer said. “I always play well at the Tennis Masters Cup and last year's title was one of the best tournament wins of my career. The top 8 players will be competing and I look forward to defending my title.”

In contrast to Federer's announced qualification this year during the first week of August, the first two players last year to be officially announced as qualifiers for the Tennis Masters Cup Houston, a joint event run by the ATP, ITF and Grand Slams, were Andy Roddick and Juan Carlos Ferrero in September during the U.S. Open. Federer currently leads the INDESIT ATP 2004 Race by more than 300 points.

“We all marvel at Federer's remarkable form that has resulted in this unprecedented early qualification,” said Mark Miles, ATP Chief Executive Officer. “Tennis fans throughout the world not only are thoroughly enjoying watching Roger's style and superb level of play, but they also are witnessing the emergence of one of the greatest champions in tennis' history. I'm certain that the Houston fans in particular will be eager to see Roger attempt to defend his Tennis Masters Cup title in November.”

Federer has won eight tournament titles in 2004, and his 23-match winning streak is the sixth longest since the ATP began keeping track in 1990. Each win this week at the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters will move him higher up the chart. A win in Cincinnati (six match victories) would tie him with Sampras in the No. 2 spot (29) behind Thomas Muster's 35-match streak in 1995 that many experts consider insurmountable. Federer's eight titles in 2004 also puts him within reach of the 12 won by Muster in 1995, another modern-era achievement that many expected to last for decades.

The Race for the remaining seven spots will be heavily contested through the remainder of the season, with Andy Roddick, Guillermo Coria, Carlos Moya and Gaston Gaudio likely to be the next players to qualify for Houston, which will be held November 13-21 at the Westside Tennis Club. While those four look likely, the remaining spots likely will not be decided until after the US Open and the fall ATP Masters Series tournaments in Madrid and Paris.

The top seven finishers in the INDESIT ATP 2004 Race qualify for the Tennis Masters Cup. The eighth place will go to the highest-placed Grand Slam champion who finishes between eighth and 20th. If no player fits this classification, the eighth place will go to the player who finishes eighth in the INDESIT ATP 2004 Race.

Seraphim
08-03-2004, 11:37 PM
Wow, another record!!! :worship:


Federer sets Masters record

Federer beat Andre Agassi in last year's Masters Cup final
Roger Federer has booked his place at the end-of-season Masters Cup, the earliest a player has qualified in the 15-year history of the event.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/3532668.stm

I was wondering (with 881 pts and all) when they were going to announce it.

Federer Fan
08-03-2004, 11:39 PM
Roger still has the ability to set another Master's record. If he wins either Madrid or Paris then he will become the first man to win 4 TMS in a year.

LCeh
08-04-2004, 05:24 AM
This is an article from a few months ago, but it's really nice. :)

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Roger Federer Defends His Crown

He’s the man that everyone wants a slice of at the moment. Television, the world’s top magazines, sponsors and no doubt a growing band of female admirers, but Dubai will have him all to itself for a week in March.
One of the gentlemen of tennis is eagerly looking forward to his return to Dubai, and this time he arrives not only as the defending champion of the Dubai Tennis Championships and world No. 1, but as the champion of Wimbledon and the Australian Open.
Roger Federer has long been acknowledged as a player with extraordinary talent, and it was only a matter of time before he won his first Grand Slam. The only mystery was why it didn’t happen earlier. It had been at Wimbledon two years before that Federer first gave notice that he was someone to watch, when he ended the 31-match Wimbledon winning streak of Pete Sampras.
But the breakthrough came close to being delayed even further, after Federer suffered back pain in Wimbledon’s fourth round while playing Feliciano Lopez. The pain was so bad he almost quit the match, but he battled his way through and ended up as champion. There’s a lesson there for all of us.
“It happened in the warm-up,” said Federer. “I just couldn't move anymore, so I had to call the trainer and hope for a wonder. It was very tough for me. I still can't explain what happened. I was really in big pain, you know. I was struggling to serve, I was struggling to return. I couldn't even really sit down because I was hurting so much. ”
“I told myself, ‘If this continues for a few more games it's not worth playing’. But somehow I stayed in the match and it got a little bit better. Then I kind of won that first set, which was important.”
His victory in the final over Mark Philippoussis changed his life, and since then he has been acclaimed by many of the greats of the game, including Andre Agassi, John McEnroe, Boris Becker and Patrick Rafter. Since that magic day last July the quietly spoken, modest 22-year old has had to adjust to being a well-known personality, and that hasn’t always been easy.
“I’m more famous, not only as a tennis player but in general,” he said. “Especially in Switzerland I’m very famous. I became Swiss Person of the Year and Sportsperson of the Year, which means actually quite a lot in Switzerland. Now things are more challenging. I get more positive press but I also get more negative press, just because I’m in the limelight more, and that’s something you have to learn to deal with. It’s been mainly positive, but I have had some bad experiences. ”
“And people pay more attention to what I say now. It gives me quite a lot of responsibility. You have to think twice about what you want to say and sometimes be better prepared. We always have to watch what we say because we’re sports idols and I always feel I cannot speak 100 percent freely, even though I’m trying to because I’m a very open and honest person.”
One positive is that his Wimbledon victory lifted a weight off his shoulders, as he explains.
“I feel totally different now. I feel much more relaxed. The pressure to win that I'd felt over the last few Grand Slams hasn't been so much fun. I'm very happy to have come over that stage, and now I don’t have to prove that I can win one. I feel much more relaxed inside. “
“I’m maybe the most natural ball-striker, I don’t know. I'm not going to start praising myself. But just for me, my game feels natural. I feel like I'm living the game when I’m out there. I feel when a guy is going to hit the ball, I know exactly with the angles and the spins, I just feel I've got that all figured out. And that is a huge advantage. Also, when it gets important, I feel I can raise my game.”
Winning Wimbledon is something that every player dreams of, and Federer was overcome with emotion during the presentation ceremony.
“Australia was magnificent but Wimbledon means so much to me, because I've had the great experience of my '98 junior victory, then 2001 when I beat Sampras, and now this. It's just too good,” he said. “It was the most important match in my life, and to have played so well was just an absolute dream. And then in the end to lift the trophy is something you don't expect, and when it happened it was very tough on the emotions. “
“It's incredible. You see the trophy, and it's so beautiful. Gold. You know, you don't have golden trophies very often. When you look at it and when you hold it, it’s something you've always dreamed of. It’s so nice. If I look at all the players who have won, a lot have been idols to me. To be on the board with Borg and these people, it's just nice to be a part of history at Wimbledon.”
His success hasn’t changed him. Federer has proved over and over that you don’t have to be self-centred and mean to be a champion, and he has shown great tolerance in dealing with the circus that inevitably follows you when you win a Grand Slam. Recently he showed his consideration of others when a reporter did an interview with him but then dropped his recorder and the interview was gone. Federer quietly sat down and did the interview again, when most players would have said ‘Bad luck’ and gone on their way.
On 1st March, the amiable Swiss will attempt to become the first player to successfully defend his Dubai Tennis Championships crown, and it is a challenge he is looking forward to.
“Dubai is a special place. It’s different to the rest of the world that I travel in, and I’m really looking forward to coming back this year,” he said. “It was a great week for me and I was really surprised I won last year, even though I was top seed, because I felt really tired when I came to Dubai. It almost happened like the year before when I lost first round. But I was proud that I could raise myself to quite a good level to get through to the semis, and after that I kind of recovered and started to play really good tennis.”
Federer’s return has delighted organisers of the Dubai Tennis Championships who welcomed back the women’s World No 1 Justine Henin-Hardenne for the WTA Tour event last month.
“Roger has become a huge crowd favourite in Dubai and it is a massive boost to the tournament to welcome him back once again,” said Colm McLoughlin, Managing Director of Dubai Duty Free, the tournament’s owners and organisers. “He launched a memorable year with victory in Dubai and his triumph at the Australian Open recently showed that he is still the player to beat.”
Held at the Dubai Tennis Stadium, the Dubai Tennis Championships is owned and organised by Dubai Duty Free, and takes place under the patronage of HH General Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai and Minister of Defence, UAE.

