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Roger news and articles

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Velvetcat
01-29-2006, 06:18 PM
The Davydenko match produced a lot of errors, true but that match started at midnight, so I think Roger was tired in that one.
Unless you were referring to a different time-zone, that match actually began around 8:00pm :)

Velvetcat
01-29-2006, 06:29 PM
A snippet from an otherwise un-interesting article:

Federer has maintained he would not decide whether to play until after the Australian Open, but let it slip in a French-language media conference during the week that he was looking forward to a substantial break after leaving Melbourne.

LCeh
01-29-2006, 06:37 PM
I hope he doesn't play DC. Sorry to be a little selfish, but I think the man needs some time to relax right now.

1sun
01-29-2006, 07:47 PM
ditto LCeh. they could pull off the tie even without rog, considering its on clay, at home, and hewits not playing.

1sun
01-29-2006, 08:18 PM
See, I knew the tears had something to do with this. I'm sure he'll skip DC, but I'd like to see him skip Rotterdam as well. Just rest his body and mind for a while. Then play Dubai to get some match practice in before IW and Miami.
yeah skip dc, but play rotterdam, dubai and indian wells but skip miami, so he can concentrate and be fit for the clay season.

nobama
01-29-2006, 09:24 PM
I hope he doesn't play DC. Sorry to be a little selfish, but I think the man needs some time to relax right now.He won't play DC, especially since Hewitt isn't playing.

bokehlicious
01-29-2006, 09:28 PM
I'm torn, I hope he'll play DC as I'll be there and want to watch him, but on the other hand I know he'll need rest to achieve bigger things this year !

Daniel
01-29-2006, 09:29 PM
AUSTRALIAN OPEN: Final day: Interview with Roger Federer


/noticias.info/ R. FEDERER/M. Baghdatis
5‑7, 7‑5, 6‑0, 6‑2

Q. Why was this such an emotional win for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think after seeing, you know, he was struggling all of a sudden with the cramp on his calf muscle, I knew I was in very good shape, but I had to stay focused. So many things go through your head about the win already because you think, "Well, now nothing can go wrong."

But as we saw, it was still quite a long way to the finish line. I was getting I think emotionally ready for that sort of, which normally you shouldn't, but I can't block it out. I'm also just human.

And I guess, you know, when I won, I was so relieved that I got it through. Wasn't emotional in the first minute, except the relief. It only came out later when I was standing there with Marcos waiting for the ceremony. I was very relaxed. Once I got up on stage, it all changed. Why, I guess I just explained it.

Q. At any point, like at the end of the first set, in the second set, did the thought creep into your head, "I could lose this"?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, yeah, many times. Well, I was struggling so much to hold my serve for a set and a half, I would say. And I was sweating like crazy, you know, because I had to fight so hard on my own service games, you know, that I thought, "Well, if this is gonna continue like this, I'll probably lose, and a miracle is gonna save me tonight."

But I was impressed the way he played, you know, how he started off. Maybe I was a little passive, you know, in the beginning, not as aggressive maybe as I should have been. But I always like to give the credit to the opponent, you know, because it is a Grand Slam final after all. He was the better shot‑maker in the beginning. He totally deserved the first set.

The second set got tight once I came back. Didn't take his opportunity early in the second. Actually went very similar to the match with Kiefer. That that happened again surprised me, obviously, because I thought he had more left in the tank.

Q. The fact that he was unseeded in the beginning, an incredible story really, did that put even more pressure on you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think the whole fact of being such a huge favorite, you know. And if I lose, huge upset since I don't know when. Him having so much, you know, positive and good press, having the whole fans with him. What a great story. It would be basically perfect to basically win the tournament.

I think, I don't know, I felt very nervous going into the match again. I was incredibly nervous, actually. I remembered when I was last time that nervous. I think that whole thing was building up. And waiting also all day for the night session, that is nerve‑wracking on top of it. So those were the reasons why it was a really tough match for me mentally today.

Q. Do you think the fact that you've beaten Haas the way you did, Davydenko, then Kiefer, now this, the whole effect of the four matches from the fourth round onwards, does it make it that much more satisfying? Is that why you're churning more than you would actually?

ROGER FEDERER: I thought I played great from the first round on till third set against Haas, you know, basically. From then on, it was a bit of a struggle, you know. I think if I could have closed out Haas maybe earlier, the whole tournament would have been much more of a great run, you know, if I would have ended up winning the tournament.

But that made me struggle to maybe lose two sets in a row. Looking back, I maybe never really played my best except the first two sets against Haas. After that, it was kind of gone for a while.

It was hard, you know. I really had to battle. I was physically a little tired, you know, after a tough couple of matches there. I was happy the way I bounced back against Kiefer and also for the finals today. So it was a different type of Grand Slam victory, and I think that's why it was so emotional in the end for me.

Q. Would you consider this the most difficult of all Grand Slam titles?

ROGER FEDERER: Of all I've won? I mean, the first one, I had a totally blocked back. I didn't expect at all to win. There was other ones, I was down also against Agassi at the US Open. So I don't know. I put it up there with a few, actually.

Also what I would like to say is, once I got out there, you know, I wasn't scared of the fans or anything. I went through them last year, so I knew what to expect. And actually once I got on court, I said, "Compared to New York, this is nothing," because, I don't know, we didn't even speak about it in the press room, what I went through in New York. So for me, when I was out there on court was very actually comfortable. Because in New York, it was really tough.

Q. Seemed very often, especially early on, you went right at him punch for punch. He often seemed to get the best of it. Was that surprising to you?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I knew he was a good counterpuncher. I knew he's a shot‑maker. I knew that he will for sure do this on a few occasions. I was just as surprised that his backhand was so steady, and the way he just played in the beginning, you know. I was struggling on my serve. He was returning well, you know, hardly missing any returns. I was really trying to make that kick serve go in. But credit to him, he really played good in the beginning and didn't really allow me to play.

Q. He said he started thinking too much and then he lost it a little bit. Was there any point in the second set where you figured he was starting to play below par?

ROGER FEDERER: Who was? He?

Q. Marcos. He said he started to think too much.

ROGER FEDERER: I thought the end of the first and beginning of the second, this was the time when I had to really weather the storm. I did, thank God, stay with him. I knew that eventually, you know, that's what happened. I told you this the other day, that in Doha, this is what happened. He played maybe a little bit of a loose game. And this is also what he did I think at 2‑1. He got me back into the match and he went on from there. So that was obviously the key of the match, I thought.

Q. Did you feel you had to get to the net?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it only ‑‑ the idea of coming to the net, especially after maybe the second serve of his, only came at the end of the second really. I realized, maybe if I do that a little bit more often, cut down the points a little bit more, don't give him the rhythm maybe he's looking for, that might change a little bit.

On top of that, he got a little bit tired and maybe a little disappointed he couldn't win the second after he should have. I think the combination did the trick in the end, you know. I think that was a good effort from my side to really change up my game a little bit more, play more aggressive, and it paid off. So that's really nice.

Q. Is there any added significance to winning here in Australia, given that Peter Carter worked with you at the beginning of your career, and his family was here with you tonight and celebrated afterwards?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, absolutely. It's always very emotional, you know, winning here, because of Peter, then Tony. It's very nice to share the moment with them, you know, obviously. So I think it means a lot to them, too. Very happy that they still enjoy watching tennis after how much he was into tennis, too. They could just walk away from the game and say, "Look, we'd rather not face it anymore, you know, because of how much he loved the sport." But I'm happy they come out and they really, really support me. It's very nice.

Q. Could you say how difficult it is when day in, day out, you're having to spend an entire day waiting around. It's likely to happen more and more because No. 1 seeds at US Open and here, there's more night sessions coming along. It's going to become a trend. How difficult is it to spend all day waiting to play, two days really?

ROGER FEDERER: Also the rhythm is just really difficult, you know, because the average going to bed was about 4 o'clock in the morning, you know, the last few nights, waking up at 12 to 2 in the afternoon. So it's a really weird schedule, you know, I'm going through. I wake up and all I do is rest and hit a little bit. If I feel like I need, you know, to do some extra stuff, I'll do it, but I didn't have to do it this time because I thought I was ‑‑ I had to save myself.

I think especially before the big matches, like maybe Kiefer and now Baghdatis, it's hard, waiting in the room all day. So actually nice to get out here and get the first hit, take a shower, get ready, you know, sort of eat something and being active. Just sitting in the room, it makes it hard, but you don't want to lose energy either.

So makes it hard, but I think once you get used to it, it's easier.

Q. Going for four straight in Roland Garros, there's going to be a lot of attention, obviously. Is there anything you can change or you would like to change between now and then in your preparation?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I would like to get even more fit. I have ‑‑ I'll have time for that, for sure. I'm not gonna change anything in my game very much. I thought I played the right way last year at the French. Maybe just I didn't play as great as I was hoping to, but I still gave myself a chance. I thought the match against Nadal was decent, you know, but maybe was my ‑‑ unfortunately, my worst semifinals I ever played.

But, again, he deserved. He was better on the day. Best player by far on clay last season. He totally deserved the French. I hope he'll be back by then and I get a chance to play him again.

Q. Will Tony Roche maybe travel with you a little bit earlier, given it's clay court?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, he came to Hamburg last year, which I thought was pretty early. He might come a week early, maybe to Rome. We'll see about that. He's definitely coming for that trip again, I'm very happy about. I think he also knows the importance of the French and of the clay. I think the more time I spend with him, you know, the more information I get about playing on clay. Just, you know, being together and working together, it's very interesting.

Q. You've said in the past, like Wimbledon is normally your priority each year. I mean, has that changed at all? Would the French Open now become more important this year given that you could have all four slams?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, doesn't help I win the other ones, you know. Now I've won them twice each at least. Puts the pressure on the French. What can I do? I enjoy winning tournaments. I enjoy playing well at slams. Obviously, I know the importance of winning the French, what it would do to my career.

But, again, Wimbledon is the one for me. And if I keep on winning Wimbledon and not the French, I'm very happy about that, too. So that's no problem.

Q. You said you are not as fit as you actually wanted to be considering the injury. You thought you had enough time to be 100% as fit as you wanted?

ROGER FEDERER: No, it's interesting, you know. I went through tough time, you know, because I came back from Shanghai, I took vacation, I started practicing again. I thought my ankle got pretty stiff. It got really, really solid, but too solid almost. So I needed flexibility back. I told you guys this a few times.

I was wondering how it's gonna to hold up with the conditioning work with Pierre, then also the tennis with Tony here in Sydney when I practice every day four hours, how it's gonna hold up. Thank God nothing happened. Thank God it held up.

Then obviously Doha was, for me, a big break, knowing that I can back up match after match and play well. Coming here, I was not very worried, but I started very slow in Kooyong, just to not take a chance. It was worthwhile doing it. So very happy that program I chose, I could keep it. Because obviously when it happened with the injury, I didn't know what the plan's gonna be, you know, for the next couple of months.

But I'm happy I did Shanghai. I'm happy I won the first two events of the year. It's fantastic. It's actually more than I could expect.

Q. Roger, with each one of these you win, majors, as you etch your place further in the history of tennis, do you have a growing sense of your role in the history of the game with each one of these you win?

ROGER FEDERER: Obviously, yeah. I left my idols behind me now. That means something, you know. I'm very pleased. But they still stay my heroes from back in the day, Becker and Edberg.

No, definitely on a great roll at the moment. I don't forget, you know, that it's been a tough road for me. I amaze myself every time I do well. It's been so consistent, too, you know, winning so many slams, seven out of the last eleven I think it was. You know, it's quite incredible.

I try to keep it up, you know, stay healthy and keep enjoying it, because that's what I'm doing, and I think that's what makes me play well.

Q. Would you one day quite like to sit in a tennis court that's named after you and walk out there and present a big cup to someone like you coming along? ? Would that be nice?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, it would be nice, I think. But I don't think I will get one, of a Grand Slam.

Q. Maybe in Switzerland somewhere, "Roger Federer Court"?

ROGER FEDERER: Maybe. But it's not the same like a Grand Slam, I think. I think it's especially nice from Rod, you know, to come out and do it, you know, because he doesn't need it. He doesn't live in Australia at the moment. It's a long way, you know. He's not the youngest anymore, so we really appreciate the players. Very disappointed, you know, not to have seen also Ken Rosewall last year in the finals, at the trophy ceremony.

But I've seen him, you know, many times now at Tony's place. I know him well. But it's nice, you know, to finally met Rod. It means a lot to me.

You know, I don't expect anything like a court named after me. I'm not playing the game because of that, but obviously it would be nice (smiling).

Q. Why is it that winning makes some people more hungry rather than less hungry?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, because you want the hard work to be paid off. I think once you get the sense of winning, you want more of it because it just feels great. Going through such an emotional roller coaster, every time it's different. I think that's what you're looking for.

Q. What would be the best single tennis advice you would give to a tennis player, beginner, intermediate?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you go through up and downs in tennis. It's a very mentally tough game emotionally, I think because you win a lot and you lose a lot, too. You lose usually more than you win in the beginning. You have to stay positive and enjoy it and get good support from family and coaches.

Then, you know, be tough. When the days come, your chance comes along, you want to take your chance and don't choke on it (smiling).

Q. When are you going to make a decision about Davis Cup, do you think?
ROGER FEDERER: I don't know how much time I have left, but probably next couple of days I'll let the people know if I'm in or out.

Daniel
01-29-2006, 11:37 PM
By Jake Niall
January 30, 2006

THIS Australian Open had seen two Federers: Roger the Invincible, prominent in the first few rounds, and the Vulnerable Federer, who was most auspicious in the quarter-final against Nikolay Davydenko and, in the human sense, on the podium last night when he choked up and gave Rod Laver a hug.

Last night, we saw both Rogers. The vulnerable one began the match, the invincible one finished it and so took his seventh grand slam title in the space of barely 30 months, with an eye on an extraordinary non-calendar grand slam should he conquer his toughest foe yet - clay - and take the French Open.

But it was not the unbeatable version who frog-marched frail, insipid Roger off centre court and finally took control of his destiny and then the match. This task fell to Federer's less glamorous persona: Roger the Gritty, also known as Fighting Roger.

No matter how gifted, no one can be the best player in the world by such a clear margin without having such a warrior within. The final scores make the match seem relatively angst-free for Federer. It wasn't. This was a smooth landing after a turbulent flight, and the Federer crew were assuming crash position at 5-7, 0-2 and break point to Baghdatis in the second set.

Fighting Roger sees off the vulnerable player and eases the champion's transition into Mr Invincible. It is this part of Federer's make-up that is most easily overlooked - his inner Hewitt, the little Lleyton inside him that just hangs in, defends for a while, gets agitated and passionate and extricates himself from the edge of the cliff. It's this aspect of Federer, much as the freakish eye-hand athletic package, that made him 82-4 in 2005.

By midway through the first set, it was clear that Perfect Roger had not shown up, and his pale facsimile - the one Davydenko pushed to the brink and Tommy Haas took to five sets and thought beatable - was in the midst of a struggle, not only with an unseeded 20-year-old who'd never won a singles title, but with himself. His forehand, normally a weapon of mass destruction, was like those in Iraq - missing, and missing often. It went high and wide and was seldom handsome.

The shaky Federer was playing himself. But as the match went on, the invincible version took charge. But the one we'll remember is the man who broke down in his acceptance speech. Officially, he was taking the Norman Brooks Challenge Cup from Rod Laver. In truth, he was being unofficially accepted into Laver's company.

Daniel
01-29-2006, 11:41 PM
By Richard Hinds
January 30, 2006
Page 1 of 2
IF ROGER Federer sometimes seems more like machine than human in the way he accumulates grand slam silverware, his emotional acceptance of the latest trophy to be held in his firm grip, the Norman Brookes Challenge Cup, should dispel forever any doubts about what the game means to him.

Having been handed the Australian Open trophy by Rod Laver, the legend he met for the first time last week, Federer was momentarily lost for words. "I don't know what to say," he ventured, before thanking his opponent and breaking down in tears. "I guess it's all coming out now."

By his own impossibly high standards, Federer's 5-7, 7-5, 6-0, 6-2 victory over the amazing Marcos Baghdatis did not seem stellar. However, having struggled at stages during the tournament, and in the early part of last night's final, his seventh grand slam title clearly meant more to the Swiss than you might expect.

Federer, who hugged Laver twice at the presentation, said there were many reasons the Australian Open means so much to him, including the fact his late coach, Peter Carter, who was killed in a car accident, was an Australian. Some of Carter's family were at last night's final. "I guess it is just very emotional winning a grand slam, but especially here in Australia and Wimbledon also," Federer said.

Having become the first player since Pete Sampras to win three consecutive grand slam titles, Federer's talents will now be put to their greatest test so far at Roland Garros in May when the 24-year-old attempts to become the first man since Laver in 1969 to hold all four grand slam trophies simultaneously - thus completing the Roger Slam.

However, after he had dropped the first set and trailed 0-2 and a break point in the second, that date with destiny was far from Federer's thoughts. While he was to ultimately crush his opponent, winning 11 straight games from late in the second set, his relief was apparent when he slumped on the net after clinching the match and at the presentation.

While Federer continued his rapid accumulation of silverware, Baghdatis's incredible run was to end with a mixture of pride and disappointment. Having played brilliantly to build his lead, raising for a few precious moments the prospect of an unthinkable upset, the man with the engaging smile and boundless energy finished the match waging a futile battle against both cramp and, on the other side of the net, the weight of tennis history. "It's like a dream, I just wake up at the end," said Baghdatis.

Federer now holds the Wimbledon, US Open and Australian Open titles. In the days of varied court surfaces and vastly improved breadth and depth of competition, to hold them all would be an incredible achievement. As it is, at 24, Federer has joined a group of eight players who have won seven grand slam titles that includes John McEnroe and John Newcombe.

Laver, who presented the trophy to Federer, sees no reason the Swiss cannot keep winning majors, perhaps with sufficient frequency to surpass Pete Sampras's record 14 grand slam titles. "It's amazing how well he plays in the finals," he said of Federer's perfect record in seven grand slam finals. "The main thing is that he looks like he's enjoying the game and it's not pressure … He finds a way to win."

Finding that way proved difficult last night. Those not draped in Greek flags had come expecting to see another virtuoso Federer display. Instead, more often than in recent memory, they saw the Swiss miss.

It had been apparent during his matches against Tommy Haas and Nikolay Davykenko that Federer was not at the height of his powers. However, some of the mis-hits that clattered from the frame of the usually immaculate champion's racquet were startling.

At the same time, the composure of Baghdatis was unusual for a man not merely trying to win a first grand slam title, but a first title of any description at the top level.

Indeed, when Federer conceded the first set, and then a break of serve early in the second, Federer seemed like a driver who had missed his turn-off on a freeway, becoming increasingly agitated as he waits to reach the next exit.

That turning point came suddenly and dramatically. With Baghdatis serving at 5-6, 40-0 in the second set, Federer won the next five points - the last to clinch the set after the umpire overruled a linesman's call that the Cypriot's forehand had landed in. A replay showed the official was right to intervene. However, the point seemed to be playing on Baghdatis's mind at the start of the third set when Federer immediately broke serve.

From then, the gap between the champion and the rising star was more akin to what might have been expected at the start of the Open. Since then we have seen Baghdatis's brilliance and Federer's vulnerable side. Yet such is the talent of the Swiss, we still got the champion we expected and he got the trophy he deserved.

Federer now holds the Wimbledon, US Open and Australian Open titles. In the days of varied court surfaces and vastly improved breadth and depth of competition, to hold them all would be an incredible achievement. As it is, at 24, Federer has joined a group of eight players who have won seven grand slam titles that includes John McEnroe and John Newcombe.

Laver, who presented the trophy to Federer, sees no reason the Swiss cannot keep winning majors, perhaps with sufficient frequency to surpass Pete Sampras's record 14 grand slam titles. "It's amazing how well he plays in the finals," he said of Federer's perfect record in seven grand slam finals. "The main thing is that he looks like he's enjoying the game and it's not pressure … He finds a way to win."

Finding that way proved difficult last night. Those not draped in Greek flags had come expecting to see another virtuoso Federer display. Instead, more often than in recent memory, they saw the Swiss miss.

It had been apparent during his matches against Tommy Haas and Nikolay Davykenko that Federer was not at the height of his powers. However, some of the mis-hits that clattered from the frame of the usually immaculate champion's racquet were startling.

At the same time, the composure of Baghdatis was unusual for a man not merely trying to win a first grand slam title, but a first title of any description at the top level.

Indeed, when Federer conceded the first set, and then a break of serve early in the second, Federer seemed like a driver who had missed his turn-off on a freeway, becoming increasingly agitated as he waits to reach the next exit.

That turning point came suddenly and dramatically. With Baghdatis serving at 5-6, 40-0 in the second set, Federer won the next five points - the last to clinch the set after the umpire overruled a linesman's call that the Cypriot's forehand had landed in. A replay showed the official was right to intervene. However, the point seemed to be playing on Baghdatis's mind at the start of the third set when Federer immediately broke serve.

From then, the gap between the champion and the rising star was more akin to what might have been expected at the start of the Open. Since then we have seen Baghdatis's brilliance and Federer's vulnerable side. Yet such is the talent of the Swiss, we still got the champion we expected and he got the trophy he deserved.

Daniel
01-30-2006, 02:25 AM
Federer sets sights on French clay

By Bill Scott, dpa

Melbourne (dpa) - Methodical Roger Federer put the emotion of winning a seventh Grand Slam behind him Monday following his second Australian Open success to concentrate on the missing link in his glittering tennis curriculum.

Only hours after beating persistent Marcos Baghdatis in four sets for what became an emotional victory in front of tennis legend Rod Laver, the 24-year-old Swiss champion was plotting strategy as he bids for four majors in a row.

The winning streak began over Andy Roddick for the All England Club title and was followed by a win against Andre Agassi last year in New York before Federer felled the upstart Cypriot in Melbourne. The world number one player now heads for the next test.

Federer has never won the French Open, with last year's semifinal defeat to Rafael Nadal his closest call.

"Now I've won them (the other majors) twice each, at least. It puts the pressure on the French," he said.

"What can I do? I enjoy winning tournaments. I enjoy playing well at Slams. Obviously, I know the importance of winning the French, what it would do to my career."

Federer appears to have secured a commitment from veteran Sydney- based Aussie coach Tony Roche to travel more this season.

Among the first ports of call for the tennis guru, a contemporary of the legendary Laver, could be the red clay of Europe leading up to the May 29 start at Roland Garros.

Laver, who presented the trophy to a tearful Federer, was the last man to hold all four Grand Slams - albeit in the calendar year of 1969. As he did in 2004, Federer has take the annual first step in his own quest for that honour.

"I'm not gonna change anything in my game very much," Federer said, looking ahead to the spring clay circuit, which follows the March hard court month outdoors in the US.

"I thought I played the right way last year at the French. Maybe, just, I didn't play as great as I was hoping to, but I still gave myself a chance," he said. "I thought the match against Nadal was decent - but maybe worst semifinal I ever played."

Federer strides atop the tennis world with trophies in seven of his last 11 majors.

He cannot help but be proud of his current three on the trot.

"Winning three or four or two in a row is a fantastic effort, so I'm going for four. That would be fantastic," Federer said. "We're still a few months away (from Roland Garros). I hope I stay healthy so I get a chance to do it."

Federer is halfway to the all-time record of 14 Grand Slam titles held by Pete Sampras - whose career followed a trajectory similar to Federer's success.

Federer drew praise from Laver, who returned to the Open for its 101st edition. "That's a pretty good start, and he's only 24," Laver said.

"The main thing is that he just looks like he's enjoying the game, and it's not pressure. I think age is not really an issue when you're looking at someone like Roger. He could be 31, 32 and be winning matches if the desire's there."

