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Stevens Point
11-15-2005, 05:31 PM
Federer Pushed to Limit by Ljubicic

By Bill Scott

Two-time defending champion Roger Federer has booked the first semifinal place at the Tennis Masters Cup 2005 after surviving a stern test against Ivan Ljubicic 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (7-4) in their Red group match Tuesday.

The Croatian saved three match points before falling. Federer said he expected a battle - and he got one.

"This is exactly the match I expected," said the Swiss, who suffered ankle ligament damage a month ago. "I expected a close one.

"I thought maybe he was even slightly the favorite because of what I've been going through the last few weeks. Obviously, I'm very pleased with the result.

"A win is a win no matter if it's two or three sets."

Federer's fourth semi in as many Tennis Masters Cup appearances came as David Nalbandian defeated Guillermo Coria 7-5, 6-4 in an all-Argentine showdown. Coria dropped to 0-2.

Federer needed two hours, 17 minutes to squeeze through at the Qi Zhong tennis stadium.

Federer's victory assured him But he escaped a close call against the Croatian whom he has now defeated five times this season - three in February and March finals. Federer stands 8-3 in the series.

Ljubicic saved three match points in the final set and broke Federer as the Swiss served for victory leading 5-4 in the third.

Federer, despite coming back just in time from ankle ligament damage suffered a month ago, extend his current win streak to 33 matches.

The in-form Croat came in as a threat, owning the best indoor record on the tour this year being 34-6 through his first match in Shanghai.

Ljubicic said he could find little wrong with his opponent. "He's not struggling. I just think that he's not top-fit. He's not sharp as he usually is - but it's not like you can take advantage of it.

"If he plays the way he can play, it's really very little you can do. I just tried to play my best tennis. It was almost enough. Unfortunately, it wasn't."

Federer now holds a 15-1 career record in TMC and has a perfect 11-0 record in round robin play.

TenHound
11-15-2005, 07:49 PM
Does anyone know where to find the post-match interviews?

Stevens Point
11-15-2005, 07:57 PM
Does anyone know where to find the post-match interviews?
It hasn't been out yet, but check these two sites later...

http://www.masters-cup.com/en/interviews/
http://www.asapsports.com/tennis/05shanghai.html

TenHound
11-15-2005, 08:25 PM
Merci beaucoup :)

Daniel
11-15-2005, 09:35 PM
Thnanks SP for articles :)

Daniel
11-16-2005, 01:21 AM
Shanghai - World number one Roger Federer battled past Croatia's Ivan Ljubicic 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 on Tuesday to close in on the semifinals at the season-ending Masters Cup.

The Swiss, who has just recovered from a six-week injury layoff, bounced back from a poor second set to make it two wins out of two at the troubled $4.45-million event in Shanghai.

Federer squandered three match points at 5-3 and 5-4 in the third before sealing victory 7-4 on a tiebreak to stay on course for a third straight Masters Cup title.

Only Ilie Nastase in 1971-73 and Ivan Lendl in 1985-87 have achieved three-in-a-row.

Federer was assured of finishing the second round of matches on top of the Red Group with Argentines Guillermo Coria and David Nalbandian, who lost their openers, playing later on Tuesday.

The Masters Cup was hit by the sudden pullouts of former world Andre Agassi and French Open champion Rafael Nadal through injury on Monday.

The withdrawals were a further blow to organisers after the pre-tournament pullouts of Andy Roddick, Marat Safin and Lleyton Hewitt.

Daniel
11-16-2005, 01:22 AM
SHANGHAI, China (AP) - Roger Federer survived his second match unscathed at the season-ending Tennis Masters Cup, a massive relief Tuesday for organizers of the injury-marred tournament.

Two-time defending champion Federer, the only top-five player left in the event, held on for a 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (4) victory over sixth-seeded Ivan Ljubicic to extend his winning stretch to 33 matches.

The Swiss player had two match points on Ljubicic's serve in the ninth game of the third set and one on his own serve in the next game before the eighth-ranked Croat broke back and took a 6-5 lead.

Federer forced a tiebreaker and jumped to a 3-0 lead with consecutive aces. After giving the mini break back at 4-3, he closed out with a powerful serve to set up match point, his fourth, and then ended it with a backhand winner down the line.

Expectations on Federer are usually high, but the scale took on a new dimension after second-ranked Rafael Nadal and No. 5 Andre Agassi withdrew within an hour of each other Monday with foot and ankle injuries.

No. 3 Andy Roddick, No. 4 Lleyton Hewitt and Australian Open winner Marat Safin had already withdrawn before the tournament pitting the world's top eight players.

Nadal pulled out with his sore foot while Agassi was on court, losing to Nikolay Davydenko. Agassi quit after his upset loss, citing an injured left ankle and upsetting local tournament organizers.

Federer came into the round-robin tournament after six weeks off with an injured right ankle.

He rallied to win over Argentine David Nalbandian in his opening match Sunday and had some difficult moments against Ljubicic after dominating the first set.

Already assured of the year-end No. 1 ranking, Federer's next aim is to equal John McEnroe's Open era record (82-3) for winning percentage in a season. Federer improved to 79-3 and has one round-robin match and likely a semifinal and final remaining here.

Gillermo Coria and Nalbandian played later Tuesday in Federer's Red Group. The top two players advance to the semifinals against the top two in the Gold Group, now missing Nadal and Agassi.

Mariano Puerta replaced Nadal at short notice and lost to Gaston Gaudio. Fernando Gonzalez will take Agassi's place in two remaining round-robin matches.

Daniel
11-16-2005, 01:23 AM
SHANGHAI (AFP) - World number one Roger Federer battled through a third-set tie-breaker against Ivan Ljubicic to qualify for the Masters Cup semi-finals.

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The two-time defending champion, still searching for full fitness after damaging ankle ligaments a month ago, was pushed all the way by Ljubicic before triumphing 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (7/4).

He became the first player to make the semi-finals after David Nalbandian beat Guillermo Coria 7-5, 6-4 in the second singles match.

"I expected a close match. I thought he was even slightly the favourite," said Federer, who has watched from the sidelines while Ljubicic saw off a host of rivals to clinch the final invitation to Shanghai.

"I'm pleased with the result as a win is a win but I would have been very disappointed in the end to have lost, because I had lots of chances."

Federer, playing with his right ankle strapped, has been taken to three sets in both his matches here but remains odds-on favourite for his 12th title of the year after a series of high-profile withdrawals.

Local organisers, who have spent 200 million dollars on the futuristic Qi Zhong Stadium which will host the season finale until 2007, have urged the ATP to trim the crowded tennis calendar to avoid another disaster next year.

Federer, the only top-five player left here, broke the six-foot four-inch (1.93 metres) Croatian in the fourth game and wrapped up the set with a forehand winner for 6-3.

But Ljubicic, who has taken Federer to three sets in three finals this year, recovered in the second set to break for 3-1.

A loose Federer forehand gifted him three set points before the Swiss put a backhand volley into the net and took the game into a decider.

As tension grew in Qi Zhong Stadium, Ljubicic fell 0-30 behind with the scores at 2-2, eventually double-faulting to go a break down.

Federer, rediscovering his touch and rhythm, held two games to love to leave Ljubicic serving to stay in the match at 5-3.

However, the Croatian saved two match points, then another on Federer's serve before breaking him back for 5-5.

But Federer regained his composure when it mattered, firing down two aces in the tie-breaker as he raced to a 3-0 lead. At 6-4, he found a classic backhand winner to clinch the match, pumping his arms in the air in celebration.

"After I broke him in the second, all the way through until the end I thought I was the better player on the court and I thought I could win it," said Ljubicic, who has lost five times to Federer this year.

"I saved two match points at 5-3 and one at 5-4 but I still thought I could win it. I really believed that I had a chance, and unfortunately nothing happened."

Meanwhile, Sweden's Thomas Johansson was called up as a last-minute reserve after Rafael Nadal and Andre Agassi's shock withdrawals on Monday left the tournament without emergency cover.

The world number 14 will fly in early on Thursday after both reserve players, Mariano Puerta and Fernando Gonzalez, were called into action at the last minute.

Organisers here were incensed at the withdrawals, which has further stripped the event of star appeal, and urged the ATP to make changes.

"In terms of the hectic schedule from the ATP's side, we are talking to them about it," said organising committee deputy director Qin Weichang. "We are suggesting that they really perhaps need to make some adjustment in order to play for the athletes' interest."

Marat Safin and Andy Roddick pulled out injured before the 4.45-million-dollar event started and Lleyton Hewitt is at home with his pregnant wife.

Daniel
11-16-2005, 01:26 AM
Federer moves to 2-0 in Shanghai
Shanghai, China (Sports Network) - Two-time defending champion Roger Federer held on to defeat Ivan Ljubicic in round-robin action Tuesday at the Tennis Masters Cup.

The top-seeded Federer posted a hard-fought 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (7-4) decision against the sixth-seeded Ljubicic (1-1), improving to 8-3 in their lifetime series, including a perfect 5-0 record this year, with three of the 2005 wins coming in finals.

Federer secured a spot in Saturday's semifinals here.

The world No. 1 Federer (2-0) wasted three match points and came within two points of losing on Day 3, but the super Swiss rebounded and drilled a backhand down the line to seal the deal in the third-set tiebreak after 2 hours, 17 minutes at Qi Zhong Stadium.

Federer knew he was going to be tested by Ljubicic.

"This is exactly the match I expected," said the mighty Swiss. "I expected a close one."

Ljubicic, who's appeared in eight finals this year (2-6), is making his Masters Cup debut. The big-hitting Croat was the runner-up at the Paris Masters just two weeks ago and has won 21 of his last 25 matches, including titles in France and Austria. He also reached a final at the Madrid Masters last month before losing to French Open champ Rafael Nadal.

The 26-year-old Ljubicic leads the ATP with 30 indoor victories this season.

The 24-year-old Federer is appearing in the Masters Cup for a fourth straight year, having reached the semifinals in Shanghai in 2002 and winning titles in Houston in 2003 and 2004.

Federer, the only top-five player on hand this week, was honored here on Monday after putting together one of the greatest seasons in tennis history. He piled up 11 titles for a second straight year, including two Grand Slam championships and four Masters Series events.

Federer has now won his last 12 Masters Cup matches, is the reigning three-time Wimbledon and two-time U.S. Open champ, and currently owns a sizzling 33-match overall winning streak.

Tuesday's other Red Group round-robin bout was an all-Argentine affair, as eighth-seeded David Nalbandian (1-1) handled fourth-seeded Guillermo Coria 7-5, 6-4. The 0-2 Coria, who piled up 14 double faults, is now out of contention here for the semifinals.

The 2004 French Open runner-up Coria is 3-2 all-time versus the 2002 Wimbledon finalist Nalbandian, as Nalbandian has won both of their meetings this season. with the other one coming in the fourth round at the Australian Open way back in January.

Thursday's Nalbandian-Ljubicic winner will join Federer in the final four.

The Gold Group will return to action here on Wednesday, as fifth-seeded Russian Nikolay Davydenko (1-0) will battle seventh-seeded Argentine Gaston Gaudio (1-0) and Argentine alternate Mariano Puerta (0-1) will face Chilean alternate Fernando Gonzalez (0-0). Puerta joined the field when the world No. 2 Nadal pulled out here on Monday, while Gonzalez entered the picture when Andre Agassi withdrew on Monday after losing to the gritty Davydenko in straight sets.

Davydenko is 0-5 lifetime versus the 2004 French Open champion Gaudio, all on clay, including a loss in a semifinal in Stuttgart earlier this season, while the 2005 French Open runner-up Puerta and Gonzalez have never met in an ATP- level match.

The first six days of the '05 Masters Cup will feature round-robin action. The semifinals will be staged on Saturday, while the final will take place Sunday at Qi Zhong. The top-two players from each four-player group will advance to the semis at this lucrative season-ending event

RogiFan88
11-16-2005, 03:36 AM
gracias, Danielito, por los articulos! ;)

TenHound
11-16-2005, 04:11 AM
Steve Bierly begins his post-match Guardian article w/a Wonderful line:

That most used phrase in men's tennis, "Game, set and match, Roger Federer", rang out in the Qi Zhong stadium here last night, bringing untold joy to his many fans and some blessed relief to the Chinese authorities.

SUKTUEN
11-17-2005, 07:01 AM
thanks for the articles~!!

LCeh
11-18-2005, 02:37 AM
This was posted by VamosRafa over at tennis-warehouse's forum:

What I did see today, though, was a program he did on Chinese TV. It was so sweet. The audience was mostly children, and he did a lot of interaction with them, giving some lessons to a 13-year-old player.

But what really impressed me is that a young Chinese fan came up to give him a gift she had made for him. It was a wonderful book, in English, but it chronicled his whole career, with emphasis on 2004. On each page she put an inspirational Chinese poem (translated to English). Roger was so wonderful to her, but he looked very emotional over it. He was close to tears -- it obviously meant a lot to him.

And then it was acknowledged that he has made a major donation to some Chinese charities, and he accepted an award from them. He was very humble, but it's obvious that he's very involved with this.

He is a wonderful ambassador for the sport. The show was close to an hour, and I was very impressed.

------------------------------

Original post here (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showpost.php?p=648104&postcount=34)

NYCtennisfan
11-18-2005, 03:58 AM
He is a wonderful ambassador for the sport. The show was close to an hour, and I was very impressed.

Such a class act through and through. It's amazing that he can have so many haters but that's what greatness brings out no matter how classy/nice/genuine you are.

peripheral
11-18-2005, 04:49 AM
This was posted by VamosRafa over at tennis-warehouse's forum:

What I did see today, though, was a program he did on Chinese TV. It was so sweet. The audience was mostly children, and he did a lot of interaction with them, giving some lessons to a 13-year-old player.

But what really impressed me is that a young Chinese fan came up to give him a gift she had made for him. It was a wonderful book, in English, but it chronicled his whole career, with emphasis on 2004. On each page she put an inspirational Chinese poem (translated to English). Roger was so wonderful to her, but he looked very emotional over it. He was close to tears -- it obviously meant a lot to him.

And then it was acknowledged that he has made a major donation to some Chinese charities, and he accepted an award from them. He was very humble, but it's obvious that he's very involved with this.

He is a wonderful ambassador for the sport. The show was close to an hour, and I was very impressed.

------------------------------

Original post here (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showpost.php?p=648104&postcount=34)

I think the interview VamosRafa is referring to is this (http://sports.sina.com.cn/t/2005-11-14/19461880332.shtml) one. It is also incidentally the one during which Laura got to meet Roger, give him the RE and a hug! :cool: It is indeed a wonderful interview, worth watching, and Roger really does come across as wonderfully warm and genuine :)

TenHound
11-18-2005, 06:48 AM
NYCt-, do you really think he has haters? The most disgusting remark I've seen was by someone who edits/publishes a major am. tennis rag. Steve Tignor calls him "Mr. Sickeningly Perfect"....I think that plus am. male sports journos are hung up about their masculinity...so they're much more comfortable w/Thuggy. The closer someone is to violent, brutal & vicious the more comfortable they are. One thing I love about Roger, is that he really outs these bastards, separating the wheat from the chaff.

Beyond that, what have you observed?

nouf
11-18-2005, 02:19 PM
nouf scan:
http://img361.imageshack.us/img361/6751/federescan13lg.th.jpg (http://img361.imageshack.us/my.php?image=federescan13lg.jpg) http://img341.imageshack.us/img341/7943/federescan25tf.th.jpg (http://img341.imageshack.us/my.php?image=federescan25tf.jpg) http://img460.imageshack.us/img460/9867/federescan39xt.th.jpg (http://img460.imageshack.us/my.php?image=federescan39xt.jpg)

PaulieM
11-18-2005, 02:34 PM
NYCt-, do you really think he has haters? The most disgusting remark I've seen was by someone who edits/publishes a major am. tennis rag. Steve Tignor calls him "Mr. Sickeningly Perfect"....I think that plus am. male sports journos are hung up about their masculinity...so they're much more comfortable w/Thuggy. The closer someone is to violent, brutal & vicious the more comfortable they are. One thing I love about Roger, is that he really outs these bastards, separating the wheat from the chaff.