http://www.arabia.com/index.php/english/woman/issue_4/variety/roger_federer_defends_his_crown

Lalitha
08-04-2004, 07:52 AM
I was wondering (with 881 pts and all) when they were going to announce it.

Was'nt that evident the moment he won his second GS of the year??

Daniel
08-04-2004, 10:39 AM
Vamos Roger :D :D

Seraphim
08-05-2004, 12:26 AM
Was'nt that evident the moment he won his second GS of the year??

Yes, but they usually highlight (in yellow) the qualifiers on the ATP and MC sites. They didn't, so I just wondered what was taking so long is all.

lsy
08-05-2004, 01:32 PM
He’s the man that everyone wants a slice of at the moment. Television, the world’s top magazines, sponsors and no doubt a growing band of female admirers

:lol: I think so too...just look at Rogi's site these days, it's fill with so many really warm and passionate female fans there :eek: but they all seem really nice and mature.


His success hasn’t changed him. Federer has proved over and over that you don’t have to be self-centred and mean to be a champion, and he has shown great tolerance in dealing with the circus that inevitably follows you when you win a Grand Slam. Recently he showed his consideration of others when a reporter did an interview with him but then dropped his recorder and the interview was gone. Federer quietly sat down and did the interview again, when most players would have said ‘Bad luck’ and gone on their way.
[/url]

:hug: :angel:

Thanks for the article, LCeh :wavey:

I can't remembered where I read that, but now understand why Rogi can be so fired up in the Toronto final all of sudden. He's thinking of his former coach :sad: I saw his photo on Peter's funeral before and he looked absolutely devastated there :sad:

LCeh
08-05-2004, 04:20 PM
Federer focused on Athens

Roger Federer has restated his desire to add Olympic gold to the Australian Open and Wimbledon titles he has already won this year.

The Swiss star is keen to erase bad memories of Sydney 2000, when he missed out on a medal.

"I lost in the semi-finals and the bronze medal match and it was very hard for me," he said. "I remember crying a lot after that."

Despite the disappointment of finishing fourth, Federer became a staunch supporter of tennis in the Olympic games - unlike many of his contemporaries.

"I had such a great time in 2000, it is where I met my girlfriend," he said.

"This time I hope my girlfriend and I can celebrate our fourth anniversary with me getting a medal."

And Federer appreciated the chance to stay in the Olympic Village among the other athletes.

"I have such great memories of it. I was staying with the wrestlers. I was on the second floor and they were on the first so I was safe from any attacks.

"Just being there, hanging around with the other athletes, it's amazing. It is great to see the other side.

"Lots of these guys are amateurs, they do other jobs or their sport is not 12 months a year like tennis."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/olympics_2004/tennis/3528014.stm

LCeh
08-05-2004, 04:21 PM
Federer finds Aussie inspiration
By Leo Schlink

OLYMPIC gold medal favourite Roger Federer will use the memory of his former Australian coach Peter Carter - killed two years ago - as his Athens inspiration.

Federer, winner of an incredible eight tournaments already this season, is still recovering mentally from Carter's death in a South African road accident after he had persuaded his former mentor to take the safari holiday which claimed his life.

"Peter is still very strong in my heart and my memories," Federer said.

" I still can't get over what happened.

"It has been very hard for me to go through this. I have not lost anyone else close to me. I had never been to a funeral before, so it was a big shock. I still think of him every day. And, whenever I win, particularly big matches (like the Wimbledon final), I'm thinking of him for sure."
Former tour player Carter, from Nuriootpa in South Australia's Barossa Valley, first worked with Federer when the Swiss prodigy was 12.

He continued with Federer until 2001 when the world No.1 organised for the Australian to captain the Swiss Davis Cup team.

Carter was awaiting for his Swiss nationality - he married a Swiss and lived in Basel - when the vehicle he was travelling in rolled and hit a bridge. His wife was travelling in a following car and was the first on the scene.

Federer was comforted at Carter's memorial service by Andre Agassi's coach and Carter's best friend Darren Cahill and former Melbourne captain Todd Viney.

Two years on, Carter's influence endures.

"Peter is the one person who truly opened my eyes to what I could achieve because maybe I was not taking the game seriously enough at times," Federer said.

Mark Philippoussis, runner-up to Federer at Wimbledon last year, is Australia's only Olympic singles entrant after Lleyton Hewitt's decision to bypass the Games.

http://townsvillebulletin.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,7034,10350093%255E23216,00.html

-----------------------------------------

I just love how Roger is always thinking of him. Shows how emotional and loyal person he is. But the death of Carter is just really sad... :sad:

tangerine_dream
08-06-2004, 07:30 PM
Thanks for the great articles, LCeh! :wavey: It's very sad about his coach. As I read the article, I kept envisioning that AO match of Sampras vs. Courier when Sampras had a complete emotional meltdown on the court because his coach was dying of cancer. I can see Roger doing that himself. :sad:

BTW, I didn't see this posted yet but Sports Illustrated listed their favorites to medal at the Olympics :banana:

Gold - Roger
Silver - Andy
Bronze - Moya

EHendrick
08-06-2004, 09:18 PM
jeez, how original of them. #1,2 and 4 because #3 Coria is not going to play in Athens.

marchen
08-08-2004, 06:27 AM
Roddick, Federer form new tennis odd couple


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
JIM OSBORN/The Post
Andy Roddick had little trouble disposing of Paradorn Srichaphan, 6-2, 6-3, to advance to the quarterfinals.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By Josh Katzowitz
Post staff reporter

MASON, Ohio -- In the 2003 U.S. Open, Andy Roddick beat Juan Carlos Ferrero in the final to claim his first Grand Slam title. Yet, hardly anybody was watching.
The television ratings -- even for this rising American star -- were low, about a 44 percent decline from the year before when Pete Sampras dispatched Andre Agassi in the championship match.