Daniel
01-30-2006, 02:28 AM
Tears for fabulous Federer and fears for every rival

Steve Bierley in Melbourne
Monday January 30, 2006
The Guardian


The rarefied pinnacles of tennis - the calendar grand slam and Pete Sampras's record 14 majors - remain hidden in the clouds for Roger Federer, just as were the tops of this city's skyscrapers on a humid evening of high emotion which saw the world No1 win his second Australian Open title and his seventh grand slam by beating the Cypriot Marcos Baghdatis 5-7, 7-5, 6-0, 6-2.
"So far my career has followed Pete's almost in parallel," said Federer afterwards. "It's kind of scary." The comparison will continue to be made as long as he is playing and will grow ever more frenzied, assuming, as everybody currently must, that the Swiss is not cut down by injury or by the sudden rise of someone vastly superior. And for the moment the latter is hard to imagine. Sampras and Federer are far from being peas in a pod. The American rarely displayed much emotion whereas Federer finds it hard to contain the tears. Those who may be present should he reach one of those twin pinnacles may consider collecting wood to build an ark, for there may be a flood. "I don't know what to say," said Federer yesterday after Rod Laver presented him with the trophy, and from then on whatever he tried to say was accompanied by many a gulp and many a tear.
Federer had met Laver for the first time earlier in the week and was clearly affected by his presence in the arena named after the player who was arguably the greatest of them all. The Rockhampton Rocket won 11 slam titles and managed the calendar slam twice, the first in 1962 when he was 24, Federer's age now. That same year Laver turned professional, thereby missing, in the amateur era, four majors for the next six years. The Australian performed the calendar slam again in 1969.
"Roger has so much talent but the main thing is that he so enjoys playing the game. It's easy to get mentally drained and for the desire to ebb if you have to grind out matches, but Roger loves playing. And when things are not working he tries something else and finds a way to win," said Laver yesterday.

Minutes after this latest victory, Federer's mind was already turning to this spring's French Open, the only major title to elude him: "Last year was the first time that I really committed myself to try and win it, and I reached the semi-final which was a pretty good effort. Providing I stay healthy I think I can do it."

The Spanish teenager Rafael Nadal, who is currently injured, beat Federer at Roland Garros and went on to win the title, and whether he recovers fully may be crucial to Federer fulfilling his ambition.

Federer, despite his apparent nonchalance on court, admitted to being extremely nervous at the outset against Baghdatis, the 20-year-old from Limassol who had previously defeated three top-10 players here and whose success up to the final had been the story of the tournament.

The opening set saw Baghdatis continue his rich vein of form and in the second he was twice within a point of a 7-5, 3-0 lead. "I started thinking about the trophy and I stopped playing," he said. "I gave Roger the chance to come in and be more aggressive. And that cost me the match."

Federer has multiple gifts of which his movement is the most underestimated. Whereas many modern players stand well behind the baseline and slog away with huge top-spin ground-strokes, the Swiss hugs the line, ready to pounce on the short ball and open up the court.

"His court coverage and his anticipation are uncanny," said Laver, "and if his backhand is in shape he just seems to roll."

This was Federer's third successive slam win, something only Sampras has achieved since Laver in 1969. Here in 2003 Serena Williams completed four slams in succession, the so-called "Serena slam", so the "Roger slam" is a possibility at Roland Garros this June which, if achieved, would make Federer only the sixth man to win all four majors.

This victory moved him ahead of Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg of the modern players, and he is now on level terms with John McEnroe, John Newcombe and Mats Wilander. Of the current men players only Andre Agassi, with eight, has won more slams.

It was clearly Federer's plan not to give Baghdatis any pace, although this tended to make the world No1 err on the side of caution initially. "Maybe I was a little passive in the beginning, not as aggressive maybe as I should have been, but he was the better shot-maker and totally deserved the first set."

The fact that Federer had looked more vulnerable than usual here over the past two weeks no doubt accentuated his emotions. This and the fact that his coach, Tony Roche, is an Australian icon, and he also holds dear the memories of his former Australian coach Peter Carter, who died in a car crash four years ago and whose family were present yesterday.

To see Federer cry may be regarded as a weakness by some, but not by his opponents. Last year he lost only four matches. This year he remains undefeated in tournament play.

He is without doubt a thoroughly nice man, but on the court, as the defeated Baghdatis discovered, Federer is as mean as any champion.

Daniel
01-30-2006, 02:31 AM
Last Update: Monday, January 30, 2006. 11:28am AEDT


An emotional Roger Federer addresses the crowd at the Rod Laver Arena after his victory in the Australian Open final | Getty Images

Baghdatis dared to dream, but Federer was just too good
By Gerard Whateley

For a set and three quarters Marcos Baghdatis made believers of even the most hard-bitten, pessimistic sports fan.

For 90 minutes the world number 54 out-served, out-rallied, out-hit, out-thought and out-manoeuvred Roger Federer.

The Swiss maestro wasn't so much poorly cast as the villain of the piece, he couldn't hold down the part as the world's best player.

It was a giddy ride of power and finesse, of drop shots and volleys, of winners off both wings and the routine monstering of the Federer second serve.

It wasn't enough to say the force was with Baghdatis for that denied the basic truth that he was out playing his opponent.

Federer had looked mortal for the second week of the tournament and now he looked thoroughly vincible. Early in the final he popped forehands, botched volleys, shanked backhands and served more double faults than he had in six matches combined.

After claiming the first set 7-5 Baghdatis was running the baseline at the northern end on the fourth point of the second set. With the rally ended he pulled up one step from the Norman Brookes Challenge Cup sitting on a courtside table.

He was staring at sheer possibility and there was no-one within Rod Laver Arena who didn't believe he could now claim that trophy.

Federer's resurgence was gradual. He absorbed some heavy blows and searched for a way to break the rhythm.

Without a discernible shift in momentum but without leaking any further ground he corrected his serve and set about menacing the second ball of the Cypriot.

He turned to the sliced backhand to dig in while rallying. At the key moment in the second set - the 12th game - he changed his tactics.

Whenever Baghdatis served to his backhand Federer chipped and charged. It knocked his opponent off balance for just long enough to break serve and level the match.

By the third game of the third set Federer was making winners. He pulled the trigger from deep or shallow in the court on forehand and back.

The joy briefly deserted Baghdatis. He trudged and mused about line calls. He carried the burden of missed opportunity.

And this was when you knew the natural order of things had been restored.

There was nothing more remarkable about the men's final of the 2006 Australian Open.

Baghdatis couldn't match a rampant Federer as he reeled off 11 straight games. Few expected he could. That's just the way things are.

To the last Baghdatis enjoyed wonderful support, for his spirit and achievement have made this tournament. He fought off cramp and engaged in the battle as best he could.

Even as his tournament obituary was nearing completion he conjured a break point. At the final end-change he skipped to the baseline.

All who have seen him these two weeks in Melbourne would hope Baghdatis proves this was more than a one-off. "Strength be with you," was an apt parting wish.

At the last Federer held aloft the trophy just as was expected from the outset. While many found this predictable the man himself did not. He sobbed and repeatedly embraced the man he sees as the greatest, Rod Laver.

It was refreshing and reassuring to see just how much victory meant.

It's Federer's seventh grand slam title. In isolation it doesn't add weight to the argument he's the best of all time.

He beat Denis Istomin (world number 195), Florian Mayer (69), Max Mirnyi (seeded 30), Tommy Haas (41), Nikolay Davydenko (fifth seed) and Marcos Baghdatis (54). Not all grand slam titles are created equal.

But should it come to pass that Federer can win the French and hold all four major titles at the same time - golf's Tiger Slam - or that he might string together the French, Wimbledon and US Open in 2006 to match the deed of Laver then this will stand as one of the most important Australian Opens.

At that moment it would support his crowning as the king of the open era.

SUKTUEN
01-30-2006, 07:43 AM
thankyou~~!thankyou~~!thankyou~~!thankyou~~!thanky ou~~!thankyou~~!thankyou~~!thankyou~~!thankyou~~!t hankyou~~!ththankyou~~!thankyou~~!thankyou~~!thank you~~!ankyou~~!thankyou~~!thankyou~~!thankyou~~!th ankyou~~!thankyou~~!thankyou~~!thankyou~~!thankyou ~~!thankyou~~!

ToanNguyen
01-30-2006, 03:59 PM
A very nice and insightful article. I am not sure if anyone post it yet but here it it.

The force behind the serve … and the tears

He won the battle, not just against the underdog ... and then the dam burst, writes David Williamson.

THE vast world audience who watched the men's final of the Australian tennis open on Sunday night saw an extraordinary spectacle. One of the all-time greats, possibly the greatest player ever, Roger Federer, convincingly and coolly won the title, then broke down and cried.

It was a moving and endearing moment. But what caused it? Men would usually rather admit to an erectile problem than cry in public.

Sure, Malcolm Fraser had tears in his eyes when he was defeated by Bob Hawke in 1983, but that was a defeat, not a victory.

And Hawke cried openly at the spectacle of Tiananmen Square. Some cynics claimed Hawke was crying in sheer wonder at the depth of his own compassion, but I'm prepared to believe that he was genuinely moved. But again that's not tears in response to a victory.

Women's tears don't draw the same surprise or disapproval as men's tears, and men's comparative stoicism has been long put down to social conditioning. Recent brain imaging studies cast doubt on this.

The feeling and compassion centres of women's brains are far more active than men's. The male inability to cry seems to also have a structural and biological basis in the brain.

So what made Federer defy those social and biological restraints and show us his vulnerability?

It could be any number of reasons.

Pete Sampras cried on court in a match with Jim Courier and it was not known until afterwards that he'd just found out his coach had been diagnosed with cancer, so any explanation has to be speculative, but here goes.

Federer, on court, usually convinces us he has no emotions at all. He glides gracefully around the court so casually that it seems as if he's somehow in command of time itself, and can slow it down at will. It's just all too easy.

In sport, whose essence is the drama of not knowing outcomes, predictability is irritating, especially to sports journalists whose pay packet depends on new scenarios.

So it's not hard to understand why they seize on every close contest to try to proclaim that the Federer era is over. While they don't hate Federer, they hate the inevitability that comes as a result of his massive talent. which they try to undermine by highlighting every falter and stumble. It has to eat away at Federer's inner confidence and sense of fairness.

But Federer should take heart. He's not alone. Our greatest racehorse, Phar Lap, was shot at in an attempt to kill him because he just kept winning.

Playwrights who were contemporaries of Shakespeare delighted in vicious attacks which accused him of being a country bumpkin whose style of writing was stuffed with vapid similies and far-fetched metaphors.

The greatest wicketkeeper/batsman who ever played cricket, Adam Gilchrist, had a recent bad run, and the chorus to get rid of him rose to shrill heights. His century in the one-day match on Sunday seems to suggest his talent has not totally evaporated.

It's an iron law of achievement that when one rises too far above the competition the slings and arrows start, and with it the merciless rooting for the underdog.

And what an underdog Marcos Baghdatis turned out to be. Mercurial, voluble and likeable, and as flamboyant as Federer is controlled. With a beautiful young model as his companion, and confessing that spending time with her in bed was a strategy to keep him from stressing out, he was a publicists' dream.

Ranked below 50 and coming from nowhere, Baghdatis was the darling of the tennis world after his heroic five-set win from behind over David Nalbandian.

Federer could surely sense that the vast majority of the world was hoping that Baghdatis would win. From their point of view the new kid on the block had arrived at last, and while Federer could rationally accept that Baghdatis was the new darling of the tennis world, at an emotional level it must have taken its toll. From his point of view he had more than earned his eminence. Why was there such a rabid frenzy of hope that he would be humiliated?

I think that part of the reason Federer broke down was an attempt to show us all that to him his victories are not at all inevitable. That being on top of the pile is in some ways the most vulnerable position it's possible to have. That it's not easy. That from his point of view every match is a contest. As in any sport, confidence and belief are just as essential as talent, and every time Federer plays it's possible that the emotions, which we now know are patently there under the surface, might derail him. We saw it happen at the start of the match. He willed himself brilliantly back into the game, but he knows that if he loses, the baying hounds are out there ready to proclaim an era is over. And that if his confidence is shaken enough, it might well be.

To intensify his emotion the man handing him the trophy was Rod Laver, perhaps the greatest tennis player ever.

If any man was able to understand the very real loneliness at the top, it was Rocket Rod.

Federer broke down because the trophy, handed to him by his all-time idol, meant more to him that any of us thought it could. Every new trophy is another Everest he has to climb.

Every time he comes to centre court now he has to do battle with the world's huge expectations and with their hope that the underdog will win.

Federer showed us that he's vulnerable, that victory matters very much for him, and that it's very hard work. That was what moved us.



I love this article. Roger, you are really my inspiration. :worship: :worship: :worship:

ToanNguyen
01-30-2006, 04:04 PM
Another one.

Tears reveal humility behind Federer's greatness

By Bill Barclay, Reuters tennis correspondent

LONDON, Jan 30 (Reuters) - Every Roger Federer grand slam success is accompanied by a fresh deluge of eye-watering statistics, but the tears of the great Swiss were the most telling part of his Australian Open triumph.

Federer's four-set victory over Marcos Baghdatis on Sunday will not be remembered for the tennis itself, intriguing as it was to see the precocious Cypriot dominate the first set before eventually ceding to the world number one's superiority.

The final was special above all for the remarkable sight of a player long recognised as the best in the world clutching the winner's trophy like a comfort rag and weeping uncontrollably as if it was the last thing he had been expecting.

Someone watching Federer for the first time could have been forgiven for thinking this was his maiden grand slam victory, not his seventh in seven finals and his third in succession after Wimbledon and the U.S. Open last year.

It was not the behaviour of a player whose dominance of the men's game is almost absolute and whose place alongside the greatest players the sport has ever seen is already assured.

"I don't forget that it's been a tough road for me. I amaze myself every time I do well," Federer said.

Those words and his tears reveal the extraordinary humility that underpins his greatness as a tennis player.

Such modesty insulates the Swiss from the dangers of complacency. The rest of the world may think he is virtually unbeatable but Federer genuinely believes he is vulnerable, despite statistics which include winning his last 52 matches on a hard court.


MENTAL STRENGTH

As a result the 24-year-old's quest for improvement never falters and his concentration never wavers on court, his face a mask of serene intensity whether he has just lost a set or, as in Sunday's third set, won it 6-0.

There is not a player among the top 10 who can match such mental strength.

At a telling point in the final, when a correct umpire over-rule allowed Federer to level the match at one-set all, Baghdatis approached the chair official and suggested the point in question had been effectively match point.

It was a fatal sign of psychological weakness from the Cypriot and the exuberant spirit that had accompanied his startling progress suddenly drained away.

Baghdatis won only two more games and Federer wrapped up what in the end was a convincing 5-7 7-5 6-0 6-2 victory before emotion overwhelmed him so endearingly.

After a difficult start to 2006 for the sport following the doping cases of Mariano Puerta and Sesil Karatantcheva, it was a timely reminder of how lucky tennis is to have the exemplary Swiss at its pinnacle.

Seraphim
01-30-2006, 06:33 PM
A very nice and insightful article. I am not sure if anyone post it yet but here it it.

The force behind the serve … and the tears

He won the battle, not just against the underdog ... and then the dam burst, writes David Williamson.

THE vast world audience who watched the men's final of the Australian tennis open on Sunday night saw an extraordinary spectacle. One of the all-time greats, possibly the greatest player ever, Roger Federer, convincingly and coolly won the title, then broke down and cried.

It was a moving and endearing moment. But what caused it? Men would usually rather admit to an erectile problem than cry in public.

Sure, Malcolm Fraser had tears in his eyes when he was defeated by Bob Hawke in 1983, but that was a defeat, not a victory.

And Hawke cried openly at the spectacle of Tiananmen Square. Some cynics claimed Hawke was crying in sheer wonder at the depth of his own compassion, but I'm prepared to believe that he was genuinely moved. But again that's not tears in response to a victory.

Women's tears don't draw the same surprise or disapproval as men's tears, and men's comparative stoicism has been long put down to social conditioning. Recent brain imaging studies cast doubt on this.

The feeling and compassion centres of women's brains are far more active than men's. The male inability to cry seems to also have a structural and biological basis in the brain.

So what made Federer defy those social and biological restraints and show us his vulnerability?

It could be any number of reasons.

Pete Sampras cried on court in a match with Jim Courier and it was not known until afterwards that he'd just found out his coach had been diagnosed with cancer, so any explanation has to be speculative, but here goes.

Federer, on court, usually convinces us he has no emotions at all. He glides gracefully around the court so casually that it seems as if he's somehow in command of time itself, and can slow it down at will. It's just all too easy.

In sport, whose essence is the drama of not knowing outcomes, predictability is irritating, especially to sports journalists whose pay packet depends on new scenarios.

So it's not hard to understand why they seize on every close contest to try to proclaim that the Federer era is over. While they don't hate Federer, they hate the inevitability that comes as a result of his massive talent. which they try to undermine by highlighting every falter and stumble. It has to eat away at Federer's inner confidence and sense of fairness.

But Federer should take heart. He's not alone. Our greatest racehorse, Phar Lap, was shot at in an attempt to kill him because he just kept winning.

Playwrights who were contemporaries of Shakespeare delighted in vicious attacks which accused him of being a country bumpkin whose style of writing was stuffed with vapid similies and far-fetched metaphors.

The greatest wicketkeeper/batsman who ever played cricket, Adam Gilchrist, had a recent bad run, and the chorus to get rid of him rose to shrill heights. His century in the one-day match on Sunday seems to suggest his talent has not totally evaporated.

It's an iron law of achievement that when one rises too far above the competition the slings and arrows start, and with it the merciless rooting for the underdog.

And what an underdog Marcos Baghdatis turned out to be. Mercurial, voluble and likeable, and as flamboyant as Federer is controlled. With a beautiful young model as his companion, and confessing that spending time with her in bed was a strategy to keep him from stressing out, he was a publicists' dream.

Ranked below 50 and coming from nowhere, Baghdatis was the darling of the tennis world after his heroic five-set win from behind over David Nalbandian.

Federer could surely sense that the vast majority of the world was hoping that Baghdatis would win. From their point of view the new kid on the block had arrived at last, and while Federer could rationally accept that Baghdatis was the new darling of the tennis world, at an emotional level it must have taken its toll. From his point of view he had more than earned his eminence. Why was there such a rabid frenzy of hope that he would be humiliated?

I think that part of the reason Federer broke down was an attempt to show us all that to him his victories are not at all inevitable. That being on top of the pile is in some ways the most vulnerable position it's possible to have. That it's not easy. That from his point of view every match is a contest. As in any sport, confidence and belief are just as essential as talent, and every time Federer plays it's possible that the emotions, which we now know are patently there under the surface, might derail him. We saw it happen at the start of the match. He willed himself brilliantly back into the game, but he knows that if he loses, the baying hounds are out there ready to proclaim an era is over. And that if his confidence is shaken enough, it might well be.

To intensify his emotion the man handing him the trophy was Rod Laver, perhaps the greatest tennis player ever.

If any man was able to understand the very real loneliness at the top, it was Rocket Rod.

Federer broke down because the trophy, handed to him by his all-time idol, meant more to him that any of us thought it could. Every new trophy is another Everest he has to climb.

Every time he comes to centre court now he has to do battle with the world's huge expectations and with their hope that the underdog will win.

Federer showed us that he's vulnerable, that victory matters very much for him, and that it's very hard work. That was what moved us.



I love this article. Roger, you are really my inspiration. :worship: :worship: :worship:

I've been trying to put this into words for the longest and this man, David Williamson, just said it perfectly. Perfectly.

The best article I've read so far.

PaulieM
01-30-2006, 06:36 PM
A very nice and insightful article. I am not sure if anyone post it yet but here it it.

I love this article. Roger, you are really my inspiration. :worship: :worship: :worship:
I love that one too, thanks so much for posting it! :)

JustmeUK
01-30-2006, 06:53 PM
Hope this isn't a repost. Had a quick glance and can't see this been posted yet.

Tears flow as Federer takes stage with Laver
By Mark Hodgkinson in Melbourne
(Filed: 30/01/2006)



In pics: Federer overcomes Baghdatis
In pics: Mauresmo lifts women's title


Just as his tennis during the Australian Open fortnight had included a few wobbly moments, Roger Federer became increasingly emotional during his champion's post-match speech yesterday. After winning his seventh grand slam title, he was unable to prevent himself from slowly starting to weep into the microphone.

Federer, occasionally caricatured as a multiple title-winning tennis machine and who is now halfway to the all-time record of 14 majors achieved by Pete Sampras, does not often display his soft and sensitive side.

The tears demonstrated just how much victory meant to Switzerland's world No 1, who came from a set and a break down to defeat the unseeded Marcos Baghdatis, the colourful Greek Cypriot, 5-7, 7-5, 6-0, 6-2 and take his second title at the Melbourne slam.

Federer is usually capable of making witty thank-you speeches, with his jokes and comments as well timed as the ball off his strings. But last night the 24-year-old was in trouble as soon as he was handed the trophy by one of his idols, Rod Laver, in the main stadium at Melbourne Park, the Rod Laver Arena. At first he stood in front of the microphone not knowing what to say and how to act.

When Federer did start to speak he was unsure of himself and was rambling, and the tears soon began. "I guess it's all coming out now. I've had some hard speeches but this one is really tough," he said and on finishing he turned around and hugged Laver, in a warm and affectionate close to an evening which had contained some brutal hitting by the Swiss and the Cypriot.

Only once before had Federer cried during a post-final ceremony at a slam and that had been after winning his first major at Wimbledon in 2003. That was almost expected. Yesterday's tears took everyone by surprise. "I'm just human," he said.

"Being such a huge favourite had put so much pressure on me. And if I had lost it would have been the biggest upset since I don't know when. I can't remember when I had last been that nervous going into a match. And waiting all day for the night session, that was even more nerve-racking on top of it."

The sense of history was palpable. Laver, still called "The Greatest" and the last man to achieve the grand slam by winning all four majors in a season, had previously indicated that he regarded Federer as possibly "the greatest of all time".

The Australian had suggested before the start of the tournament that Federer had the opportunity this year of doing the same calendar sweep, a view that he no doubt passed on during their private meeting at Melbourne Park last week.

Laver achieved the grand slam twice, in 1962 and 1969, and won a total of 11 majors. Only two players have since won three successive slams - Sampras in 1993-94 and now Federer, with Wimbledon and the US Open last year and this Australian Open.

With his seven slams - two Australian Open titles, three Wimbledon championships and two US Open titles - Federer drew level with a group of seven others which includes John McEnroe, Mats Wilander and John Newcombe.

But, more importantly, it meant that he was halfway to Sampras' total, and had reached the seven-slam mark in 27 major tournaments, just one more than the American had required. A French Open title has so far eluded Federer, just as it did Sampras.

Federer had been missing some of his usual edge and touches of genius here, which was akin to seeing a cuckoo clock without the cuckoo. And he certainly did not have everything his own way against Baghdatis, the 20-year-old world No 54 making his first appearance in a grand slam final in only his sixth major.

Baghdatis was the better player for a set and a half, and he held two points in the second set for a second break and a 3-0 lead. But Federer took the second set and gradually worked his way into a winning position, with Baghdatis tiring and requiring treatment in the fourth set for cramp in his left calf.

Federer won 14 of the last 16 games, including an 11-game run, and maintained his perfect record in grand slam finals. The tears were on their way.

Fedex
01-30-2006, 10:22 PM
Here's an article from ESPN.com It seems like Roche will be working with Roger a bit earlier in the clay season this year, to help better prepare Roger for the French.

MELBOURNE, Australia -- Roger Federer is leaving nothing to chance in his bid to win the French Open and complete his own version of the Grand Slam.

Federer's victory over Marcos Baghdatis in Sunday's Australian Open final gave the Swiss master his seventh Grand Slam singles title and put him on course for a shot at the "Roger Slam."

Federer won Wimbledon and the U.S. Open last year and his victory at Melbourne Park leaves him needing just the French Open title to become the first man since Australia's Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all four titles simultaneously.

The world No. 1 intends to fly his Australian coach Tony Roche to Europe to fine-tune his game on clay ahead of the French Open.

Roche rarely travels with his star pupil outside of Grand Slams but is considering going to Europe earlier than normal to help Federer get the one major title that has eluded him.

"Tony came to Hamburg last year, which I thought was pretty early," Federer said at a news conference.

"He might come a week early, maybe to Rome. We'll see about that. "He's definitely coming for that trip again. I'm very happy about that."

Federer has won seven of the last 11 Grand Slam events he's entered but the French Open has always eluded him.