Beyond that, what have you observed?
i haven't really heard anyone say anything too negative, mostly just oh he won again what a snoozer, or somebody else needs to start winning otherwise it'll hurt tennis. i read one article last year that was so silly it made me laugh, talking about how rogi seems girly at times because his ponytail was always perfectly parted, and carefully pinned, they even said something about he takes so much care of his hair/it always looks so perfect that it wouldn't be surprising if he had his personal hair stylist as part of his traveling team. :rolleyes: i couldn't for the life of me think of where that came from, it was very exaggerated. :shrug:

nobama
11-18-2005, 06:54 PM
Seems to me the haters really aren't in the media but some tennis fans (especially here). Seems to me the Media loves him because he goes out of his way to be nice to them and give them access. In fact either yesterday or today on ESPN the commentators said Rogi deserved to be Sports Illustrated's Sportsman of the Year.

NYCtennisfan
11-18-2005, 10:01 PM
NYCt-, do you really think he has haters? The most disgusting remark I've seen was by someone who edits/publishes a major am. tennis rag. Steve Tignor calls him "Mr. Sickeningly Perfect"....I think that plus am. male sports journos are hung up about their masculinity...so they're much more comfortable w/Thuggy. The closer someone is to violent, brutal & vicious the more comfortable they are. One thing I love about Roger, is that he really outs these bastards, separating the wheat from the chaff.

Beyond that, what have you observed

Hi there Tenhound:) I think fans in general and you can see it here on MTF which is a very small total population but it is there nonetheless. Extraordinary success breeds jealousy and envy. It always has and always will.

RogiFan88
11-18-2005, 10:42 PM
merci, nouf, pour les scans!

Stevens Point
11-19-2005, 10:20 PM
FINAL PREVIEW
November 19, 2005

Federer Seeks Masters Cup Hat-trick

Roger Federer is attempting to become the first man to win the Tennis Masters Cup three times, and the first man to win a year-end championships three times since Pete Sampras won the last of five ATP Tour World Championship titles in 1999. The last man to win three consecutive year-end events was Ivan Lendl, doing so 1985-1987 at the Masters (he also won 1981-82).

To date, only five men have won three or more year-end championships, and only two men, Lendl and Ilie Nastase, have won year-end championships in three consecutive years.

David Nalbandian is the first Argentine in 31 years to reach the finale final.

Three or more year-end titles

Player/No. of year-end titles/Years won
Pete Sampras 5 1991, 1994, 1996-97, 1999
Ivan Lendl 5 1981-82, 1985-87
John McEnroe 4 1978, 1983-84
Ilie Nastase 4 1971-73, 1975
Boris Becker 3 1988, 1992, 1995

Federer is also bidding to become the first player in the history of the year-end championship to win three straight season-ending titles without losing a match. (By winning the Tennis Masters Cup last year, he became the first man since Ivan Lendl in 1986-87 to win back-to-back titles at a year-end championship without losing a match.)

THE TITLE STREAK: 24 AND COUNTING
Federer has won an Open Era record 24 consecutive finals dating back to October 2003 and now has a chance to extend that to 25. His last loss in a final came to Jiri Novak in Gstaad on July 13, 2003


THE MATCH WINNING STREAK
Since losing to Nadal in the Roland Garros semifinals, Federer has compiled a career-best 35-match winning streak that is still active through the TMC semifinals, and includes titles in Halle (d. Safin), Wimbledon (d. Roddick), AMS Cincinnati (d. Roddick), US Open (d. Agassi) and Bangkok (d. Murray). This is the longest winning streak on the circuit since Thomas Muster won 35 in a row in 1995. If Federer wins today, he will go into sole possession of the fifth-longest winning streak in the Open Era, and will own the longest winning streak since John McEnroe won 42 in a row in 1983-84.

THE INDOOR STREAK
Federer has won his last 22 indoor matches (15-0 in 2005) since his last loss to Tim Henman in the quarterfinals of Rotterdam on Feb. 20, 2004

FEDERER vs NALBANDIAN
Nalbandian led their head-to-head 5-0 until the turnaround at the Tennis Masters Cup in Houston two years ago. Federer defeated the Argentine in straight sets there in their second round robin match, going on to win his first TMC title, and has since built up a four-match winning streak against Nalbandian, including in their first match in the Red Group here.

When they played each other last Sunday however, Federer was forced to rally from a third set deficit – he won six of the last seven games against Nalbandian after being 1-3 down.

At 24, Federer is the older of the pair by nearly five months. As contemporaries on the junior circuit, Federer and Nalbandian played for the very first time in the 1998 US Open junior boys’ final, with Nalbandian winning 63 75. In their other junior match-up, Federer defeated the Argentine 64 62 in the semifinals of the 1998 Orange Bowl in Florida. Federer finished 1998 at No. 1 in the ITF Junior World Rankings, while Nalbandian finished at No. 3.
By defeating Gaston Gaudio in the semifinals, Federer extended his winning streak against Argentines to 15 straight matches.

Nalbandian has a 0-4 record versus No. 1s (0-2 vs Hewitt and 0-2 vs Federer).

lunahielo
11-20-2005, 01:56 AM
Thanks, SP............:)

peteslamz
11-20-2005, 07:08 PM
'Let me keep this one'
Nalbandian outlasts Federer in Masters Cup final

http://i.a.cnn.net/si/2005/tennis/11/20/masters.cup.ap/p1.nalbandian.jpg
David Nalbandian nudged Roger Federer into the background Sunday, ending the No. 1 player's run of 24 straight finals victories.


SHANGHAI, China (AP) -- Roger Federer's record-chasing run ended with a jolt Sunday, a five-set loss to David Nalbandian in the Tennis Masters Cup final.

Nalbandian, who made the elite eight-man field because of injuries to top players, ended Federer's 35-match winning streak by rallying from two sets down for a 6-7 (4), 6-7 (11), 6-2, 6-1, 7-6 (3) victory. Federer had won his previous 24 finals and lost for only the fourth time this year.

"Roger, don't worry, it's not your last final," Nalbandian joked. "You're going to win a lot of tournaments, so let me keep this one."

Federer, bidding for a third straight Masters Cup title, entered the tournament after a six-week layoff because of an injured right ankle.

The top-seeded Swiss finished one victory short of John McEnroe's Open era record (82-3) for best winning percentage in a season, ending 2005 at 81-4.

"It's been a fantastic year ... unfortunately I couldn't win the last one, but this year will be a great memory for me," Federer said. "To be back after the injury -- I'm happy I made it so far. I'm proud of that."

http://i.a.cnn.net/si/2005/tennis/11/20/masters.cup.ap/p1_federer.jpg
Roger Federer finished the year at 81-4.


He rallied from 0-4 in the deciding set and was two points from victory, serving at 6-5 and 30-0, before Nalbandian broke back to force a tiebreaker. Nalbandian earned three championship points when Federer sent a backhand into the net.

The eighth-seeded Argentine clinched the 4½-hour match when Federer netted a forehand. He dropped to his back, almost in disbelief. Federer walked off court and slumped into a chair.

"We played an incredible match," said Nalbandian, who earned $1.4 million in prize money and will move from No. 12 to No. 6 in the ATP rankings.

Nalbandian has never won a Grand Slam singles title and was appearing at the Masters Cup for only the second time. He became the first Argentine to win the year-ending championship since Guillermo Vilas' title in 1974 at Melbourne.

Federer had only once lost a best-of-five set match after leading 2-0 -- to Lleyton Hewitt in the 2003 Davis Cup semifinal.

He said he felt pressure to perform in Shanghai after No. 2-ranked Rafael Nadal and No. 5 Andre Agassi withdrew with injuries last Monday, joining No. 3 Andy Roddick, No. 4 Hewitt and Australian Open winner Marat Safin on the sidelines.

Nalbandian made Federer run to the net, using slice backhands and drop shots, then whipped winners past him. Federer needed treatment on his left thigh after the fifth game of the fourth set, telling the trainer he was almost exhausted.

The final was the only scheduled best-of-five set match in the tournament. Federer had dropped a set in each of his three round-robin wins, then had a 6-0, 6-0 semifinal win over Gaston Gaudio on Saturday night -- the first "double-bagel" in his career. It was also the first love-love result at the year-ending tournament, which began in 1970.

But that game-winning sequence stopped Sunday when Nalbandian broke Federer to open the final. After trading breaks in each of the first two sets and clinging on in tiebreakers, Federer won only three games in the third and fourth sets.

Nalbandian's luck changed when he swapped his sweat-soaked black shirt for a red one. He'd wasted three set points and then spiked his racket into the court after the second set. He won 16 of the next 19 games.

Federer twice gave Nalbandian break-point chances with double-faults in the fifth set and once surrendering a break with a double-fault. He finished with eight for the match.

Groups of fans at Qi Zhong Stadium wearing red-and-white Swiss shirts willed Federer back into the match. His girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec, sitting near the court, urged him to "hang on."

After winning only five points in the first four games of the fifth, Federer broke Nalbandian twice and held twice to pull even at 4-4.

Nalbandian dropped serve again in the 11th game and went behind 30-0 in the next. But he won the next six to force a tiebreaker and then led it 2-0. Federer hung his head after missing a volley to fall behind 4-2 in the tiebreaker. He won only one more point.

nobama
11-21-2005, 11:35 AM
I've noticed most of the news stories have been very positive towards Rogi. As if even though he lost in the end he's still the hero of this Masters Cup. Just shows how much he's liked by the press, that they actually feel bad he lost. In the British papers every story basically said Nalby won because Rogi was an injured pup out there.

I think if Nalby has some decent results next year this win will really mean something. But if he fades away I think some people will just chalk up the win to Rogi not being fit.

Federer beaten but reputation remains unbowed (http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=sportsNews&storyID=2005-11-21T065047Z_01_KWA124520_RTRUKOC_0_UK-TENNIS-MASTERS-REVIEW.xml&archived=False)

By Alastair Himmer

SHANGHAI (Reuters) - Roger Federer proved he was human after all but still managed to reinforce his reputation as being arguably the greatest player of all time despite losing his Masters Cup title.

Argentine David Nalbandian's epic 6-7 6-7 6-2 6-1 7-6 victory over Federer in Sunday's season-ending final brought the Swiss world number one's 35-match winning streak to a shuddering halt.

It also prevented Fededer from claiming a third straight Masters Cup title and matching John McEnroe's professional-era best record for a season of 82-3 set in 1984.

However, it did nothing to shatter Federer's aura of invincibility.

Feeling the effects of a month off with an ankle injury, Federer could barely chase down Nalbandian's shots by the fourth set.

Playing on pure instinct, the Swiss maestro was simply trying to keep the fifth set score respectable after Nalbandian raced into a 4-0 lead.

"I thought it was going to be over in five minutes at 4-0," said Federer, who played the tournament with a strapped right ankle after suffering a bad sprain in training last month.

"I was just trying to make it harder for him to win. I wasn't even trying to win anymore in the end."

But through a superhuman effort, an exhausted Federer clawed his way back on level terms and to within two points of the title at 6-5 and 30-0 before finally running out of steam.

"I almost turned it around," shrugged Federer, who had won his previous 24 tournament finals.

"That would have been some incredible comeback."

Federer had single-handedly rescued the tournament from becoming a farce after the sudden pullouts from injury of Rafael Nadal and Andre Agassi.

Andy Roddick, Marat Safin and Lleyton Hewitt were all Shanghai no-shows and the withdrawals of French Open champion Nadal and former world number one Agassi left the $4.45 million (2.6 million pound) event looking threadbare.

VILLAIN AGASSI

Chinese organisers cast Agassi as the villain of the piece, doubting his reasons for quitting after an upset 6-4 6-2 defeat to Russia's Nikolay Davydenko in his opening match.

But in a week when he was named as one of People magazine's "international men of sexiness", some of Federer's play certainly bordered on sexy, helping to smooth over the problems.

Federer made history in the semi-finals with an awesome 6-0 6-0 victory over Argentina's Gaston Gaudio, the first whitewash in 35 years of the competition.

After the match, Federer acknowledged the extra burden he was feeling following the unscheduled departures of Nadal and Agassi.

"I was shocked when Nadal didn't play and then I felt the pressure when Agassi pulled out," said the Wimbledon and U.S. open champion. "All of a sudden I felt a bit left alone."

Ultimately, a 12th title of the year was beyond even Federer.

His rivals had been hoping all week that Federer's injury would provide a leveller in Shanghai and, finally, it did.

"Those first two sets took too long, took too much out of me," Federer said after the final.

"But there's also pride there because three weeks ago I was still on crutches."

Gaudio said after his semi-final humiliation that a lot of players were psychologically defeated before stepping onto the court to play Federer.

"Most of the players are beaten before the match against Roger," a dejected Gaudio said. "I was playing against the best player in history."

Nalbandian, to his credit, refused to be beaten. But the manner of Federer's defeat will be an ominous warning to his rivals ahead of the 2006 season.

RogiFan88
11-21-2005, 04:27 PM
The Times November 21, 2005
Nalbandian nets the biggest fish
From Neil Harman, Tennis Correspondent, in Shanghai

AS FISHERMEN’S tales go, this one would take some swallowing at David Nalbandian’s local haunts in Córdoba. Their man becomes the first Argentinian to win the Masters Cup, interrupting Roger Federer’s streak of 24 consecutive final victories after a match in which he comesomes from two sets down, surrenders a 4-0 lead in the fifth set along the way, survives Federer serving for the match and wins the concluding tie-break with the stadium reverberating to chants for his opponent. Then he collects his, £800,000 prize-money, climbs into a sparkling silver Mercedes and rides off into the Shanghai sunset. Wait a minute that is not the way it was supposed to happen.

Nalbandian was heading off on a fishing expedition with friends ten days ago before he got the call to jump on a plane to China, the 12 twelfth-best player asked to join a tournament that had been cut off at the knees by injuries, accidents and pregnancies. To win the event was not part of the deal.

But the minute this gifted Argentinian arrived here, he became the epitome of the dark horse on a medium-fast paced court that felt as if it had been made to his specific design, his great gift of turning defence into attack, his wonderful eye, and his cunning movement. And so now, on the back of his 6-7, 6-7, 6-2, 6-1, 7-6 victory, he is the world’s sixth finest player.

For Federer, the whole episode it is difficult to swallow. A man grown accustomed to winning almost every tournament he enters, came to this one the two-time defending champion not sure if he could last one match, let alone five. He won his semi-final 6-0, 6-0, but taking the last steps on the right ankle he hurt so badly six weeks ago proved a burden too immense.

Nalbandian had made Federer work for every point he earned in the first two sets. Indeed, the Argentinian had three points to snatch the second set tie-break, one from which you could not avert your gaze for fear of missing something incredible. Instead of clinching it 13-11, releasing him to surge through in straight sets, the toll taken on Federer’s courageous decision to come here, all the appearances, fanfests, and the adulation, rendered him immobile.

He served his first two double faults in the first game of the third set and by the end of the fourth, he could not win a point to save his life. Nalbandian’s level rarely changed the whole four hours and 36 minutes of the match as he clubbed his backhands down the line, he used the drop shot to bruising effect, returned audaciously and attacked with a radar’s precision. Only when he trailed 4-0, 30-0 in the final set, staring a potential humiliation in the face, did Federer’s instincts take over.

It was the equivalent of Mr Nice Guy lashing out. What was the point of going down ingloriously, when gloriously was a far more attractive proposition? And so Federer clawed his way back, one pained step at a time, until he was not only level but ahead, serving for the match at 6-5. It was an extraordinary effort but it was not enough, for Nalbandian, the former Wimbledon finalist, stuck tenaciously to his guns, fashioning another drop shot and then thumping a backhand winner to take it into the tie-break that he claimed 7-3.

The only other time in his career that Nalbandian had fought back from such peril had been on Wimbledon Centre Court in the middle Saturday this year, when a precocious kid called Andy Murray played two sets of such splendour the crowd were thinking they had witnessed a mirage. The force of Nalbandian’s comeback that day still hurts the Scot, much as the pained look on Federer’s face was evidence of how much he hates to lose.

“There was big, big fatigue,” he said. “The leg was killing me. Actually what I have achieved here this week, is one of my greatest results in all the circumstances. I am proud of the way it has turned out, I didn’t believe I could come this far, so on the human side, this is a really big tournament for me.”