Sampras had Agassi. Jimmy Connors had John McEnroe. Rivals have other rivals. So on and so on.

Ask any of the tennis players on the ATP Tour. Rivalries make this sport appealing to the masses. Rivalries are the blood that gives it life.

Which leads us to the importance of Roger Federer.

Twice in the past 32 days, Roddick has faced Federer in the finals of an event -- at Wimbledon in July and at last week's Tennis Masters Canada. Both times, Roddick lost. The game of tennis, though, has been the big winner.

Wimbledon's TV ratings for the final rose 33 percent from the previous year. The final last week was an exciting blend of athleticism and style.

Maybe now, tennis fans can forget about the days of old when Sampras-Agassi and Connors-McEnroe were a big reasons people watched the sport.

Maybe now, Roddick has Federer.

"Now that me and Andy, we've been dominating a little bit, I think it's good for tennis," Federer said Monday, the day before he lost to Dominik Hrbaty in the first round of the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters. "Especially now leading up to the U.S. Open, it's going to have a huge effect on tennis."

There won't be any effect for this tournament, now that Federer's been eliminated. But in the future, this budding rivalry could become important. Especially in this country where Roddick is the only American in the top 10 and interest has seemed to dissipate since Sampras retired.

"I don't spend too much time in America, but I know that basketball, hockey, baseball and NFL are maybe more important or get more coverage in papers and TV," Federer said. "It's important that we have a guy like Andy. I think tennis deserves a place in every paper and sports show."

Roddick, who beat Paradorn Srichaphan in Thursday's third round, certainly could help that.

He's young, good-looking and has the ability to cross over into the eye of the mainstream. He dates models and actresses, and, oh yeah, he's the second-best tennis player in the world.

Just what tennis needs.

"Both those guys are incredible for the game of tennis," said the 34-year-old Agassi. "If they can build on it with each other, I think it's only for tennis to gain."

Roddick compares it to baseball.

"If the Yankees and Red Sox are playing, it's going to be a lot more people watching than the Yankees and pick any other team," Roddick said. "The same with when Pete and Andre played. Great rivalries are what sparks interest. So if we can develop that, that would be great."

An element in all great rivalries is missing in this one thus far. The equality factor.

McEnroe was 20-13 against Connors. Sampras was 20-14 against Agassi. You watched, and you weren't sure who was going to win. In part, that's probably why you watched.

Roddick? Well, he's 1-7 against Federer.

Said Agassi: "If you're talking about the best of the best, you want to see a lot of finals, you want to see a lot of high-standard tennis, and you want to see a real 50-50 proposition as to who's going to win."

If that's the case, maybe Federer doesn't want to establish a rivalry with Roddick. Maybe he's more content just to dominate everybody on earth.

"For me, I'm in the driver's seat; I'm No. 1 in the world," Federer said. "I've won the last couple of meetings, and I've won the big tournaments lately. Whoever comes, I'll try to beat him. But it's almost up to me to decide who's my rival, isn't it?"

Good point. And maybe it's not Federer's problem, but in order for tennis to reinvent itself as a front-page sport in the United States -- or a sport this country's viewers care to watch on TV -- the ATP needs Roddick.

It's not a problem in the rest of the world. Just in America.

"The ratings in Europe are always good, because in almost all the countries, it's sport No. 2," said Sjeng Schalken of the Netherlands, who fell to Srichaphan in the second round. "Except in America. But Andy Roddick and Roger Federer can help it."

Even if one of them is from Switzerland and has played only three weeks in America this year.

"You know, Pete and I were both from here, so that helped for the domestic audience," Agassi said. "But I think Roger has a good-enough appeal to transcend those boundaries."

Can this, though, be as good as Connors-McEnroe, as exciting as Sampras-Agassi? Why not, asks Western & Southern tournament director Bruce Flory.

"With Sampras and Agassi, people were longing for McEnroe and Connors," Flory said. "The (rivalries) you had as a kid were always better. People were saying, 'Where's the next McEnroe or the next Connors?' But 10 years from now, if Roddick stays healthy, people will say they remember the days of Roddick."


http://www.cincypost.com/2004/08/06/atp08-06-2004.html

--------------------------------------------------------
I just love that:
Federer said. "I've won the last couple of meetings, and I've won the big tournaments lately. Whoever comes, I'll try to beat him. But it's almost up to me to decide who's my rival, isn't it?"

Daniel
08-08-2004, 07:54 AM
Thanks :)

Dirk
08-08-2004, 04:40 PM
ROGI GIVETH, ROGI TAKETH AWAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! The line of Rogi's career. ITS UP TO HIM TO DECIDE IF THE USTA GETS A CRUMB TO EAT OR GETS LEFT OUT IN THE COLD.

Rogi just like good old American capitalism....NEVER EVER THINK ABOUT SOCIALISM WHEN IT COMES TO THIS SPORT. TAKE EVERYTHING ALL THE TIME!!!!!!!!!!!! http://instagiber.net/smiliesdotcom/otn/blobs/multi.gif

ytben
08-23-2004, 04:45 PM
Thanks to yanchr for the link and lsy, who are in her rare dilligent moment :p , for translating it.

A reporter from China interview Rogi after his Athens loss.

http://2004.sina.com.cn/fenghuo/te/2004-08-20/031279205.html

记者对费德勒说,他的出局可能让奥运会网球赛失去不少中国观众,因为在两年前的大师杯之后,上 海有很多小美 眉变成了他的拥趸。原本还和记者有些生疏的费德勒,突然间哈哈大笑:“哦?真的吗?我真的让她 们失望了吗? ”

I (reporter) told Federer, his early exit caused Olympic Tennis games losing quite some Chinese audiences. Coz since the TMC Shanghai 2 years back, he had captured many of the young pretty Shanghai mei mei (:haha: yanchr one of them) as his avid followers. Federer who was originally still feeling slightly distant burst out in laughter :"oh? Really? Did I really let them down?"