The 24-year-old reached the semifinals last year, losing to eventual champion Rafael Nadal, and hopes the extra work he's doing with Roche, who won at Roland Garros in 1966, will make the difference.

"I think the more time I spend with him, the more information I get about playing on clay.

"Just being together and working together, it's very interesting.

Federer said he wouldn't change a great deal for the French Open as he believed he played the right way in 2005.

"Maybe I didn't play as great as I was hoping to in the semifinal.

"But I still gave myself a chance. Rafael totally deserved to win the French. Best player by far on clay last season.

"I hope he'll be back by then and I get a chance to play him again."

While Federer was preparing to fly out of Melbourne on Monday with another Australian trophy tucked under his arm and the tennis world at his feet, Baghdatis agreed to stay on another day to thank the Greek community that had supported him.

The 20-year-old Cypriot developed a cult-following during the tournament, defying the odds to beat top-10 players Andy Roddick, Ivan Ljubicic and David Nalbandian to qualify for his first grand slam final.

He can also expect a tremendous welcome when he gets back to Cyprus this week.

Minnie
01-30-2006, 11:26 PM
From The Herald Sun, Australia 31.1.06

Roger Federer yet to decide
Leo Schlink
31jan06

ROGER Federer will decide this week if he will play Davis Cup against Australia in Switzerland next month.

The world champion yesterday deferred a decision on the February 10-12 tie on indoor clay in Geneva as he celebrated a second Australian Open success.
"It's too early yet," he said. "I will speak with the team later in the week and then I will decide."

The world No. 1 remains unlikely to take his place against John Fitzgerald's underdog Australians, who will be without injured Lleyton Hewitt.

Federer is concerned about his suspect right ankle and scheduling issues.

The Swiss is still to regain peak fitness after slipping during practice on October 11. He has worn an ankle brace since resuming.

Eager to win the French Open, Federer has convinced coach Tony Roche to travel overseas more often this season.

Roche will accompany Federer to Indian Wells, California, in March and go earlier to Europe for the claycourt season, beginning in Rome in May.

Sydneysider Roche is expert in the art of building fitness with on-court drills, honing skills and boosting endurance in intense four-hour blocks.

Federer flew to his Dubai base last night after sleeping for only an hour following his victory over Cypriot Marcos Baghdatis in the Australian Open final on Sunday night.

He claims Hewitt's absence in Geneva will have no bearing on his Davis Cup decision, but Swiss sources insist he will not play.

His impressive understudy Stanislas Wawrinka will lead the Swiss defence if Federer opts out.

Australia will rely on a combination of Peter Luczak, Chris Guccione, Nathan Healey, Wayne Arthurs and, possibly, Mark Philippoussis.

Hewitt has an injured left ankle.

Both teams are obliged to reveal their teams this week.

The final combinations will be named at Thursday week's draw.

Australia will have a new coach -- almost certainly Todd Woodbridge -- in Geneva. Former coach Wally Masur has moved to Tennis Australia's High Performance Academy in Sydney. "


Interesting that its reported Tony will travel to IW to be with Roger this year.

ToanNguyen
01-31-2006, 12:51 AM
TEARS OF A CROWN
By Brian Miller
January 31, 2006
*
*
LAST night, under a starry Melbourne sky, Roger Federer delivered on the hype.

Then he cried.

Right there on the podium, as he held tight on to the Australian Open trophy, he cried.
He shed tears. He lost his voice. His nose turned red. He sobbed.
It wasn't Federer that we knew. But it was nice to see the ice man melt. If we doubted it before, we knew it then. This guy was human, after all.

Then there was Marcos Baghdatis.
If ever there was a jubilant loser this was the guy.
The Cypriot and the huge underdog, carried the hopes of the crowd who packed the Rod Laver Arena. And for some heart-stopping moments in the opening set, he looked like he had the measure of the great Federer.

He won that opener 7-5. But Federer won everything else.
And while we rooted for the bearded Cypriot, there were some truths which we had to face.
Compared to Federer's relaxed, easy going style, Baghdatis was like some cosmic cowboy on some gaudy pinball machine.
He moved all over the court, hustling for points - even when they seem far out from his reach.
Along the way, he ran himself to the ground.
Still, though weary, we saw in his eyes the pride in having survived the hardships of his youth.

Because there on the podium and mixed in the sweat was a sweetness as he remembered the family he loved.
While it didn't make the deprivations of his youth seem less, it did pull us further into his corner.
Then we saw Federer cry.
At first we squirmed at such an emotional 'exhibition'. Then we had to give it to him.Still, there were those who had Baghdatis as their prince.
This was no fault of theirs. But that lack of inhibition endured Baghdatis to the crowd.

He may not have been the handsomest bloke in Victoria, but even in defeat, every mother in the Rod Laver Arena wanted to hug him.
That is, until Federer cried.
Last night, as we watched the final unfold, we knew that Baghdatis had been blessed with grace.
The personal grace that is bravery in the face of adversity and the grace in performance whose hallmark is an easy, sure intimacy with himself and his fans.
And they were there in the stands - all decked in blue and white. They were Greeks, and Cypriots and Australians.
To them, it was not the view from the summit that mattered. It was Baghdatis' climb to get there that counted.
Throughout the last fortnight we had heard how, some years ago, tennis had become the language of his life.
His dream was like a child's. He believed in fantasy and yesterday, before our eyes, it became reality. He was in a Grand Slam final.
Oh, how we loved him. We had probably read the script but we hoped that our man would tweak it just a little bit.

Out there and facing Federer, he was like an enchanting elf who not only enjoyed playing tennis but could be seen enjoying it.
We willed him to win and sat down wearily when Federer scored the winner in that fourth.
Then Federer cried, and even Baghdatis' camp rose as one to applaud a great champion.
As for us who weren't privileged to be courtside, this was a made-for-television triumph of the human spirit sort of thing.
And while the result did not favour the 'nice guy', at the end of the day, it was the right result.
Sure, today in Cyprus, Baghdatis' photo will still hang among the crucifixes but Roger Federer will still be the best there is. Numero Uno. Number One.
While it wasn't the most remarkable episode I had seen in tennis, there was something unreal about it.
That was when, facing a bank of television cameras and a worldwide audience, the great Roger Federer broke down and cried.
It was, quite honestly, the shot of the day.


TRUE THAT!!!! THAT WAS THE BEST ENDING TO THE AUSTRALIAN OPEN THAT I CAN HOPE FOR. GO ROGER, THE NUMERO UNO. :worship: :worship:

MissMoJo
01-31-2006, 01:07 AM
Great articles, i almost feel like i'm witnessing Rogi's speech all over again when i read them :)
His nose turned red
This visual cracked me up :lol:

RogiFan88
01-31-2006, 01:36 AM
Sampras is honoured to see Federer follow in his footsteps

TO ROGER FEDERER, it is a scary coincidence. At 24, Pete Sampras captured his seventh grand-slam tournament, the US Open of 1995, having been crowned the Masters champion in Indian Wells and Key Biscayne the previous year. Federer collected his seventh grand-slam victory here on Sunday and — guess what? — the 24-year-old Swiss is the title-holder of the tennis showpieces of California and Florida.

Scary is right. The timing of their ascent to greatness apart, these are men who can boast an extraordinary range, who play down their talent yet realise how touched they have been, whose demeanours belie fiercely competitive instincts, who appreciate the toil it takes to win. The subtle difference is that Sampras — who won seven more grand-slam tournaments before deciding that he had nowhere else to turn and laid down his rackets — lost in two of his first seven finals. Federer has won them all, losing a mere three sets in the process.

Federer knows that he cannot escape those who will pursue him across the world questioning at each turn if he can match the American’s record 14 grand-slam victories and leave a mark of his own. Three years ago, when Sampras won the US Open for the final time and departed the scene, the logical assumption was that he had set a standard to last for all time.

Sampras did not win the French Open in 13 attempts; Federer has had seven shots and his best is a semi-final appearance last spring. He said that that was the only time he gave himself a legitimate chance on red clay and yet the force was with Rafael Nadal, the teenage Spaniard, who became the champion two days later.

Sampras played Federer once, on Centre Court in the fourth round of 2001, when a teenage Swiss burst the American’s Wimbledon bubble 7-5 in the fifth set. As Federer reaches halfway towards the Holy Grail, Sampras greets his achievements as one would expect, with no envy and recognising what it has required for the present world No 1 to have come even this far.

“I don’t like to be reminded of the time we played at Wimbledon — he beat me fair and square and though it hurt, I knew he was a real talent,” Sampras said. “From what I see, he is able to play at a higher level with less effort than the rest — a bit like me. You see Andy Roddick and it is work. Roddick’s out there grinding, but it doesn’t take a lot of effort for Federer to play great. He is the complete package, head and shoulders over the rest.

“I put up the records and I know that is the most that I could give. If someone breaks those, my hat is off to them because I know what it takes. It seems that Federer has the temperament to stay at the top for as long as he wants.”

Within three hours of going to bed on Sunday evening, Federer was up, bright as a button, to appear on morning TV in Australia. He reiterated that his joy was based, for the large part, in disbelief that he had recovered to defeat Marcos Baghdatis, the Cypriot story of the championship, in four sets. He had practised in Australia over Christmas with Tony Roche, his coach, flown to the Middle East to win Doha, played patchily at Kooyong in the pre-championship exhibition, then had to cope with the excessive demands of being forced to play so many matches under lights.

As the Australian Open squeezes more and more evening sessions into its schedule, so the big boys — ie, Federer — are required to play to sustain viewer figures. “I had so much time to think about my last four matches here,” he said. “It was nerve-racking. I don’t think I’ve ever been as nervous before a grand-slam final. I try to save myself, but it isn’t easy.”

Making it look as though it is, makes Federer the champion he is.

postscript: Andri Baghdatis, the mother of Marcos, had an operation yesterday after being taken to hospital during the Australian Open final. She complained of stomach pains early on Sunday that worsened when she saw her son suffer cramp during his defeat by Roger Federer. Doctors diagnosed gallstones and she watched the end of the match from hospital.

nobama
01-31-2006, 04:57 AM
From The Herald Sun, Australia 31.1.06

Roger Federer yet to decide
Leo Schlink
31jan06
Federer is concerned about his suspect right ankle and scheduling issues.
Did Roger say something about his ankle in his press conference or another interview?

peripheral
01-31-2006, 05:53 AM
Did Roger say something about his ankle in his press conference or another interview?

Only this guy Leo Schlink seems to think Roger's ankle is still in bad shape :rolleyes: In another article (http://www.theadvertiser.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5936,17979871%255E12428,00.html) of his about the AO final, he talks about Roger's ankle being swollen and how he has 'disguised the gravity' of the injury, but there are no quotes, and not a mention of where he's getting this information from :rolleyes: Since we've heard it from no one else, I think this can be safely disregarded.

bokehlicious
01-31-2006, 06:30 AM
Only this guy Leo Schlink seems to think Roger's ankle is still in bad shape :rolleyes: In another article (http://www.theadvertiser.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5936,17979871%255E12428,00.html) of his about the AO final, he talks about Roger's ankle being swollen and how he has 'disguised the gravity' of the injury, but there are no quotes, and not a mention of where he's getting this information from :rolleyes: Since we've heard it from no one else, I think this can be safely disregarded.

I heard something similar... In fact his ankle seems to have annoyed him specially on his fitness preparation during the winter break. His fitness was not so well prepared for AO and I think this could come from his ankle problem.

ExpectedWinner
01-31-2006, 06:43 AM
Since we've heard it from no one else, I think this can be safely disregarded.

I'm not so sure.

ExpectedWinner
01-31-2006, 06:44 AM
I heard something similar... In fact his ankle seems to have annoyed him specially on his fitness preparation during the winter break. His fitness was not so well prepared for AO and I think this could come from his ankle problem.

It sounds very real.

Dirk
01-31-2006, 06:44 AM
Roger don't come back until you are 100%.

bokehlicious
01-31-2006, 07:22 AM
He said this yesterday to a swiss reporter: "well today my right ankle is still not as my left"... Really sounds he's not 100% ok.

Mrs. B
01-31-2006, 07:34 AM
Thanks for the articles.

Toan Nguyen, i love that article too, "the force behind the serve...and the tears".

RonE
01-31-2006, 09:48 AM
It is amazing that he actually won a grad slam even with his ankle not being 100% when you think of it. Especially a slam as physically demanding as Australia.

However I only hope it will not have a severe long term affect and I really wish he would give himself the best possible chance of recovering and getting back to full fitness. It is no coincidence iin his post match interview that he said he wants to get fitter but he has to allow the ankle to heal properly first.

ToanNguyen
01-31-2006, 10:26 AM
Thanks for the articles.

Toan Nguyen, i love that article too, "the force behind the serve...and the tears".
You are welcome. By the way, I love your avatar. It's cool.

nobama
01-31-2006, 11:11 AM
If his ankle is still in that bad of shape how the hell did he just win a slam? :scratch:

avocadoe
01-31-2006, 01:14 PM
finally got to read all the articles...all good but enjoyed David Williamson's thoughtful piece extra much...re the question of Roger's ankle, I'm sure its been a problem, I can see in his movement, still so good but not quite the flow, a stiffness that translates upward a bit. I hope he takes some time now, and plays and wins anything before IW and IW and then doesn't bother with Miami. I'd love for him to pull out of Miami, choose not to defend, get the rest again before the road to the FO continues!!!!

nobama
01-31-2006, 01:27 PM
Does anyone know when the Laureus award nominees comes out? I've seen some news stories about how Roger is a favorite to win the award again, but have the nominees been announced yet? I'd love to see him win it again (Tiger Woods won it 2 years in a row), but I thought for sure Lance Armstrong would be a lock after his win last year.

violet coley
01-31-2006, 08:06 PM
Federer in contention for Laureus award
February 1, 2006 - 12:09AM


Roger Federer's Australian Open victory has put him in line for his second Laureus World Sportsman of the Year award.

The world No.1 won the award last year and after his gritty victory over 20-year-old Cypriot Marcos Baghdatis in Melbourne, the Swiss star is favourite to retain the title.

Baghdatis, who saw off Andy Roddick, Ivan Ljubicic and David Nalbandian before meeting Federer in his first Grand Slam final, is now a contender for the World Newcomer of the Year award.

Federer's compatriot Martina Hingis is in contention for the World Comeback of the Year award following her mixed doubles win with Mahesh Bhupathi in Australia.

Winners will be announced at the Laureus Awards ceremony to be staged in Barcelona on May 22.

Minnie
01-31-2006, 11:55 PM
If his ankle is still in that bad of shape how the hell did he just win a slam? :scratch:

I wouldn't be surprised if his ankle swelled after all that intense play in Melbourne - but its not an indication of anything seriously wrong - just that the muscles surrounding the joint are not yet as strong as they should be. Having damaged ligaments myself - ankle + knee, I was told that the muscles surrounding the joint then have to become stronger than they were before so no repeat injury occurs. It'll takes some time for that to happen. He'll just have to keep on doing whatever strengthening exercises they've given him to do. I was very relieved to see him still wearing that brace - and he may go on wearing it for some time yet. But his movement looked pretty good to me during AO - much, much better than at Shanghai. He may not play in the Davis Cup and I hope he doesn't - the ankle probably needs a bit of a breather now from match play - before the next onslaught at Rotterdam!

nobama
02-01-2006, 12:40 AM
Last year the Laureus nominees were announced in early March. I'm sure Roger will be nominated again, and hopefully he can take home another trophy. I love seeing him in a tux anyway. :cool:

SUKTUEN
02-01-2006, 04:18 AM
I always worry about Roger's health too

Daniel
02-01-2006, 08:32 PM
Thanks for the articles .

I am sure he will get fitter and theankle will heal 100% soon. :)

PaulieM
02-01-2006, 10:02 PM
Last year the Laureus nominees were announced in early March. I'm sure Roger will be nominated again, and hopefully he can take home another trophy. I love seeing him in a tux anyway. :cool:
:yeah:

Daniel
02-02-2006, 12:10 AM
After winning the Australian Open, can Roger Federer win the Grand Slam? Probably not, says Eurosport TV analyst Mats Wilander. However the 24-year old Swiss could well be on his way to topping Pete Sampras' record of 14 majors. But Federer has to act fast, argues Wilander.

I think it will be very difficult for him at Roland Garros, but if he wins Wimbledon or the U.S. Open, he will have a very good chance to top Sampras," commented three-time Australian Open champion Wilander.

Sampras, like Federer, was 24 years old when he won his seventh major.

As time goes by, it becomes more and more difficult to dominate the circuit.

Staying number one, as Wilander himself knows, leaves no room for outside distractions.

RACE AGAINST TIME

Also, with each title, the pressure builds. Federer's tears were real when he accepted the trophy from the hands of Rod Laver on Sunday.

"Federer's crew need to understand that he is an emotional guy. Once you leave something come into your life, it's very, very difficult to keep up what he is doing. He's got some serious thinking to do in the next few months," says Wilander.

It was fitting that Laver, the last man to win the Grand Slam in 1968, was there at Melbourne Park.

"Roger Federer is aiming at Pete Sampras record, if he wins the Grand Slam, then Rod Laver will be forgotten, and eventually Pete Sampras will be forgotten. He can do it if he gets by the next several months." Says Wilander

A lot depends on the return of defending French Open champion Rafael Nadal - who beat Federer in the semi-finals last year on the slow red clay of Roland Garros.

In Australia this year, Tommy Haas, Nicolas Kiefer, Nicolay Davydenko, and even Marcos Baghdatis went into their encounters with Federer with nothing to lose and played some of their best tennis.

The longer Federer stays on top, the more his opponents will be pumped up and looking for keys to beating him.

Daniel
02-02-2006, 12:12 AM
Laureus World Sports Awards
FEDERER’S GRAND SLAM WIN PUTS HIM IN LINE FOR SECOND LAUREUS WORLD SPORTSMAN AWARD


· Australian Open victory gives World No.1 his third straight Grand Slam
· Baghdatis becomes contender for Laureus Newcomer of the Year Award
· Hingis celebrates great comeback with mixed doubles victory
· Laureus World Sports Awards to be held in Barcelona, May 20-22

MELBOURNE, January 31, 2006 – Switzerland’s Roger Federer became a hot favourite to be nominated for his second straight Laureus World Sportsman of the Year Award after beating 20-year-old Marcos Baghdatis to win his second Australian Open Grand Slam tennis title.

Federer’s 5-7 7-5 6-0 6-2 victory in Melbourne over unseeded Cypriot Baghdatis meant that the current Wimbledon and US Open champion has become the first man since Pete Sampras in 1993-94 to win three consecutive Grand Slam titles. If he wins the French Open in May, he could become the first man since Rod Laver to win all four Grand Slam titles in 12 months.
Baghdatis, who had beaten Andy Roddick, Ivan Ljubicic and David Nalbandian en route to the final - the biggest match of his career - won the first set, but then Federer cruised away to a comfortable victory. However Baghdatis’s remarkable performance, reaching his first Grand Slam final despite being ranked 54th in the world, could make him a contender for the Laureus World Newcomer of the Year Award.

Federer’s fellow Swiss Martina Hingis celebrated her remarkable return to tennis by winning the mixed doubles title with Mahesh Bhupathi. Hingis and India's Bhupathi, who entered the tournament as wild cards, beat sixth seeded pair Daniel Nestor and Elena Likhovtseva 6-3 6-3.

The victory is 25-year-old Hingis’ 15th Grand Slam title and her first mixed doubles crown. Hingis, who was playing her first Grand Slam tournament since 2002 as a result of long-term injury problems, also reached the quarter-finals of the women's singles event to make herself a strong contender for nomination for Laureus World Comeback of the Year.

Belgium’s Justine Henin-Hardenne, the current French Open champion, had hoped to strengthen her claims for the Laureus World Sportswoman of the Year Award with another Grand Slam victory, but she had to retire in the final with stomach problems, leaving France’s Amelie Mauresmo the 6-1 2-0 winner.

China’s Yan Zi, aged 20, winner of the Guangzhou International in October when she was ranked just 163rd in the world, reinforced her chances of being nominated for the Laureus Newcomer of the Year Award when, along with Zheng Jie, she won the Australian Open women's doubles. The Chinese pair came from behind against top seeds Lisa Raymond and Samantha Stosur after losing the first set, but they fought back for a
2-6 7-6 (9-7) 6-3 victory.

There is a two-part voting process to find the winners of the Laureus World Sports Awards. Firstly, a Selection Panel of the world’s leading sports editors, writers and broadcasters from over 80 countries votes to create a shortlist of six nominations in five categories – Laureus World Sportsman of the Year, Laureus World Sportswoman of the Year, Laureus World Team of the Year, Laureus World Newcomer of the Year and Laureus World Comeback of the Year.

The members of the Laureus World Sports Academy then vote by secret ballot to select the Award winners. The Laureus Academy is the ultimate sports jury, made up of 42 of the greatest sportsmen and sportswomen of all time, who have made an outstanding contribution to world sport.

The Laureus Academy members also vote for the Laureus World Sportsperson of the Year with a Disability and the Laureus World Alternative Sportsperson of the Year, the nominations for which are made by specialist panels. The winners of all these seven categories, plus several special Awards, will be revealed during a televised Awards Ceremony to be staged in Barcelona on the evening of May 22, 2006.

Last year's Awards Ceremony, in the presence of His Majesty King Juan Carlos of Spain, was attended by members of the Laureus Academy and Hollywood stars Jackie Chan, Morgan Freeman, Teri Hatcher and Marcia Gay Harden. Among the award winners present were Roger Federer, Kelly Holmes and Greece football coach Otto Rehhagel.

Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, is a city with an enormous sporting tradition which has staged the most important sports events. The immensely successful 1992 Olympic Games gave a new impulse to sport in the city. Sport is a part of everyday life in Barcelona and during the past few years the number of high-level international championships staged in the city has multiplied. Therefore it is no surprise that Barcelona was chosen to host the Laureus World Sports Awards in 2006.

Barcelona is a Mediterranean and metropolitan city with the most modern facilities. Its unique architecture, artistic ambience and many tourist attractions have made Barcelona one of the most visited cities in the world. A business and leisure city, it is the ideal place to organise such an important moment of the sporting year - the Laureus Awards Ceremony.

Daniel
02-02-2006, 12:16 AM
Link: http://www.hindu.com/2006/01/31/stories/2006013105542200.htm

A glimpse at the real Roger Federer




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
It is fashionable to see Federer not as a person but as some elegantly engineered robot, writes Rohit Brijnath
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Before anything else, before the thrill of victory slowly seeps into the bones, before contemplating his new place in history's scorebook, when the last point is won the predominant feeling that overcomes the champion is relief. It is done, he thinks.

And then, often, the athlete will simply let himself go, allow his emotions so long carefully imprisoned to break free, a sort of permission slip to the self that now, finally, it is ok to lose control.

Michael Jordan grasped his first NBA Trophy to himself like he might a child and wept. Tiger Woods fell into his father's arms on winning the Masters. Diego Maradona blubbered on his 1986 World Cup victory.

And on Sunday night, as extravagant with emotion as he usually is with shot-making, Roger Federer struggled to contain his tears after winning the Australian Open. It was the only battle he beautifully lost all fortnight.

It is fashionable occasionally to see Federer not as a person, but as some elegantly engineered robot. My God, it was noted, during his struggles through the tournament, Roger sweats, as if his insides are normally air-conditioned.

Emotional ride


But late in the tournament he sometimes lost his composure, erratic and irritated, appearing almost vulnerable, and it was revealing. For some this was the imperfect Federer, but perhaps it was a glimpse at the real Federer, momentarily unshackled from his impeccable control.

Listen up, he was saying, I may look composed mostly, but I rage within. Before the tournament began he admitted there are days when tennis is hard labour for him, but we laughed it off. His ease has disguised his effort and it pains him. He is artist yes, but pugilist too.

This should be evident. Thrice now in Grand Slam finals, Andy Roddick at

Wimbledon 2004, Agassi at the U.S. Open last year, Baghdatis on Sunday, players have confronted him with audacious shot-making, dominated sets, nudged at his self-belief, yet Federer has not wilted.

"I was struggling so much to hold my serve," he said after Sunday's final. "I was sweating like crazy. I thought, `Well, if this is going to continue, I'll probably lose and (only) a miracle is going to save me.'" But he, once a hothead, has trained himself to stay calmest amidst everyone else's storm of shots, alerting the clear-thinking warrior within him.