For Nalbandian, it is proof, if it were needed, that there is a grand-slam champion lurking within. Ivan Ljubicic had said before their round-robin meeting that Nalbandian never won the big matches, so why should their meeting be any different? Nalbandian brushed aside the Croat aside, won his semi-final in straight sets and yesterday, landed the biggest fish catch of his life.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,5205-1881127,00.html

Nalbandian battles back to end Federer's final run
Stephen Bierley in Shanghai
Monday November 21, 2005
The Guardian

It was entirely in keeping with this year's injury-plagued Tennis Masters Cup that Roger Federer should be beaten in a fluctuating five-set final not so much by the brilliance of his opponent but more because his legs simply caved in. After all, three weeks ago he was on crutches having badly hurt his right ankle in a practice accident, and he believed himself fortunate to be playing at all when the eight-day tournament began.

This is not to say that David Nalbandian did not deserve his 6-7, 6-7, 6-2, 6-1, 7-6 victory. Many might have been inclined to tiptoe quietly into submission after losing two tie-breaks against the best player in the world. But the 23-year-old Argentinian, some five months younger than Federer, is nothing if not obdurate.
And so ended the Wimbledon and US Open champion's run of 24 consecutive victories in finals, stretching back more than two years. Federer had also won his previous 35 matches, and this was only his fourth defeat this year. Remarkable statistics for a remarkable player. On this occasion it was simply a match and a final too far, although "giving up was never an option", he said.

Nalbandian was one of five players who found his way into this end-of-season extravaganza because others pulled out, rendering the meeting of the world's best as counterfeit as the goods in the city's markets. Before a ball was hit Marat Safin and Andy Roddick had excused themselves with injuries, and Lleyton Hewitt stayed at home because his wife was expecting their first baby. Last Monday this trio of absentees was joined by Rafael Nadal and Andre Agassi. Unsurprisingly the Chinese were not best pleased.
Nalbandian, who had previously won only three tournaments in his life compared with Federer's 33, was on the point of taking a fishing holiday when he received the call to replace Roddick. The Argentinian now finds himself $1.4m (£816,375) richer, though he was gulping like a gaffed salmon in the fifth set when, having established a 4-0 lead with his 10th successive game, he allowed Federer to square the match.

Somehow the world No1 dredged up enough energy to serve for victory at 6-5 when an over-rule in his favour by the Australian umpire Wayne McKewen put him within two points of his third successive unbeaten TMC title. The only time he had previously lost a match in this tournament was here three years ago when Hewitt beat him in the semi-finals. Hewitt was also the only player before Nalbandian to retrieve a two-set deficit against him - in the 2003 Davis Cup semi-finals.

Federer had several bêtes noirs in those days, another of which was Nalbandian, who won their first five meetings. However, coming into yesterday's match the Swiss had beaten Nalbandian four times on the spin and was heading for a fifth, having saved three set points in the second tie-breaker, which he took 13-11.

With a mixture of huge forehands, excellent service returns and intelligent use of the drop shot, Nalbandian had extended a weary Federer, six times a grand slam champion, to his limits, but he still found himself two sets down. If he had held his serve at the beginning of the third set, Nalbandian might well have lost heart. Instead the Argentinian turned the match around.

Federer received a medical time out after three games of the fourth set, and further massage treatment after losing it.

The slide then accelerated into a steepling fall until Nalbandian was suddenly consumed with nerves, so nearly allowing the ailing champion to pass him at the tape. With four Argentinians in the event, Nalbandian's victory could be seen as the law of averages.

Rather it was Roddick's withdrawal and Federer's lack of preparation that paved the way to this biggest victory for the 2002 Wimbledon runner-up. How dearly he would now wish it to be a launching pad for the slam title he craves.
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1647073,00.html


21 November 2005 11:07 Home > Sport > Tennis
Nalbandian upset ends Federer's great run
By John Pye
Published: 21 November 2005
Roger Federer's record-chasing run ended in a dramatic five-set defeat yesterday to David Nalbandian in the Tennis Masters Cup final.

Nalbandian, who made the eight-man draw because of a spate of withdrawals, ended Federer's 35-match winning streak with a come-from-behind 6-7 (4), 6-7 (11), 6-2, 6-1, 7-6 (3) victory.

Federer, who won back-to-back Masters Cup titles undefeated in 2003 and 2004, came into the tournament after six weeks off with an injured right ankle.

The 24-year-old Swiss star rallied from 0-4 in the deciding set and was two points from victory serving at 6-5 and 30-0 before Nalbandian broke back to force a tiebreaker.

Nalbandian earned three championship points when Federer buried a backhand into the net after 4 hours, 33 minutes.

The eighth-seeded Argentine clinched it when Federer netted a forehand. He dropped to his back on the court.

Federer, who had won his last 24 finals - an alltime record - walked slumped into a chair.

"I want to congratulate Roger - we played an incredible match," said Nalbandian, who collected US$1.4 million in prizemoney and will move from 12th to a career-high No. 6 year-end rankings.

"Roger, don't worry, it's not your last final," added Nalbandian. "You're going to win a lot of tournaments, so let me keep this one."

Federer finished one short of John McEnroe's Open era record (82-3) for best winning percentage in a season, ending 2005 at 81-4.

"It's been a fantastic year ... unfortunately I couldn't win the last one but this year will be a great memory for me," said Federer. "To be back after the injury - I'm happy I made it so far. I'm proud of that.

"Disappointment is always there, because I don't lose very often ... I still get that feeling. It's good like this." Federer said he was on crutches three weeks ago, so reaching the final was one of his greatest achievements on "a human" scale.

"I came much closer than I ever thought," he said. "I cannot believe myself I came back in the fifth, but somehow I did."

Federer didn't seem too bothered that his slew of streaks had ended. "I knew I was putting all those records on the line when I came here," he said. "It's just a pity now that I was so close."

Federer had only once lost a best-of-five set match after leading 2-0 - to Australia's Lleyton Hewitt in the 2003 Davis Cup semifinal.

Nalbandian has come back twice this year from 0-2 in a five-setter. He made Federer run to the net constantly, using slice backhands and drop shots to draw him in, then whipping winners back past him.

Federer needed treatment on his left thigh after the fifth game of the fourth set, and told the trainer he was almost exhausted. sked later if he'd contemplated retiring, Federer replied: "No. Roger Federer doesn't pull out - otherwise he doesn't walk on court."
http://sport.independent.co.uk/tennis/article328325.ece

Federer puts brave face on defeat

Roger Federer stayed positive despite a shock five-set defeat to David Nalbandian in the Masters Cup final.
The world number one went down 6-7 6-7 6-2 6-1 7-6 in a dramatic encounter for his first loss since going out of the French Open to Rafael Nadal in June.

"I feel like I've had a great year and a great tournament," said Federer. "Disappointment is always there, because I don't lose very often.

"I still get that feeling. It's good like this."

Federer had won his last 35 matches and 24 finals, and fought back from 4-0 down in the fifth set before suffering only his fourth defeat of the season.

The Swiss star was playing his first event for two months in Shanghai following an ankle ligament injury.

"I came much closer than I ever thought I would come to this tournament victory but in the end I cannot believe myself that I came back in the fifth," he said.

This year was just incredible. At times I felt invincible
Roger Federer

"There's some pride in there because three weeks ago I was on crutches and now to be back playing at the best level - I'm very happy about that."

Federer conceded that he had fallen short of his 2004 standards this year, but was not exactly disappointed with two more Grand Slam titles.

"I guess last year was better because I won three Grand Slams, one Masters Cup," he said.

"I mean, I can hardly do better than that.

"But this year was just incredible because I was in so many streaks, hardly ever lost a match. At times I felt invincible, you know."

Pity for Roger, fantastic for David. This is a great result for tennis, 2006 is looking good!
From CV

And he pinpointed the number one ranking and a fourth straight Wimbledon title among his main aims for 2006.

"Obviously, number one is going to be a huge priority for me, to try to maintain that ranking," he said.

"Wimbledon will, my whole career, stay a huge goal. Maybe I can give myself another chance at the French Open, you know. So I think those are my three goals."

Story from BBC SPORT:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/sport1/hi/tennis/4455684.stm
Published: 2005/11/21 07:37:13 GMT
© BBC MMV

RogiFan88
11-21-2005, 04:30 PM
Nalby's goal for 2006 is to win a slam and he is one of the few players who could actually win any slam on any surface.

ExpectedWinner
11-21-2005, 04:35 PM
Nalby's goal for 2006 is to win a slam

So what? I'm sure he's had this goal for a while now.

Puschkin
11-21-2005, 04:40 PM
Nalby's goal for 2006 is to win a slam and he is one of the few players who could actually win any slam on any surface.
But there is also another one capable of that ;)

nobama
11-21-2005, 07:28 PM
Nalby's goal for 2006 is to win a slam and he is one of the few players who could actually win any slam on any surface.And what does this have to do with Roger? :shrug:

Let's not forget that Nalby was two points away from losing this match against a player who was not 100% and certainly not as physically fit. I don't read as much into this match as some do. Roger wasn't 100% and still forced the match to a 5th set tie break.

RogiFan88
11-21-2005, 08:44 PM
It has a lot to do w Rogi cos now that Nalby has won a big final vs. Rogi, this has given him self-belief and motivation to really win a slam now. You could say that altho David leads the hth vs. Rogi, Rogi has unleashed "el monstruo" in David. ;)

Nalby himself can hardly believe that he has taken a big title fr Rogi. It is a shame that Rogi didn't have just that little extra to win it.

Rafa, Lleyt and Pete have managed to pull out the big wins in similar situations but not Rogi. That's why I don't like to see Rogi playing 5-set matches... ever! And he usually tries to avoid them anyway. The only good to come fr them is that they can prepare him somewhat for long, tough matches on clay vs. guys like Nalby, Nadal, Coria, Gaudio y compania.

ExpectedWinner
11-21-2005, 10:24 PM
Rafa, Lleyt and Pete have managed to pull out the big wins in similar situations but not Rogi.

Be patient. With all his talent nothing came easy. Also, all mentioned players lost some tight matches.

I had a look at Sampras 95 records. AT YEC he lost to Chang indoors. Internet message boards weren't in full force back then. I wonder if fans/haters were getting prepared for Pete's funeral after such an odd loss. :lol:

Minnie
11-21-2005, 11:37 PM
Rogi played a 5 setter against Nadal in Miami earlier this year and came back from 2 sets to love down and well on the way to defeat in the 3rd. He said at the time that he regarded it as the greatest win of his career because of how deep he'd had to dig to get back into that match. (Perhaps the hurling of the racquet did the trick!|). I'm sure all the players try to avoid 5 setters if they can! Am I right in thinking that the other 2 5 setters he's played this year, he's lost because he's either been injured (I think there were foot problems in the AO SF) or not 100% match fit?

Minnie
11-21-2005, 11:39 PM
BTW, thanks to everyone for those English newspaper articles - hardly surprising that the Brit papers view Roger as the real hero ... the press here just love him!

nobama
11-22-2005, 03:32 AM
Rafa, Lleyt and Pete have managed to pull out the big wins in similar situations but not Rogi. That's why I don't like to see Rogi playing 5-set matches... ever! And he usually tries to avoid them anyway. The only good to come fr them is that they can prepare him somewhat for long, tough matches on clay vs. guys like Nalby, Nadal, Coria, Gaudio y compania.Didn't Rafa lose a 5 set match to a certain Mr. Federer earlier this year? IIRC, he was up 2-0, third set went to a TB, and then things went down hill for him after that. He also lost a tough 5 setter at AO in the R16 against Hewitt.

nobama
11-22-2005, 03:34 AM
BTW, thanks to everyone for those English newspaper articles - hardly surprising that the Brit papers view Roger as the real hero ... the press here just love him!Yeah, the Telegraph had another cool article on him in their paper today.

nobama
11-22-2005, 04:04 AM
http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a377/jsnash/rf_espn.jpg

Federer's play, demeanor is unmatched

By Bonnie DeSimone

Special to ESPN.com
Archive

Some of the qualities that contribute to Roger Federer's success come through in less obvious places than a championship match.

One of my most vivid images of him is off-court, in the players' lounge during the second week of the 2003 U.S. Open.

Roger Federer has lost only 10 matches in the last two years.
The tournament was sagging under the worst weather in recent memory. Rain washed out more than 100 matches. Towel brigades would work frantically to dry a court only to see sprinkles polka-dot the surface minutes later.

It was a week of bad hair and bad moods. Players sprawled lethargically around the lounge, looking understandably bored and irritable.

Federer played chess. He accepted all comers. Played and won. He looked slightly amused and fully engaged in what he was doing, eyes alight in that elfin face that makes him look as if he'd fit right into Middle Earth. Why let down now, his body language seemed to suggest. Why be at loose ends when there's a game to be had?

The clouds broke eventually. Federer didn't win that tennis tournament, but he hasn't lost much since. Ten matches in the last two years, to be exact.

He won three grand slams and went 74-6 in 2004, then steamrolled the men's tour this year. Heading into the year-end championships in Shanghai, China, last week, he had lost three matches against 77 victories, won a record 24 straight finals and had a chance to equal John McEnroe's 21-year-old, all-time best season winning percentage of .965 (82-3).

"I mean, at times felt invincible, you know?" the 24-year-old Federer told reporters in China Sunday. "That is a very hard feeling to get, I think."

His opponents agree. Here's the book-blurb version:

"You just have to sit back and say 'Too good' sometimes. Hope he gets bored or something."
-- Andy Roddick, after losing to Federer in the Wimbledon final.

"We're on Earth, but he's playing on a different planet."
-- Nicholas Kiefer, after losing to Federer in the fourth round of the U.S. Open.

"Anything you do, he potentially has an answer for."
-- Andre Agassi, after Federer defeated him in the finals of the same tournament.

And finally, Mac himself:

"If I'm in the same company as Roger Federer, I can feel pretty good about that. He's the best player I've ever seen play."
-- McEnroe's comment to the Houston Chronicle, Nov. 10, 2005.

I had another chance to admire Federer's concentration in an unlikely situation when I watched him annihilate Argentina's Gaston Gaudio 6-0, 6-0 in the semifinals over the weekend.

The outcome was obvious early on. The self-destructive Gaudio looked like he was serving blindfolded. Yet late in the second set, the television announcers were still debating the probability of a shutout and making 50 cent bets.

There's a reason a double-bagel is rare at this level, and it has as much to do with the winner as the guy in the hole. It's often much harder to bear down when your opponent is offering little or no resistance. But there was no sympathy in Federer's stroke, no break in his focus. He'd lose a point or two, then drift up to the net for a winning volley in that effortless manner he has -- like a pitcher with a great move to first, he doesn't telegraph it -- and head back to the baseline with a neutral expression.

As it turned out, even that virtual walkover wasn't enough of a rest for the aching Federer, who lost to another Argentine, David Nalbandian, in a suspenseful five-set final, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (11), 2-6, 1-6, 6-7 (3). Federer was still not wholly recovered from an ankle injury that had him on crutches for three weeks in October, and the length of the first two sets drained him.

Nalbandian, a last-minute sub in the tournament for no-show Andy Roddick, has now won six of his 10 matches with Federer. Perhaps he was less over-awed than some other players might have been. He recognized Federer's fatigue and exploited it, although he very nearly backslid in the fifth set, when Federer fenced his way back from four games down. That made for another unusual spectacle: a crowd rooting for the world No. 1 against an underdog.

"They don't want to see me go down all the way, but they like to see me struggle," Federer said, smiling, after the final that finished his season at 81-4.

Perhaps that's not so surprising in Federer's case. He is consistently excellent without being mechanical, passionate but not surly, amiable without being cloying, an extraordinary yet accessible athlete who has gone for lengthy stretches without an agent or a full-time coach. Not too good to be true. Truly good.

And he showed up even though he wasn't completely sound, giving the Shanghai fans a special incentive to root for him. Five of the other seven players originally scheduled to play in the tournament scratched.

So Federer fell a couple of decimal points short of history, but his various streaks, as with many in sports, are somehow more digestible now that they've come to an end.

Forget comparisons with McEnroe and other past giants. It's enough to view Federer in the present, putting his even-keeled dominance in the context of a men's tour roiling with complaints and disgruntlement about the length of the season, increased travel demands and leaky-hulled players.

Federer wasn't completely bulletproof. He sat out a few tournaments this year because of injury and illness, but "I don't think much is wrong with the system," he said Sunday. "I was ready to play the full schedule."

He didn't ease up in Rotterdam or Cincinnati or Dubai or any of the other bus stops this season. And the reason may be as simple as this: If it's not raining, he has a pretty good chance to win. And why let down when there's a game to be had?