  让费德勒谈论他的失败,并没有想象中的困难,他只是把装在休闲服里的宽肩膀耸了耸,随后说 :“唉,是啊 。昨天是糟糕的一天。整场比赛,我都没有办法找到状态。并不
是对手打得多好,而是我打得实在太差了,所以才输了比赛。怎么说呢?好像没有球感。”

It wasn't that difficult as I thought to get Federer talk about his early exit. He just shrug his broad shoulders, and said :"sigh...yeah. It was a terrible day yesterday. For the whole match, I couldn't find my form. It's not to say that the opponent was playing exceptionally well, but I was playing horrendously. How do you say? It's like I don't have the usual feels of the ball."

  记者安慰他说,这两天对于小球高手是不顺利的一天。不仅是费德勒,中国乒乓的马琳、孔令辉 ,中国羽毛球 队的林丹等等,都令人不可思议地被淘汰出局。“这比赛太奇怪了。”“嘿,人不可能每次都赢。” 费德勒一听这 个来了劲,非要跟记者解释中国选手失利的原因:“在小球比赛中,实力固然很重要。但是,临场的 状态发挥,往 往是决定胜负更加关键的因素。我的失利,就是因为状态不好;我想,你们中国选手可能也是由于这 个原因吧。”

I conforted him, these past 2 days haven't been exactly smooth for most of the top racquect balls player. Amazingly, not only Federer, some top Chinese table tennis and badminton players were out in early rounds too, Ma Ling, Kong Ling Hui and Lin Dan. It had been strange. "hey, nobody can win all the time." Federer was keen to explain about the Chinese losses :"In racquet balls competition, yes skills are important, but it's the performance on court that is the key, that determines the winner and losers. I couldn't find my form so I lost, and that maybe the same for the Chinese."

  在雅典,“状态不好”网球高手不是费德勒一个。奥运男子网球看似明星璀璨,但是,先有费德 勒,之后罗迪 克、萨芬等高手也纷纷落马。一个不得不提的“巧合”是,在雅典奥运之后,美国网球公开赛很快就 将开战。

In Athens, Federer isn't the only one who didn't find his form. First Federer, then Roddick, Safin. It's inevitable to relate their losses to the USO. I "evily" suggested my thoughts to Federer : "Were the top players intentionally trying to hold their best forms till USO?"

“这不可能。”刚才还嘻嘻哈哈的费德勒,这时突然严肃起来,“我是一个职业选手,而奥运会也是有 ATP积分 的比赛。作为我来说,既然来了,肯定是想获胜的,只是因为状态的问题……”

"That's impossible." The else relax and easy going Federer suddendly get serious, "I'm a professional player, Olympic carries points as well. To me, if I'm here, of course I want to win, I just didn't find my form..."

  一个问题一直盘绕在记者脑际:如果奥运会没有ATP积分,像费德勒这样的顶尖高手,还会来 参加比赛吗? 毕竟,

This bring to another question which had been lingering in my thoughts : if there isn't any points given out in Olympic, will the top players like Federer still be taking part?

  “当然,我还是会参加的。”没想到,费德勒的回答不加思索。“奥运会是一项神圣的比赛,能 够参加我会觉 得很光荣。”随后,他扫了一眼四周看着我们的瑞士人,大声说:“更重要的是,我喜欢为瑞士而战 的感觉”—— —举着酒杯的瑞士人欢呼起来,起哄似地爆发出一阵热烈的掌声。

"Of course, I will still be here." Surprisingly, Federer answered without any hesitation. "Olympic games is sacred, I feel extremely honour to be part of it." And then, glancing through the Swiss around us, he said it loudly "Most importantly, I love fighting for Switzerland"...this brings a huge roar from the Swiss, holding up their beer/wine glasses applauding that.

  一个职业网球选手的生活,每一年都在数十座城市之间辗转。记者问费德勒,他是否还记得两年 前,他打进大 师杯半决赛的那座城市———上海,是否还记得那里的观众。“我当然记得。”费德勒说,“其实, 我非常喜欢上 海这座城市。这座城市很大,很有气势,充满着繁华的感觉。当然,那里的观众也对我非常热情。”

A profesional tennis players spend most of their time travellling form cities to cities. I asked Federer, does he still remember the city - Shanghai, which he made it to the SF TMC 2 years ago, still remember the fans there? "Of course I remember." Federer said. "Actually, I really like Shanghai. It's huge, blooming, lively and vigorous. and of course, the audiences there were very warm to me."

  记者告诉费德勒,上海已经获得2005年到2007年连续3年的大师杯主办权。在那座城市 里,他的球迷 正在等待他再次出现。“我知道这件事情。”费德勒得意地说,“从我个人来说,我也很想再去上海 ,参加大师杯 赛。不过……”

I told Federer, Shanghai will be the host of TMC 2005-2007 for continuously 3 years. His fans in Shanghai are eagerly waiting for his appearance. "Yes, I know about that" Federer said, "for me, of course I want very much to go shanghai again, taking part in the TMC, but..."

  不过什么?“不过我想,我必须要把比赛打好。成绩打上去了,我才有资格参加大师杯,才能得 到那张我想要 的,飞往上海的机票。”

But what? "But I think, I need to first play well, get the results, then only I can qualify for TMC, and then get that ticket I wish, the one flying to Shanghai."

Billabong
08-24-2004, 01:37 AM
Hello everyone, I missed you a lot during summer :hug:!

I'm back to encourage Rogi at 100% for the US Open and I'm confident he can do well:D!!!

GOOOOOOOOOOO FEDDDDDDDDDD:woohoo:!!!

RogiFan88
08-24-2004, 03:06 AM
Merci beaucoup, Billabong!!!

Billabong
08-24-2004, 03:41 AM
:yeah:

LCeh
08-24-2004, 04:31 AM
Hey Seb, long time no see! :wavey:

SUKTUEN
08-24-2004, 05:15 AM
I read this Chinese article too~~~ Roger look feel better now !!

Fedex
08-24-2004, 06:24 AM
Billabong, Can you make a Roger USO cheering thread :) ;) They always seem to be good luck, like the Wimbledon one you made. :D And this is coming from someone who usually doesnt believe in curses or jinxes. ;) :lol:

lsy
08-24-2004, 08:03 AM
Hello everyone, I missed you a lot during summer :hug:!

I'm back to encourage Rogi at 100% for the US Open and I'm confident he can do well:D!!!

GOOOOOOOOOOO FEDDDDDDDDDD:woohoo:!!!

:hug: Seb...You're back! :yippee:

Worry no more of Rogi in USO guys...our lucky star is back! ;) :lol:

Happy Belated Birthday Seb! :hug:

lsy
08-24-2004, 08:10 AM
and lsy, who are in her rare dilligent moment :p , for translating it.