Striking similarities


In this he bears resemblance to Sampras, and not only there; indeed, so compelling are the similarities between him and the American, that Federer on Sunday called it "scary."

Born four days and 10 years apart, at exactly this time when 24, Sampras had seven Grand Slams, so does Federer; Sampras had won two Masters, so has Federer, the American had been the first since Laver to win three Slams in a row, now so has Federer, Sampras had 36 titles, Federer has 35.

Men labour a lifetime to win one Slam, for as Federer said "it is so hard to do." Especially for him, for so accomplished he has become that we believe he carries no fear, nor owns any doubt. He is not allowed, he said, to be sick. He must always be "physically strong" and "mentally tough." Every day, even as 127 opponents gang up with a solitary idea: beating him.

Match after match, he must manage nerve, stir desire, swallow pressure, staying normal in an abnormal environment and somehow willing himself to keep control.

Then he wins, and Rod Laver is shaking his hand, and the trophy within his grasp. Then it is all too much. Then he says, as if his tears didn't speak enough as it is: "I'm also just human."

Daniel
02-02-2006, 12:38 AM
Column: Tennis has its Tiger

By Mark Blumenthal
The top five stories from the Weekend That Was:

5. Future Hall of Famer Mike Piazza finally has a new team, signing a one-year deal to play for the San Diego Padres, where he will actually be one of their home run threats at 37.

4. The Chip Ganassi sports car team shines at Daytona Beach as the trio of Scott Dixon, Dan Wheldon and Casey Mears captures the Rolex 24 championship at the speedway.

3. It’s No. 2 North Carolina beating No. 1 Duke, 74-70 ... but this time it’s in women’s basketball. Erlana Larkins scores 17 of her 23 points in the second half as the Tar Heels climb out of a 13-point deficit to remain the only unbeaten team in the women’s game.

2. After opponent Marcos Baghdatis storms out to a 7-5 first-set win and a 2-0 lead in the second set, Roger Federer realizes he’s in a Grand Slam championship, where he never loses, and beats Baghadatis 7-5, 6-0, 6-2 the final three sets to win his seventh Grand Slam title and second Australian Open title.

1. Tiger Woods takes advantage of other golfers hacking their way to bad rounds the final two days, then watches as Jose Maria Olazabal blows a four-foot putt in the second sudden-death playoff hole to win his fourth Buick Invitational.

Our topic of discussion: 2. Roger, over and out.

Roger Federer is the Tiger Woods, Lance Armstrong and Michael Jordan of his sport right now.

Seems hard to imagine, but it’s true. Only the 24-year-old Swiss superstar would be the lone reason these days for yours truly to stay up at 4:30-5 a.m. to watch tennis.

I may have been one of the very few in this area who was up and thought the upset of all upsets would take place as the 20-year-old Baghdatis — who had a large Greek population there to cheer him on — won the first set almost effortlessly.

Down 2-0 in the second set, Federer was another broken serve away from “it just isn’t his day” status. Baghdatis had him on the ropes and another flurry of tennis punches may have knocked the world’s best player out.

But like Tiger, Lance and Michael, Federer never loses in these situations. He reached down and won his serve and then survived the rest of the set for a 7-5 victory.

From there, Baghdatis was nothing more than a mere footnote winning just two games the last two sets. And after it was all over, Federer broke down on the victory stand, emotions setting in that the award was given to him by none other than the man who last won all the Grand Slam events in 1969, Australian Rod Laver, considered by some to be the greatest tennis player ever.

Others say it might be Pete Sampras, who went out in a blaze of glory with the 2002 U.S. Open title, his record 14th Grand Slam crown.

Federer is halfway to Sampras’ total and only turns 25 on Aug. 8. If he wins the French Open title (he was a semifinalist last year when he lost to Rafael Nadal), he joins a very few select players to win all four Slam titles, Andre Agassi being the last to win all four championships in a career.

Sampras never won the French Open, and neither did Jimmy Connors nor John McEnroe. Ditto for Stefan Edberg. Ivan Lendl couldn’t win at Wimbledon. Neither could Mats Wilander nor Guillermo Vilas. Bjorn Borg could never win at the U.S. Open.

With a win at May’s French Open, Federer will not only have the career Grand Slam, but he will be halfway to joining Laver (twice) and Don Budge as the only players to ever win the Grand Slam for an entire calendar year.

Then he might be considered the greatest ever.

For now, he’s the best at dominating his sport. And he’s fun to watch.

Even at 4 in the morning.

Mark Blumenthal is a writer for the Palatka Daily News.

lunahielo
02-02-2006, 12:45 AM
Wow~!!
People everywhere are finally getting what we've known for a long time!

Thanks, Daniel.. :hug:

SUKTUEN
02-02-2006, 03:23 PM
thanks

onewoman74
02-02-2006, 09:56 PM
I'm not sure if this was posted, but Roger made THE ONION newspaper...there is nothing cooler!!!

http://www.theonion.com/content/node/45054



Roger Federer Admits Tennis His Fourth-Favorite Sport
February 2, 2006 | Onion Sports

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA—In a tearful admission following his seventh Grand Slam title at the Australian Open Sunday, Roger Federer told members of the press that, while he "like[s] tennis okay," there are at least three other sports he would rather be playing or watching.

Enlarge Image

"Tennis is all well and good, and yes, I'm great at it, and sure, I've made millions of dollars playing this sport, but when you get right down to it, it's just a game of human Pong," Federer said. "On the rare occasion that I hear the roar of the crowd during one of my matches, I like to pretend I've just hurdled into the end zone, or sank a three-pointer at the buzzer, or hit a home run to win the game."

"Just the thought of all the exciting moments that can happen in other sports is enough to make me want to give up tennis, buy a big-screen TV, and sit at home all day watching ESPN Classic for the rest of my life," added Federer, placing his Australian Open trophy where it wouldn't obscure his signed photo of Cal Ripken Jr.

While tennis is the most important sport to Federer's livelihood, he admitted that he follows baseball, football, and basketball far more closely.

"I couldn't even tell you who the No. 1 ranked tennis player in the world is right now," Federer said. "It's probably me, still. It is, isn't it? That's so weird when you think about how I don't really care one way or another."

Federer, known for his reserved, unemotional style of play on the court, said his famous "stoicism" is usually just his mind wandering off to thoughts about that night's NBA schedule, or whether it would be worth it to purchase the MLB Extra Innings cable package.

"People always assume I'm concentrating on the match, but how can you concentrate on tennis when there are literally 10 football games being played at the same time? It takes all my mental faculties to not run off the court and try to find a TV," Federer said. "Thank God the [Australian Open] finals didn't fall on Super Bowl Sunday. I might have had to forfeit."

After a teary-eyed Federer accepted the Australian Open trophy from tennis icon Rod Laver, the last man to sweep all four Grand Slam events in the same year, he attributed his uncharacteristic show of emotion to his sudden on-court realization that he will probably never become a major-league baseball player.

"Sure, Rod Laver is my hero—my tennis hero," Federer said. "But if I had the opportunity to just meet—never mind receive an award from—Ken Griffey Jr., Troy Aikman, or Michael Jordan, I would be so much more thrilled."

"No offense to Rod Laver, who was a great tennis player and is probably a very nice guy," Federer added.

Federer, who blames his inability to bring home a French Open title on the fact that it usually falls right in the midst of the NBA postseason when he has other priorities, has also begun to take a liking to golf and often catches himself practicing his swing between sets.

"Golf is a lot like tennis in that it requires immense focus and concentration, but ultimately it's so much more relaxing and rewarding than two guys hitting a ball back and forth for hours on end," Federer said. "One more 90-degree day on clay courts, and I might just consider joining the PGA Tour."

Federer added that, while he doesn't technically consider stock-car racing a "sport," he finds it "much more exhilarating and interesting than tennis" and would "happily trade in all the Wimbledons in the world for a chance to ride shotgun in a Chevy Monte Carlo at Daytona with [his] idol Kurt Busch."

Rogiman
02-02-2006, 10:08 PM
:lol:

LCeh
02-02-2006, 10:13 PM
Gotta love TheOnion. :lol:

MissMoJo
02-02-2006, 10:17 PM
The onion is hilarious :yeah:
Federer, who blames his inability to bring home a French Open title on the fact that it usually falls right in the midst of the NBA postseason when he has other priorities, has also begun to take a liking to golf and often catches himself practicing his swing between sets.
:haha:

nobama
02-02-2006, 10:58 PM
Anyone know if Roger was at the Golden Kamera awards this year? I think they happened tonight. Obviously he won an award last year and was there with Arthur Cohen and Marti Hingis. But I haven't yet seen any pictures of him this year so I'm guessing not?

Dirk
02-02-2006, 11:23 PM
Onion is a mock sports site?

PaulieM
02-02-2006, 11:29 PM
"I couldn't even tell you who the No. 1 ranked tennis player in the world is right now," Federer said. "It's probably me, still. It is, isn't it?
:rolls:

nobama
02-03-2006, 12:41 AM
Pages: The secret between Woods and Federer
By John Pages
Matchpoint

Roger and Tiger. Tiger and Roger. Don’t they sound the same? They sure act the same. Win the same. Roger is No.1; Tiger is above No. 2. They’re twins. Roger stands 6-foot-1 and weighs 177 pounds, Tiger is an inch taller and three pounds heavier. Their T-shirts have the same logo. You know the ones with the check mark?

Last Sunday, the brothers reached the finals. They were in opposite ends of the earth. Roger was Down Under in Australia, while Tiger was down in San Diego, California.

The result? The same. They were down, then up. Twins. They’re twins, remember?

Let me prove it.

LOSE. Roger. In the Australian Open finals against Marcos Baghdatis, Roger was ready to lose. He lost the first set, 5-7, and was 0-2 and a break point down in the second set. Had Baghdatis won that crucial point, Roger would have been the bridesmaid. But he didn’t. Next thing “The Pirate” knew, “The Master and the Commander” had won 18 of the next 23 games.

Tiger. In the Buick Invitational, Tiger was all set to lose. After Day One, he played so bad the critics wrote he’d miss the cut after Day Two. Tiger hung on. He prowled. In the final day, he trailed, same with the final 18th hole. He had to birdie. Did he? Of course.

Roger is younger at 24. He’s at his peak. Last year, he won 81 matches and lost only four. Not bad, huh? He captured two majors: one in England (Wimbledon) and another in America (the US Open) and increased his bank account by $6,137,018.

The older twin? Tiger turned 30 last Dec. 30. In ‘05, he won six official money events on the PGA Tour. Tiger won two majors: one in England (the British Open) and another in America (The Masters) and increased his bank account so much that he celebrated by buying a $40 million oceanfront Florida mansion.

Roger. This early on, this tennis star has been hailed as one of the best ever. But to lay claim to that title, he knows he’s got to beat Pete Sampras, who owns the record 14 major titles. Roger has seven. He’s got seven to go.

Tiger? He’s right up there. But to be “The Greatest,” he’s got to surpass Jack Nicklaus and his record 18 major titles. Tiger has 10. He’s got eight more to tie.

Roger is not the world’s No.1. He’s the world’s No.1 BY FAR! Read the ATP Tour rankings: (1.) Federer 7275 (2.) Nadal 4615 (3.) Roddick 2785 (4.) Nalbandian 2570 (5.) Ljubicic 2395. See how far Roger stands above the field? Against No.2 Nadal, he beats him up by a whopping 57 percent.

His bro, Tiger? The golf rankings: (1.) Woods 16.46 (2.) Singh 9.91 (3.) Goosen 7.98 (4.) Mickelson 7.61 (5.) Els 7.25. Embarrassing for the rest of the field. Against Vijay, he’s up 66 percent. Amazing.

HELP. More on Roger? Sure. The Roger Federer Foundation was started in December 2003. Its goals include funding projects (primarily in South Africa) that benefit disadvantaged children.

Any help from the twin? The Tiger Woods Foundation was established in 1996 by Tiger Woods and his father Earl. It focuses on projects for children, including golf clinics aimed especially at disadvantaged children.

Roger attempts a Tiger. Later this May at the French Open, Roger has the chance to win his fourth major in a row. If he does, this achievement will be nicknamed “The Roger Slam.”

His brother Tiger did that in 2000-2001 when he became the only player ever to hold all four majors at once (although this did not occur in a calendar year, and is not recognized as a true Grand Slam). The achievement has been nicknamed “The Tiger Slam.”

The Roger Slam, the Tiger Slam. The foundation for disadvantaged children. The T-shirt logo. One is No.1, the other is above No.2.

Didn’t I tell you they were twins?

nobama
02-03-2006, 01:06 PM
From Roger's website:

ATP - ROGER TO PLAY IN TOKYO

Roger has committed to play the AIG Japan Open Tennis Championships in Tokyo the week of October 2, 2006. This will be the first time Roger has ever been to Japan. He is most certainly looking forward to the tournament and the cultural experience.
:cool:

Nocko
02-03-2006, 01:14 PM
Yes! :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:
Now I pray that he will stay healthy whole year and this news become true. :worship:

Puschkin
02-03-2006, 01:49 PM
From Roger's website:

ATP - ROGER TO PLAY IN TOKYO

Roger has committed to play the AIG Japan Open Tennis Championships in Tokyo the week of October 2, 2006. This will be the first time Roger has ever been to Japan. He is most certainly looking forward to the tournament and the cultural experience.
:cool:

Meanwhile it is also on Roger's site. Great news for the Japanese fans, enjoy! :)

RogiFan88
02-03-2006, 01:54 PM
You're kidding! I was wondering when Rogi w play Japan -- I think he'd like it -- not just cos he loves Japanese food but I believe he w appreciate the Japanese culture -- honour, respect, esthetics, perfection, higher ideals... So does that mean he's not playing Bangkok? Nice change for Rogi. [wonder if they'll have him drink ceremonial sake or beat the taiko drums or sth :cool: like that?]

Nocko, our Ninja will go to Japan!! ;)

bokehlicious
02-03-2006, 02:23 PM
Roger counted out of Davis Cup and withdraws from Rotterdam

http://www.swisstxt.ch/TSR1/184-00.html

Good news !!! He will also probably withdraw Dubai I guess...

Puschkin
02-03-2006, 02:28 PM
Good news !!! He will also probably withdraw Dubai I guess...

I don't think so. He seems to like it over there. And it starts only on 27th, this is quite some time. I feel sorry for those with Geneva and Rotterdam tickets, but I do feel he needs this break.

bokehlicious
02-03-2006, 02:34 PM
I don't think so. He seems to like it over there. And it starts only on 27th, this is quite some time.

Yes you're right but he says in this news that he will focus on TMS events before the FO. :shrug:

Puschkin
02-03-2006, 02:37 PM
Yes you're right but he says in this news that he will focus on TMS events before the FO. :shrug:

He actually said AND the French Open, which delights me even more ;) .

bokehlicious
02-03-2006, 02:41 PM
He says he will prepare the Masters Series and the FO, so right, that doesn't mean he will not play other tourneys ;)

bokehlicious
02-03-2006, 03:07 PM
You were right Puschkin, swisstxt now says that he will come back the 27th in Dubai.

LCeh
02-03-2006, 03:24 PM
Good decision from Roger. :yeah: Hopefully he can rest his ankle if that's still a problem, so that it won't be hindering him for the rest of the year.

RogiFan88
02-03-2006, 03:46 PM
I just saw an article about Rogi not playing DC or Rotterdam from tsr.

I know how disappointing it is to get tickets and travel to a tourney and find that Rogi is not playing but it's best for him and for us in the long run.

He said that after AO he has to be very careful about his scheduling and his R ankle is still bothering him.

He wants to be able to be fully fit for I Wells, Miami and most importantly, RG since he intends to play all 3 clay TMSes.

He doesn't want to talk about DC QF -- too early! Besides, who knows if SUI will d AUS? If SUI wins, they will play either ESP or BLR in Basel in early April.

Fortunately, Stan's shoulder prob is not serious and he will rest up and then start training for DC.

OK, all you other players, let's see who wins Rotterdam this year... s be interesting! ;)

nobama
02-03-2006, 06:09 PM
I'm glad he's skipping Rotterdam (I hoped he would). I'm sure he'll play Dubai just to have some match practice in before IW and Miami. Just proves that players can pace themselves. Of course Rogi is miles ahead of the others in terms of ranking so it is easier for him to do so. But someone like Roddick, who complains about the schedule, needs to do this and quit overbooking himself. Even if it means pissing off a tournament director or not defending points. Because otherwise by the time you get to the Masters Series and GS events your fried and end up losing early or getting injured. And those tournaments have the most ranking points anyway.

If SUI wins DC and they play in April in Basel I'm guessing Roger will play. I mean how many times can he not play in Basel? :shrug:

Dirk
02-04-2006, 06:58 AM
Is Roger's ankle bothering him for sure or is it still a rumor.

bokehlicious
02-04-2006, 07:12 AM
Is Roger's ankle bothering him for sure or is it still a rumor.

Roger said that he felt his right ankle was a little less flexible but didn't hurt him or bother him really. I guess it bothered him for his fitness preparation in a way... :shrug:

Velvetcat
02-04-2006, 08:05 AM
Not sure whether it's been posted before, but in case anyone's interested :wavey: (from January 30, 2006)

...

Federer's management is said to have landed a "lifetime contract" with Wilson.

Rumours yesterday indicated Federer would earn at least $1.3 million a year, plus bonuses, for the rest of his career.

Contracts with Nike and watchmaker Maurice Lacroix were also said to be under review by Federer's International Management Group.

Rolex, one of the Wimbledon sponsors, is reputedly investigating ways in which to prise Federer away from Lacroix, which pays him an estimated $1.6 million annually.



http://foxsports.news.com.au/story/0,8659,17980050-23216,00.html

Dirk
02-04-2006, 08:07 AM
Roger said that he felt his right ankle was a little less flexible but didn't hurt him or bother him really. I guess it bothered him for his fitness preparation in a way... :shrug:

Good by the way I still owe you that meeting I had with Roger. If you have MSN. My name is Manaofdirk@hotmail.com Sign on and I will tell you it.

bokehlicious
02-04-2006, 08:10 AM
Good by the way I still owe you that meeting I had with Roger. If you have MSN. My name is Manaofdirk@hotmail.com Sign on and I will tell you it.

Thanks Dirk, unfortunately I work on my corporate computer and I don't have admin rights to install MSN on it... :sad: I'd really appreciate if you can PM it one day ;)

SUKTUEN
02-04-2006, 08:15 AM
I also think that Roger is too need to have a rest, he is too tired :hug: :hug:

yanchr
02-04-2006, 02:28 PM
Roger said that he felt his right ankle was a little less flexible but didn't hurt him or bother him really.
Thank you for the info :wavey:

Great decision from Roger not to play Rotterdam, as well as DC, while I really feel sorry for Swiss and Dutch fans. I can feel how disappointed you might be. But it's understandable as long as Roger stays healthy. I believe Roger will come back to tour 100% fit and motivated :D

A long break for Roger, and also for us fans. It's also energy-consuming and emotion-drained following all his matches worrying and delighting about this and that :p

RonE
02-04-2006, 03:34 PM
Good choice by Roger :yeah: A shame of course for all the fans looking forward to see him play in the next couple of weeks but by him it was the right choice to make.

I knew the ankle wasn't back at 100% and IMO you could really see in his matches that his fitness was not maxed out probably because he couldn't train properly during the offseason. He needs this break to rest up the ankle and improve his fitness because he will need every bit of it.

And as I have discussed with some of you already I think now the importance of winning the Australian Open takes on a whole new context. I believe last year after his loss to Safin he was keen to get as many wins as possbile under his belt to guard his #1 ranking and ended up playing and winning event after event. While that was a great run, I believe he paid a heavy price for it. By the time the clay season started for him in Monte Carlo he was too tired and worn out and ended up withdrawing from Rome. I think had he been more fresh for Carlo he could have made it further in the event (as well as Richard played Roger did have match points in that match so it is not inconceivable that he could have progressed at least one more round) and also he wouldn't have had to withdraw from Rome.

His buildup on the clay leading up to the French Open would have been more encompassing and he would have also probably played Rafa on the clay beforehand, two factors I think which would have solidly improved his chances at RG and helped him in his match with Rafa.

So I think this year, having won the Australian has now given him the luxury to withdraw from certain events and play a little more freely, and most important of all, prepare better for the clay. I would even be happier if he played say Dubai and Indian Wells and then withdrew from Miami but that is still a long way off and who knows it might just happen.

Health always comes first and it is good to see Roger sees it that way too.

nobama
02-04-2006, 04:02 PM
Yeah, I think Miami will depend upon how Roger feels. But being that it's a TMS and he's defending champ I can't see him withdrawing unless he really is having problems with his feet (or gets sick or something). Yes he did skip Montreal last year where he had points to defend but he already was on vacation so it was easy to just delay his comeback.

On an unrelated note, does anyone know if the courts at Indian Wells play faster than Miami? I thought Miami was similar to AO. But I'm not sure about IW. All I know is the courts in IW are blue and in Miami they're still green.

ExpectedWinner
02-04-2006, 05:10 PM
On an unrelated note, does anyone know if the courts at Indian Wells play faster than Miami?

The courts at IW seem faster to me (at least on TV).

1sun
02-04-2006, 05:47 PM
there're not much faster, still pretty slow

1sun
02-04-2006, 05:55 PM
i dont think its a good decision. it doesnt start until feb 20, thats a nice rest. and if he wants to play all 3 clay tournies, then he needs to skip miami anyway. plus the longer he stays away from tennis, the less match fit he is and the more he will lose his game and the longer it will take for it to come back. he hasnt played much tennis since wimbledon and has had many long breaks. he needs matchs to get to his best level.

1sun
02-04-2006, 05:57 PM
I knew the ankle wasn't back at 100% and IMO you could really see in his matches that his fitness was not maxed out probably because he couldn't train properly during the offseason. He needs this break to rest up the ankle and improve his fitness because he will need every bit of it.



there hasnt been any reports that rogers ankle isnt fine. hes said many times he 100%, and he couldnt train properly through the off season? shite, he had many intense sessions.

ExpectedWinner
02-04-2006, 06:38 PM
there hasnt been any reports that rogers ankle isnt fine. hes said many times he 100%, and he couldnt train properly through the off season? shite, he had many intense sessions.

Keep reading newspapers, mate.

bokehlicious
02-04-2006, 06:44 PM
there hasnt been any reports that rogers ankle isnt fine. hes said many times he 100%, and he couldnt train properly through the off season? shite, he had many intense sessions.

Yes he spoke about it to swiss newspapers a couple of times after Melbourne.

nobama
02-04-2006, 06:44 PM
Maybe this is more mental than physical. Who knows. But I don't think he'd skip a tournament where he's defending champ unless he was totally drained and/or didn't feel he was 100%.

I've heard Roger call Miami and IW the 5th and 6th slam so I could never see him skipping either one unless he really was injured where he couldn't play. I can't see him flying all the way to the US just for one tournament. And I don't think he'll ever play the smaller tournies in the US because the financial incentive isn't there. The prize money is less and I'm sure Roger gets paid a nice sum to come play in Dubai. Tiger Woods is playing a golf tournament there this week and it was reported he got a couple million just for showing up.

bokehlicious
02-04-2006, 06:49 PM
The prize money is less and I'm sure Roger gets paid a nice sum to come play in Dubai. Tiger Woods is playing a golf tournament there this week and it was reported he got a couple million just for showing up.

I guess "the showing up" cheque in Dubai must be consequent, as for Bangkok too :o

RonE
02-04-2006, 07:55 PM
On an unrelated note, does anyone know if the courts at Indian Wells play faster than Miami? I thought Miami was similar to AO. But I'm not sure about IW. All I know is the courts in IW are blue and in Miami they're still green.

IW is faster simply because the air in the desert is drier making the ball fly through that much quicker. Sampras always struggled there (funnily enough after he won it twice) citing that the courts were too quick and the ball skidded through the surface.

In Miami the humidity is a huge factor making the balls heavier and subsequently makes the pace a lot slower.

there hasnt been any reports that rogers ankle isnt fine. hes said many times he 100%, and he couldnt train properly through the off season? shite, he had many intense sessions.