Freelance writer Bonnie DeSimone is a frequent contributor to ESPN.com.

nobama
11-22-2005, 04:21 AM
http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a377/jsnash/rf_si.jpg

Roger Federer
Despite a rotten end to the year -- apart from a searing defeat, Federer lost in the final for the first time in 25 matches and failed to equal John McEnroe's 82-3 year -- let's take a step back and applaud Federer's 2005. When you lose four matches, take two Slams and finish No. 1, you're doing plenty right.

WERTHEIM: Federer is my 2005 Sportsman (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/magazine/specials/sportsman/2005/11/07/roger.federer/index.html)

By Jon Wertheim

For all the relentless winning Roger Federer did in 2005 -- to date, his record this year is a preposterous 77-3 -- one of his more telling moments came in defeat. In a gripping semifinal match at the Australian Open, Federer was down match point to Russia's Marat Safin. Reaching to retrieve a shot, Federer lost his footing and fell to the court. Safin lined up an easy, final winner, and, from his knees, Federer dejectedly tossed his racket toward the ball. For a split second, neither Safin nor the capacity crowd erupted. Instead, they froze for a split second and watched. To them, it was hardly impossible that Federer could somehow find a way to retrieve a shot without a racket in his hands. Such is the level of expectation for his magic.

Federer would rebound from that loss and lay claim to 11 titles on the year, including successful defenses at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. Along the way he rendered the rest of the field foils. There is a collective realization on the ATP Tour that, until Federer retires, everyone is playing for second place. Lleyton Hewitt -- not usually one to make concessions -- conceded after losing to Federer for the ninth straight time: "There's no doubt that Roger has taken it to a new level and everyone else is trying to play catch-up." Or as Nicolas Kiefer put it matter-of-factly, "We play on earth, but he he's playing on another planet."

As for rest of the tennis salon, we have long exhausted superlatives to characterize Federer's brilliance. (Roger, Roget. Roget, Roger.) Broadcasters have given up trying to describe the indescribable and simply laugh an incredulous laugh when Federer reels off one of his you-gotta-be-kidding-me winners. Most fans have the reaction of my seatmate one hot afternoon in Cincinnati, who, during a changeover, whipped out his cell phone and told a friend, "You just gotta see this guy. I can't explain it. He's just un-friggin-believable."

Raw numbers don't do justice to Federer's artistry and versatility, nor to the fact that the next person he antagonizes will be the first. But consider: at a time when men's tennis has never been more competitive Federer has won five of the last eight Majors. For the second straight year, he won titles on every major surface. Perhaps the most impressive streak in sports at the moment, he is undefeated in his last 24 tournament finals.

Contrary's to Kiefer's assertion, Federer does play on this planet. All over it, in fact, from Melbourne to Miami to Monte Carlo to the Middle East. He's based in Switzerland. His charitable foundation is based in South Africa. Being a global icon -- literally a citizen of the world -- doesn't always work in his favor. If, by accident of birth, Federer were from Spokane or Syracuse, is there any doubt he would reside in the same sports celebrity wing as Tiger or Shaq? If he played a full season in Atlanta or Dallas, is there any doubt he doesn't win this award?

As it stands, he gets my vote. And sooner or later, he'll be made in the U.S.A.

LCeh
11-22-2005, 04:23 AM
I am so glad he is getting the appreciation he deserves from all over the media. Just tells you that when you keep on doing something right, it can never go wrong. ;)

soraya
11-22-2005, 04:26 AM
WOW! Thanks Mirkaland, though I never doubted Roger's on and off class , this is good medicine for our latest wounds. Resourceful Mirkaland

nobama
11-22-2005, 05:30 AM
This is a few days old...not sure if I agree with everything he says....I think Safin's injury is serious and Hewitt chose to be with his very pregnant wife, nothing wrong with that. But I do have to wonder if Roger takes this event more serious than other players. I mean if Roddick really cared he probably would've flown to Shanghi from Paris rather than going home first. And then you have Rafa pulling out an hour before his match was to start and Agassi pulling out right after he loses his RR match. I dunno, I just got the sense aside from Roger and maybe Ljubicic the other guys were just going through the motions. I mean watching the Gaudio/Gonzalez match you got the feeling both of them would rather be somewhere else. I certainly felt that way after Gaudio put in that pittiful performance against Roger in the SF. Or maybe Roger enjoys playing in Asia more than the other guys? :shrug:

Federer only elite player gutting it out (http://msn.foxsports.com/tennis/story/5090318?cmp=otc-k9b140813162&att=199)

Matt Cronin / tennisreporters.net
Posted: 2 days ago

World No. 1 Roger Federer didn't expect to go to the Tennis Masters Cup Shanghai and be asked to save the event from total disgrace, but he's in that position now.

Federer had sucked it up and decided to play despite an ankle injury that kept him off the court for much of the fall. Only one other elite player attempted the same feat, Andre Agassi, and he has been brutalized by tournament directors for pulling out of the event with — what else? — an ankle injury after his first match.
American Andy Roddick, Australian Lleyton Hewitt and Russian Marat Safin didn't make the trip because of injuries, leaving the tournament without three marquee attractions before it started. Then, Spanish sensation Rafael Nadal traveled to China and pulled out just before the event began with an injury. Quintuple ouch.

Shanghai is a city that substantially overpaid for the event to begin with, signed a three-year deal with the ATP Tour and spent millions on what is being called the nicest new stadium in tennis.

So now those fans who bought tickets are being force fed the likes of Russian Nicolay Davydenko, Croat Ivan Ljubicic, Argentines Guillermo Coria, David Nalbandian, Gaston Gaudio and Mariano Puerta, and Chilean Fernando Gonzalez.

Do you know how many of those men would have qualified for the eight-man event had Roddick, Hewitt, Safin, Agassi and Nadal been healthy enough to play?

Two — Coria and Davydenko.

Coria has been knocked out of his round robin already; so that leaves the tournament with only two legitimate entrants — Federer and Davydenko — left in the field.

Do you think they are celebrating in Argentina because four of their players came though the back door and qualified? No. Are they waving flags in Chile because Gonzo snuck in at the last minute as a substitute? Absolutely not.

They likely feel how tournament organizer Wang Liqun feels — a little embarrassed.

"The players ranked from No. 2 to No. 6 are absent, and this is certainly a pity to the fans here," Liqun said. "Those who have already bought tickets for this tournament will be able to enjoy a discount next year. ... We know that (maintaining) the mania in China surrounding tennis is not easy. China has started the tennis fever at a late stage; so it's not easy."

Like the WTA Tour, the ATP will likely go on ignoring the injury crisis in the sport because the organization is so heavily compromised to so many different tournaments that it cannot find a way to reduce its calendar. Both tours are failing in their long-term vision, cashing in now and praying that their leading lights suddenly develop bionic bodies and don't continue to go down like tin soldiers year after year.

So, like the WTA did last week in Los Angeles, the ATP is attempting to highlight the star players who are actually playing in Shanghai.

Unfortunately, there is only one such man: Federer, the best player this sport has seen since Pete Sampras retired. Federer doesn't feel like he has to carry the entire event on his shoulders, but unless he can find two million or so fans who will tune in to watch Davydenko play Ljubicic, he'll have to take on that role anyway.

"Next year, again, the top players will be here, and hopefully back in shape," he said. "I understand the big disappointment from the government, from the tournament, from the fans. Also, obviously, I am a little disappointed. (But) we'll still see some great tennis this week. I came here not knowing if I can play, and I went through all the therapy just to really show the people how much this event really means to me. I arrived basically on one leg. Now that I can play, it's fantastic. It means very much to me. It also should show a message how important this tournament (is) to tennis. For me, this is equaling a Grand Slam. I think everybody wanted to play but was just not able to."

That's certainly debatable, but what else is Federer going to say about his main rivals, that they ignored their tour's jewel (the ATP does not own the Grand Slams) because they don't think it's that big of a deal?

You can't make that case with either Agassi or Nadal, who at least went to China, but you could in the cases of Roddick, Hewitt and Safin, who appeared to be in similar shape to Federer — limping but somewhat able.

"I think it's still great that Andre showed up and tried," Federer said. "Maybe other guys could have tried, too. I don't know. I don't think so because they know their bodies better. I think criticism is allowed at this point, but the tournament's still going on. The best players (who aren't hurt) are here."

But is that attractive enough to fans, that Federer might face Ljubicic in the final, a fine player with a decent back-story, but one who doesn't exactly have Madison Avenue written all over his back? No … it's not, which is why the Swiss star is going to have to perform his best Snow White initiation and keep the dwarves in hiding while he turns the eyes of the kingdom directly toward him.

That means winning the tournament with a brilliant display of tennis, something he is more than capable of when in good health — but which he may be hard-pressed to do given that his conditioning isn't what it was when he won the U.S. Open.

But at least Federer is there trying, which is more than you can say for the other elite guys. He's No. 1, on court and off.

Minnie
11-22-2005, 11:20 PM
Yeah, the Telegraph had another cool article on him in their paper today.

Thanks, Mirkaland - I'll call my mom and ask her to save the paper for me as she gets the Telegraph! I hardly ever buy or read the newspapers here!!

TenHound
11-23-2005, 06:03 AM
Screw Cronin: "Federer the best the sport has seen since Sampras retired".

Really Mat. Go check single season performance records. Sampras has hardly any in Top 25. Roger has 2 in the Top 5, and he's 24. The only thing Sampras ever dominated was Wimby. The only reason he has so many victories in Majors is 'cuz of longevity - a lot easier to accomplish before advent of nanotechnology & Super-sized racquets. If you think that should be the major criteria of Greatness, ask Andre.

And one more thing, Matt. You know how many tickets Pete sold? Nada. Zip. Zilch. None. Promoters could have cared less if he showed up. And you know what his peers thought of him in the locker room - not a helluva lot. Want to start trading tales, of what's fast becoming the legend of Roger Federer?? Didn't think so. Pete won 14 Majors. Good for him. Now onto a more interesting topic.

Thanks Roger. Will Adore You always. Now, Please Rest & Get Well.

nobama
11-23-2005, 09:31 AM
When Tennis magazine did their top 40, pete came in at #1. The guy won 14 grand slams and was YE #1 for 6 years in a row. Those stats may never be equalled. That's probably what Cronin was referring to. But I'm sure if you asked these guys off the record who they like more on a personal level, they'd probably say Roger. Before the US Open there was a program on ESPN about Roger and someone from the Tennis Channel was inteviewed. He gave the impression that Roger is more well liked on the tour than Pete was. And really have you ever heard another player say something bad about him? I haven't.

For me the only valid comparisons between Roger and Pete are their dominance on the tour (and at Wimbledon). I thinkthey play a completely different game (Pete more S&V, Roger more baseline) and are completely different personalities.

lsy
11-23-2005, 10:11 AM
Too long...no time to read yet, or maybe you guys can read it and highlight the "important" one for me :o :lol:

================================================== ========

Federer On Federer


Photo By Paul Zimmer By Steve Flink
11/23/2005


A few days before the start of the Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai, an
upbeat Roger Federer, hoping to garner a third consecutive title at the prestigious season-ending event, is in his room at the Shanghai Hilton, which overlooks Jing An Park. His manager and girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec, is with him, keeping close tabs on his schedule. He has a massage scheduled within the hour.



In two days, the formal media-rounds for the tournament take place, though he took time for this exclusive telephone interview. Federer, needing no validation of his status or stature, has already assured himself of a second consecutive year at No. 1 in the world after sweeping 11 of 14 tournaments along the way, taking two more major championships in the process, becoming the first man since Don Budge (1937-38) to rule at Wimbledon and the U.S. (Open) Championships in successive years, and winning 35 matches in a row before suffering a torn ligament in his right ankle during an October 11th practice. The ankle injury forced Federer to miss most of the indoor season while he recuperated on crutches, but he seems reinvigorated and eager to remain on the ascendant, reflecting on his astonishing 2004 and 2005 campaigns while looking ahead to 2006.

The 24-year-old Swiss stylist collected three Grand Slam tournament championships in 2004 before his blockbuster season in 2005; no man since Rod Laver (1968-69) had swept five majors in a two-year stretch. Federer clearly does not take that brand of success for granted, particularly in light of the ligament tear, which disrupted his autumn and dampened an otherwise brilliant season. If anything good could come from being forced to walk on crutches for a few weeks, for Federer it was the realization that there is something more at stake than defending his crown in Shanghai or even returning to Australia for a run at regaining the title he took there in 2004. The larger issue is his long-term well being, as he looks to stretch his greatness deep into his 20s and beyond. His most formidable challenge in the coming years won't necessarily come from Rafael Nadal or Andy Roddick or Richard Gasquet or any other man. The test will be maintaining his physical health so that his body doesn't break down, wrecking the volumes of promise that are evident to all. To be sure, Federer is doing everything he can to keep his body intact and to compete with as little pain as possible. If successful, he will inevitably keep raising his stock among the sport's all time greats.

Many in the know are projecting that Federer, with six majors, will put himself in a position two to three years down the road to challenge Pete Sampras's record of 14 Grand Slam tournament singles crowns. Remarkably, Federer, essentially a modest and understated man, is willing at least to address the possibility of becoming only the third man in history after Don Budge (1938) and Rod Laver (1962 and 1969) to record a Grand Slam before thinking about the Sampras mark. Certainly if Federer makes it to the final "Down Under," he will be heavily favored to take the title. After all, he had won an astounding 24 finals in a row (from the middle of 2003) upon arriving in Shanghai prior to Sunday's 6-7(4), 6-7(11), 6-2, 6-1, 7-6(3), loss to David Nalbandian in the Tennis Masters Cup final. Included in that streak are his last five "Big Four" triumphs. Altogether, he stands 6-0 in Grand Slam tournament finals. Win No. 7 in Melbourne, and the Grand Slam quest is on.

What makes Federer's ongoing success all the more remarkable is how much he has done on his own to make it all happen. Throughout the 2004 season, after he had parted ways with Peter Lundgren, Federer competed without a coach and celebrated his finest year yet. Then he joined forces with Tony Roche in December 2004, and the wily Australian has guided Federer on a selective basis throughout this year. Still, Federer has thrived as largely a solo competitor, not leaning on a coach, because his instincts are so sharp, his judgment so sound. While Federer credits Roche with a substantial contribution, the fact remains that he has not relied on him as much as most players do on their coaches. Roche, of course, was of the old Aussie school, a superb serve-and-volleyer outstanding at the net, boasting as he did perhaps the best backhand volley the game has yet seen. It was his skill in the forecourt that led Roche to the finals of Wimbledon and the U.S. Open early in the Open Era after a triumph at the French Championships in 1966. Surely he would love to see the great Federer come forward more frequently, serving and volleying much more regularly than he does now. In fact, over the last two years, Federer has improved his ground game immensely, developing by far the best forehand in the game and displaying an increasingly effective blend of topspin and slice off the backhand. Yet he does not come in as often as perhaps he could.

Unmistakably, Federer has demonstrated across the last three years that he has the right set of priorities on the court, competing with a growing assurance, imposing his game on every opponent. He has solved all his most familiar rivals. Since the start of 2004, he has played Roddick and Lleyton Hewitt a combined total of 14 times and has not lost a single match to either of them. That is why close followers of the game look to the surging Nadal and the enormously promising Gasquet — two of the players who beat Federer in 2005 en route to Shanghai — to provide the most severe challenge to the world No. 1 in 2006. Nadal, seemingly, will be the most consistent threat to Federer over the next bunch of years, and a gripping rivalry could develop. But from the standpoint of tennis fans, it is a real loss that the paths of Federer and Sampras did not cross for much longer. They clashed only once head-to-head in a stirring, five-set skirmish at 2001 Wimbledon, where Federer toppled the seven-time champion, 7-6 (7), 5-7, 6-4, 6-7 (2), 7-5, ending the American's 31-match winning streak at the All England Club. At that juncture, Federer was not nearly the overwhelming force he has become and Sampras was past his prime, but both players performed honorably.