:mad: :mad:

But then I actually agree with you... :eek: :haha:

Daniel
08-24-2004, 09:43 AM
Thanks for the article :)

ytben
08-24-2004, 10:22 AM
Welcome back Seb :hug: Where have you been? :D

yanchr
08-24-2004, 02:54 PM
Hello everyone, I missed you a lot during summer :hug:!

I'm back to encourage Rogi at 100% for the US Open and I'm confident he can do well:D!!!

GOOOOOOOOOOO FEDDDDDDDDDD:woohoo:!!!
miss you seb :wavey::hug: hope your extra cheers for Rogi will bring him extra good luck in USO :bounce: :bounce::yeah:

mitalidas
08-24-2004, 03:51 PM
For anyone who hasn't been there recently, some stupid people with little to do and too much time on their hands, calling themselves the Lejon team have hacked Rogi's website.

One way to override, is to go to the Deutsch website (sorry to all who don't understand German)

LCeh
08-24-2004, 04:41 PM
:mad: Who the heck is that team? :banghead:

SUKTUEN
08-24-2004, 04:59 PM
OHHHHHHHHHHHHH MY GOD ! ! ! ! ! ! ! :mad: :mad: :mad:

:worship: GOD PLEASE SAVE THE ROGER SITE ! ! ! :worship: :worship:

RonE
08-24-2004, 05:23 PM
OHHHHHHHHHHHHH MY GOD ! ! ! ! ! ! ! :mad: :mad: :mad:

:worship: GOD PLEASE SAVE THE ROGER SITE ! ! ! :worship: :worship:

They don't need God for that, they just need some skilled computer technicians ;)

tangerine_dream
08-24-2004, 05:47 PM
I just saw that this morning. Who the heck is the "Lejon Team"? Some nerd kid living in his mom's basement in Germany? :p

At least there was nothing offensive about the hack job. When Brad Gilbert's site was hacked, they put a swastika on the front page.

ytben
08-24-2004, 08:21 PM
Yeah I noticed someone hacked Rogi's site too. Some people have too much time on their hand :rolleyes:

Billabong
08-25-2004, 01:45 AM
Any recent news about Rogi:D??

Daniel
08-25-2004, 09:51 AM
He is seeded #1 at USO :o well everyone expectd that :o
Go Rogi :D

mitalidas
08-25-2004, 09:56 AM
that is really weird. this morning (US morning at least) , I got on without any problem and actually throughout the day till I posted the info about it I could get on fine. maybe it was timed differently on different servers or something, but that is really weird that you say you saw it yesterday morning

I just saw that this morning. Who the heck is the "Lejon Team"? Some nerd kid living in his mom's basement in Germany? :p

At least there was nothing offensive about the hack job. When Brad Gilbert's site was hacked, they put a swastika on the front page.

mitalidas
08-25-2004, 09:57 AM
He is seeded #1 at USO :o well everyone expectd that :o
Go Rogi :D

Lleyton Seeded 3, and Tim Seeded 5.
Does that mean those 3 are possibly going to meet up the draw? I guess no longer is any match a trivial one, but Rogi should show both of these two the door when he plays his great game

Billabong
08-25-2004, 01:04 PM
Yep Rogi is #1:D! I hope he'll also play like a #1;)! I'm confident he will:)!

RonE
08-25-2004, 01:33 PM
Lleyton Seeded 3, and Tim Seeded 5.
Does that mean those 3 are possibly going to meet up the draw? I guess no longer is any match a trivial one, but Rogi should show both of these two the door when he plays his great game

Actually Lleyton will be seeded 4. That means that the earliest Rogi can meet him is in the semis, and the earliest he can meet Tim is in the quarters.

SUKTUEN
08-25-2004, 02:04 PM
:bounce: If Roger play his BEST , :bounce:

NO ONE CAN STOP HIM ! ! ! ! ! ! :yeah: :yeah: :yeah: :yeah: :yeah:

mandy5401
08-25-2004, 03:00 PM
A question? - wouldn't the #4 seed be on the same side of the draw as #2.

Go Rogi!

Fergie
08-25-2004, 03:35 PM
A question? - wouldn't the #4 seed be on the same side of the draw as #2.

Yes ... In semis: Roger vs Moya and Andy vs Lleyton

Go Rogi :D

mitalidas
08-25-2004, 03:39 PM
Actually Lleyton will be seeded 4. That means that the earliest Rogi can meet him is in the semis, and the earliest he can meet Tim is in the quarters.

Here it says Lleyton will be seeded 3. this is the news on BBC. Is yours a different source? Or, do you mean some different seeding from the one the BBC is talking about:

World number one Roger Federer will be the top seed, while defending champion Andy Roddick and Leyton Hewitt have been named as second and third seeds.

speedracer
08-25-2004, 03:42 PM
Lleyton is no 5 at the moment, Coria is out. Hewitt should be seeded number four, unless USO screwed up.

speedracer
08-25-2004, 03:45 PM
Yes ... In semis: Roger vs Moya and Andy vs Lleyton

Go Rogi :D

Is the draw out? If not, it's 50-50, Rogi can draw either one.

Давай, Роджер!!!!!!!!!!!

RogiFan88
08-25-2004, 05:08 PM
speedracer, I like your Davai, Roger!!

speedracer
08-25-2004, 05:20 PM
Hi, RogiFan :bigwave: Do you understand Russian?

RogiFan88
08-25-2004, 09:26 PM
A little but I've been away from it too long, speedracer. I used to read Sergei's site on Marat Safin in Russian just to practise but too bad it's not around anymore...

RonE
08-25-2004, 11:01 PM
Here it says Lleyton will be seeded 3. this is the news on BBC. Is yours a different source? Or, do you mean some different seeding from the one the BBC is talking about:

World number one Roger Federer will be the top seed, while defending champion Andy Roddick and Leyton Hewitt have been named as second and third seeds.

Here is my source:

http://www.usopen.org/en_US/scores/draws/ms/r1s1.html

ytben
08-26-2004, 04:23 AM
Anybody have read the article Federembrandt posted in Rogi's site? It's an old article but it is a really good read :D

http://www.rogerfederer.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=931&start=60

Daniel
08-26-2004, 07:15 AM
thanks :wavey:

SUKTUEN
08-26-2004, 12:55 PM
ROGER IN THE NEWS said that : :wavey:

" people think I am down. BUT I FEEL GOOD !!!!!!!!!!!" :hearts: :hearts:

GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO ROGER ! ! ! ! ! ! :bounce: :bounce:

tangerine_dream
08-27-2004, 04:00 AM
http://www.sportsmediainc.net/tennisweek/FedWimble04FMullane.jpg

August 26, 2004

Federer Offers Views On Tennis And Time

TennisWeek
By Richard Pagliaro

The head popped out of the top-floor apartment window quicker than the inhabitant of a cuckoo clock alarmed by an early wake-up call. It was joined by a second head and then a third with three sets of eyes all riveted to the action on the roof top below.