I do not need to read reports or listen to what Roger said I just had to use my eyes to watch him during his latter matches at the AO and he was not moving and covering the court as well as he did before the injury. It is minimal of course and the fact is he won the event but even a fraction of a drop in movement is so crucial when you are talking about this level.

nobama
02-04-2006, 08:13 PM
IW is faster simply because the air in the desert is drier making the ball fly through that much quicker. Sampras always struggled there (funnily enough after he won it twice) citing that the courts were too quick and the ball skidded through the surface.

In Miami the humidity is a huge factor making the balls heavier and subsequently makes the pace a lot slower.Well I'm hoping it's really hot in IW this year. In 2004 it was in the high 90s I think the whole time. It was wonderful for being on holiday, but I'm sure not so fun for the players. Although it's dry heat, so that helps. Last year it was a lot cooler. I think the day of the finals it was 75F.

RonE
02-04-2006, 08:30 PM
Well I'm hoping it's really hot in IW this year. In 2004 it was in the high 90s I think the whole time. It was wonderful for being on holiday, but I'm sure not so fun for the players. Although it's dry heat, so that helps. Last year it was a lot cooler. I think the day of the finals it was 75F.

Well the downside to that is the suntroke Roger had in 2004 which handicapped his chances in Miami. But there is no doubt in my mind the conditions at IW suit Roger's game a lot better than those in Miami.

RogiFan88
02-04-2006, 08:43 PM
I wish people w stop talking about the money, as if that's the reason why Rogi plays certain tourneys like Dubai. Rogi plays tennis for tennis and for himself and in the end for history. He truly loves the sport and being part of it, unlike some players who like it cos it's an easier life than, say, being a high school or uni student slogging away w exams and essays and trying to graduate w high marks to be hired by some Fortune 500 [or is it 1000] company so they can get paid big bucks... let's face it, for a lot of players, this is THE life -- money, fame, babes [if you're a guy], sponsors [if you're hot] and fun fun fun... Rogi is NOT one of those players. Besides, it's not as if he has no money anyway...

Good, sound decision by Rogi -- he knows he has to pace himself or he'll not make Shanghai [i.e., burned out, injured or both].

NYCtennisfan
02-04-2006, 10:55 PM
Rogi88, I don't think anyone can deny that Roger is now playing for history and the love of the game, but it is also understandable that a player plays an event because they get a higher appearance fee. Dubai and Doha undoubtedly give Fed huge numbers to come and play.

NYCtennisfan
02-04-2006, 11:00 PM
Yeah, IW does play faster than Miami because of the dry desert air compared with the heavy humdity of South Florida. Fed has played some of best tennis at IW, not dropping sets to anyone.

As for Fed skipping Miami, I don't see it. Dubai, IW, and Miami going into the clay sounds about right.

nobama
02-04-2006, 11:09 PM
I don't think Roger is obsessed with money and certainly is not playing tennis just for the financial aspect. But who doesn't like making lots of money? There's a lot of good you can do with money too - like Roger's foundation. I have no doubt if Roger's being paid just to show up he's not refusing that money. Everyone to some extent is motivated by money/materialism. Roger's no different. He likes the finer things like Prada suits and staying in nice hotels/resorts. During RG he stayed at the very posh Hotel de Crillon. And in the interview he did for Mens Vogue (which was conducted in that hotel during RG) he said he likes being well served and treated with respect. During the US Open he stayed at The Peninsula a very ritzy hotel in NYC. I've no idea what room he stayed in but they have suites that go for $19,000 per night.

So no, I don't think Roger's prime motivation is money, but it's obvious he (and Mirka) enjoys the finer things in life, which you cannot enjoy if you're not rich.

RogiFan88
02-05-2006, 03:28 AM
Rogi88, I don't think anyone can deny that Roger is now playing for history and the love of the game, but it is also understandable that a player plays an event because they get a higher appearance fee. Dubai and Doha undoubtedly give Fed huge numbers to come and play.

Sure, whatever but if Rogi gets a higher appearance fee, he's earned it. ;)

violet coley
02-05-2006, 05:01 AM
The Sunday Times - Sport



The Sunday Times February 05, 2006


Tennis: Surface tension
BARRY FLATMAN

He’s already a legend, but doubts will remain about Roger Federer unless he can tame the hot clay of Roland Garros


No player has possessed a greater awareness of what it takes to be acknowledged as a tennis legend than Roger Federer. Last weekend Rod Laver, the last male winner of the calendar Grand Slam, stood at the shoulder of the man from Switzerland and applauded his genius. But Federer has long appreciated that his ultimate test will not be on the rubberised hard courts of Melbourne, the grass of Wimbledon or the cement of New York, but on the brick dust of Roland Garros.
He is not alone in pondering why the surface on which he originally learnt the game as a child poses the most problems, and he can repeatedly gaze at the list of wondrous past champions from the other tournaments who never mastered the vagaries of the red clay. And regardless of a collection of seven Grand Slam titles that promises to become much larger, he is already counting the days to his eighth attempt on the perilous Parisian surface.



Federer’s sweat and victorious tears had barely dried after last week’s Australian Open triumph when he faced up to the inevitable question. “I know the importance of winning the French and what it would do to my career,” he acknowledged, mindful of the fact that victory in Paris would equate to four straight major titles — which, although technically not a Grand Slam, would make him the first man since Laver to hold all four together. “But I’m not going to change anything in my game very much.”

Therein lies the question he has repeatedly asked himself: is an athleticism and near- faultless technique that has no current equal anywhere else suddenly flawed when the time comes to head to the 14th arrondissement in May? Or is the problem predominantly in the mind and accentuated by the pressure he puts himself under? The latter was the case for Pete Sampras, who became racked with self-doubt at the very mention of clay.

Juan Carlos Ferrero, who knows what it is like to win at Roland Garros after taking the 2003 title there (the year Federer suffer one of his three first-round demises), once insisted that success on clay is 50% mental, 45% physical and 5% tennis. An analytical study of the Federer game makes it hard to disagree.

Clay’s crumbly composition and the fact that it does not present the firmest of footings does present specific problems, but Federer is able to slide and therefore cope with the least supportive of surfaces. He is happy to contest extended rallies from the baseline and has no intrinsic problem with the higher bouncing ball. Most importantly, he has repeatedly shown the facility to change his gameplan on the run, although in last year’s semi-final against Rafael Nadal he struggled to cope with the young Spaniard’s viciously top-spun left-handed groundstrokes. However, few people could deny that Nadal’s form throughout last spring’s clay-court season was Herculean and will prove hard to repeat.

One trait of Federer’s is his ability to be philosophical in defeat, and he insisted at the time: “The disappointment is in control. I’m not going to destroy the locker room and never play tennis again.” Such rationality can only be of benefit in the long run, and if Laver is to be regarded as a judge of quality four decades on from his pomp, then Federer is a player whose talent will eventually be equal to the test.

“He has so much talent,” said the 67-year-old Rockhampton Rocket. “There are a lot of ingredients: the temperament, the stroke production, court positioning and anticipation. His court coverage is uncanny and he concentrates very well, too. A lot of other players go deeper behind the baseline and slog away with heavy groundstrokes, but Roger just seems to glide around the baseline.”

In addition to an affinity with the player who many observers believe is qualified to sit alongside the flame-haired Queenslander and Sampras in a three-cornered debate as to who is the greatest player of the Open era, there is an added connection between the pair. When Laver completed the second of his Grand Slams, close on the heels on the advent of Open tennis and seven years after first collecting all four titles, the man he beat in the concluding US Open final was his fellow Australian Tony Roche. After proving his coaching expertise with Ivan Lendl and Pat Rafter, Roche now fills the mentor’s seat in Federer’s corner.

Although their relationship is often long-distance, with Grand Slam preparation regarded as more important than Roche’s presence at tournaments, there are plans this year for a longer alliance before the French Open. After last year’s defeat, Federer mentioned changing his pre-French schedule for 2006, but that does not appear to be the case. After attempting to defend his American hardcourt Masters Series titles in Indian Wells and Miami, his itinerary currently reads Monte Carlo, Rome and Hamburg, with no extra clay-court tournaments added.

Nevertheless, Roche is scheduled to get to Europe more than a week earlier, for the warmer climes of Rome’s Foro Italico, where conditions are far more similar to Roland Garros than the often frigid setting of Hamburg’s Rothenbaum, where blasts from the Baltic regularly produce the coldest and slowest conditions on the tour. There is also an insistence that Federer wants to be fitter for the challenge ahead. The concerns about the damaged right ankle that hampered him in last November’s Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai are a thing of the past.

“Physically I feel I can make the transition to clay quite easily,” he said. “The way I move makes it very natural for me, but because the serve doesn’t bring as many free points as it does on other surfaces, I must be more patient, mentally and physically. It’s a different game on clay and you have to get used to that.

“Of course I prefer grass or a hard court, where I have the feeling that I if I hit a good shot, then the point is normally won. On clay the way people can counter-punch is quite extraordinary. You can hit a great shot, but the guy is on the run, he slides and totally gets back in the rally, so sometimes you have to win the point not once but twice or three times.”

In common with fellow Europeans, Federer was initially schooled in the game on clay under inflatable tents near his Basle home. But there was not a natural progression and in the year he won the Wimbledon boys’ title (1998), progressing to become the world’s top junior player, Roland Garros produced a painful disappointment with a first-round defeat. By the time he returned, Federer was a member of the ATP tour, but his phobia of clay deepened.

“The first 11 clay-court matches of my pro career ended in defeat,” he recalls. “There was Gstaad in 1998 and ’99, a bad loss in Monte Carlo to Vince Spadea (7-6 6-0) and then another at Roland Garros to Patrick Rafter after I was given a wildcard entry. In 1999 I also got beaten in both (Davis Cup) rubbers when we played Belgium on clay in Brussels, and then in 2000 I lost to Andrei Medvedev in Rome and Andrei Pavel in Hamburg.

“At the time playing indoors was not a problem for me; neither was grass or hard court. But on clay I could not create surprises, because you have to hit too many balls and both physically and mentally you have to be so tough. Back then I simply wasn’t, but now I am so much stronger, and know I can play well in Paris.”

Those who yearn to laud the Swiss as a talent with no peer throughout the history of the game hope that he is finally true to his word. But the conclusion is undeniable: the barrier appears to be more in the mind than integral to the game.

Fedex
02-05-2006, 10:52 AM
Nice article, Violet.

yanchr
02-05-2006, 11:14 AM
Talking about money is not guilty :angel: Is there anybody who doesn't like money? Surely not me :p It's also not guilty at all to say that Roger enjoys being paid with huge appearance fee to show that he is admired and respected and welcomed. On the contrary, you have to give him credit for having earned such kind of treatment which not you or me will get anyway. There are many factors involved in choosing which tournaments to play, money is surely one of them, but won't be the main course I believe.

So no, I don't think Roger's prime motivation is money, but it's obvious he (and Mirka) enjoys the finer things in life, which you cannot enjoy if you're not rich.
Unluckily I'm not in the least rich to enjoy that luxury or any kind of lesser luxury. I wish one day I can afford. So Roger is my inspiration :D ;)

artur_brazil
02-05-2006, 12:42 PM
hey guys,

i am a journalist from Brazil and I'd like to invite you to read the interview that I've done with Roger.

it's published in www.raciociniocritico.com

one simple click in "leia noticia completa" and you could read the english version

thanks

nobama
02-05-2006, 01:07 PM
Someone on the tennis warehouse boards posted another one of those 'why doesn't Fed get any love in America' articles. Of course a lot of the replies were about what Roger needs to do. But honestly I don't think Roger is the problem. Ok maybe he could be doing more endorsements where people would see him in TV commercials or in magazines. But I really think this is more refelective on the state of our culture and what the media and pop culture choose to cover and promote.

Roger's biggest problem is he doesn't have any problems. He's not "bad" in anyway and our celebrity culture likes to focus on baddies. Look at any of the celebrity magazines - like People, US Weekly - and it's all about who's getting divorced, who's cheating on their spouse, who's got a drug/alcohol/weight problem, who's secretly gay, ect. And on the sports side too, people gravitate to sports stars that do and say outrageous things, the media spends more time on them too.

So someone like Roger who's just a decent, good guy with no "issues" on or off court that we know of doesn't stand a chance. So if the only way Roger can get noticed in the US is to really change who he is as a person, I hope he's says "no". If people in the US can't appreciate someone like Roger it's their loss, not his.

nobama
02-05-2006, 01:15 PM
Talking about money is not guilty :angel: Is there anybody who doesn't like money? Surely not me :p It's also not guilty at all to say that Roger enjoys being paid with huge appearance fee to show that he is admired and respected and welcomed. On the contrary, you have to give him credit for having earned such kind of treatment which not you or me will get anyway. There are many factors involved in choosing which tournaments to play, money is surely one of them, but won't be the main course I believe.


Unluckily I'm not in the least rich to enjoy that luxury or any kind of lesser luxury. I wish one day I can afford. So Roger is my inspiration :D ;)That's another good point. When you get huge appearance fees it does emphasize that you're the best and that you are admired and respected so much that a tournament will pay you just to show up. I'm sure he's not paid as much as Tiger to come to Dubai, but I'm sure it's not chump change either. Roger loves being #1 and everything that goes with it - which includes being able to stay at the finest hotels and being served well wherever you go.

SUKTUEN
02-05-2006, 01:44 PM
thanks

lsy
02-05-2006, 05:12 PM
oh...the same old "Federer boring" "Tennis at it's low in America...doesn't help that Federer is dominating" etc how many times we need to read those :lol: and what do you mean there's nth Rogi can do? Lots of things he could have done...let's see :

1) Give up his no.1 to an American player (any will do really) and consistently let them beat him in slams. You aren't getting much love if you keep thrashing their home players ;)

2) Dump Mirka for some Hollywood actresses/models or any hot gals...sweet/faithful/gf of 5 yrs??? :yawn: boring...

3) For gods sake...stop being nice/thoughtful/respectful/calm on court...it's so "not cool" -> no charisma :yawn: boring...

4) if that still don't get him love...it's probably the nose...not HOT enough...put the career aside, go for a plastic surgery.

5) do none of the above, but simply to become the US citizen. I bet he would have been on thousands of headlines there by now after the past 2 years ;)

All jokes aside...As Mirkaland said, and sadly I don't think it's in US alone. People do prefer to see a "showman" but that's not in Rogi's nature, ironically he didn't choose to be in the showbuz either :shrug: But he has enough people to love him already I say :hug: Besides he gets lots of respects from his peers and people that matter, that I think worth much more to him.

PaulieM
02-05-2006, 05:21 PM
Someone on the tennis warehouse boards posted another one of those 'why doesn't Fed get any love in America' articles. Of course a lot of the replies were about what Roger needs to do. But honestly I don't think Roger is the problem. Ok maybe he could be doing more endorsements where people would see him in TV commercials or in magazines. But I really think this is more refelective on the state of our culture and what the media and pop culture choose to cover and promote.

Roger's biggest problem is he doesn't have any problems. He's not "bad" in anyway and our celebrity culture likes to focus on baddies. Look at any of the celebrity magazines - like People, US Weekly - and it's all about who's getting divorced, who's cheating on their spouse, who's got a drug/alcohol/weight problem, who's secretly gay, ect. And on the sports side too, people gravitate to sports stars that do and say outrageous things, the media spends more time on them too.

So someone like Roger who's just a decent, good guy with no "issues" on or off court that we know of doesn't stand a chance. So if the only way Roger can get noticed in the US is to really change who he is as a person, I hope he's says "no". If people in the US can't appreciate someone like Roger it's their loss, not his.

:worship:

bokehlicious
02-05-2006, 05:40 PM
Someone on the tennis warehouse boards posted another one of those 'why doesn't Fed get any love in America' articles. Of course a lot of the replies were about what Roger needs to do. But honestly I don't think Roger is the problem. Ok maybe he could be doing more endorsements where people would see him in TV commercials or in magazines. But I really think this is more refelective on the state of our culture and what the media and pop culture choose to cover and promote.

Roger's biggest problem is he doesn't have any problems. He's not "bad" in anyway and our celebrity culture likes to focus on baddies. Look at any of the celebrity magazines - like People, US Weekly - and it's all about who's getting divorced, who's cheating on their spouse, who's got a drug/alcohol/weight problem, who's secretly gay, ect. And on the sports side too, people gravitate to sports stars that do and say outrageous things, the media spends more time on them too.

So someone like Roger who's just a decent, good guy with no "issues" on or off court that we know of doesn't stand a chance. So if the only way Roger can get noticed in the US is to really change who he is as a person, I hope he's says "no". If people in the US can't appreciate someone like Roger it's their loss, not his.

Very cool lines Mirkaland, thanks. Specially the last ones... :)

RogiFan88
02-05-2006, 05:49 PM
:)

Here's what Toni says about Rafa's FH.

Check out the link:

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=3033461&postcount=469

Minnie
02-05-2006, 05:51 PM
Mirkaland - I agree with everything you said (also laughed at what Isy wrote re things Rogi should do to get noticed in the US). But it makes me sad ... what kind of world are we living in where someone at the very pinnacle of his sport, and is a thoroughly decent human being, doesn't get the recognition he deserves in a particular country (wherever it is) because no skeletons have been found in his cupboard? :sad: :confused:

NYCtennisfan
02-05-2006, 08:49 PM
Great points on the money and appearance fees issue Mirkaland.

nobama
02-05-2006, 09:22 PM
:)

Here's what Toni says about Rafa's FH.

Check out the link:

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=3033461&postcount=469And what does this have to do with Roger? :confused:

Dirk
02-05-2006, 11:15 PM
Roger is a good man and should stay that way.

eleven11
02-06-2006, 10:12 AM
‘He’s a hit in my books’ –
Scott Gullan
Herald Sun, Mon, 30-01-2006

Tony Roche may be the flag-bearer of Australia in the Roger Federer camp but dig deeper behind the scenes and you come across Luke Bourgeois.

Luke who? Last night the 28-year-old journeyman from Sydney was sitting a couple of rows behind Roche in his role as hitting partner for the 2006 Australian Open champion.

For the past two years Bourgeois, who is ranked about 350 in the world, has been the man responsible for getting Federer warmed up and ready to play at Melbourne Park.

“It is amazing to be a part of it,” he said. “He is just a class individual, I mean he had to guts it out there, it was a bit touch and go for a while but it shows what great character he has to be able to pull it out.”

Bourgeois, who is mistaken regularly for fellow Aussie Pat Rafter, said the Swiss magician is the most relaxed and normal guy you would find.

“It’s fantastic being around him. Everything about the guy is class but the funny thing is he is just a normal guy. A normal 24-year-old who loves a laugh and is just so relaxed,” he said.

“Before the match tonight he was just joking around in the locker room. You see all the other players and they are just so full-on but it’s amazing how cool and calm he is.”

So how does he manage to even get the ball back against one of the game’s greats?

“I won’t say I wasn’t nervous the first time I hit with him.” Bourgeois said.

“But he makes you feel so relaxed as well and working with him has obviously done great things for my game. After the first time I hit with him I had one of my best weeks.”

Bourgeois was beaten in the playoff for a wildcard to get into this year’s Open but he is determined to climb up the rankings and fulfil his dream of squaring off with his hitting partner.

“I’ve had a few injuries but I’ll keep going and just try to get up there so I can have a match with this guy some day,” he said.


Bourgeois, you are so lucky! ;)

nobama
02-06-2006, 11:37 AM
ATP - WELCOME ROGER IN ZÜRICH

Roger's fanclub, „Fans4roger“, has organized to meet him at Zurich airport today and congratulate him for his terrific success at the Australian Open. Roger is already looking forward to coming home to his Swiss fans.

So come in large numbers to cheer for Roger, he will be arriving at 12.40 h from Dubai with Emirates. Hoooooray!



Anyone here going?

bokehlicious
02-06-2006, 11:58 AM
Anyone here going?

Unfortunately personally not :sad: I had an important job and had to stay in Lausanne this afternoon... The worse is that I'll be in Zurich tomorrow :mad:

Stevens Point
02-06-2006, 12:44 PM
ATP - WELCOME ROGER IN ZÜRICH

Roger's fanclub, „Fans4roger“, has organized to meet him at Zurich airport today and congratulate him for his terrific success at the Australian Open. Roger is already looking forward to coming home to his Swiss fans.

So come in large numbers to cheer for Roger, he will be arriving at 12.40 h from Dubai with Emirates. Hoooooray!



Anyone here going?
I live in Zurich, but it doesn't matter where I am and being how close to him, when I got other important things to do.... Otherwise I would have gone.

Welcome back, Roger! :wavey:

nobama
02-06-2006, 02:20 PM
:yeah: to everyone who got to see Roger today! :D

SUKTUEN
02-06-2006, 03:01 PM
:eek: WHO WENT TO See Roger Today????????????? :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:

bokehlicious
02-06-2006, 04:45 PM
Thanks Mirkaland for those cute pics ;)

Doris Loeffel
02-06-2006, 05:34 PM
Me and it was great!! As he was late we had enough time to create a special song for him which we sang when he arrived - and it seams he liked it ;)
As we stood there each time the door opened we started cheering just to goo Rooo ohhhh.... But finally he came and there the noise rose. Even with the few ppl who were there it was a really great athmosphere!! As usual he took some time with the fans made even some pics and signed a few things. Sure he wanted to go home so the whole thing was pretty sort but very enjoyable - thanks Roger for showing up ;)

And it looks like my bag is getting famous ;)

nobama
02-06-2006, 06:01 PM
Who was all with Roger, or was he by himself?

Doris Loeffel
02-06-2006, 07:34 PM
Mirka - Reto Staubli (and probably his gf) came to pick them up

Stevens Point
02-06-2006, 10:25 PM
Me and it was great!! As he was late we had enough time to create a special song for him which we sang when he arrived - and it seams he liked it ;)
As we stood there each time the door opened we started cheering just to goo Rooo ohhhh.... But finally he came and there the noise rose. Even with the few ppl who were there it was a really great athmosphere!! As usual he took some time with the fans made even some pics and signed a few things. Sure he wanted to go home so the whole thing was pretty sort but very enjoyable - thanks Roger for showing up ;)

And it looks like my bag is getting famous ;)
Doris, you could still make it there! :)

I think, not only your bag but you yourself are getting famous thanks to the pictures above and after that Basel tournament picture.. I can recognize some famous faces there, too... Eve, Jennifer, Sabrina, and that only man who is always with them.... :) I haven't met them, but I would love to get to know you guys someday... :)

Doris Loeffel
02-06-2006, 11:11 PM
Yes I just asked in the office even though nobody would be around doing the job i got a yes ;)

btw that lonely man (he wasn't the only one this time though) is Mario

yanchr
02-07-2006, 08:16 AM
Me and it was great!! As he was late we had enough time to create a special song for him which we sang when he arrived - and it seams he liked it ;)
As we stood there each time the door opened we started cheering just to goo Rooo ohhhh.... But finally he came and there the noise rose. Even with the few ppl who were there it was a really great athmosphere!! As usual he took some time with the fans made even some pics and signed a few things. Sure he wanted to go home so the whole thing was pretty sort but very enjoyable - thanks Roger for showing up ;)

And it looks like my bag is getting famous ;)
It is, Doris, and you are famous too ;) :D

Thank you for the description and for the warm welcome of our champion. I bet it's a good feeling for him to be back home after such a long time away, and be cheered for by such a warm and nice crowd :D Lucky Roger ;)

RogiFan88
02-07-2006, 01:11 PM
February 7, 2006
Federer Breaks Own INDESIT ATP Rankings Record
© Getty Images

Roger Federer is celebrating his 106th consecutive week as World No. 1 with the highest-ever points total in INDESIT ATP Rankings history.

The Swiss has compiled 7,275 points to beat his own record of 6,980 points, set on June 6 last year.

Successful title defenses at the Qatar ExxonMobil Open in Doha en route to a second Australian Open title, last month, has seen Federer increase his lead over World No. 2 Rafael Nadal to 2,660 points - the equivalent of about two-and-a-half Grand Slam victories, worth 1,000 points each.

Federer also holds a massive 4,490 points advantage over World No. 3 Andy Roddick, the player he replaced as World No. 1 in the INDESIT ATP Rankings.