Federer demonstrated with his career-altering triumph that he possessed rare talent and immense capability, although few realized then that he was destined to become one of the finest ever in his field. A prerequisite for being regarded as an all-time great is recording major victories over a long span. Two-time Grand Slam victor Rod Laver (1962 and 1969) did just that, and Sampras raised his stature immeasurably by securing Grand Slam championships for eight consecutive years (1993- 2000), a men's record he shares with Bjorn Borg (1974-81). Federer is a player of astonishing gifts and must be regarded along with Sampras and Laver as the most complete players of the modern era. But he seems to realize that many admirers may have placed him a bit prematurely alongside Sampras and Laver as a candidate for "the best ever." Nevertheless, it has been fascinating to watch Federer sweep so rapidly into his own after Sampras captured his last major in his final tournament appearance at the 2002 U.S. Open, making the comparisons between the two champions among the pundits almost inescapable, even if there is a disparity in their respective records. Like Sampras before him, who started playing for history after establishing his dominance in the mid-1990s, Federer is currently striving for his place in the history books. And as he keeps breaking or setting new records, Federer, perhaps more than any of his predecessors at the top, seems to take great pleasure in following the numbers and finding out precisely what he has left to conquer.

Steve Flink: How aggravating was it for you, though you lost only three times on your way to Shanghai, to have two of those defeats come at the majors, in the semifinals of the Australian and French Opens, against Marat Safin and Rafael Nadal?

Roger Federer: If I can keep winning two or three [Grand Slam tournaments] a year, that would be fantastic. It did get me worried after the first two Slams this year when I hadn't won one because everybody was talking about me and saying that nobody could stop me at the Australian Open, but I knew that was not the case. Anybody can beat me at certain times and I have to make sure I am aware of that. With the Safin match, it was just unfortunate. I had match point and who knows what would have happened if my foot had not hurt. Nadal was better on the day at the French Open. I didn't deserve to win that match, but I made it to the semifinals there. That gave me confidence to get so close to winning the tournament after the past few years when I had no clue how to win matches in Paris. Then I felt the pressure coming into Wimbledon, but from there I am happy with how the year turned out.

SF: There were different reports about your injury in October that kept you out for a month. Was it the ankle or the foot?

RF: Sort of in between, I guess. I tore a ligament and the ligament goes from the ankle into the foot. I have played many times with pain; so this will be nothing new. I did it exactly four weeks ago [October 11] running for a forehand in practice. I rolled over the ankle. I fell down and couldn't get back up. The foot got swollen within five seconds.

SF: Did this injury make you think that maybe the toughest opponent any great player has is the body? How much did it scare you?

RF: You are right that maybe injuries are the biggest rival of all. Every step we take on court is really brutal and anything can happen at any moment. It makes you think and wonder. Did this torn ligament scare me? Absolutely. You are so vulnerable and we are so close to injuries all the time. But the harder you practice, the fitter you are going to get and hopefully the less injuries you are going to have. So far I have been very lucky, which has helped me to keep up playing so well. This injury did not come at a bad time, and hopefully I can defend my Masters Cup title and be fit for next year. It is so difficult to win Grand Slam [tournament] titles because for two-and-a-half weeks you are not allowed to get injured or sick or whatever. You have to be on top of your game or, otherwise, you are not going to make it.

SF: Do you allow yourself to think about trying to break Pete Sampras's record of 14 Grand Slam tournament titles? Does that enter your mind at this stage of your career?

RF: I am getting asked many times about that, but to be honest the thought doesn't cross my mind even once when I practice or play or think. This is not what I am looking for [as if], every time I win a Slam, I go, "Wow, it's already five" or "Wow, it's six." I look more at the moment, but I never set for myself in my life a career goal [that] I want to achieve because everything I set for myself happened much earlier. So all I do now is set myself goals for one year to come, and now I have to look at my goals for next year: to stay No. 1 in the world, try to defend Wimbledon again and have the same focus on all the Grand Slams. Now that I have come so close in Paris that is obviously a big goal for me now. Maybe I feel more importance with Paris now, but the preparation for me is probably going to be the same.

SF: You have won six of the last 10 Grand Slam events going back to Wimbledon in 2003. Is winning a Grand Slam, that is, sweeping the four in a single year a possibility for you?

RF: The Grand Slam is sort of a talking point once you go to Australia. But once you fail there it is gone. If you win it, then obviously it gets very interesting because I have won Wimbledons and U.S. Opens. With the French Open the second one of the season, that would really show if I could go further. So I have definitely thought about it, but it is not worthwhile talking about it because the Australian Open decides everything.

SF: How do you explain not only your extraordinary ability to win every Grand Slam final you play but also your incredible record of winning 24 straight finals altogether? How do you constantly rise to the occasion?

RF: It is hard to say. I remember in the juniors I was already very good in finals. So when I came on tour, I actually had a mediocre sort of start in ATP finals, and I was really disappointed. That was a very uncomfortable situation for me to be in, and I think I just learned after that how to prepare for big occasions. Now when I move into a big occasion it is basically with the same preparation as for any match, whether it is the first round or the final. I have just gotten used to pressure situations. So maybe I don't get as tense as I used to, and of course it helps to have No. 1 on my back. That helps with my confidence and maybe the opponent feels that and falters, while I also play well when it really counts. But I am amazed, too, because 24 is a lot, and not just for tennis [but also for any other sport].

SF: You seem so comfortable being No. 1 in the world. John McEnroe appeared uneasy in that position, while Sampras and Lendl felt they belonged there. Does dominating the game as you have over the last two years just make you that much sure of yourself?

RF: You do become sure of yourself because becoming No. 1 is not just a fluke. It doesn't happen overnight. Winning a Grand Slam [tournament] title can be a little bit that way, but becoming No. 1 is really hard work. And once that pays off, you are very satisfied. And then there are two options: You can either lie back and enjoy it, which means that the moment is going to be short, or you can decide you want to stay there at the top and enjoy it a long time. That (the latter) is what I have chosen to do. For me it is a very comfortable situation to be in because there is nobody better than me, and every time I walk on the court I am the favorite. I would rather be the favorite than the challenger, and I think that is why I have handled the situation of being No. 1 so well.

SF: You parted ways with Peter Lundgren at the end of 2003 and played without a coach all through the 2004 season. Then you brought in Tony Roche at the end of that year, but Tony is not there all the time. How are you able to do something that none of the other top players have tried to do these days, namely, figure out so much by yourself?

RF: This is not a regular thing to do, to play as No. 1 in the world without a coach. When I split with Peter at the end of 2003, I started 2004 in Australia expecting the media to really kill me because it was my feeling that they could not understand why I split with Peter. Then I made it to No. 1 in the world. I won that Australian Open and the confidence I got from that tournament carried me through the whole season. I think I was looking at the time to be a little more independent, to get to know more about life and myself and how everything is done. But I knew that I didn't want to continue for that long without a coach. I was looking around and thinking about it, but there are not 100,000 coaches out there that I would be a good match with. I think traveling on my own all the time and believing in my own strengths and capabilities and my own advice, basically I knew that eventually I would get to a dead end with that, where I have no more information for myself. With Tony, I got new information and that has been fantastic.

SF: Will you have the same routine with Tony for 2006?

RF: To be honest, I haven't spoken with him about next year yet. I will see what he is intending to do, but I don't want to force anything. If he wants to do it one more year, that would be fantastic, but if he doesn't that is no problem. He doesn't need it.

SF: Over the last two years, you have played a serve-and-volley game less and less. Overall you are more selective about using that tactic. But you do it so well and you are such a complete player. And the fans would surely like to see you do it more. Is it impossible in the modern game to play serve- and-volley regularly?

RF: You have to have a very, very good serve to do that. I believe I have a good serve, but is it that incredibly good for playing serve-and-volley? This I don't know. At this time, my volleys are not good enough to serve and volley on a consistent basis. It is a combination of maybe me not volleying good enough and the guys running down too many shots and passing and returning too good in this modern game, which makes it really hard. I think players these days don't work on their volleys anymore. Eighty [percent] to 90 percent of the practice sessions are played from the back. So where guys before would stand at the net all the time, as Tony has told me, it has changed. Of course, I do try to spend more time at the net in practice and try to improve that area of the game because all of a sudden that could make a big difference in the long run for me. I would like to be able to shorten up the points and have that solution. We will see what happens. I wish I could play a little more serve- and-volley because I enjoy doing it, but in the end I am playing the matches to win and not just to please myself.

SF: Do you believe you were a better player technically in 2005 than you were the year before?

RF: Not technically, but more mentally. I am more match tough, a little more fit, a little bit more experienced. And those things sometimes make a difference. But I have to say that I played an equal number of great matches in 2004 like I played in 2005.

SF: Do Nadal and Richard Gasquet stand out in your mind as your biggest threats in the coming year?

RF: I do think so, yeah. There really is a new generation of players coming along right now. The guys I am playing now - Safin, (Lleyton) Hewitt, (Andy) Roddick - I know them all, but I definitely am going to start to focus on the young players coming along because these are the guys I don't know so much about. And look what has happened: I lost to a couple of young players the last two years, like Nadal, Gasquet and Tomas Berdych (2004 Olympic Games). So you have to watch out. It is hard for a rookie to keep it up, but he can be very dangerous in one match. That is exactly the danger for the top players. We have to make sure we are on top of our games against these guys. Definitely I think that Nadal has proven himself. He doesn't belong anymore in the younger group because he has already proven himself so much. Gasquet still has much to prove, but he has huge potential.

SF: Are you sorry that you and Sampras did not play each other more than the one time at 2001 Wimbledon? Have you thought about that?

RF: Maybe it is better this way. Keep it to one match. Let it stay very unique because it was my first Centre Court appearance and it sort of closed his career at Wimbledon. It was my start and a very special moment, first time on that court, first time against him. And the same for him against me. Who knew how good I was going to get? I never thought I would rival anybody like him, but suddenly now I am. So maybe it is actually good that we played only that one time, on grass, on Centre Court at Wimbledon. That is quite special.

SF: You seem to enjoy hearing about all the statistics, the 24 straight final round wins, breaking other records. How much attention do you pay to that?

RF: That is the fun side next to all of the success and the hard work, to sort of see where you stand, what else there is to achieve, what else can be done. And somehow if you play so great like I did the last couple of years, eventually you are going to start breaking records or equaling records or equaling idols like (Boris) Becker and (Stefan) Edberg with six Grand Slams. That is a lot of fun and it gives you a motivation boost. That is how I see it.

SF: You seem to take your losses harder now and you have so much pride. Is part of dominating the game accepting losses, but not taking them easily and always finding reasons why you could have won?

RF: What is it, 10 losses in the last two years? [It was nine at the time of this interview.] Of course I remember every one of the losses very clearly because I have lost so little, but to be honest, I get over the losses very quickly these days, not like the way it used to be. When I used to play, I wasn't always 100 percent sure if I gave my best effort or if I just started to really lose hope in winning, and that would make me play very differently. Today I play from start to finish at a hundred percent, and when I walk off the court, I can only say [if I've lost] that the other guy played too good today or it was just not my day. And then I can move on. But I think you have to analyze your losses because sometimes you can learn more from them than from matches you have won. So maybe it will be an hour or two after a loss where I felt like, "What a pity," but then I move on and I have more time for myself, more time for vacation. I always try to see the positive side.

SF: Like Martina Hingis, Swiss is your native language. Isn't it difficult to be as precise with using the English language as you are with your strokes on the court? Can you be misconstrued?

RF: I am very lucky to have a South African mom, and I grew up with English also. So I have a feeling I feel very comfortable speaking the language. But to be honest, when I do interviews or I go on shows and it is in English, I am much more relaxed than if it was my native language because in my native language I am not allowed to make mistakes, while in English or French, I feel like this is not my perfect language, so everybody will understand if I make mistakes. So I am more relaxed. It is funny.

SF: So where do you go from here? Looking at next year and beyond, how do you maintain your success and make the most of yourself?

RF: When I go on the court, I have to be at 100 percent; so I will try to keep that up. After that, all the other Grand Slam tournaments are very high in the priority list, but right after that are all the other tournaments and trying to win them. Whenever I play I want to win the tournament, and I know I can do that. I think I have done some good scheduling and I definitely want to keep that up, be smart, and look at the big picture and the long term.

lunahielo
11-23-2005, 02:55 PM
Great article, Isy.
Thank you. :hug:
luna

Skyward
11-23-2005, 03:09 PM
I think I have done some good scheduling and I definitely want to keep that up, be smart, and look at the big picture and the long term.

I love his mindset. Thanks Isy. :hug:

nobama
11-23-2005, 03:34 PM
Great interview, thanks. Where is it from?

bokehlicious
11-23-2005, 04:33 PM
I think if Nalby has some decent results next year this win will really mean something. But if he fades away I think some people will just chalk up the win to Rogi not being fit.


That's a point. Another one is that some people who congratulate today Nalby for this main title would have bashed Fed's title if he had won because of all the withdrawals...

Let's wait next season to see if David is able to confirm ot not, I wish him the best, but I doubt this trophy will really have a big impact on him. I guess he knows deep in his mind that he would probably never have beaten a fullfit Roger last sunday...

peripheral
11-23-2005, 05:50 PM
Thanks for all the wonderful articles everyone. I really loved this quote:

He is consistently excellent without being mechanical, passionate but not surly, amiable without being cloying, an extraordinary yet accessible athlete who has gone for lengthy stretches without an agent or a full-time coach. Not too good to be true. Truly good.

That just about sums it up for me :) It's incredible what an outpouring of positive press there has been about Roger's willingness to put his health and his records on the line out of-- and I can't think of a better word for it-- honor. To honor the YEC, the fans, the sport of tennis itself. For all the 'David slays Goliath' headlines, there's been a wonderful recognition of Roger's character as well, and I'm very glad for that.

BTW, that amazing interview was from Tennis Week mirkaland. It's good to hear Roger finally describing what exactly he injured and how, even if it's painful to hear. Rest up and heal Roger!!

MissMoJo
11-23-2005, 06:59 PM
You do become sure of yourself because becoming No. 1 is not just a fluke. It doesn't happen overnight. Winning a Grand Slam [tournament] title can be a little bit that way, but becoming No. 1 is really hard work. And once that pays off, you are very satisfied. And then there are two options: You can either lie back and enjoy it, which means that the moment is going to be short, or you can decide you want to stay there at the top and enjoy it a long time. That (the latter) is what I have chosen to do
:D :D

nobama
11-23-2005, 07:07 PM
That's a point. Another one is that some people who congratulate today Nalby for this main title would have bashed Fed's title if he had won because of all the withdrawals...

Let's wait next season to see if David is able to confirm ot not, I wish him the best, but I doubt this trophy will really have a big impact on him. I guess he knows deep in his mind that he would probably never have beaten a fullfit Roger last sunday...I'm about 99% certain he wouldn't have. Even with Roger being in the shape he was he took it to a 5th set breaker. And you know had Roger won people would've said he didn't play anybody decent, except for Ljubicic who was too exhausted to do well.

Mrs. B
11-23-2005, 08:13 PM
SF: Are you sorry that you and Sampras did not play each other more than the one time at 2001 Wimbledon? Have you thought about that?

Roger: Maybe it is better this way. Keep it to one match. Let it stay very unique because it was my first Centre Court appearance and it sort of closed his career at Wimbledon. It was my start and a very special moment, first time on that court, first time against him. And the same for him against me. Who knew how good I was going to get? I never thought I would rival anybody like him, but suddenly now I am. So maybe it is actually good that we played only that one time, on grass, on Centre Court at Wimbledon. That is quite special.
:cool:

Lalitha
11-24-2005, 09:58 AM
Hi all! :wavey: Wanted to share this with you guys!

Roger Federer, an exceptional athlete defying descriptions

Federer has become a familiar traveller, but his journey's end is not even in sight, writes Rohit Brijnath



The exceptional athlete moves us, he also makes us guess. What inspires him? What is his genius made of? How is he able, in times of stress, to reach down within himself, into the caverns of his mind, and where other men find nothing, abandoned even by hope, he discovers courage? Is this greatness?

It's hard to comprehend such uncommon men, they operate on a frequency we cannot pick up, they defy a thorough description for any analysis of them becomes part imagining. It's as if they exist in a parallel universe, and for two years it is where Roger Federer has resided.

Down 0-4 in the fifth set in Sunday's Masters Cup final in China, having lost the third and fourth sets 6-2, 6-1 to a fluent David Nalbandian, breathing like a climber in thin air, his crutches recently abandoned, no tournament played in 35 days, married to error, defeat appeared inevitable even understandable, still.. still, you thought, Federer is going to win!

It was absurd, but he has conditioned us to believe most things are possible with him. No match does this mature practitioner toss away.

But it is good Federer lost, for having inhaled his eloquence with the racket all year, we have been allowed to exhale. To appreciate his streaks, first they must break.