As the world's top-ranked player casually completed his service motion the spectators watching from the top-floor window of the adjacent apartment building erupted in Roger Federer's favorite sound: spontaneous applause. The two-time Wimbledon winner didn't hear them, he was too busy obliging his guests' requests for photos and conversation.

Even when he finds himself on a Manhattan rooftop surrounded by a crowd of admirers, Federer remains remarkably well grounded, cooperative and polite. A man so comfortable with his place at the top of the sport — and on this night, the top of a building — Federer strolls around the clay court of the as if he were hosting a backyard barbecue.

Last night, the man who plays timeless tennis appeared on the rooftop courts of the Town Tennis Club on East 56th Street in Manhattan to talk about time. Federer, who signed an endorsement deal with respected Swiss watchmaker Maurice Lacroix as the brand's international ambassador in June, appeared at the three-hour launch for the company's new Roger Federer signature watch for a private gathering of conversation, tennis and time. The Swiss stylist said the fact that Maurice Lacroix is a Swiss brand appealed to him.

"Without a doubt, Maurice Lacroix is a Swiss company and the Swiss are known for a great watch tradition was definitely part of the reason," Federer said. "They are very beautiful watches and I'm proud to have two."

Hosted by James Lipton, who who also serves as host of the Emmy-award nominated Bravo series "Inside the Actors Studio", Federer sat on a director's chair bearing his name ("you're now officially allowed to direct films," Lipton quipped) bearing his name next to the Lacroix logo on the back.

Looking fit and casually clad in tan khaki pants and an untucked blue polo shirt, Federer, who smiled regularly and laughed frequently, was in good spirits both throughout the interview and in interacting with guests on the rooftop courts afterward. Guests dined on some of Federer's favorite food — Japanese — and as part of a Lacroix-sponsored contest, Federer hit a couple of serves with guests invited to follow suit. The guest approaching the service speed closest to Federer, who kindly served at half speed yet still made the strings pop, earned two tickets to the U.S. Open final.

During an interview, the man who owns a 14-match Wimbledon winning streak revealed one of his earliest childhood memories is a vividly painful Wimbledon loss.

"I remember crying in my living room when Boris Becker, who was my big idol then, los the Wimbledon final to Edberg in 1988, I think," Federer said. "I was probably seven at the time and I remember crying."

A decade later, Federer would make his mark at the All England Club by winning the Wimbledon junior singles and doubles titles (he beat Irakli Labadze to claim the singles championship and partnered Olivier Rochus to win the doubles title). When Federer beat Mark Philippoussis to win Wimbledon last year he joined an esteemed collection of champions — Bjorn Borg, Pat Cash and Edberg — as the only players to win Wimbledon as both juniors and professionals. His success came at the expense of a conventional childhood as Federer left school early to pursue his tennis career.

"Sometimes I do (miss the fact I didn't have a traditional childhood)," Federer said. "I miss the easy life — the parties and things — that people experience growing up. I have friends who are totally normal. I travel too much to be normal (smiles), but through this life I have learned a lot about many different cultures so I wouldn't change it."

The artistry Federer exhibits as a pro was crafted on the canvas that were the years of childhood training on the court. One of Federer's greatest strengths is the lack of a discernable weakness — he owns one of the most formidable forehands in the game, serves with power and precision, he is a highly skilled volleyer capable whose leaping ability gives him an explosive overhead on both forehand and backhand sides, covers the court with such graceful anticipation he sometimes seems to barely break a sweat and can impart both slice and topspin off his one-handed backhand — Federer believes the vast variety in his game that is now a strength is born from weakness he had as a child.

"I had very little power on my backhand when I was younger," Federer said. "I could only slice the ball, I could not drive it and I think because of that it helped me develop other options and figure out other ways on the court. Sometimes now, when I play someone with a strong double-handed backhand it can still be tough. Of all my shots, my backhand maybe looks the nicest, but it doesn't always work the way I would like it to."

Asked to assess his greatest strength, Federer did not not hesitate in identifying the weapon opponents have long sought to avoid. If Federer's backhand his the scalpel that can slice apart opponents, his forehand is the sledgehammer that can slam holes in their defense.

"My forehand is always there," Federer said. "It is my best shot, I think, and the one that is most dangerous to my opponents. I think the my overall game, that I try to hit mix it up and can hit all shots, is a good thing too."

About the only shot Federer doesn't enjoy hitting is the drop shot.

"I'm not a big fan of the drop shot — it's like a panic shot to me," Federer said with a smile. "Look at my matches and you'll see I only do it when I'm not feeling well or tired."

Former Wimbledon runner-up David Nalbandian (who is 5-2 against Federer) and Tim Henman (6-2 against Federer) are two of the players who have enjoyed the most success against Federer. Asked to assess his two toughest opponents, Federer cited a pair of former U.S. Open champions he could face during this Flushing Meadows fortnight — Andre Agassi and Lleyton Hewitt — as the toughest to beat.

"Andre Agassi and Lleyton Hewitt, for me, are always the toughest because they always play to a high level so you know they will always be there fighting in the match until the end," said Federer, who has split his six career meetings with Agassi and is 5-7 lifetime against Hewitt. "So for me, mentally, they are the toughest to play."

Eight-time Grand Slam champion Agassi brought out the best tennis of Federer's life when they met at last November's Tennis Masters Cup in Houston. The pair played a classic opening-night match, which Federer won 6-7, 6-3, 7-6 and met again in the rain-delayed final that saw Federer surrender just seven games in sweeping Agassi, 6-3, 6-0, 6-4, playing the best set of his career in the second set of that encounter.*

"Against Agassi, the second set in the Masters Cup I won 6-0 and that is the best set I probably ever played," Federer said. "I could not believe I could dominate a great player this way. Everything went my way in that set."

Both Federer and the sixth-seeded Agassi reside in the same quarter of the U.S. Open draw and are on course for a quarterfinal clash. In their lone U.S. Open meeting, Agassi beat Federer, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4 in the fourth round of the 2001 U.S. Open. Should they meet again in the quarters, the winner would be favored to move through to the final.

Despite the fact he leads the ATP Tour with eight tournament titles on the year and is undefeated in finals this year, Federer says he still feels the freeze before finals.

"Yes, I still get nervous," Federer said. "Even before doing TV interviews, I still get nervous. Before finals, I get cold hands. It's just a different feeling unlike any other match. But you play two games and it usually goes away."