However, Federer’s recent withdrawal from the ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament means he will lose points from winning the 2005 Rotterdam title and ‘top out’ at his current total of 7,275 points.

Upon Federer’s return, he will need to defend three consecutive titles at Dubai [starting February 27] and Masters Series events at Indian Wells and Miami in March.

Since reaching the summit of men’s professional tennis on February 2, 2004, the 24-year-old has compiled a remarkable 108-6 win-loss record at ATP tournaments – winning 18 of a possible 24 titles.

Federer’s dominance over his fellow players in the INDESIT ATP Rankings means he also has an excellent chance of setting a new mark for most consecutive weeks at World No. 1.

He recently surpassed Pete Sampras’ tally of 103 consecutive weeks at No. 1 and now has his sights set on Ivan Lendl’s record.

If Federer stays at the top of the INDESIT ATP Rankings until after the next year’s Australian Open, on January 29, 2007, he will equal Lendl’s tally of 157 consecutive weeks (September 9, 1985 to September 12, 1988).

Should Federer hold the No. 1 ranking through to the end of February 2006, he will set a new record of 161 consecutive weeks and beat Jimmy Connors' haul of 160 consecutive weeks from July 29, 1974 to August 23, 1977.
http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2006/rankings_federer.asp

RogiFan88
02-07-2006, 01:12 PM
Doris, were you guys on TV??

SUKTUEN
02-07-2006, 03:26 PM
Doris in Here?

PaulieM
02-07-2006, 11:45 PM
for those of you who were wondering about Laureus Award nominations roger and martina(also clijsters) are both really strong contenders for a nomination. you can check out info about it on their site if you want. :)

Martina (http://www.sportsfeatures.com/index.php?section=pp&action=show&id=29101)
Laureus Site (http://www.laureus.com/awards/stories/story_archives.php)

lunahielo
02-08-2006, 12:54 AM
Thank you for the report!
Is that you and *the bag* in the first pic?
Very nice. :)
luna

nobama
02-08-2006, 01:11 AM
Federer shows perfect grip on stardom (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/sport/2006/02/08/stinve08.xml)
By John Inverdale
(Filed: 08/02/2006)

It's 1981. Ian Botham is the national hero because of his deeds at Headingley. Everyone loves him. Everyone that is, except my elderly next-door neighbour in Lincolnshire. According to her, he once bumped into her in a supermarket in S****horpe and didn't apologise. "You can only speak as you find," she always used to say, "and I don't like him." No swashbuckling century was going to change her mind.

Such is fame. A twin-edged sword if ever there was one. Opinions formed on well-known individuals that either enhance or tarnish their reputation, and invariably based on just the most fleeting of encounters. Last Friday a man out walking his dog near a pub on Blackheath told me that he'd once met Lawrence Dallaglio in the street, and he had to be "one of the nicest guys you could ever come across". At Twickenham on Saturday, some Welsh fans were amazed that their defeated coach Mike Ruddock still found time to stop and chat with them as the team left the ground, even though the easy option was to head for the bus and say nothing. I bet they told all their mates that night. At a charity fund-raising function on Monday night at Loughborough University, some of the present England cricket team went out of their way to sign a rag-week shirt for the auction. One of their number, though, refused to have his picture taken by some of the students. You can imagine the conflicting verdicts afterwards. "He's a really great guy." "Yeah, but that other guy was a complete..."

It's wholly unfair, but that's just the way it is, and it's a topic that was brought to mind by a friend who's just returned from the Australian Open, where some of the behaviour from the likes of Maria Sharapova apparently took sporting prima-donna-dom to new heights.

But she also told me a story about Roger Federer in the opening week of the championship. He'd just conducted his press conference in three different languages, and had gone through the usual rigmarole of half-a-dozen interviews with the major broadcasters covering the event. Then it was the turn of a Japanese film crew who, to the immense frustration of everyone who was waiting behind them in the queue, over-ran their allotted time. But they eventually finished, and Federer headed off to his next assignment. However, one of the Japanese film crew chased after him, saying he was a major fan, and was intrigued by Federer's grip and how he puts so much spin on the ball.

So what did Federer do? Say "thank you" and walk on? Ignore the guy because by now he was running late? No. What he did was go to his tennis bag and get a racket out, and show the cameraman exactly how he shifts his grip on the forehand and the backhand. And then he went on to explain how he gets so much top-spin on his second serve. It was a five-minute masterclass from the master. And you can bet the Japanese film crew spoke of little else for the rest of the tournament.

Now depending on your point of view, it was either just a piece of shrewd public relations, or it was typical of a true champion, aware of his responsibilities, and prepared to treat every cog in the international sporting wheel just the same. Undeniably, though, it was the act of someone who knows that these days we all sit in judgement on our sporting heroes, not just on the field of play, but in the press conference, the car park, the street, and of course, the supermarket.

RogiFan88
02-08-2006, 01:35 AM
:) For the lucky people who get THE TENNIS CHANNEL, on Open Access this month it looks like they're featuring Rogi:

G'day Mates! This month on Open Access we're traveling to the land Down Under to catch up with the stars of the Australian Open. We'll start off at the gates of Melbourne Park, catching up with some of the wackiest and wildest tennis fans in the world. Then we'll strut our stuff with Maria Kirilenko as as she unveils her new clothing line tailored by the designing superstar Stella McCartney. And oh how "suite" it is when champion Roger Federer invites us in and gives us a private tour of his home on the road. Finally, we'll bust a move outback-style with Sharapova, Davenport, the Williams sisters and many more at the IMG player party. Break out the Vegemite, it's Open Access from the Aussie Open!

http://www.thetennischannel.com/Ttc/Programs/OA_Federer_pic.jpg

www.thetennischannel.com

Check out the schedule! ;)

LCeh
02-08-2006, 01:38 AM
Unbelievable. I really don't know how to describe this man. :worship:

RogiFan88
02-08-2006, 01:58 AM
One more thing: on TTC they're showing Dubai SFs and FINAL!!!

PaulieM
02-08-2006, 02:04 AM
i wish i had TTC :(

Billabong
02-08-2006, 03:41 AM
February 7, 2006
Federer Breaks Own INDESIT ATP Rankings Record
© Getty Images

Roger Federer is celebrating his 106th consecutive week as World No. 1 with the highest-ever points total in INDESIT ATP Rankings history.

The Swiss has compiled 7,275 points to beat his own record of 6,980 points, set on June 6 last year.

Successful title defenses at the Qatar ExxonMobil Open in Doha en route to a second Australian Open title, last month, has seen Federer increase his lead over World No. 2 Rafael Nadal to 2,660 points - the equivalent of about two-and-a-half Grand Slam victories, worth 1,000 points each.

Federer also holds a massive 4,490 points advantage over World No. 3 Andy Roddick, the player he replaced as World No. 1 in the INDESIT ATP Rankings.

However, Federer’s recent withdrawal from the ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament means he will lose points from winning the 2005 Rotterdam title and ‘top out’ at his current total of 7,275 points.

Upon Federer’s return, he will need to defend three consecutive titles at Dubai [starting February 27] and Masters Series events at Indian Wells and Miami in March.

Since reaching the summit of men’s professional tennis on February 2, 2004, the 24-year-old has compiled a remarkable 108-6 win-loss record at ATP tournaments – winning 18 of a possible 24 titles.

Federer’s dominance over his fellow players in the INDESIT ATP Rankings means he also has an excellent chance of setting a new mark for most consecutive weeks at World No. 1.

He recently surpassed Pete Sampras’ tally of 103 consecutive weeks at No. 1 and now has his sights set on Ivan Lendl’s record.

If Federer stays at the top of the INDESIT ATP Rankings until after the next year’s Australian Open, on January 29, 2007, he will equal Lendl’s tally of 157 consecutive weeks (September 9, 1985 to September 12, 1988).

Should Federer hold the No. 1 ranking through to the end of February 2006, he will set a new record of 161 consecutive weeks and beat Jimmy Connors' haul of 160 consecutive weeks from July 29, 1974 to August 23, 1977.
http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2006/rankings_federer.asp

:yeah:

nobama
02-08-2006, 03:49 AM
I know this really doesn't belong here, but I was doing a search and came across this old thread right around the time Roger fired Peter Lundgren. Looking back on it now it's funny to see how worried and upset people were. Little did anyone know what Rogi would accomplish after dumping Lundgren. :D

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=7249&page=1&pp=15

MissMoJo
02-08-2006, 04:07 AM
i wish i had TTC :(
Me too :sobbing:
but i did see that episode of open access while i was at a friend's house :D murphy brought rogi flowers and chocolates :rolls:, Rogi showed him his like 10 pairs of extra tennis shoes assuring murphy that 'they don't smell.' He showed him around his room (i'm pretty sure there was a caption that he declined the presidential suite so he could be on the same floor/room with tony )

When they got to the bedroom area, they showed an unflattering shot imo of Mirka lying on the bed :o Roger said that he watches alot of the night matches on t.v and that mirka gets a little annoyed with him watching t.v in bed. Roger and murphy sat on the couch, and they looked over the draw sheets and rogi tells him that he keeps track of the women's and the mens, of course. Murphy asks him what philosophy he lives his life by and he says 'it's nice to be important but it's more important to be nice' :) and then murphy thanks him and gives him a ratty rock band(metallica i think ) t-shirt as a parting gift as roger had told him earlier than he listened to alot of heavy metal when he was being coached by peter lungren :p

There was more to it, but i forgot :( Check it out if you get the chance, it's always cool to see rogi interact off court :) i'm looking forward to his own episode of 'No Strings', don't know there's been one.

nobama
02-08-2006, 04:57 AM
When they got to the bedroom area, they showed an unflattering shot imo of Mirka lying on the bed :o Roger said that he watches alot of the night matches on t.v and that mirka gets a little annoyed with him watching t.v in bed. :lol: I wonder if that's because she'd rather be doing something else in bed. :devil: Or maybe she just wants to sleep and would rather he watch in the living room or something. During Wimbledon he did say that he watched too much tennis for Mirka's liking. My guess is she won't win that battle. :lol:

MissMoJo
02-08-2006, 05:27 AM
I know this really doesn't belong here, but I was doing a search and came across this old thread right around the time Roger fired Peter Lundgren. Looking back on it now it's funny to see how worried and upset people were. Little did anyone know what Rogi would accomplish after dumping Lundgren. :D

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=7249&page=1&pp=15
What's funny is all the Mirka blame :lol:it's pretty strange that some people seemed to think she was some kind of manipulator pulling Rogi's strings, i've always gotten the impression that, as far as their business relationship goes, she's something of a consultant and carries out his decisions and caters to his needs as a manager.

nobama
02-08-2006, 11:06 AM
What's funny is all the Mirka blame :lol:it's pretty strange that some people seemed to think she was some kind of manipulator pulling Rogi's strings, i've always gotten the impression that, as far as their business relationship goes, she's something of a consultant and carries out his decisions and caters to his needs as a manager.Yeah all this stuff about him being under Mirka's thumb is nonsense. I think the choices he makes are all his, but sometimes he probably does defer to her. I do think though he'd be lost with out her, but you could say that about a lot of men. I did have to chuckle at the fan posts blaming her. Because Pat Cash had said the same thing during AO 04. Of course everyone was forced to eat their words. ;)

SUKTUEN
02-08-2006, 03:45 PM
thankyou for the photos

nobama
02-08-2006, 05:45 PM
http://www.thetennischannel.com/news/NewsDetails.aspx?newsid=1419
Where's Murphy?
1/10/2006 4:30:00 PM

Melbourne, Australia
I’m here and life is up and running at the Australian Open. Last night Andy Roddick invited me to play in his private Texas Hold’em poker game at the Crown Casino, the hotel all the players love to stay. The buy-in was a hundred bucks and the rules were a bit ridiculous - no limit on blinds and all the fixins.

Andy, a very competitive player, was the star of the show, of course, and he loved to bluff. Wearing an iPod and shades, he kept his hood over his head to keep his expressions under wraps. Things got tense as players started dropping from the table, but I hung in there and got closer and closer to the top cash prize of 500 bucks. But then along came Maria Sharapova, who I gladly gave my seat to, despite the fact that Andy told her the game was for boys only. Only Andy can get away with that with Maria. ...

Other poker faces seen that night included players Sebastien Grosjean and Xavier Malisse, coaches Paul Annacone and Dean Goldfine and Andy’s trainer Doug Spreen.

By the way, I finished sixth and Andy finished fifth. Let’s just say he was not a happy loser.

My interview with Roger Federer in his suite at the Crown Casino Hotel has been the highlight of the trip so far. There is no cooler and classier person than the great Roger Federer, believe me. He is everyone’s best friend. He shared his motto on living and I think you should know it. I’m getting it tattooed on my back:

"It’s nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice."

Stay tuned next time for more on my interview with Federer.

Doris Loeffel
02-08-2006, 07:31 PM
Thank you for the report!
Is that you and *the bag* in the first pic?
Very nice. :)
luna


Yeap that's me + bag ;)

RogiFan - there was only a local TV present - official Swiss TV wasn't around so I guess you won't get to see the two minutes of it...

tonia9
02-08-2006, 07:34 PM
I'm a little late ;)

Thank you for news Doris :worship:

Your bag is just :yeah: :cool:

PS. I saw it now you had also a t-shirt with pic! You rock Doris!!

peripheral
02-08-2006, 09:51 PM
Thanks for that mirkaland... Roger is such an amazing role model. In this world where niceness is so often considered banal and unimportant, it's incredibly heartwarming to know that a great champion lives his life by that motto. :worship: :worship:

I wish I had TTC :sad:

lunahielo
02-08-2006, 11:56 PM
Originally posted by Doris Loeffel
Yeap that's me + bag
Well, you and your bag are just lovely!

My Federer shirt from Nike came today and it is very cool.
So soft and comfortable.
I love it! :)

RogiFan88
02-09-2006, 02:10 AM
OK, guys, time to vote for ROGI in the ACE mag's hot list:

http://www.acehotlist.co.uk/frames.html

avocadoe
02-09-2006, 02:23 PM
thanks voted!!!

RogiFan88
02-10-2006, 01:24 AM
:) Rogi on the cover of March ACE mag:

http://advantage.lta.org.uk/magazines/acemarchcover06.jpg

SUKTUEN
02-10-2006, 04:58 AM
Thankyou~!

Chiiko
02-10-2006, 11:39 AM
OK, guys, time to vote for ROGI in the ACE mag's hot list:

http://www.acehotlist.co.uk/frames.html

I've voted! :)

Nocko
02-10-2006, 05:16 PM
Me,too. :D

PaulieM
02-10-2006, 05:19 PM
OK, guys, time to vote for ROGI in the ACE mag's hot list:

http://www.acehotlist.co.uk/frames.html
that makes 2 votes for rogi over here. :)

lunahielo
02-10-2006, 06:20 PM
And one more here.......... :)

SUKTUEN
02-11-2006, 04:27 PM
which?

onewoman74
02-12-2006, 09:23 PM
Me too :sobbing:
but i did see that episode of open access while i was at a friend's house :D murphy brought rogi flowers and chocolates :rolls:, Rogi showed him his like 10 pairs of extra tennis shoes assuring murphy that 'they don't smell.' He showed him around his room (i'm pretty sure there was a caption that he declined the presidential suite so he could be on the same floor/room with tony )

When they got to the bedroom area, they showed an unflattering shot imo of Mirka lying on the bed :o Roger said that he watches alot of the night matches on t.v and that mirka gets a little annoyed with him watching t.v in bed. Roger and murphy sat on the couch, and they looked over the draw sheets and rogi tells him that he keeps track of the women's and the mens, of course. Murphy asks him what philosophy he lives his life by and he says 'it's nice to be important but it's more important to be nice' :) and then murphy thanks him and gives him a ratty rock band(metallica i think ) t-shirt as a parting gift as roger had told him earlier than he listened to alot of heavy metal when he was being coached by peter lungren :p

There was more to it, but i forgot :( Check it out if you get the chance, it's always cool to see rogi interact off court :) i'm looking forward to his own episode of 'No Strings', don't know there's been one.

Also, Murphy asked Roger what kind of tunes he has on his Ipod? Roger responded that HE DIDN'T have an Ipod. Murphy was a bit surprised by his answer...so was I.

Mirka looked quite comfortable on that bed...I thought it was kinda cute.

nobama
02-12-2006, 10:45 PM
Also, Murphy asked Roger what kind of tunes he has on his Ipod? Roger responded that HE DIDN'T have an Ipod. Murphy was a bit surprised by his answer...so was I.

Mirka looked quite comfortable on that bed...I thought it was kinda cute.I had to laugh when Roger said the bedroom is good for relaxing. Because he paused before he said it and then smiled. I suppose he was thinking of what to say that wouldn't conjur up certain thoughts. :devil:

Minnie
02-12-2006, 11:30 PM
I guess we all know what can be "relaxing" in a bedroom !! No wonder he smiled! :devil: :devil:

lunahielo
02-12-2006, 11:44 PM
Originally posted by MissMoJo
(i'm pretty sure there was a caption that he declined the presidential suite so he could be on the same floor/room with tony )

I saw it and thought it was a really nice and fun interview.

There was a caption saying "Roger turned down the Delux Suite to have the same room as his coach." (I taped it and am reading it off of the tape.)

Mirka looked very relaxed and comfortable on the bed.

A couple of other things~~for those who are interested.

There was a personal laptop on the desk~~a massage table in the 'living room'~a vase with a single yellow rose on a table by a stuffed chair and 4 pillows on the bed (two on each side)~~~And either the bedspread/duvet was white and thin or the bed was only made up with sheets...

And Roger said the English word "Sword" with the 'w' pronounced. I guess he didn't know it was a silent letter. It was cute.
(He was talking about his different awards.)
As usual, he was quite charming and appeared very relaxed.
luna

bokehlicious
02-13-2006, 01:24 PM
I just read a funny quote from Luczak in the newspaper "Le Matin". He was asking yesterday if Wawrinka's game reminds him of a top player, and he answered yes, Federer... :)

SUKTUEN
02-13-2006, 03:54 PM
I love mirka on the back

onewoman74
02-13-2006, 07:36 PM
I had to laugh when Roger said the bedroom is good for relaxing. Because he paused before he said it and then smiled. I suppose he was thinking of what to say that wouldn't conjur up certain thoughts. :devil:

I'm glad you caught that, cause I busted out laughing...you knew what he wanted to say, but completely refrained from comment. LOL!!!

MissMoJo
02-13-2006, 10:16 PM
I had to laugh when Roger said the bedroom is good for relaxing. Because he paused before he said it and then smiled. I suppose he was thinking of what to say that wouldn't conjur up certain thoughts. :devil:
haha yeah, i remember that part, he seemed a little embaressed and i thought he was gonna give us the honest answer for sec there :p

Federer Seeks To Sweep Roger Slam
http://www.sportsmediainc.net/tennisweek/FEDEREROpen05TRophySMullane.jpg

Photo By Susan Mullane By Tennis Week
02/13/2006

Roger Federer has made a name for himself as the world's premier player and is now seeking to imprint his name on the final line of every major draw. The World No. 1 holds three of the four major title trophies and has now set his sights on sweeping all four Grand Slams in succession to win the "Roger Slam."

"My next goal is to prepare well for the French Open during the weeks lying ahead. I certainly want to play my best tennis during the next tournaments, which will be a good test for the second Grand Slam of this year," Federer said in a post on his official web site Roger Federer.com. "The title in Paris would be the fulfillment of an enormous dream: the Roger Slam, winning all four Grand Slams in series."

Serena Williams is the last player to hold all four major titles simultaneously. Williams completed the "Serena Slam" when she won the 2003 Australian Open.

Earlier this month, Federer announced he would not defend his Rotterdam title at next week's ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament. A year ago, Federer held off Ivan Ljubicic, 5-7, 7-5, 7-6(5) in one of the season's most memorable finals. Rather than return to Rotterdam, Federer plans to practice for defense of his Masters Series titles at Indian Wells (March 10-19th) and Key Biscayne (March 22nd-April 2nd).

"My triumph at the Australian Open, as well as the successful start this year has cost me a lot of energy," Federer said. "Many challenges lie ahead this season and I feel the need to plan everything carefully and listen to my body. I will use the time to prepare for the upcoming Masters Series tournaments as well as the French Open."

Federer is off to a 12-0 start this season. The seven-time Grand Slam champion has won 93 of his last 97 matches.
http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=14740&bannerregion=
As long as he doesn't put too much pressure on himself to his detriment, hope he can make it happen

LCeh
02-13-2006, 10:24 PM
Just got Roger's newsletter in my e-mail inbox today. For those that didn't get it :)

Dear tennis fans

It has been a while since my last update. A lot has happened these past months and that has required my full attention. After my terrific success in Australia I would now like to take some time and reflect on the end of the last season as well as the start of 2006.

My diary

My victory in Cincinnati last summer made for a perfect start into the American hard-court season. After that success I was able to travel to New York with a good feeling and begin my preparation for the US Open.

I had used the break after Wimbledon to recover from my foot-injury and felt pretty good again. My performance in the first rounds of the last Grand Slam of the year certainly confirmed my feeling. To my delight I managed to maintain that level during the entire two weeks and only dropped two sets up until the final. I guess everyone would like a tournament to end with a real highlight, and this time everyone was in for just that!

The question was: would Andre Agassi – the Americans’ favourite – end his brilliant career with a Grand Slam victory in front of his New York audience. The atmosphere in Flushing Meadows was overwhelming and put a lot of pressure on me. I was, after all, challenging the local hero. The match began rather well for me, but then suddenly the tide threatened to turn as Andre played a great second set. In the end I would say I was able to take home the title thanks to my strong focus. It was enormously satisfying to win the US Open after a terrific two weeks and it makes me proud to have taken home the title a second time.
The match against Andre ranks amongst the very best in my personal greatest hits-list. It really, really means a lot to me to have defeated one of the greatest players of all time in such a spectacular encounter.

During my stay in New York I had the honour of opening the NASDAQ Stock Market on August 25th. The ‘Big Apple’ lived up to its reputation as a media metropolis even before the US Open started; I hosted the launch of the new “Men’s Vogue” together with Anna Wintour (editor in chief of the American Vogue) and Anthony Shriver (from the Kennedy family). And as expected I found myself right in the middle of a huge storm created by the media after my victory at the Open – from being a guest on the David Letterman Show all the way to the photo-shoot in front of the Rockefeller Center with my two US Open trophies.

I was thankful to be able to spend some time at home since our Davis Cup Tie against England was played in Geneva. The three days on clay were most positive and it was the first time in five years that we reached a victory this convincingly: 5-0. In my opinion Stanislas Wawrinka’s excellent performance against Andy Murray on the first day of play was the key to success for the entire team. I feel that Stan has made a big step forward with his game and I am convinced that he has the potential to be a top-25 player. He certainly showed that he can do a great job as Switzerland's number one of the team this last weekend against Australia. I would also like to pay Yves Allegro a big compliment; he played a great doubles match.

Straight after the matches in Geneva I was on my way to Asia. Defending the title in Bangkok was next on my schedule. After a long intercontinental flight I practically went right from the runway onto the tennis court. It was a short but most intense week. The matches in Thailand went well and I managed to win my second consecutive title without too much pressure, despite being the top seed.

During a short trip to Shanghai I had the privilege of inaugurating the new Qi Zhong stadium. It was a terrific feeling to be the first player to enter this monumental arena. The architectural concept of this futuristic building – based on the shape of a flower with eight petals – is most fascinating. By the way, eight is a lucky number in China and eight players participate in the Masters Cup! Just take a look at my own birth date and you’ll see that this number is also my personal favourite: 08.08.1981. So there are quite a few indications that this stadium will bring me luck, hopefully.

I then returned to Bangkok for a couple of days of relaxation. Mirka and I enjoyed a varied program, with a cultural part that included visiting famous temples and Buddha-statues. The Thai hospitality makes me feel most comfortable and I adore the Thai cuisine – curries, meat or fish – there is simply an incredible diversity of culinary delights to discover.