Winning streak

Constantly athletes talk of peaking, and of the exhaustion that follows the ascent of an athletic mountain. So then, what amalgam of physical and mental majesty, what purity of effort, must be required to win 24 consecutive finals?

Eleven tournaments he has won this year. Five of the last eight slams. Ten matches lost in two years. A head-to-head record since 2004 that stands at 4-1 vs Safin, 8-0 vs Hewitt, 6-0 vs Agassi. Of the four matches he lost this year, in two (Safin, Australian Open final; Gasquet, Monte Carlo) he had match points, and in a third, against Nalbandian, he served for the match. Only one day in the year, against Rafael Nadal in the French Open, did someone truly own him.

But Federer did more than produce statistical chaos and visual feasts. He has forced us to revise what we previously believed feasible within the boundaries of a tennis court. If Federer's game is sophisticated then he is also an affable, cosmopolitan man, and if he is bizarrely not completely embraced in America, he is at least embraced by an American. As Andy Roddick kidded, "I'd love to hate you, but you're really nice".

True professional

No stories follow Federer of excess, no tale haunts him of rudeness, accompanied as he is by a minimal entourage and substantial grace. In an era of the haughty, indulged superstar, it cannot be discounted. When he lost to Nadal in Paris, despite 62 unforced errors, he said firmly, "Never take anything away from somebody who beat me, because I was trying my best."

In the interview room he is responsive, forthright and occasionally amusing. Recently dubbed one of the world's sexiest men by People magazine, he was asked, in China, if coach Tony Roche was with him. Yes, he replied. Did he get any advice from Tony? Replied a grinning Federer: "Yeah. He doesn't just come here to hang out with me. I mean, he likes to visit the most sexiest guy alive once in a while, (but) he gave me some advice."

Federer appears to wear fame comfortably, but responsibly, not shy of using his status as a platform, preaching strongly the values of sport, believing that it can, as he once said, "bridge difficulties, cultures, conflicts". This is not a careless man. Last year, just before giving a speech at the UN, he told Tennis Week, "Even though it's only a few minutes, still, you want to do well and you have to come up with the right words."

Outside tennis, he helps educate disadvantaged South African children through his foundation. In tennis, he plays ambassador. For instance, to merely champion China as a Masters Cup venue is polite, but to chuck his crutches a week before and carry the tournament as others left abruptly is commitment. Asked later if he might have withdrawn from the final if it was a lesser event, he said: "No, Roger Federer doesn't pull out, otherwise he doesn't walk on court."

In a year when Andre Agassi, the ultimate arbiter, said "I think he's the best I've played against", Federer's peers may have to find solace in the barest of offerings, in the most miniscule of tears in his domination. Last year the Swiss won three Slams and the Masters Cup; this year only two slams. Federer has become in a short while a familiar traveller, but his journey's end is not even in sight. This is only the second year he has ended as No.1, Sampras did it six times. Will his body hold, his racket stay fluent, his polish as a man remain intact when defeat starts recurring? We do not know, for this exceptional athlete remains somewhat beyond our comprehension.

Doris Loeffel
11-24-2005, 12:07 PM
Thanks for sharing - was a good read

avocadoe
11-24-2005, 01:43 PM
Thanks, I love to see the articles come from all over the world!

Mrs. B
11-24-2005, 02:53 PM
thank you, Lalitha.

and love your sig. :)

SUKTUEN
11-24-2005, 04:18 PM
Roger ~~I Love You~!! Always~!

nobama
11-25-2005, 02:19 PM
The man behind the champion (www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-11/18/content_495909.htm+vogue+%22roger+federer%22&hl=en)

2005-11-18 08:33

On Sunday when Roger Federer, started his bid for a third straight Tennis Masters Cup title with a 6-3, 2-6, 6-4 victory over David Nalbandian, the 24-year-old, showed the sparse crowd at the 15,000 seater Qizhong stadium in Shanghai why he has been the No 1 player in the world for the past two years.

The top-ranked Swiss is recovering from an ankle injury, but he moved smoothly against the eighth-seeded Argentine. In the third set, when he was 1-3 behind, he fought back from triple break point, to hold serve in the third game, then broke Nalbandian in the sixth game to capture the opening set.

"I took the opportunity he gave me," said Federer as quoted by Accoiated Press, referring to a match-winning stretch in which he won five of the last six games. He won 14 of 18 points to build a 5-3 lead.

The next day the tennis player was formally crowned year-end number one for the second year running in a lavish ceremony in the same stadium. Federer was greeted by thousands of screaming fans as he picked up his latest accolade.

Federer has held the top ranking for 94 consecutive weeks since last February. He will soon pass the 102 consecutive weeks that Sampras spent at No 1 to be third on the list behind Jimmy Connors with 160 weeks and Ivan Lendl at 157 weeks.

By Tuesday when he won his match over sixth-seeded Ivan Ljubicic of Croatia in the season-ending tournament, his record for the year is 80-3. With this, he has equalled John McEnroe's match-winning percentage record (.965) in a calendar year, the best of the men's professional-era.

And there are already six major titles under his belt, back-to-back US Opens, three straight Wimbledon victories and one Australian Open.

He is already proclaimed by many as the greatest male tennis player in history, including by Andre Agassi, whom he defeated in this year's US Open final, and is no doubt an international superstar on the court.

Off the court he also proves to be star, as a successful businessman, an enthusiast for charity and a loving friend, family member and boyfriend.

Last September saw him to bring IMG, the world's largest sports marketing and management agency, into his management team.

Two years ago, he founded the Roger Federer Foundation to help underprivileged children in South Africa. And he has maintained a steady five-year relationship with his girlfriend, Miroslava (Mirka) Vavrinec, whom he got to know in the Sydney Olympic Games.

For the tournament in Shanghai, Federer arrived five days earlier. Besides preparation for the matches, he had taken the opportunity to help promote Maurice Lacroix, a young Swiss watch brand that has invited him to be its global ambassador.

In a grand gathering on November 8 organized by the watch brand, Federer showed up in smart casual wear, jeans topped with a wool jacket, and appeared as a bright, polite, relaxed and thoughtful young man. The tennis star shared some time with BJW talking about his tennis career, business and personal life.

What inspired you to play tennis?

I loved sports as a very small child already and was fascinated by anything to do with balls, soccer, table tennis, squash, etc. As my parents played a lot of tennis and took me along I guess that is where I developed a love for the sport.

What's the most impressive moment in your life?

The one thing I am very proud of is the Roger Federer Foundation. That's something next to tennis, very important to me. It is to help underprivileged children in South Africa, where my mother came from.

About my career, my first win at Wimbledon was the most special thing I've ever achieved, although I've already won it three times now. That was very special moment when I became the world No 1. You know, as you win the Wimbledom championship, you are the best (he chuckles). You have a very special feeling, maybe in a month, you become world No 1. All you have is the very proud feeling.

What persuaded you to become the global ambassador of Maurice Lacroix?

I have always loved Maurice Lacroix or I wouldn't be their ambassador. I guess we are both young and successful Swiss brands.

The way they work with the equipment is very impressive. You can see they are very interested in what they do. And the precision they have to display is the same way with tennis. In my business, everything has to be right. Nothing is allowed to be wrong, otherwise you won't win the match.

What are your expectations for the future?

If I want to be an all time great, I have to keep it up for the year to come. I've already showed them over the past two or three years, I can do it. So I guess this is going to happen. But you have to stay healthy. If you are not, you can't do it. I enjoy it anyway.

How do you balance your tennis career and your personal life?

That's very important to me. When I get away from the tennis court, I spend a lot of time with Mirka. You know she does a lot of waiting for me, which sometimes she is not so ready for. But she is great for that. She is a great help, makes my life much easier, more comfortable since I gotta feel good also off the court. It wasn't easy when I first won the first Wimbledon championship.

Puschkin
11-25-2005, 02:33 PM
quoting The man behind the champion (www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-11/18/content_495909.htm+vogue+%22roger+federer%22&hl=en)

What are your expectations for the future?

If I want to be an all time great, I have to keep it up for the year to come. I've already showed them over the past two or three years, I can do it. So I guess this is going to happen.


So much about modesty ;) . Don't get me wrong: I like it, very much so.

nobama
11-25-2005, 06:16 PM
So much about modesty ;) . Don't get me wrong: I like it, very much so.One thing I should say is these answers were kinda chopped up a bit. There's video of this interview somewhere and his answers are a bit different.

Stevens Point
11-25-2005, 10:39 PM
Published on Monday Nov.21st...

www.yahoo.com

Federer sets sights on dominating 2006 season

By Alastair Himmer

SHANGHAI (Reuters) - No sooner had Roger Federer digested his five-set defeat by David Nalbandian at the season-ending Masters Cup than he set his sights on dominating 2006.

Beaten 6-7 6-7 6-2 6-1 7-6 by Argentine Nalbandian in Sunday's pulsating Shanghai final, an exhausted Federer pledged he would come back stronger next year after regaining full fitness.

"Obviously, number one is going to be a huge priority for me, to try to maintain that ranking," said the Swiss, who sprained his right ankle in training last month.

"Wimbledon will, my whole career, stay a huge goal. Maybe I can give myself another chance at the French Open, you know. So I think those are my three goals."

Federer became the first player since Don Budge in 1937-38 to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in back-to-back years in a remarkable 2005 season.

Victory over Nalbandian would have given Federer a third straight Masters Cup title and matched John McEnroe's professional-era best record for a season of 82-3 set in 1984.

But with his fitness always a concern in China, Federer's body simply would not obey his mind after two stamina-sapping tiebreaks.

ON THE LINE

"Disappointment is always there, because I don't lose very often," said Federer, who had won 35 straight matches and 24 finals in a row before falling to Nalbandian.

"I knew I was putting those records on the line. But three weeks ago I was on crutches. Now to be back at the best level, I'm happy about that."

Despite his painful defeat, Federer said 2005 had given him almost as much satisfaction as last year, when he captured three grand slam titles and the Masters Cup.

"I guess last year was better because (I won) three grand slams, one Masters Cup. I mean, I can hardly do better than that," smiled the six-times grand slam winner.

"But this year was just incredible because I was in so many streaks, hardly ever lost a match. At times I felt invincible, you know."

Federer's immediate plans were to recuperate.

"I've got to make sure I keep doing my rehab," he said. "Even on vacation, make sure I strengthen that foot so I can really start the season without any problems.

"I still have plenty of things I would like to achieve."

LCeh
11-26-2005, 01:11 AM
I hope this has been posted before, cause this is such a great article. If not, here it is... ;)

The making of a champion

By Mark Hodgkinson, Telegraph

It was at the Old Boys Tennis Club in Basle that Roger Federer first received proper instruction on how to apply pace and spin to a tennis ball. And it was also on the club's red clay courts, and not on Wimbledon's Centre Court two years ago, that the Swiss first cried over the result of a tennis match.

"It was so funny when Roger won Wimbledon for the first time and then started crying," recalls Madeleine Barlocher, one of his first coaches. "I remember when he was little and lost a match, and he would try to hide behind the umpire's chair and would not stop crying for more than 10 minutes. The next time I saw Roger after that I said to him, 'You used to cry when you lost a match, and now you cry when you have won a match.' Roger laughed when I reminded him of that."

It may be strange to recall now, given his calm and measured exterior, but, as a pre-teen and young teenager, Federer found it difficult to control his emotions. There were more to his tantrums than sniffles and games of hide-and-seek behind the umpire's chair. He often threw and kicked his racket around the court, yelped like an alley cat, and occasionally swore.

Federer has said that there were times when his parents would watch from the balcony of the Old Boys club, calling out for him to be quiet, and he would respond by shouting at them to, "Go and have a drink, leave me alone". Federer said that the family would then drive home "in a quiet car, with no one speaking". "I would carry on like an idiot," he has admitted.

"This stage was part of his growing up," his mother, Lynette, said. "But when his behaviour was bad, we told him that it was bad and that it upset us. We used to say, 'Come on, Roger, get control of yourself, pull yourself together'. He says that he can't remember crying when he played tennis, but he also cried when he played football. I remember saying to him once, 'Is it such a catastrophe if you lose a match?' But the tears just showed how ambitious Roger was, how determined he was to succeed."

A couple of days spent in Basle, his home city, provided plenty of insight into the making of Roger Federer. His balanced and well-mannered outlook on life is said to be typical of Switzerland's second city, which is polite, overly-ordered and introduced to tourists as the place where a local scientist became the first man ever to take an LSD 'trip'.

Federer, who was born on Aug 8 1981, spent his childhood in the suburb of Munchenstein, with the family home just a short walk from the football and tennis stadiums. His early life was dominated by sport and he was four when he first picked up a tennis racket, having watched his parents on the local courts. The earliest surviving photograph of Federer playing tennis, borrowed from the family's private album, shows him swinging at a forehand with great enthusiasm and no little skill. "We would go to play tennis, and Roger just picked up the racket and started playing. He loved the sport from the beginning," his mother said.

His first strokes were played at the Ciba Tennis Club, a private venue for the employees of a chemical company, where his parents were both working at the time (Robert and Lynette met on a business trip to South Africa for Ciba). Both are avid social players, and his father still plays regularly at the club, but his mother is said to have been the more accomplished of the two, with a smoother and more stylish game.

The club is suburban, friendly and unassuming. The courts are surrounded by greenery, with tree branches overhanging the red clay, ferocious games of volleyball on the lawns, and men drinking beer at the tables on the terrace. The club has apparently not changed much, but Federer's first racket, given to a friend but never returned, has vanished.

Federer, whose boyhood hero was Boris Becker, spent countless hours at home walloping the ball against the garage door, determined in his pursuit of perfection. "I remember always loving to play against the garage door, or against the cupboard doors inside, with any kind of ball. My mum got fed up because it was bang, bang, bang all day," he said.

His parents quickly saw how gifted Federer was with a racket in hand, and when he was eight he started playing at the Old Boys club, surrounded by blossoms and suburbia. Barlocher was then running the junior programme, as she still does now in her sixties. She remembers Federer as one of the more talented players in his age group, as a fast learner on the club's seven clay courts, but she would never have predicted what her pupil would go on to achieve in the sport.

Federer's first individual lessons were with Seppli Kacovsky, a Czech coach who also still works at the club. They trained on Court Five, the furthest from the wooden-slatted clubhouse. "Roger didn't always concentrate during the sessions - sometimes he would hit some shots and then shout, 'Whack! Pow! With this shot I win Wimbledon!' Some of those shots would hit the back fence on the full. Roger remembers those times, and we still speak about it," Kacovsky said.

"Roger always had dreams of being a professional tennis player. He would tell me that he was going to become the world No 1. A lot of other kids would say that, but it was like Roger was born with a racket in his hand. He had such natural talent. I've coached for over 40 years and never seen such a gifted player. I would tell him how to hit a shot and he would get it straight away. Other kids might take several hours. Roger was exceptional even then."

Federer had a natural eye for a ball, and as well as his precocious skill as a tennis player, he won skiing trophies, impressed on the basketball court, and fancied himself as a striker on the football field. At the age of 12, he had to decide between tennis and football. "He enjoyed all sports at that time, and probably liked football as much as he liked tennis. Roger was into anything that was outdoors and sporty," his mother said.

Barlocher said that Federer was impeccably behaved off the court at the Old Boys club. Only once did he cause any trouble, when she was waiting for him to play a club match and he had seemingly gone missing. The future world No 1 found the confusion and panic beneath him absolutely hilarious: he had climbed a tree and was sitting proudly on one of the branches. "Roger was laughing so much. That was one of his favourite jokes," Barlocher said.

Federer was well liked, both at the tennis club and his primary school, the Schulhaus Neue Welt (the New World School). One of his teachers, Theresa Fischbacher, recalls: "The only problem was that he was in a classroom with a good view, so it was tempting just to look out of the window and start daydreaming."

He would often work as a ball-boy at the club. One of the coaches produced a fading and crumpled photograph which showed him on duty during a girls' singles match, fetching the stray balls and folding the towels for Martina Hingis. She would go on to become the youngest women's world No 1 in history, reaching the top of the rankings at the age of 16.

At 14, Federer's parents were shocked to discover through a tennis magazine article that he might be prepared to leave home and join the Swiss national centre at Ecublens, near Lausanne. They were surprised because they knew that Federer did not like being away from his family, and sensed that he would be homesick in Ecublens, which is in the French-speaking part of Switzerland and a long drive from his German-speaking friends and family in Basle.