The 23-year-old Federer came face to face with his favorite player — 14-time Grand Slam champion Pete Sampras — for the only time in his career in the fourth round of the 2001 Wimbledon. Wielding a Wilson Pro Staff and playing an aggressive all-court style similar to Sampras, Federer shocked Sampras, 7-6, 5-7, 6-4, 6-7, 7-5*to snap Sampras' 31-match Wimbledon win streak in what some spectators saw as a passing of the torch between the former and future champion. Federer said Sampras is the best player he's ever seen.

"I'd go with Pete Sampras (as the best player I've seen)," Federer said. "I was lucky enough to face him at Wimbledon and break his streak. People like to compare me to him, but what he's accomplished — 14 Grand Slams and six straight years at No. 1 — is an amazing achievement and hard for anyone to live up to that."*

The fourth-round has been the final stop for Federer in his past three U.S. Open appearances and while he is a strong favorite to reach the final this year, Federer politely declined to offer a pre-tournament prediction last night.

"No thanks, that's not my style," Federer said. "I was a little disappointed with my Olympic results. I am looking forward to the Open and I'll do the best I can."

If Federer does reign at Flushing Meadows next month, don't expect him to celebrate the championship with the emotional drop to his knees that culminated his first Wimbledon triumph. The hard courts of the Open that have been less responsive to Federer's game than the grassy grounds of the All England Club, can also be a lot tougher on the knees.

"At Wimbledon, if you win you do it because it's a nice grass court and it feels soft," Federer said. "At the Australian or U.S. Open, the court is too hot — you burn your knees if you try it."

Among the other Federer-revelations: he speaks "three and a half languages — French, German, English and Swiss-German" (his girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec, said when Federer talks in his sleep he speaks in English); is an avid soccer fan, but rarely plays anymore due to the risk of injury; and loves the music of Lenny Kravitz.

The interview concluded with the 10 questions Lipton asks at the end of "Inside the Actor's Studio" based on the questions French host Bernard Pivot popularized at the end of his talk show. Lipton's questions and Federer's responses are reprinted here:

James Lipton: What is your favorite word?

Roger Federer: Please.

James Lipton: What is your least favorite word?

Roger Federer: Bad words.

James Lipton: What is your favorite sound?

Roger Federer: Applause.

James Lipton: What is your least favorite sound?

Roger Federer: Air planes, jumbo air planes.

James Lipton: What turns you on creatively, spiritually or emotionally?

Roger Federer: Holiday resorts, fashion.

James Lipton: What turns you off?

Roger Federer: Dishonesty.

James Lipton: What is your favorite curse word?

Roger Federer: No way! (laughs).

James Lipton: What profession other than your own would you like to attempt?

Roger Federer: Soccer player.

James Lipton: What profession would you not like to do?

Roger Federer: Pilot of a jumbo plane.

James Lipton: If Heaven exists, what would you like to hear God say when you arrive at the Pearly Gates?

Roger Federer: Welcome, Roger, welcome.

RonE
08-27-2004, 10:28 AM
Thanks for the article Tangy :yeah:

tangerine_dream
08-27-2004, 05:31 PM
You're welcome, Ron. :D I love that Roger was interviewed by Lipton. Lipton's line of questioning is always interesting and I like how Roger took a pass on that "What's your favorite curse word?" question. :lol:

Here's another goodie. I hope I see lots more Roger PR in the American papers as USO approaches. :banana:

Federer Wants USA to Know Him Better

By Tom Clark, USA TODAY
Aug 27, 2004

Roger Federer is a good juggler. You probably didn't know that. He's a very good tennis player. But you knew that.

The 23-year-old Swiss enters the U.S. Open on Monday as the No. 1 seed with a 58-6 match record in 2004. He's captured a career-high eight titles on the ATP Tour circuit this year (including the Australian Open and Wimbledon).

But besides his flawless tennis game, Federer remains a bit of mystery in the USA. Fans know he bucks conformity by playing and traveling without a coach or entourage, and they know he was awarded a cow by his country after winning Wimbledon last year. That's about it. Now, as he continues his assault on the tennis record book, he is hoping we get to know him better as a person.

Federer, whose mother is from South Africa, speaks Swiss-German, English and French fluently. He spoke with USA TODAY this week from New York:

Q. You looked like you were having a lot of fun carrying Switzerland's flag at the Olympics opening ceremonies.

A. It was an unbelievable experience. I didn't play so well (losing in second round), but I have that memory of carrying the flag to look back on.

Q. What other Olympic sport do you wish you were good at?

A. Athletics or gymnastics - the classic Olympic sports.

Q. Explain the difference in playing the U.S. Open compared with Wimbledon, besides the playing surface?

A. It is a totally different setup. At Wimbledon it's a little more quiet. I stay in a house with my girlfriend, and we cook ourselves. Now we are in Manhattan, where the traffic is quite different, so you have to plan your days differently. It's a nice change for me. I try to think positive, and I love coming back to New York. It's an incredible city - there's lots to do over the next three weeks.

Q. Do you get a chance to explore the cities you visit on the tennis tour?

A. More and more I try to see more than the hotel and the club, because once I stop traveling I might be disappointed that I was at a place and didn't see enough of it.

Q. The media have been hyping your potential rivalry with (defending U.S. Open champion) Andy Roddick. Do you see the value in having a rivalry in tennis, so you'll let him win a few times?

A. I'm not going to let him win. He's not far away from beating me anyway (Federer is 7-1 lifetime vs. Roddick, including a win at the Wimbledon final this year). He does probably need to win a couple to get the rivalry really going. But I hope that doesn't come too soon. Rivalries are good for sports - and with me from Europe and him from the States, it would be good to push tennis.

Q. Who is the best player you've ever faced?

A. (Pete) Sampras. Even though I beat him that day (at Wimbledon in 2001). For all he's achieved, it was great to face him. After him it's (Andre) Agassi.

Q. If you could steal one thing from anybody's game on tour now, what would it be?

A. The volleys of (Tim) Henman. I'm not bad at the net, but would love to be better.

Q. Next week at the U.S. Open you are going to try to win three of the four Grand Slams. Did you ever think that was possible?

A. Looking back, yes, but in the beginning you never think it's going to be an easy thing to do. After I won the Australian Open this year, people were talking about me winning the Grand Slam, and I thought that was impossible. If I can play better in the U.S. Open than in the past (Federer has lost in the fourth round the last three years), we'll have to see if it's good enough. I've never really been in a huge center-court match there. I need it for the experience.

Q. Do you still think it's impossible to win all four majors in one year?

A. Everything is possible. But the men's game is wide open. There are so many good players on all surfaces. To be up for every match is very difficult. I lost to a better man at the French (Gustavo Kuerten). I deserved to lose because Guga was better that day.