Just after returning to Switzerland I was forced to change my plans for the rest of the season. On one of the first days of training I sprained my foot during an exercise I am used to. I felt severe pain and I was not even capable of getting up. At first I was afraid that I had broken something. I was driven to the doctor immediately and was rather relieved to hear that it was only a torn ligament. I started therapy right away. My days consisted of massage, drainage and special exercises. It was awkward to be on crutches and I was most limited in my activities – showering, driving a car – everything became a challenge if not impossible. Mirka was an enormous help to me, supporting me in every way she possibly could.

There was no possible way I could even consider playing tennis now. I was forced to cancel Madrid, my home tournament in Basel, as well as Paris. Only five weeks remained until the Masters Cup in Shanghai. The season finals are one of the most important events of the year. I was therefore profoundly disappointed when the doctor voiced his doubts about my being fit enough for the occasion. I knew that I had to try everything in order to participate in the opening round in Shanghai.
After a little more than three weeks, I was glad to resume my work on the tennis court. Even though I didn’t know until two days before the start of the tournament whether I would be able to play at all, I left for China early. I worked hard with my supporting team - Tony Roche, Pierre Paganini and Pavel Kovac - the entire time we were there. I had been looking forward to the days in Shanghai the whole year, especially since qualifying for the Masters Cup earlier than any player ever before me.

Despite not having had too much time to prepare for the tournament after my injury I performed surprisingly well. I was expecting tough matches since only the best players qualify for the Masters Cup. It, nevertheless, turned out to be a great success and I am happy with the fact that my recovery went that smoothly.
If there is something particular that comes to mind thinking of Shanghai it is most certainly the magnificent atmosphere and the enthusiasm of the Chinese fans. You can feel that the whole country is changing and the tennis-hype is overwhelming. I am already looking forward to returning there. I feel that my chances are pretty good, especially after my victory in Australia and the lucky eights.
One thing still on my mind today are the “Roger, Roger!” cries from the fans during the final against Nalbandian. Thanks to their help I came back from 0-4 down in the last set and almost managed a spectacular turnaround.




After a terrific season Mirka and I treated ourselves to two weeks on the beach. We enjoyed having some time to ourselves and unwinding. We were then off to Switzerland where I worked on my physical conditioning. It is great to be at home and I always try to catch up with as many friends as possible during those periods. I was invited to the Swiss Sports Awards, where I had been nominated, that finished off my stay.

It was at this point that the preparations for 2006 entered the hot phase. I trained with Tony Roche in Sydney for ten days, absorbing two sessions per day. I had to find my rhythm again, since I had not been able to play for a whole month. So we gradually raised the intensity after a gentle start, playing for points towards the end. The conditions were perfect and I felt prepared for the first matches of the season lying ahead.

I was a guest in the sheikdom of Qatar for New Year. We visited horse stables with over 150 animals before the tournament in Doha. These noble stables are home to three of the five most beautiful Arabian horses. Capturing the title at the Qatar Exxon-Mobil Open was definitely the best start into 2006 I could have hoped for.

Tony joined me for the invitational in Kooyong, just outside Melbourne. The most important aspect of this phase was getting used to the conditions in Australia and feeling confident for the upcoming Grand Slam. I was very pleased with my performance, especially because my foot did not cause me any trouble at all.

I tried to practice on the center court, Rod Laver Arena, as much as possible before the beginning of the Australian Open. You have a lot of time to think about the first big event of the year during the long period of preparation, so it’s always rather a relief when the tournament finally starts. The intensity was not too high in the beginning, but constantly rose from round to round. Reaching the final was great – but I had gone to Australia for even more. I wanted to win my second title there. My opponent would be the surprise of the tournament, Marcos Baghdatis. It turned out to be a tough battle, but I noticed that the former rounds had cost Marcos a lot of energy and he was now running low. But I must add that it is not easy to stay focused when you can feel that the other player is not at his best.
I felt a tremendous weight falling off my shoulders after the match-ball.

At first it was just a feeling of relief, I only slowly began to realise what I had achieved. It was a most emotional moment when Rod Laver handed me the trophy. He is an absolute tennis-legend and it had been a great honour for me to get to know him a few days before. - I had won it and here I was, amongst all of these great people and the fans – I did not know what to say and tears just started streaming down my cheeks. I felt incredibly happy and most proud to have won my second title at the Australian Open.

To all you fans out there: I would like to thank you with all my heart for your support. You guys are incredible!

The “Roger Slam”

My next goal is to prepare well for the French Open during the weeks lying ahead. I certainly want to play my best tennis during the next tournaments, which will be a good test for the second Grand Slam of this year. The title in Paris would be the fulfilment of an enormous dream: the “Roger Slam”, winning all four Grand Slams in series.
Davis Cup and Rotterdam

I have cancelled my participation in the first round of the Davis Cup 2006, held this past weekend in Geneva. The Swiss Team showed a solid performance in Geneva and I am sure that there are many successful moments still to come. The 2-3 result against Australia certainly deserves my full respect.
My triumph at the Australian Open, as well as the successful start this year has cost me a lot of energy. Many challenges lie ahead this season and I feel the need to plan everything carefully and listen to my body. I will use the time to prepare for the upcoming Masters-Series tournaments as well as the French Open.
I have also withdrawn from the ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament in Rotterdam (20.–26, February 2006) for these reasons.

I am looking forward to the next challenges and hopefully I can bring you pleasure with a lot more good tennis.


Take care, bis bald, à bientôt

Yours sincerely,
Roger

MisterQ
02-13-2006, 11:56 PM
Thanks for sharing that, LCeh. :)

His words about Andre are so generous. :cool:

Doris Loeffel
02-14-2006, 12:23 AM
Thanks for posting looking forward to find it in my in box...

nobama
02-14-2006, 01:03 AM
I'm glad you caught that, cause I busted out laughing...you knew what he wanted to say, but completely refrained from comment. LOL!!!Actually I think he caught himself off guard. I don't think it was something he planned on saying, but once you say "the bedroom is good for..." you've got to say something. I almost wish he would've winked at Murphy and said something like "you know what" with a big grin. But of course we know that certain something can be relaxing too. :devil:

Daniel
02-14-2006, 01:38 AM
Thanks Lchech :)

nobama
02-14-2006, 03:01 AM
I like the new header for the newsletter. And I like that there's pictures and color. It looks like a real newsletter now.

http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a377/jsnash/rf_header.jpg

bokehlicious
02-14-2006, 05:56 AM
Thanks for sharing LCeh :worship: ;)

SUKTUEN
02-14-2006, 03:24 PM
Thanks Lceh ~~I also Got roger's Fan Mail~!!!!

I Love it~~~~~~~~~ :kiss: :kiss: :kiss:

PaulieM
02-15-2006, 01:10 PM
not news but a little blurb from si's olympic blog:
Heidi's husband, Seal, by the way, may be the biggest Roger Federer fan on earth. Later this month you'll learn all about his passion for tennis in an SI.com Q&A.
roger has all kinds of interesting fans, although i'm pretty sure anyone on here could rival seal for the title biggest fan on earth. :p

SUKTUEN
02-15-2006, 01:36 PM
THANKS report paulie

RonE
02-15-2006, 03:26 PM
not news but a little blurb from si's olympic blog:

roger has all kinds of interesting fans, although i'm pretty sure anyone on here could rival seal for the title biggest fan on earth. :p

:lol:

You gotta love Seal :worship:

I wonder if he will write another song as the official song of the ATP as he did a few years back.

nobama
02-16-2006, 11:46 AM
Here's some cool video of Roger after AO. Nice to see that he's so chipper at 2.20 in the morning!

http://media.seven.net.au/asxgen/video/0601/t1138608528_a0130_1800_7as_tennis_h.wmv.asx

peripheral
02-16-2006, 02:26 PM
Awwww mirkaland, what a great little video... thank you!!!
"Who wants a handshake?" :lol:

nobama
02-16-2006, 02:58 PM
Awwww mirkaland, what a great little video... thank you!!!
"Who wants a handshake?" :lol:Yeah I laughed at that too. I don't know if I'd be that friendly at 2am unless I was totally buzzed. And I'm guessing Roger didn't have much alcohol (if any) in his system at that time. When did he have a chance to celebrate? :lol:

SUKTUEN
02-16-2006, 03:03 PM
thanks the link

casillas_girl
02-16-2006, 03:03 PM
Why was Marcos mad about the journalists? It's part of his job, he needs to live with it.

SUKTUEN
02-16-2006, 03:06 PM
Roger looks good

peripheral
02-16-2006, 03:44 PM
Yeah I laughed at that too. I don't know if I'd be that friendly at 2am unless I was totally buzzed. And I'm guessing Roger didn't have much alcohol (if any) in his system at that time. When did he have a chance to celebrate? :lol:

:lol: I think he was just high on relief and happiness!! He did have a lot of soda sloshing around in him though-- I remember reading that he asked for a Coke and a Sprite during the interviews. Sugar high maybe? :lol:

SUKTUEN
02-16-2006, 04:07 PM
Sugar Roger?

Doris Loeffel
02-16-2006, 06:44 PM
Thanks for that link mirkaland - oh I would accept any handshake with Roger ;)

Dirk
02-16-2006, 07:06 PM
:lol:

You gotta love Seal :worship:

I wonder if he will write another song as the official song of the ATP as he did a few years back.

Yes, which reminds me. I have a Mission to write. I got my PC working again so I will start tonight. Shame Seal couldn't have gotten to Heidi before her last asshole bf did. :fiery:

RonE
02-16-2006, 07:16 PM
Great video thanks :D

And :eek: at that Greek fan who threw the chair at the tv screen :tape:

lunahielo
02-16-2006, 10:33 PM
Thanks for the video~~ :)

RogiFan88
02-17-2006, 08:57 PM
I miss ROGI... :sad:

tonia9
02-17-2006, 09:14 PM
I miss ROGI... :sad:

We have to be patient. Don't be sad :hug: :hug:

nobama
02-17-2006, 09:30 PM
I miss ROGI... :sad:But you've got wonderboy Nadal back...

SUKTUEN
02-18-2006, 09:06 AM
I miss ROGI... :sad:
Me too :sad:

RonE
02-18-2006, 09:33 AM
But you've got wonderboy Nadal back...

http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0021.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0020.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0006.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0005.gif

nobama
02-18-2006, 11:55 AM
http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0021.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0020.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0006.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0005.gifVery funny. :lol: But seriously based on some of the posts in GM you'd think he just climbed mount everest. :lol:

Dirk
02-18-2006, 11:56 AM
Piggy will get his soon enough. Roger will kill him at Dubai if he must.

SUKTUEN
02-18-2006, 01:16 PM
http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0021.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0020.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0006.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0005.gif

:eek: :eek: :eek:

avocadoe
02-18-2006, 02:03 PM
I miss Roger, too, its not even half the fun when he isn't playing...maybe I'll try the video, though my pokey dial-up doesn't like anything fancy...hopefully I'll have my high speed installed by the time Roger returns!!!

ExpectedWinner
02-18-2006, 03:27 PM
Who wants to play a tournament, when there's Winter Olympic Games on TV. :p

RogiFan88
02-18-2006, 07:49 PM
At least Rogi can watch and cheer on his Swiss compatriots, who are doing not so badly! ;)

RogiFan88
02-18-2006, 07:51 PM
SuperNadal is what the Spanish press calls Rafa.

lunahielo
02-18-2006, 10:56 PM
Most everyone reads this thread~~so I'll post this here, in case you didn't catch it in GM. :)

http://starsforstarsmiami.com/fanvoting/

Go Rogi!

WF4EVER
02-18-2006, 11:59 PM
http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0021.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0020.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0006.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0005.gif

I didn't expect this from you, RonE. I think I've lost some respect for you. But I feel the same way; didn't miss him, couldn't wait for him to lose, can't stand him. I think I just lost some respect for myself too, admitting that.

I miss Rogi baaaad. But as long as he's getting prepared to play more tennis and hopefully more successful tennis, I'll wait. Wish I could say the same about Venus Williams who, tho my fave female player ever, is becoming a bigger disappointment by the day.

Can't wait for Rogi to come back. And hopefully Marat, too. That's enough for me.

SUKTUEN
02-19-2006, 12:23 PM
I miis roger too, but I know he need a rest.

MisterQ
02-19-2006, 04:10 PM
http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0021.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0020.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0006.gif http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/sick/sick0005.gif

Is that the Sampras, Murray, Roddick, Reid, and Blake highlight reel?

RonE
02-19-2006, 06:04 PM
I didn't expect this from you, RonE. I think I've lost some respect for you. But I feel the same way; didn't miss him, couldn't wait for him to lose, can't stand him. I think I just lost some respect for myself too, admitting that.

No one is perfect. It would be a pretty boring world if we were ;)


I miss Rogi baaaad. But as long as he's getting prepared to play more tennis and hopefully more successful tennis, I'll wait. Wish I could say the same about Venus Williams who, tho my fave female player ever, is becoming a bigger disappointment by the day.

Can't wait for Rogi to come back. And hopefully Marat, too. That's enough for me.

As long as this break will help him and get him better prepared for the long road ahead I am more than willing to wait. I don't want him burning out after winning tournament after tournament which is what happened this time last year. He arrived in Monte Carlo exhausted and withdrew from Rome. I want to see him play all 3 clay Masters this year.

Is that the Sampras, Murray, Roddick, Reid, and Blake highlight reel?

:rolls: :worship:

RogiFan88
02-19-2006, 09:28 PM
The Sunday Times February 19, 2006
Tennis: In with a shout
BARRY FLATMAN

Rafael Nadal enjoyed watching his rival on TV, but there can be no room for sentiment when battle resumes

In common with most teenagers, solitude is not something that Rafael Nadal normally craves. Fortunately for him, the gregarious young Spaniard is so constantly in demand that he rarely finds himself alone. Yet sitting in front of a television in his Majorcan home on Sunday morning three weeks ago, more than 11,000 miles distant and prevented by a nagging foot injury from even having a chance of competing in the climax of the year’s first Grand Slam tournament, the world’s second-best tennis player was grateful the rest of his family were occupied on other matters.

On the screen, his greatest rival, Roger Federer, was struggling to control his emotions as he accepted the Australian Open trophy from Rod Laver. As Federer found himself unable to withstand the joy and relief of winning a seventh Grand Slam title and the floodgates burst open, Nadal realised that tears were also cascading down his cheeks.

In retrospect, he admits to surprise, and the confession is tinged with embarrassment. Nevertheless, Nadal insists he cried not out of self-pity at being denied the opportunity of adding to the French Open title he won last June, more out of empathy for a player he reveres yet knows how to beat.

Nowadays confident enough to answer questions in English, he revealed: “I didn’t watch many matches at the Australian Open because I wanted to be there, but I had to watch the final because it’s my job. In the end I was glad I was on my own because it does not look good to see a grown man crying while watching TV. It seems like a girl, but I just got involved in the whole emotion and understood it all.

“It wasn’t my sadness at not being able to play that made me cry. I knew what Federer was thinking and appreciated how much pressure he put upon himself to win. The tears were not something I was expecting, but they just happened. When I am on court against him I cannot allow myself to be concerned with the way he is feeling, but because I admire him so much as both a player and a person, I got very emotional. Maybe it was strange.”

The absence of Nadal from last year’s season-concluding Masters Cup in Shanghai and the Australian Open denied tennis another meeting between the two players who look set to dominate the second half of this decade. “We need Rafa back on court soon because he is the one guy that forces Federer all the way,” says Henri Leconte, the Frenchman whose devil-may-care attitude masks a deep concern for the future of the sport. “Whenever they walk out to play, you get the feeling Federer is more concerned about what Nadal might do than Nadal is worried about Federer.”

Pat Cash, the former Wimbledon champion, agrees: “You look at most of the guys who are set up as Federer’s rivals and they are not rivals at all, because they cannot beat him. Andy Roddick and Lleyton Hewitt struggle to remember their last win, and although David Nalbandian came out on top in Shanghai, he would not have been so fortunate if Federer had been fully fit. Nadal is different. He manages to get under Federer’s skin and produce nagging doubts deep inside his brain. ”

Nadal has been more than content with his comeback in the Open 13 in Marseilles, despite losing to Arnaud Clement 2-6 6-3 7-5 in yesterday’s semi-final, and intends to step up his game this week when he is top seed for Rotterdam’s ABN-Amro World Tennis Tournament. Federer has opted not to defend the title he won last year, planning to head for Dubai before crossing the Atlantic for the first two Masters Series events in Indian Wells and Miami.

Not unhappy at the news, Nadal believes a first confrontation of the year between the pair would be premature so early in his comeback. “If I arrive for the Masters Series tournaments with my fitness and game somewhere near 85%, I will be happy and hope I get the time and matches in those tournaments so I can be be ready,” he said after an early winter spent at home trying to find an answer to the foot problem that struck as he collected his 11th and final title of the year in Madrid. Two days before Christmas the concerns were finally alleviated by special orthotic inner soles after Nadal made a visit to Nike’s headquarters in Oregon.

“What I saw in Australia was Federer having his most difficult Grand Slam. He didn’t play his best and he was more nervous than usual because every Grand Slam sees him put more pressure on himself to win. Look at the match with (Tommy) Haas that went to five sets: there were some really difficult moments. And he wasn’t at his best against (Nikolay) Davydenko or (Nicolas) Kiefer. That is why he got so emotional at the end, because he still managed to win.”

If Nadal is correct in his assessment, the pressure Federer will exert on himself at the French Open will be immense. Not only will he be looking to win the one major title that has eluded him, he will try to become the first man since Laver to hold all four Grand Slam titles concurrently.

Nadal baulks at such speculation. He is more concerned with getting his game back to the required standard to test the master. Absolute confidence in fitness and mobility is paramount when facing a player whom many presume to be the most complete of all time, and he does not gauge himself as close to the level of confidence and conditioning that saw him win last year’s French Open semi-final in four sets and force Federer to admit he had lost to a better-equipped player on the day.

After a victorious procession that took him to the titles in Brazil and Mexico before returning to Europe to triumph in Monte Carlo, Barcelona and Rome, the Parisian clay was clearly a footing more suited to Nadal than his opponent. A run of 36 consecutive clay-court victories was the most successful on the surface since Thomas Muster’s gargantuan season 10 years earlier, but to accuse Nadal of simply being a specialist on the crumbly dirt would be inexcusable.

North American cement has also become increasingly more conducive to the young champion. Federer still shudders at the memory of a straight-sets defeat to 17-year-old Nadal on a balmy Florida night in March 2004. The Swiss concedes he should also have lost the Miami final a year later after he trailed by two sets.

“That match is hard for me to remember because I know I should have won, but I kept thinking, ‘This is my first Masters Series final’,” admitted Nadal, who plans to extend his grass-court experience after signing a two-year deal to compete in the Stella Artois championships at Queen’s Club in London. “But it wasn’t the fact I was playing Federer that made me nervous, because I had beaten him there a year before and that really convinced me I could play at the top level.

“I don’t know what other players think when they go out to play him, but though I think he is the greatest player, I have never allowed myself to think he is unbeatable. This is something I cannot allow. I have never allowed myself to have any tennis idols. Every time I go on court I am determined to give 100%. The more pressure there is from the opponent, the harder I try. When I play a difficult match my ability seems to go up, and there is no greater test than playing Federer. That, I believe, is why I play so well against him.”

In Federer’s absence, the main threat to Nadal in Rotterdam this week would appear to come from last year’s runner- up, Ivan Ljubicic, and second-seeded Davydenko. Tim Henman and Greg Rusedski will be hoping the traditionally fast Ahoy stadium court works in their favour. Sadly, Marat Safin’s hopes of making a long overdue return to action after knee surgery last summer were dashed on Friday.

Nadal is only too aware of the anguish of prolonged recovery. He admits many a tear was shed as repeated efforts to step up his practice regime in late November and December had to be abandoned when the pain in his foot made it impossible to unleash even the most straightforward of forehands. Not even the delight of passing his driving test or having more time to indulge his devotion to Real Madrid could assuage the inner torment of self-doubt.

But they are tears he can now happily forget. The emotion he shared from opposing sides of the world with Federer will stay in his mind until the pair walk out on court together to continue their rivalry. But that, according to the young man from Majorca, is the moment compassion will cease.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2094-2047141,00.html

nobama
02-20-2006, 01:11 AM
I just got Roger's Aussie interview on the TTC on tape. He's so cute in the interview. In the beginning when he opens the hotel room door and Murphy is standing there with flowers and chocolate, Roger laughs and says sth like 'oh no, don't give me flowers' like he's a bit creeped out by a guy giving him flowers. Then Murphy says 'they're for the room'. :lol: At the very end of the interview Murphy gives him an AC/DC t-shirt and says 'I never lost in this shirt' and Roger looks at him kind of surprised and says 'You used to play in this shirt?', and then of course gets the joke when Murphy says 'I never won in it either'. :lol: There were a couple shots of Mirka. The camera panned over to her when Roger said she sometimes gets upset because he watches too much tennis on TV. The shot was not so flattering - she's lying on the bed on her stomach reading or sth and you can actually see a dip in the mattress. :tape: Overall though it was a good little interview and you can understand why people like interviewing him. He came across like such a cool guy that would just hang with you and chat all day.

peripheral
02-20-2006, 02:18 AM
Awww that's awesome mirkaland... how long is the interview?

nobama
02-20-2006, 11:22 AM
Awww that's awesome mirkaland... how long is the interview?Not very long at all 5-7 mins maybe.

SUKTUEN
02-20-2006, 03:16 PM
thanks

casillas_girl
02-20-2006, 03:41 PM
Great article! :yeah:
Rafa is so sweet! :hug:

Daniel
02-21-2006, 12:56 AM
Thanks for the article . :)

SUKTUEN
02-21-2006, 02:07 PM
thanks again

nobama
02-21-2006, 05:47 PM
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=87633

AP Wire Feed 2/23/06: In what some view as a desperate move, Andy Roddick, the top ranked U.S. players fired his new coach, his brother. Instead he lured away Miroslava Varvinka, who was the effective business manager of world #1, Roger Federer. Roddck: "Mirka has avery stabilizing and empwering presence and will help to rejuvinate me." Federer issued no comment, but was seen munching on some ATP players before a practice. "I'll even give Andy some Wilson N-Codes, if he thinks that will help," a playful Roger commented to a Basel reporter.

In other tennis news, the entire ATP tour except for Federer, Murray, Henman and Davydenko were banned for two years for postive substance tests. This assures a semi final appearance for Henman and Murray at the '06 Wimbledon Slam.

:D

SUKTUEN
02-22-2006, 04:04 AM
thanks

lunahielo
02-22-2006, 10:30 AM
mirkaland !!!

:lol: :lol:

nobama
02-22-2006, 11:46 AM
Yeah, did you notice the name "Varvinka"? :lol:

SUKTUEN
02-22-2006, 02:45 PM
Yeah, did you notice the name "Varvinka"? :lol:
:confused: :confused:

Sjengster
02-22-2006, 02:58 PM
Yeah, did you notice the name "Varvinka"? :lol:

Somebody thinks Stan the Man isn't so manly after all. ;)

RogiFan88
02-22-2006, 03:40 PM
:) Hmmm... interesting...

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=3112488&postcount=562

MissMoJo
02-22-2006, 03:49 PM
uhmm...nice sig sjengster :lol: that's almost up there with one of them asking baghdatis if he was getting any sex that night :rolleyes:

MissMoJo
02-22-2006, 03:53 PM
:) Hmmm... interesting...

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=3112488&postcount=562
Not really. More like ewww.....bullshit... :)

ExpectedWinner
02-22-2006, 06:18 PM
:) Hmmm... interesting...

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=3112488&postcount=562

:smash: Listen, I don't want to play a policeman here, but I hate wasting my time. When I click on the link, I expect to read an atricle about Federer. Instead I get the bs post (which has nothing to do with Fed) written by a person who graces the GM forum with a quazillion garbage messages per day. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

nobama
02-22-2006, 06:20 PM
:) Hmmm... interesting...

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=3112488&postcount=562Exactly what does this have to do with Roger? :scratch: If I really cared why Nadal pulled out of Rotterdam I'd go to his player forum to find out.