His mother emphasised that she and Federer's father did not force the decision on him. "We are a close family, but Roger took the decision at a very early age that he wanted to play tennis away from home. We never forced him to do anything, we let him develop on his own," said his mother. "He made a lot of important decisions himself when he was younger and that was key to his success because he had to learn how to do things for himself. He learned to be very independent."

As his parents had predicted, Federer was not always happy in Ecublens. He struggled with his broken French and has recalled other pupils being "mean" to him. His frustration would often manifest itself in bad behaviour, such as more racket-hurling, and it has been said that when they installed a new backdrop on one of the courts, Federer was the first to put a hole in it. He was punished by being made to sweep the courts at 7am.

But Federer's mother said that he quickly matured at Ecublens. "It was a great lesson in life for him - that things don't always go your own way, and that you don't get anywhere in life with talent alone. You have to work at things," she said. "I know that that it wasn't always fun and games for Roger there, and that many days he wasn't that happy. But those struggles were good for him. Overcoming those ups and downs was a challenge for him, and it helped him to develop as a person."

Federer, who combined tennis and schoolwork, spent two years at Ecublens and also at Biel when the Swiss national centre moved there. He was starting to form a close working relationship with Peter Carter, an Australian coach whom he had originally met at the Old Boys Tennis Club. Carter taught Federer to use his emotional energies more wisely, and to think through exactly what he was doing on court. He was ranked the world's top junior in 1998, winning Junior Wimbledon in the same year, though sadly Carter would never witness his protege's Wimbledon singles triumphs, as he died in a car accident in 2002.

The only visible sign of teenage rebellion for Federer was the peroxide stage he went through. He turned his hair an unflattering yellow-white, which amused Barlocher. "He came back to see us once at the Old Boys Tennis Club and at first refused to take his hat off to show me his hair. But we have the photos of it, so he will not be able to forget that particular hairstyle," she said.

Federer has not forgotten his early years, and still lives in Basle, in the suburb of Oberwil, occasionally training at the Ciba Tennis Club. He is usually left alone in a city that does not have a fawning obsession with celebrities, and he feels able to mingle with the amateur players in between training sessions at the club.

He still visits the Old Boys club and has been known to return to the small bar, which has a colour painting of him hanging on the wall, to play cards with his friends. He is still in contact with Barlocher and Kacovsky, sending them text messages with updates of his progress around the tennis globe. "Roger used to send me a telegram whenever he won a title," Barlocher said. "It was a real pity when they stopped doing telegrams."

A few weeks ago Federer returned to the club for a fund-raising exhibition match. He was delighted when, just before the match started, a sign was unveiled showing that the old Court One had been renamed 'Roger Federer Centre Court', a tribute to his two Wimbledon titles. "It was a lovely surprise for Roger," Barlocher said. "It is our little joke at the club, that there is now a Centre Court where it all started for Roger."

Federer's friends and old coaches watched the 2003 Wimbledon final on the clubhouse television. "I was so nervous that I could hardly watch that match, so nervous that I popped the champagne cork too early," Kacovsky said. "It was his first match point, and suddenly there was champagne everywhere, and then Roger didn't win the point. Everyone was laughing at me. Luckily Roger finished the match a little later. That was a great day at the club. We were so proud. We drank champagne and we cried."

More tears may be expected over the next fortnight, from both Federer and the city of Basle.

-------------------

http://www.goroger.net/press/article/telegraph050620.html

He would often work as a ball-boy at the club. One of the coaches produced a fading and crumpled photograph which showed him on duty during a girls' singles match, fetching the stray balls and folding the towels for Martina Hingis. She would go on to become the youngest women's world No 1 in history, reaching the top of the rankings at the age of 16.

That's a picture I would like to see. ;)

TenHound
11-26-2005, 02:25 AM
Thanks, Lalitha, for finding the latest Rohit Brijnath article. He is The Best tennis writer. He nails it on Roger -The Word to Describe Him, on court & off - GRACEFUL. But equally so is Rohit. I strongly recommend any of you looking for something Great to read, google him up. He is So Perceptive, as well as being a beautiful, graceful writer.

Thus, it's obvious to realize that Rohit is Roger's Natural Biographer.
ATTENTION SILVY. Can we start a campaign to get Roger to bring him along on tour, commissioned as his Official Biographer, w/the Mandate Not to Write Propagandistic Rubbish?? Would You Pls. Include His Articles in Yr. Birthday Packet??? Thanks.

Billabong
11-26-2005, 02:27 PM
:yeah:

Lalitha
11-27-2005, 09:04 AM
thank you, Lalitha.

and love your sig. :)

Thank you! :)

When I first read those words (my sig), the person who came to my mind was Rogi. :D

Lalitha
11-27-2005, 09:10 AM
Thanks, Lalitha, for finding the latest Rohit Brijnath article. He is The Best tennis writer. He nails it on Roger -The Word to Describe Him, on court & off - GRACEFUL. But equally so is Rohit. I strongly recommend any of you looking for something Great to read, google him up. He is So Perceptive, as well as being a beautiful, graceful writer.

Thus, it's obvious to realize that Rohit is Roger's Natural Biographer.
ATTENTION SILVY. Can we start a campaign to get Roger to bring him along on tour, commissioned as his Official Biographer, w/the Mandate Not to Write Propagandistic Rubbish?? Would You Pls. Include His Articles in Yr. Birthday Packet??? Thanks.

Hi :wavey: Thanks for the kind words!

Rohit is a good writer, but there used to be a person named "Nirmal Shekar" whose articles were so good. So good that in this Cricket mad country, whatever I knew about tennis - I learnt from Nirmal.

Rohit writes about almost all the sports, but Nirmal was specially for Tennis alone. His coverage of Wimbledon in one of India's daily "The Hindu" is a treat to read. Sometimes you feel like as if you were there and talked to the players in person.

SUKTUEN
11-27-2005, 10:25 AM
HIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII~!!!

And THANKSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS~!!

nobama
11-27-2005, 12:11 PM
Courting Federer (http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2005/11/27/lifefocus/12683684&sec=lifefocus)

On a cool autumn evening in Shanghai, the hot Fed-Ex of tennis, also one of People magazine’s sexiest men, talked about his game and the other loves of his life. FOO YEE PING has the story.

THEY say no one is born to greatness. That applies even to Roger Federer, the Number One tennis player in the world.

He gave a glimpse of the hard work and discipline required of a great sportsman like him when he casually mentioned that “the day I arrived (in Shanghai), I went to practise straight away to get used to the conditions here.”

The 24-year-old Swiss maestro was in the cosmopolitan Chinese city early November to defend his Masters Cup title.

Days before the start of the US$4.4mil (RM16.5mil) tournament, the three-time Wimbledon champion spoke to scores of Asian journalists at a get-together organised by Maurice Lacroix, the watchmaker which appointed Federer as its ambassador a year ago.

The tennis star was at ease answering all questions, even one which seemed to be a teaser, a simple test of his geography: Has he heard of Taiwan?

“I have heard of Taiwan although I can’t really tell you much about it,” came his frank reply.

He came across as a pleasant enough guy, smiling most of the time and waiting politely when a number of the questions had to be translated to English for him.

Throughout the 35-minute session, he was patient although it was clear that he must have repeated much of the stuff previously, especially those that concerned his partnership with Maurice Lacroix.

“Of course I like Maurice Lacroix watches. It is an honour to become the ambassador. It is a young brand, very innovative. We have a lot in common,” he said, ever faithfully.

He spoke of his previous visit to the factory in Switzerland and saw how the watchmaker would peer closely at the timepieces.

It was all about precision, he said. That was how he approached his game, too, so they were a good match, he added.

Federer, of course, is not the only tennis star who is endorsing a watch label. Maria Sharapova, the Russian powerhouse, is ambassador for Tag Heuer.

Federer said that he had gotten used to people wanting to know more about him now that he is a tennis star.

“Life has changed quite a bit. It’s been interesting,” he said. “To become number one is a very special feeling.”

The French Open is the only Grand Slam title which has eluded him. He has, so far, six Grand Slam wins under his belt.

His goal next year is to maintain his top ranking, which he concedes is not going to be easy.

On reports comparing him with Pete Sampras, the American star who has won a record 14 Grand Slam victories, he replied: “He was one of best we've ever had, so it is nice to be compared to him but I still have a long way to go to be like him.”

Asked how he relaxes, he mentioned his yen for travelling. “When I arrive at a city, I like to do the classic thing – go to the tourist spots that you can tell your family and friends later. And shopping, too.”

He is fond of the “wellness and spas, which is great in Asia.”

Known to like golf as well, Federer professed his wish to meet Tiger Woods, who was also in Shanghai at the same time to play at the Champions Tournament.

The other famous sportsman he had met was David Beckham, he said.

Federer spoke fondly of his Swiss girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec,a former tennis player whom he met five years ago during the Olympic Games in Sydney.

“When I get away from the court, I spend time with her. She does a lot of waiting for me. She has been a great help. I wished I was home more often.”

At 6’1” (186cm), the tennis star was towering over most of the Asians during that press briefing.

The minute he entered the room, one female was overheard gushing about his good looks.

Small wonder that on Nov 16, People magazine named him one of the “International Men of Sexiness” although the main crown went to Hollywood actor Matthew McConaughey.

But for the people from Maurice Lacroix, Federer’s winning spirit is the main attraction. To them, the Swiss watch and Federer portray that spirit perfectly.

Throughout the Shanghai promotional event, the top bosses of Maurice Lacroix kept talking about that “winning spirit”. They were clearly proud of having Federer on board, of course for quite a tidy sum which they declined to reveal.

Maybe the watchmaker is right. Although he failed to capture the season-ending Masters title, losing to David Nalbandian of Argentina in the finals on Nov 20, it had been a remarkable year for the tennis king.

Prior to that surprise defeat, he had been on a 35-match unbeaten streak and, according to news reports, remains one of the greatest players around.

SUKTUEN
11-27-2005, 12:16 PM
thanks mirkaland~~~

I am sad to think about it

Minnie
11-27-2005, 11:45 PM
Nice article Mirkaland - I gush about his good looks too!! Though I do wish writers wouldn't keep saying that Rogi's defeat was a "surprise" ... not to me it wasn't - I'm still amazed he even got to the semis bearing in mind his lack of match fitness. I've no doubt he will be back with a vengence in 2006, looking to settle some scores!

TenHound
11-28-2005, 04:18 AM
Don't feel like the Lone Ranger on that Minnie. I was disappointed he even agreed to play, given his condition. He said he expected to lose his opening match (to Nalby) in 2 sets. JMac said he "probably shouldn't have played".

I highly recommend Everyone read art. on bbc, w/JMac's year end thoughts. interesting stuff there. Also, he refers to Roger as the "Greatest Player Who Ever Lived". Add that to AA's post NYC comments on RF...let the idiots continue to yammer away about Pete...but then it takes awhile for the Redefinition of Greatness in Tennis that Roger's play has necessitated to sink in among those lower on the Information Food Chain.

nobama
11-28-2005, 11:56 AM
Hey I enjoy watching Roger more than I did Pete. And you could argue that he's more talented than Pete was. But the numbers are there and right now Pete has better results than Roger. Someone posted in GM the comparison of Roger and Pete at the same age (since they were born in the same month 10 years apart). And Pete has more titles (including 1 more GS), and earned more $$. As far as I'm concerned they're both great and I don't think one has to be better than the other. Like Roger said, you can't really say who the best ever is.

SUKTUEN
11-29-2005, 02:58 PM
OHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH~!!! :eek:
I Love Pete so Much~!! :kiss: :kiss: :kiss:

But I dislke his wife~! :ras:

peteslamz
11-29-2005, 04:45 PM
But I dislke his wife~! :ras:


How come?

TenHound
11-30-2005, 02:54 AM
Did Everyone see the GReat News that Martina Hingis is going to try & make a comeback?? Be great news if she succeeds! Anyone want to start a petition to the ITF, governing body of the Majors, requesting they stage an Exhibition Match - on TV - Martina & Roger v. Steffi & AA?? Loser plunged in pool of mud, or some such!! So there's something to lose, and fun for all? Even playing for $100k wouldn't phase these folks!! It could be quite competitive....

TennisGrandSlam
11-30-2005, 02:58 AM
Hey I enjoy watching Roger more than I did Pete. And you could argue that he's more talented than Pete was. But the numbers are there and right now Pete has better results than Roger. Someone posted in GM the comparison of Roger and Pete at the same age (since they were born in the same month 10 years apart). And Pete has more titles (including 1 more GS), and earned more $$. As far as I'm concerned they're both great and I don't think one has to be better than the other. Like Roger said, you can't really say who the best ever is.


Both are great, so are Bjorn Borg! :cool:

TennisGrandSlam
11-30-2005, 02:59 AM
Did Everyone see the GReat News that Martina Hingis is going to try & make a comeback?? Be great news if she succeeds! Anyone want to start a petition to the ITF, governing body of the Majors, requesting they stage an Exhibition Match - on TV - Martina & Roger v. Steffi & AA?? Loser plunged in pool of mud, or some such!! So there's something to lose, and fun for all? Even playing for $100k wouldn't phase these folks!! It could be quite competitive....



http://www.hingismartina.org/0hopman/HopmanCup52.jpg


:cool:

TenHound
11-30-2005, 03:04 AM
@TennisGrandSlam, so you approve of my suggestion?? What is that photo?

Did Everyone see that Great Article in Sydney's Leading Newspaper:

Phones that go buzz in the night announce baby Hewitt

.....

Hewitt's coach, Tony Roche, is believed to be among the first to see the baby. Roche was at the hospital by coincidence, visiting his daughter who was also giving birth yesterday.

I assume we would have heard had there actually been such an Earthquake in Tennis :)
(No, I'm n-o-t making this up. It's really in print in the Aussie Press, no less!!!)

Billabong
11-30-2005, 03:52 AM
Hingis coming back is absolutely fantastic news, and I'm sure Rogi is also thrilled about her comeback:bounce:!

avocadoe
11-30-2005, 01:39 PM
me tooooooooooooooooo, thrillllllllllllllllllllllled that is :)

RogiNie
11-30-2005, 04:46 PM
Since when is Roche Hewitt's coach? :rolleyes:

Stevens Point
11-30-2005, 11:02 PM
www.foxsports.com

McEnroe happy to keep record from Federer

LONDON (AP) - John McEnroe is happy to keep his record of highest winning percentage from Roger Federer.

The seven-time Grand Slam champion had been waiting for Federer to take over his win-loss record of 82-3 and finish the calendar year with a higher winning percentage than McEnroe's .965 from 1984.

However, an injury to Federer's right ankle kept him out of action for six weeks and meant he only had a chance to equal the record at the Tennis Masters Cup. Federer then lost to David Nalbandian in the final on Sunday.

"It was nice to see how hard he was trying to beat my record because perhaps now people will realize that it's not easy as it looks to go 82-3," McEnroe said Thursday. "Roger has had a phenomenal year, he came up one short, but while it would have been nice to be tied with him, it is still sort of cool that I still have one record."

Federer finished 2005 with a 81-4 record, winning 11 titles, including his third straight Wimbledon and his second consecutive U.S. Open title. His loss to Nalbandian ended a 35-match winning streak.

In 1984, McEnroe won 14 titles, including Wimbledon and the U.S. Open.

"It puts into perspective how good my year was in '84, that he put in that sort of effort when he probably shouldn't have played," McEnroe said. "People are now going to start believing Roger is human."

McEnroe is in London to compete in the Champions Masters, the final event on the seniors tour, which starts Tuesday at Royal Albert Hall.

MissMoJo
12-01-2005, 03:01 AM
I'm sure he is

TenHound
12-01-2005, 05:23 AM
Off-season, so slightly OT....

To finish off Hingis story, there's an exc. long art. on her return on tennisweek.com. She played doubles w/JMac last yr. on WTT. Be fun to watch, if there are any tapes around. Anyway, he said, she'd Definitely Be Top 10 again...and quickly...the big deal for her is starting to physically work out hard enough to last...WTT was one set...Also, She's Training in Switzerland. (Her Mother will be her coach.) She'll play full sched. in Jan, possibly starting w/Tier II Sydney, and see how that goes. I hope she has the patience, to give herself a year or so, if necessary, to build herself up again. Mary Pierce's return @30, must tell her that she has a future...Yippeee...