Q. What's the most extravagant thing you've bought? (Since turning pro at age 17 in 1998, Federer has won $11,491,230 on the ATP Tour.)

A. I make sure the people around me get treated well, first. I do get myself a nice gift on occasion, because I work hard. I got myself some cars, an apartment, a house. My favorite cars are Aston Martin.

Q. If you weren't playing tennis, what would you be doing?

A. I'd think I'd be a soccer player. I played until I was 12 and have followed it ever since. I never had dreams of being a pilot or anything - I've always been interested in sports.

Q. What's the biggest misconception about you?

A. In America, people don't know me well enough yet to have any misconceptions. They know the tennis player, but not the person. I am seldom in America, so when I'm here I'll try to do more interviews than in the past. I hope they see me as relaxed, cool. We'll have to see.

Q. What are your favorite places to visit?

A. Australia - I like the down-to-earth people, their friendliness. Rome is a great city. Miami for the culture and the beach. I love Asia more and more. After the U.S. Open, I'm going to visit L.A. for the first time.

Q. Are there any other players you like to watch?

A. I used to enjoy watching (fellow Swiss) Martina Hingis. With her gone, now my interest in women's tennis is not as high. On the men's side I used to like watching Marcelo Rios' game when he played.

Q. What do you expect to do with the rest of your life after tennis?

A. I created a charity last Christmas (The Roger Federer Foundation, helping disadvantaged youths) which is something that goes beyond my tennis game. After that, no real plans yet.

Q. What do you think of racket technology in tennis? Is it too developed?

A. I think it's OK. If you look at the top players, there is only one guy with incredible power, and that is Roddick. There is a misconception of the game being all power because of Andy. I play different, with feel and tactical decisions. If you look at the Spaniards, they play with spin. The players will always adapt.

Q. What are your goals for the U.S. Open?

A. I have high hopes. The dream is to win three of the four Grand Slams this year. But I really have to start from zero and play well from the first round on. I've lost some recently, and players might think I could be down. But I feel good.

mitalidas
08-27-2004, 05:35 PM
nice post
I love the nod of respect to Pete
("Q. Who is the best player you've ever faced?
A. (Pete) Sampras. Even though I beat him that day (at Wimbledon in 2001). "

just like we want our Rogi to be... deferential to the big players before him

Mrs. B
08-27-2004, 05:40 PM
thanks for posting.

Q. The media have been hyping your potential rivalry with (defending U.S. Open champion) Andy Roddick. Do you see the value in having a rivalry in tennis, so you'll let him win a few times?

A. I'm not going to let him win. He's not far away from beating me anyway (Federer is 7-1 lifetime vs. Roddick, including a win at the Wimbledon final this year). He does probably need to win a couple to get the rivalry really going. But I hope that doesn't come too soon. Rivalries are good for sports - and with me from Europe and him from the States, it would be good to push tennis.

:lol:

SUKTUEN
08-27-2004, 06:31 PM
THANKS FOR THE SOOOOOOOOOO FUNNY NEWS OF ROGER ! :worship:

lsy
08-27-2004, 06:59 PM
"My forehand is always there," Federer said.

Except the match in Toronto vs Johansson :tape: :tape:


James Lipton: What turns you on creatively, spiritually or emotionally?

Roger Federer: Holiday resorts, fashion.

Serena next to be? :eek: :tape:


Q. What other Olympic sport do you wish you were good at?

A. Athletics or gymnastics - the classic Olympic sports.

Why am I not surprised? ;)


A. I'd think I'd be a soccer player. I played until I was 12 and have followed it ever since. I never had dreams of being a pilot or anything - I've always been interested in sports.

What's it about him and pilot? :confused:


Q. What are your favorite places to visit?

A. Australia - I like the down-to-earth people, their friendliness. Rome is a great city. Miami for the culture and the beach. I love Asia more and more. After the U.S. Open, I'm going to visit L.A. for the first time.

Ya the Aussies generally are very nice, laid back and easy going :) Come more to Asia then Roger :D He has so many Asian fans these days and I read one fan in his site who's not only from the same country as me but also the same hometown :eek:


Q. Do you still think it's impossible to win all four majors in one year?

A. Everything is possible. But the men's game is wide open. There are so many good players on all surfaces. To be up for every match is very difficult. I lost to a better man at the French (Gustavo Kuerten). I deserved to lose because Guga was better that day.

:) Rogi...arrogant?


Q. What are your goals for the U.S. Open?

A. I have high hopes. The dream is to win three of the four Grand Slams this year. But I really have to start from zero and play well from the first round on. I've lost some recently, and players might think I could be down. But I feel good.

:yeah: Let's go Rogi :woohoo:

LCeh
08-27-2004, 09:43 PM
:lol: lsy you always make me laugh with your commentaries of his interviews. :haha:

Thanks a lot for the interview Tangy. It was a great read. :yeah:

RonE
08-28-2004, 12:00 AM
Thanks for yet another great read Tangy :yeah:

I am always impressed with how down to earth and cool Rogi is. He would have been a very good diplomat I think.

RogiFan88
08-28-2004, 04:00 AM
wouldn't you just love to interview ROGI?? I w definitely inject some humour into the interview just to see him smile and laugh!

Daniel
08-28-2004, 09:51 AM
lsy :yeah:


Roger sounds confident, I wish he has a good USO :)

Daniel
08-28-2004, 10:14 AM
Men's report (Nos. 1-16)

1. Roger Federer, Switzerland: After a dominant eight months, Federer comes in having lost two of his last three matches. Still he's our (admittedly, less than daring) pick to win his third Major of the year -- something no one has done since 1988. More fodder for making him a beyond-obvious pick: He's won 12 of his last 13 finals.

yanchr
08-28-2004, 01:19 PM
Q. If you could steal one thing from anybody's game on tour now, what would it be?

A. The volleys of (Tim) Henman. I'm not bad at the net, but would love to be better.
Roger, you shouldn't be too greedy ;)

Q. What are your goals for the U.S. Open?

A. I have high hopes. The dream is to win three of the four Grand Slams this year. But I really have to start from zero and play well from the first round on. I've lost some recently, and players might think I could be down. But I feel good.
I even didn't expect it, Roger :eek: :eek: Again you are being greedy. ;)

Yes, go for it!

yanchr
08-28-2004, 01:23 PM
A. I make sure the people around me get treated well, first. I do get myself a nice gift on occasion, because I work hard. I got myself some cars, an apartment, a house. My favorite cars are Aston Martin.
One of the ten most expensive cars in the world. Yes, good taste Roger ;)

Mrs. B
08-28-2004, 03:53 PM
Roger loves sports cars. He drove a brown/black Maserati when he came to Bern last year for his exhibition. His plate numbers are BL 81088. ;)