RogiFan88
02-22-2006, 07:27 PM
Just keeping you up-to-date w the bs. ;)

ExpectedWinner
02-22-2006, 09:15 PM
Just keeping you up-to-date w the bs. ;)

Fine, next time give me a warning- * this post may not be suitable for EW* ;)

RogiFan88
02-23-2006, 01:32 AM
Fine, next time give me a warning- * this post may not be suitable for EW* ;)

You got it... :lol:

SUKTUEN
02-23-2006, 02:13 AM
baghdatis is Sexy ????? :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

nobama
02-23-2006, 03:02 AM
Does anyone know, has Roger been nominated for Laureus award? The article below from sfdrs.ch suggests so, but I don't see it anywhere else. Last year news of his nomination didn't come out until March. This article says for the first time in Laureus history three Swiss (inc Roger) were nominated. I'm not sure if that means they were nominated for the actual award or just in contention to be nominated. :confused:

Auch Badmann und Thürig an Weltsportler-Wahl LAUREUS - Erstmals in der Geschichte der Laureus World Sports Awards sind drei Schweizer Ausnahmekönner für die Wahl des Weltsportlers des Jahres nominiert worden. Neben Roger Federer wurde die Ehre auch Natascha Badmann und Karin Thürig zuteil. Die seit 1999 durchgeführte Wahl findet heuer vom 20. bis 22. Mai in Barcelona statt. Thürig verteidigte im letzten Jahr als Radsportlerin ihren WM-Titel im Zeitfahren erfolgreich. Natascha Badmann wiederum zog in der Ironman-Triathlon-WM auf Hawaii mit dem sechsten Triumph mit den männlichen Rekordsiegern Mark Allen und Dave Scott gleich. Als Vorjahrssieger Roger Federer könnte in Barcelona auf die gleiche Stufe mit Tiger Woods und Michael Schumacher gelangen. Die beiden Superstars gewannen den Sport-Oscar schon zweimal. In der Schweiz waren 2005 weder Federer noch Badmann oder Thürig zum Sportler des Jahres gewählt worden.

Puschkin
02-23-2006, 05:45 AM
This article says for the first time in Laureus history three Swiss (inc Roger) were nominated. I'm not sure if that means they were nominated for the actual award or just in contention to be nominated. :confused:
It says they HAVE been nominated, but you never know with papers ;).

^Sue^
02-23-2006, 05:49 AM
baghdatis is Sexy ????? :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
wHAT is Mean By THAT??? :confused: :eek:

^Sue^
02-23-2006, 05:55 AM
You mean Roger has been nominated for the awards???

nobama
02-23-2006, 11:51 AM
It says they HAVE been nominated, but you never know with papers ;).You don't. And I've also seen press releases from sports agencies that at first glance look like someone has been nominated but then when you read through it it's just saying they're a favorite to be nominated. I saw this with Hingis and Nadal. Personally I'm not so sure Hingis should get a nomination. This years award covers the period Feb 05 to Jan 06, so basically she'd be nominated for what she did in one month.

Gulliver
02-23-2006, 02:27 PM
Even so, I'm sure Roger's done enough to be nominated when the time comes.

SUKTUEN
02-23-2006, 02:36 PM
:rolleyes: because I don't think Bag is sexy~~~

nobama
02-24-2006, 11:36 AM
http://www.thedesertsun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060224/EVENTS07/602240320/1050
Frank Sinatra Invitational tees off
Golf tournament, surrounding events give children’s center a boost

Bruce Fessier
The Desert Sun
February 24, 2006

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The 18th annual Frank Sinatra Countrywide Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament officially tees off today, after the pairings party scheduled Thursday.
But the 20th anniversary of its beneficiary, the Barbara Sinatra Children's Center in Rancho Mirage, actually kicked off in January with a luncheon featuring former Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda at the Lodge at Rancho Mirage.

The Sinatra Invitational is just giving this celebration a boot.

Here are some activities and fun facts to serve as a guide:

It's an Italian thing

This year's theme, for the third straight year, is Italian - possibly because of all the Italian-Americans behind the event.
Barbara Sinatra's tournament co-host is actor Tony Lo Bianco. The gala chair is Lynn Mallotto. The chairman and CEO of the title sponsor, Countrywide Financial Corporation, is Angelo Mozilo. The special event liaison for Brown Forman, parent company of Jack Daniels (sponsoring the event for the 18th year), is Angelo Lucchesi. The tournament director for all these years has been Ken Rizzotto.

The tournament namesake's Sicilian background also might have something to do with it.

Barbara Sinatra is satisfying these Italians with all Italian lunch and dinner menus from the chef of Sirocco at the Renaissance Esmeralda Resort.

His name: Livio Massignani.


Wise guy

Tournament co-host Lo Bianco has made a career of playing cops and gangsters.
He was Detective Marinello in "Lucky Day" and Captain Tanzini in "Endangered Species" in 2002. He played Mafia bosses Frankie Carbo in "Rocky Marciano" in 1999 and Johnny Roselli in "Nixon" in 1995.

You may remember Roselli. He hung out at the Palm Springs Racquet Club before being found in a barrel in the Caribbean in 1976.

Put in a bid

You don't have to pay big bucks to participate in today's silent auction at the Renaissance Esmeralda Resort. Just put in your bids from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Items for sale include two Barbara Sinatra gowns, paintings including two Red Skelton clown portraits, jewelry including a $6,600 DeLuca white diamond ring, Pat Boone shoes, Roger Federer tennis shoes, dinners, golf and vacations.

The Friday night live auction for guests of the weekend galas will offer more expensive items.

Doris Loeffel
02-24-2006, 12:03 PM
You don't. And I've also seen press releases from sports agencies that at first glance look like someone has been nominated but then when you read through it it's just saying they're a favorite to be nominated. I saw this with Hingis and Nadal. Personally I'm not so sure Hingis should get a nomination. This years award covers the period Feb 05 to Jan 06, so basically she'd be nominated for what she did in one month.

Due to the winter olympics the comitée has prolongued the qualifying period till after the olympic games are finished so that would make two month for Martina ;)

nobama
02-24-2006, 05:37 PM
Due to the winter olympics the comitée has prolongued the qualifying period till after the olympic games are finished so that would make two month for Martina ;)Well she hasn't done as much in Februray so I don't think the extra month will matter. Roger should get it again, but I don't know if his status is yet to the level where he can win an award like that two years in a row. The committee might think they need to give it to someone else this year. Although Tiger Woods has won it two years in a row.

SUKTUEN
02-25-2006, 03:49 PM
Roger is busy

Daniel
02-25-2006, 05:07 PM
Well she hasn't done as much in Februray so I don't think the extra month will matter. Roger should get it again, but I don't know if his status is yet to the level where he can win an award like that two years in a row. The committee might think they need to give it to someone else this year. Although Tiger Woods has won it two years in a row.


By the start of Feb MArtina Hingis reached the final of a Tier I. then QF in Dubai and possible a title in Doha. why isnt that much? :p

lucashg
02-25-2006, 05:12 PM
By the start of Feb MArtina Hingis reached the final of a Tier I. then QF in Dubai and possible a title in Doha. why isnt that much? :p

If it only counts until the Winter Olympic Games are finished, then her result in Doha won't matter and still I think Mauresmo will win the title there. :p

I don't even know what you guys are talking about, though. Is the Laureaus Award? Or Fan Favorite ATP/WTA? :confused:

SUKTUEN
02-26-2006, 02:50 PM
miss Roger's matches

Daniel
02-26-2006, 08:26 PM
Fed-Ex matches Pistol Pete

rediff Sports Bureau | February 25, 2006 16:54 IST


Ever since Roger Federer beat Pete Sampras in the fourth round at Wimbledon in 2001, he has been hailed as Sampras' successor on grass.

Five years since, Federer is threatening to topple Sampras as the best modern-day player, ever.

The American, when at his peak, looked like a one-in-a-lifetime player. But it took only 10 years before Federer was born.

Australian legend Rod Laver, the only player to win all four Grand Slams the same year twice, thinks Federer can win a Grand Slam of titles.

Andre Agassi, after the 2005 US Open final, proclaimed that the Swiss was the best he had ever played against.

At 24, Federer has seven Grand Slam titles. Sampras retired with the most men's singles Slams in history --14.

ATP released statistics that show their amazingly similar career paths, separated by exactly 10 years.

Birthdate Sampras: August 12, 1971
Birthdate Federer: August 8, 1981

Winning % Sampras: 0.773 (437-128)
Winning % Federer: 0.765 (391-120)

Titles Sampras: 36
Titles Federer: 33

Year Sampras' Reign began: at the 1993 Wimbledon contest(it was his 5th Wimbledon competition and the 17th major he had entered)
Year Federer's Reign began: at the 2003 Wimbledon contest (it was his 5th Wimbledon and the 17th major he had entered)

Sampras' peak period: Won 6 out of 10 majors 1993 Wimbledon to 1995 US Open
Federer's peak period: Won 6 out of 10 majors 2003 Wimbledon to 2005 US Open

Sampras' Grand Slam record: 1 Australian Open, 3 Wimbledon titles, 2 US Open titles
Federer's Grand Slam record: 1 Australian Open, 3 Wimbledon titles, 2 US Open titles

Wimbledon Sampras: 1993-1995
Wimbledon Federer: 2003-2005

Major stumble Sampras: Roland Garros, 3 quarterfinals
Major stumble Federer: Roland Garros, semifinal, quarterfinal, 4th round

Masters Cup Sampras: 1991, 1994
Masters Cup Federer: 2003, 2004

Sampras at No. 1 slot: 109 weeks
Federer at No. 1 slot: 100 weeks

The list does not include Federer's 2006 Australian Open victory. The period up until January 1996 is considered for Sampras and the one up until January 2006 for Federer

Daniel
02-26-2006, 08:31 PM
Federer Pockets Half Mil, Headlines at ATP Dubai

By Richard Vach, Tennis-X.com Senior Writer

No. 1 seed Roger Federer received more than an estimated half a million dollars just to show up for The Dubai Tennis Championships this coming week, approximately three times what he would earn for winning the event, and Dubai organizers see the Swiss as worth every penny of the appearance guarantee.

Organizers of Middle East events can afford to buy the best in professional tennis, as they're showing with their current effort to move the men's and women's Indian Wells event from the U.S. to the desert. Landing the Swiss this week, who is on the fast track to becoming the greatest player ever with what is seemingly a large guarantee sum, is nary a drop in the bucket for the oil-rich organizers.

Last week Dubai hosted a WTA event that, though not even a lauded "Tier I" stop, nevertheless offered $1 million in prize money. This paled in comparison to the under-the-table guarantees to attract five former No. 1s among the star-studded field in winner Justine Henin-Hardenne, runner-up Maria Sharapova, semifinalist Lindsay Davenport, and quarterfinalists Amelie Mauresmo and Martina Hingis.

Both Dubai and Doha businessmen aren't shy about -- when they're not busy building ski resorts inside malls or carting in sand to build giant man-made resort islands in the shape of palm trees, or even setting up ultra-modern sea-side hotels with makeshift tennis courts high above the city on helipads -- throwing wads of cash at players without hesitation.






"It is money well spent and a perfect return on investment for Dubai," Dubai Tournament Director Salah Tahlak told Gulf News last week. "Players like Agassi, Navratilova and Sharapova have this appeal. Therefore, we don't have problems paying them appearance money. The Top 10 players normally do (receive money). The payment is more like a Persian carpet, each one has a different pricing."

Setting up the helipad appearance with Federer and Agassi with the ATP's help last year set them back a measly $10 million, but as an investment in public relations turned out to be a shrewd investment.

"That stunt was valued at $9.5 million, while the marketing and public relations returns for the entire event was pinned at $24.5 million," Tahlak said. "This is sound return on the investments."

Federer will likely be another sound return for Dubai this week, with the Swiss at the top of his game seeking a fourth consecutive Dubai title, and looking to extend his Open Era-record 52-match winning streak on hardcourts.

Federer has made two appearances thus far in 2006, winning at Doha and then the Australian Open, then pulling out of a pair of events and the first round of the Davis Cup to rest, he said, for the back-to-back Masters Series events in Indian Wells and Miami.

Agassi is also also eager to tap the Dubai guarantee flow, and speak of his past experiences in the playland for the super-wealthy.

"Dubai is something I would look forward to sharing with my wife and family," Agassi said. "It's an incredible place to see and to visit for so many reasons. To see what they've built here is really a reflection of a lot of vision, a lot of passion, not to mention the cultures that live peacefully together. It's the way the world is meant to be."

Federer and Agassi's weren't the only bank accounts receiving oil injections this week as the Dubai field also contains world No. 2 Rafal Nadal, Top 10 lesser personalities Nikolay Davydenko and David Ferrer, and features the 2006 debut of Marat Safin who returns from a knee injury.

Other seeds in Dubai are Dominik "The Dominator" Hrbaty, and Czechs Radek Stepanek and Tomas Berdych.

Opening-round encounters of interest are (1) Federer vs. Swiss Davis Cup team member Stan Wawrinka, (2) Nadal vs. the hot-and-cold Frenchman Paul-Henri Mathieu who has played him tightly in the past, (8) Berdych vs. the hot-handed Belgian Christophe "The Roach" Rochus, (3) Davydenko vs. Safin in an all-Russian, (6) The Dominator vs. always-tough Russian Mikhail Youzhny, (5) Ferrer vs. former Top 10er Rainer Schuettler, and (4) Agassi vs. the big-serving "Grinning" Greg Rusedski.

Agassi is a big question mark coming into the event, in his appearance two weeks ago pulling from San Jose due to his chronic back problem before even hitting a ball in the first round. Look for Safin's 2006 debut to be an extremely short one, save for any choking from Davydenko, who should otherwise in short order show Safin why he is the No. 1-ranked Russian these days.

If Federer bypasses Wawrinka he will then face a snoozer against one of two Middle Eastern wildcards matching up in the first round, then a potentially interesting meeting with the No. 8 seed Berdych who beat him at the 2004 Olympics.

Tim Henman took a last-minute wildcard and faces Spaniard Feliciano "F-Lo" Lopez. If successful Henman, who on Monday steps down as the No. 1-ranked Brit in favor of Andy Murray who is competing at The Tennis Channel Open in Las Vegas, could face No. 7 Berdych in the second round and No. 2 Nadal in the quarterfinals.

Last year Federer faced stiff resistance in the final from hot-burning Ivan Ljubicic, eventually dousing the Croatian's flame 6-1, 6-7(6), 6-3.

Richard Vach is a senior writer for Tennis-X.com and can currently be seen on The Tennis Channel's "Tennis Insiders: Super Insiders" episodes.

Daniel
02-26-2006, 08:37 PM
Federer: King of Dubai

Hemant Buch
Sunday, February 26, 2006 21:33 IST



The city has been a happy hunting ground for Roger Federer. The 24-year-old world No. 1 has not lost a match in the Emirates since 2002.

Roger Federer returns to Dubai fresh off a four-week break from the game, hoping to extend his grasp over the world number one crown. Having won the Australian Open earlier in the year, few would bet against the Swiss maestro extending his fine run in the Dubai Open, which he’s won thrice on the trot.

For his rivals, the prospect of taking on a fully fit and well-rested Federer is frightening. “He’s an unbelievable player. He is definitely the best player in the world at the moment and one of the greatest of all time. In fact, he’s streets ahead of the rest of us,’’ confesses his nearest challenger, Spaniard Rafael Nadal, who is also playing in Dubai.

Federer too hopes that the month spent lazing his hometown of Oberwil in the Swiss Alps will pay off.

“I am not sure how things will turn out. It’s nice to have some time off to rest and prepare yourself for the long season ahead. I hope it helps my game because I have a lot to look forward to. I have had fantastic results in Dubai and on hard courts generally. So I’m looking forward to getting on court again,’’ he says.

Dubai has been a happy hunting ground for King Roger. After falling in the first round to Rainer Schuettler in his opening foray to the Emirates in 2002, the 24-year-old has never lost a match at the Aviation Club.

Having begun the season well, he is keen to keep that winning streak alive. But even he knows that it’s impossible to win every time, no matter how good you are. It doesn’t help that he is the man to beat everywhere he goes and his scalp is prized above any other on the tour. It’s a high-pressure environment.

“Of course there is pressure. But I am pretty used to it by now,’’ he says in his typically understated way.

Obviously, having been number one in the world for 109 consecutive weeks, he has had plenty of experience in dealing with people’s expectations. But the fact that he’s won 11 titles in each of his last two seasons bears testimony to how well he has managed to deal with pressure.

Already labelled as one of the greatest players ever to play the game, by no less than the great Rod Laver, Federer has compiled an awesome record over the years. In fact, last year he lost on four matches out of the 85 that he played. An awesome record and one achieved without the help of a full-time coach.

In fact, after parting with Peter Lundgren a couple of seasons back, he has found no need to engage a travelling coach, preferring instead to interact with Australian Tony Roche on a part-time basis. “He is a great man. He has immense experience, both as player and as coach and he shares that with me,’’ says Federer. “Our relationship is not about him teaching me how to serve or how to volley. He works a bit on my technique, but our interactions are very wide-ranging, very intense. I enjoy being around him and learning from him.’’

With seven Grand Slams to his name already, Federer knows he is in the process of creating a legacy. His goals are crystal clear in his own mind. “I want to protect my number one ranking and also keep winning Wimbledon. To me that’s the biggest tournament in the world,’’ he says, “but I have made no secret of the fact that it’s the French I really want to win. It’s the only Slam I’ve missed out on. There are a lot of things to achieve out there for me.’’

Great Indian Challenge

Leander Paes and Mahesh Bhupathi, champions here in 1998, are back in Dubai albeit with different partners. Leander teams up with Czech Martin Damm — who won the doubles crown here last year alongside Radek Stepanek — and the duo are seeded fourth in the tournament. Mahesh will play alongside Wesley Moodie. The Indo-South African pair are unseeded in the tournament.

However, both Lee and Hesh are in the same half of the draw and will compete against each other in the quarterfinals if all goes well.

The ‘Indian Express’ have a formidable record in the tournament. Apart from their triumph in 1998, they have also won titles here alongside other partners, Leander with Czech David Rikl in 2003 and Mahesh with Frenchman Fabrice Santoro a year later.

Rivals To His Throne

Federer’s main rivals in the tournament will be Rafael Nadal, Marat Safin and Andre Agassi. But all three are coming off long injury breaks. Nadal, the world No 2 from Spain, is playing only his second tournament since a foot injury which he sustained while winning a thrilling Masters Series final from two sets down against Croatia’s Ivan Ljubicic in Madrid in October. But Nadal comes to Dubai hoping to build towards the form which enabled him to play such a great final against Federer on hard courts in Miami almost 11 months ago. The Spaniard had also got the better of Federer in Miami the year before with a straight sets upset win.

Marat Safin has been away from competition even longer, and has selected the Dubai Open to make a comeback after six months off. Safin has not won a title since beating Federer and going on to win the Australian Open 13 months ago, and has not competed since Cincinnati in August where he lost to American Robby Ginepri in the quarters.

Dubai Dossier

1993 Karel Novacek (Czech Republic)
1994 Magnus Gustafsson (Sweden)
1995 Wayne Ferreira (South Africa)
1996 Goran Ivanisevic (Croatia)
1997 Thomas Muster (Austria)
1998 Alex Corretja (Spain)
1999 Jerome Golmard (France)
2000 Nicolas Kiefer (Germany)
2001 Juan Carlos Ferrero (Spain)
2002 Fabrice Santoro (Spain)
2003 Roger Federer (Switzerland)*
2004 Roger Federer (Switzerland)
2005 Roger Federer (Switzerland)

*The Dubai Open was considered a graveyard for the defending champions in the first 10 years of its existence. It was Roger Federer who broke the trend in 2004, successfully retaining the title he had won the year before

SUKTUEN
02-27-2006, 07:20 AM
:eek: Daniel your avarat!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:

where are you find this photo? :devil: :devil:

veyonce
02-27-2006, 07:36 AM
From: Emirates Today ePaper
27.2.2006
Federer happy to take on the returning stars
AHMED ABBAS RIZVI SPORTS

http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/3158/2702200604600400215zo.th.jpg (http://img135.imageshack.us/my.php?image=2702200604600400215zo.jpg)

Roger Federer is happy to see Marat Safin return from a long injury lay-off.
The Swiss played one of the most memorable matches of all time against Safin – in the 2005 Australian Open semi-final and the Russian won 5-7, 6-4, 5-7, 7-6, 9-7.

Russian Safin has been walking wounded since then. He has played just one tournament in the last five months of 2005 and his ranking has slipped to No51.

But Safin is making a return to the tour now and opens his campaign in the Men’s Open tomorrow against fellow Russian Nikolay Davydenko.

Federer could meet Safin in the quarter-final and said: “We had a couple of good matches in a row.

“So both of us were hoping for a few more matches, but unfortunately that is how it goes.

“I don’t think missing would be the right word – you miss somebody else like your girlfriend! But I do enjoy seeing him back and healthy. I am never happy to see guys injured, like it was the case with many players at the beginning of this year.

“I am happy to see Andre Agassi and Rafael Nadal have come back to the tour, healthy and playing. I didn’t enjoy it when I was injured, so I hope it doesn’t happen to anyone.” Federer is also delighted with the return of Martina Hingis, who lost in the quarter-finals of the Women’s Open to Maria Sharapova. “To be honest, I was a little bit surprised by how well she is actually playing,” said Federer.

“But that again shows what a great player she is and what a great competitor. After seeing her play, I have no doubt that she will be very high ranked at the end of the year. I have always said I enjoyed watching her and now finally she is back and I can watch her again. I don’t know if it is going to be enough to win the big tournaments, but I think she is right up there to upset anybody.” Federer, who has been the Dubai champion for the last three years, meets fellow Swiss Stanislas Wawrinka in the opening round tomorrow. In the second round, he will meet the winner of the Gulf derby between the UAE’s Omar Bahrouzyan and Kuwaiti Mohammed Al Ghareeb, who play the second match of the evening today.

“I think I had a hit with one of them [Omar Bahrouzyan] last year,’ said Federer. “So I think I will have a little bit of an idea about him. I think it is great for both of them and the tournament that they are playing each other in the first round instead of some big names straight up.” Federer is feeling refreshed after a break at home following his win in the Australian Open.

He broke down after beating Marcos Baghdatis and said: “It was very hard on me mentally. I guess that is why I was emotional after the match.”

nobama
02-27-2006, 11:17 AM
Roger has a new tennis game for your mobile phone. Looks like right now it only works on Nokia and Sony Ericsson phones.

http://www.federertennis.com/en

TenHound
02-28-2006, 01:10 AM
I've heard from several places that top guys get $1M for showing up in NoWomansLand, I mean DoBuy.

nobama
02-28-2006, 01:18 AM
I've heard from several places that top guys get $1M for showing up in NoWomansLand, I mean DoBuy.Well they upped the prize money for the WTA event to $1.5M, so that will most likely become a tier I event. They're going to dish out the money to get the top players to come. I'm watching the Vegas event right now and the stands are practically empty. It's embarrassing. I'll bet the stands are full in Dubai.

kjo
02-28-2006, 03:20 AM
Re dubai - in the women's event the stands were full for the final, but I read on WTA world they were around 75% empty in some early rounds -it's because big companies buy up all the seats and then don't show up.

bokehlicious
02-28-2006, 07:12 AM
Very nice interview of Stan from yesterday available here http://www.radiosport.ch (for those who understand french).

They ask Stan about the draw and the first round against Roger. It was funny, they were practising together on Saturday (with Yves Allegro too), and Roger suddenly shouted to Stan: "First round Federer - Wawrinka", but was kidding about that, as the draw was still not done. Then a few minutes later, Roger received a message and said to Stan, yeah man, that's not a joke anymore, we're gonna play each other :) . Stan said that he was happy to play his friend Roger but is aware that it will be quite impossible to beat him.

RonE
02-28-2006, 07:49 AM
Very nice interview of Stan from yesterday available here http://www.radiosport.ch (for those who understand french).

They ask Stan about the draw and the first round against Roger. It was funny, they were practising together on Saturday (with Yves Allegro too), and Roger suddenly shouted to Stan: "First round Federer - Wawrinka", but was kidding about that, as the draw was still not done. Then a few minutes later, Roger received a message and said to Stan, yeah man, that's not a joke anymore, we're gonna play each other :) . Stan said that he was happy to play his friend Roger but is aware that it will be quite impossible to beat him.

:rolls: The look on Stan's face when Roger said that must have been priceless!