Also, Jon Wertheim (Sports Illustrated - online) pub. letter this wk. discussing JMac's Legendary year. Aside from finishing 82-3 in singles, he played doubles w/Peter Fleming...frequently...no wonder that was his last yr. of note....Damn, how the awful power of today's game has ravaged the players...

nobama
12-01-2005, 06:59 PM
Yesterday, in the name of the Roger Federer Foundation, Lynette and Robbie Federer inaugurated a multipurpose sports site in the small municipality of Zwide, South Africa. During the solemn ceremony, the parents of Roger Federer handed over the site to the local organisation IMBEWU. The project has been realized and financed in close cooperation with Roger Federer's sponsor Nike.

The site contains two tennis courts as well as a court for basketball, netball and soccer. "I am tremendously proud that we have succeeded in making these great sport facilities available to the children and the young people. A great big thanks goes to Nike for the implementation. I am convinced that my sponsor will to do whatever it takes to maintain the site in perfect shape in the years to come so that as many kids as possible will be able to go in for sports and have a lot of fun there for a long time", said Roger.

Futher to housing sports activities the site serves a second purpose: in the future it will be the center for activities of the community - such as programs for AIDS-prevention. The courts are part of the international recycling program lead by Nike and are made of recycled shoes.

http://www.rogerfederer.com/data/img/0511str_imbewu_inaug_2_3498.jpg http://www.rogerfederer.com/data/img/0511str_imbewu_inaug_1_3502.jpg

Mrs. B
12-01-2005, 07:56 PM
well done. who knows, this place might produce a future talent! :)

Mrs. B
12-01-2005, 07:59 PM
Hingis coming back is absolutely fantastic news, and I'm sure Rogi is also thrilled about her comeback:bounce:!

maybe Mirka will also make a comeback? ;)

cris1085
12-01-2005, 08:36 PM
I don't think so. Mirka is too busy like p.r. for Roger. ;)

Billabong
12-02-2005, 04:34 AM
Great news, thanks:)

SUKTUEN
12-03-2005, 09:19 AM
Roger's mother is very work hard,
I am welcome Hinggis come back,

But Mirka is no need to do this, She done a Great Job now! :inlove: :inlove: :yeah: :yeah:

Stevens Point
12-03-2005, 05:14 PM
Since many of Roger fans here are interested in Hingis' come back, I post an article about today's her press conference.

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20051203/capt.klo30212031449.switzerland_tennis_hingis_klo3 02.jpg

news.yahoo.com

Hingis Hopes to Play in Australian Open

By BRADLEY S. KLAPPER, Associated Press Writer

ZURICH, Switzerland - Martina Hingis hopes to make her return to Grand Slam tennis at the Australian Open next month.

Hingis, who announced earlier this week that she was coming back after a three-year retirement, is considering Australian Open warmup tournaments in Hong Kong or Gold Coast, Australia.

"It's going to be great — four more weeks to go probably 'til I play my first tournament," the 25-year-old Swiss star said at a news conference.

The Hong Kong exhibition and Gold Coast tournament are scheduled for Jan. 2-9. The Australian Open begins Jan. 16.

"That would be the goal at the moment, to be able to participate at that level," said Hingis, who won the last of her three straight Australian Open titles in 1999.

Australian Open director Paul McNamee said this week he planned to give Hingis a wild card.

"She has not made up her own mind yet when she's coming back," he told Australian media. "We're hoping Australia, but it's not a fait accompli."

Her manager, Mario Widmar, said she will decide in the next eight days where to play her first event.

Hingis, who retired in 2002 after battling foot, heel and ankle problems said she was willing to "take the risk" of more injuries.

"With every job, you have to be willing to pay some kind of price," she said. "You have to be willing to play with pain to a certain level. The question is how much can you take."

Hingis' doctor said she would be closely monitored to make sure her previous battles with foot injuries did not reappear.

Dr. Heinz Buehlmann said Hingis was in good health and had overcome her ankle injuries, but her heel problems remained an issue.

"It's absolutely possible that that problem will come back one day," Buehlmann said. "It depends on how many tournaments she will play (and) it depends on the training."

Hingis made a brief comeback in February, losing in the first round of the Volvo Women's Open in Thailand. Her previous match was at Filderstadt in October 2002, after which she withdrew from all remaining tournaments.

Hingis won 40 singles titles — five Grand Slams — and 36 doubles titles on the WTA Tour. She was only 16 1/2 when she took over the top ranking in March 1997. She spent 209 of the next 247 weeks in the top spot.

Hingis made her debut on the WTA Tour on Oct. 4, 1994, four days after her 14th birthday. In 1997, she won three of the four majors and missed the Grand Slam by losing the
French Open final to Iva Majoli. In 1998, Hingis won all four doubles titles at the majors.

She is one of only five women to be ranked No. 1 in singles and doubles at the same time.

Billabong
12-03-2005, 11:26 PM
Martina:worship: Everybody's excited about her comeback, WTA might be very interesting next year:banana:!!!!!!!!!!

TenHound
12-03-2005, 11:44 PM
For those wondering about her ranking, etc. She's been out too long to have a protected ranking. But she can play anywhere anytime she wants since she won 5 Majors. Once you've won 3, you can get any WC's you want!

SUKTUEN
12-04-2005, 10:28 AM
:D I think Roger is Happy for Hinggis come back~! :D

RogiFan88
12-05-2005, 10:36 PM
Roger Federer, an exceptional athlete defying descriptions

Federer has become a familiar traveller, but his journey's end is not even in sight, writes Rohit Brijnath

The exceptional athlete moves us, he also makes us guess. What inspires him? What is his genius made of? How is he able, in times of stress, to reach down within himself, into the caverns of his mind, and where other men find nothing, abandoned even by hope, he discovers courage? Is this greatness?

It's hard to comprehend such uncommon men, they operate on a frequency we cannot pick up, they defy a thorough description for any analysis of them becomes part imagining. It's as if they exist in a parallel universe, and for two years it is where Roger Federer has resided.

Down 0-4 in the fifth set in Sunday's Masters Cup final in China, having lost the third and fourth sets 6-2, 6-1 to a fluent David Nalbandian, breathing like a climber in thin air, his crutches recently abandoned, no tournament played in 35 days, married to error, defeat appeared inevitable even understandable, still.. still, you thought, Federer is going to win!

It was absurd, but he has conditioned us to believe most things are possible with him. No match does this mature practitioner toss away.

But it is good Federer lost, for having inhaled his eloquence with the racket all year, we have been allowed to exhale. To appreciate his streaks, first they must break.

Winning streak

Constantly athletes talk of peaking, and of the exhaustion that follows the ascent of an athletic mountain. So then, what amalgam of physical and mental majesty, what purity of effort, must be required to win 24 consecutive finals?

Eleven tournaments he has won this year. Five of the last eight slams. Ten matches lost in two years. A head-to-head record since 2004 that stands at 4-1 vs Safin, 8-0 vs Hewitt, 6-0 vs Agassi. Of the four matches he lost this year, in two (Safin, Australian Open final; Gasquet, Monte Carlo) he had match points, and in a third, against Nalbandian, he served for the match. Only one day in the year, against Rafael Nadal in the French Open, did someone truly own him.

But Federer did more than produce statistical chaos and visual feasts. He has forced us to revise what we previously believed feasible within the boundaries of a tennis court. If Federer's game is sophisticated then he is also an affable, cosmopolitan man, and if he is bizarrely not completely embraced in America, he is at least embraced by an American. As Andy Roddick kidded, "I'd love to hate you, but you're really nice".

True professional

No stories follow Federer of excess, no tale haunts him of rudeness, accompanied as he is by a minimal entourage and substantial grace. In an era of the haughty, indulged superstar, it cannot be discounted. When he lost to Nadal in Paris, despite 62 unforced errors, he said firmly, "Never take anything away from somebody who beat me, because I was trying my best."

In the interview room he is responsive, forthright and occasionally amusing. Recently dubbed one of the world's sexiest men by People magazine, he was asked, in China, if coach Tony Roche was with him. Yes, he replied. Did he get any advice from Tony? Replied a grinning Federer: "Yeah. He doesn't just come here to hang out with me. I mean, he likes to visit the most sexiest guy alive once in a while, (but) he gave me some advice."

Federer appears to wear fame comfortably, but responsibly, not shy of using his status as a platform, preaching strongly the values of sport, believing that it can, as he once said, "bridge difficulties, cultures, conflicts". This is not a careless man. Last year, just before giving a speech at the UN, he told Tennis Week, "Even though it's only a few minutes, still, you want to do well and you have to come up with the right words."

Outside tennis, he helps educate disadvantaged South African children through his foundation. In tennis, he plays ambassador. For instance, to merely champion China as a Masters Cup venue is polite, but to chuck his crutches a week before and carry the tournament as others left abruptly is commitment. Asked later if he might have withdrawn from the final if it was a lesser event, he said: "No, Roger Federer doesn't pull out, otherwise he doesn't walk on court."

In a year when Andre Agassi, the ultimate arbiter, said "I think he's the best I've played against", Federer's peers may have to find solace in the barest of offerings, in the most miniscule of tears in his domination. Last year the Swiss won three Slams and the Masters Cup; this year only two slams. Federer has become in a short while a familiar traveller, but his journey's end is not even in sight. This is only the second year he has ended as No.1, Sampras did it six times. Will his body hold, his racket stay fluent, his polish as a man remain intact when defeat starts recurring? We do not know, for this exceptional athlete remains somewhat beyond our comprehension.

http://www.hindu.com/2005/11/24/stories/2005112404731900.htm

Has this been posted yet?

TenHound
12-06-2005, 02:06 AM
It's been discussed. He is such a superb writer, I wish Roger's new agent would get him a book contract & have him travel w/them & chronicle Roger's next year - A Year At the Peak of the Best Ever. Maybe I should go to Roger's site & see if I can start a thread urging it. Or manybe somebody w/more clout would like to. (I don't propose that RF/his people have any input into the manuscript, except for censoring any medical/tennis info. that could give his opponents inside info. & is to be withheld from publication until Roger retires.)

Fergie
12-06-2005, 02:11 AM
:worship:

Federer Wins ITWA's Player and Ambassador Awards

The International Tennis Writers Association (ITWA) has voted Roger Federer its Player of the Year for 2005 and awarded him its annual Ambassador for Tennis Award. It’s the second year in succession that Federer has scooped both of the organisation's annual accolades.

The Swiss won Wimbledon and the US Open and was runner-up at the Tennis Masters Cup during 2005, which saw him end the season as World No.1 for the third year running. ITWA’s 104 members (from 17 countries) voted for him as their Player of the Year ahead of Roland Garros champion Rafael Nadal.

Tennis journalists and broadcasters also recognized Federer’s professionalism and hard work with the media and his role in helping the sport reach out to new and existing fans. He beat the likes of Andre Agassi and James Blake to pick up his second ITWA Ambassador for Tennis Award.

“The fans see you out on court and maybe they think ‘He’s a great player’, but I don’t know if they realize how much we are doing off the court in trying to improve the game and the image of the sport, which from my point of view are very, very important,” said Federer.

“Roger embodies professional excellence on and off the court,” said Eleanor Preston, Co-President of ITWA. “His friendliness towards the media and his willing and open attitude to promoting tennis is an example to his peers in how to bring the sport to a wider audience. That, even more than his trophies and titles, could be Federer’s most important gift to tennis. We are very, very lucky to have him.”

ITWA voted Kim Clijsters its female Player of the Year and, like Federer, the Belgian also made it a clean sweep by picking up the ITWA Ambassador for Tennis Award.

ITWA was formed five years ago to represent the select group of journalists who travel the globe, week-in and week-out, covering tennis for the written and broadcast media. ITWA includes members from 17 countries and the coverage they provide brings tennis to millions worldwide. ITWA is committed to working with the sport's governing bodies, tournaments, agents and players both to improve the working conditions of tennis journalists and to gain recognition for the media's vital role in the promotion of the sport.

Billabong
12-06-2005, 04:10 AM
Kim and Roger:worship: In my opinion, the best 2 players of 2005:yeah:!

Minnie
12-06-2005, 11:59 AM
"We are very, very lucky to have him.” And so say all of us!

TenHound
12-07-2005, 05:30 AM
did anyone/everyone read Jon Wertheim's art. today - SI's tennis writer. It's posted over in main section of MTF? I can't figure out if he chose Roger as Men's player of the year. It looks like maybe a typo & his name was omitted. It says "Men's Player of the Year. No, Really?" Huh..?? Then Women's Player of the Year is next award - he names Kim. Then gives his reasons. Crazy.

Amusingly he also names Roger as Coach of the Year!!

TenHound
12-07-2005, 05:34 AM
Since the Above article mentioned Eleanor Preston, as co-head of Int'l Tennis Writers Assoc. & this if the off-season, I'll post her pre-AO interview w/Roger from last yr. She's one of my fave writers. I love this piece that was published in the Guardian. And I'm glad that she's getting her just due from her peers.

Federer works hard on the big easy

Eleanor Preston in Melbourne hears why even as gifted a talent as the world No1 can't afford an off-day

Friday January 14, 2005
The Guardian

Watching Roger Federer play tennis, it is hard to believe he has ever found anything difficult in his life. Moving with such grace, he seems so utterly in command of what he is doing that hitting a fluffy ball with a handful of graphite and Kevlar might as well be breathing in and out.

If he had a franc for every time someone in the bleachers or the commentary box has said he made tennis look easy he would be a good deal richer than he is already. Speak with him away from press-conference platitudes, though, and it does not take him long to persuade you that the business of being a fledgling legend is a sight harder than his laid-back demeanour and velvet shots make it seem.

"Once you get on a run you are just trying to keep it up. That sounds very easy but it's not, because you have to stay professional, you have to wake up every day for this one match, then you win and you play for the next match and it goes on and on and on," he says.

"I find it hard to stay professional all the time and I'd love to have more time for my friends, my family, my girlfriend, for vacations, but I know that my career won't last 50 years so I might as well do it properly for 10, then I can say I've had enough and take it easy. But I'm young and I love tennis and I'm not here to go on vacation and stay on the practice court. I'm an absolute match player."

Few would argue, especially not the likes of Andy Roddick, Lleyton Hewitt and Marat Safin, all of whom spent last year in Federer's slipstream. All three are great players and grand slam winners but none made even a tiny dent in the huge pile of ranking points Federer amassed in winning three of the season's four grand slams and the year-end Masters Cup in Houston.

It was one of those occasions when the epithet "world No1" seemed pathetically inadequate; for Roddick and the rest it must have been like trying to doggy-paddle past Michael Phelps.

Now, in 2005, Federer is attempting to do it all again, starting with the defence of his Australian Open title, which begins on Monday, and should he do so the hyperbole about whether he will turn out to be one of the greatest players of all time will turn up a notch.

At 23 he has won four grand slams, one fewer at that age than Pete Sampras, a man whose record of 14 major titles he looks more than capable of surpassing. "I think it's the wrong approach for people to think that I have the chance to break this record or that record, because I don't care about all the records that other people have done," Federer counters, keen perhaps to minimise the fuss that perpetually surrounds him.

"I'm not here to beat this guy's record or that guy's record. If I equal it or beat records then that's nice but I want to be remembered as Roger Federer, for what he has done, as a good player and idol to kids, because I'm not just acting out there on the court. This is me and I hope that the fans, especially kids, like to play like me and like my attitude and maybe want to be a little bit like me. I'm very proud that there might be kids out there saying 'I want to play like him' or 'I want to have his talent'."

Certainly the rest of the locker room yearns to be able to do what he can do with a tennis ball, even those who have claims to greatness themselves. "He's got the hands and the balance to be one of the best of all time, across the generations," says Martina Navratilova, an idol of the Swiss player. "Federer would still be a magician if you put a wooden racket in his hands."

The magician, speaking in his quiet but certain tone, is charmingly bemused by his own success and the preternatural talents that have helped him achieve it. "I spend my whole time being amazed," he says. "It's always a surprise to me. Sometimes I watch my matches in replay and I think 'Jeez, how did I pull that shot out?' or 'How lucky did I get with that rally?' but that's how tennis is, you know? It's played on instinct, it's natural and it's all about reaction and making the right decision when you only have a fraction of a second to think about it. Making the right choice is always the hardest thing."

Federer is not the sort of sportsman to ignore his multiple blessings in favour of a good whinge, but he is certainly keen to stress that there is far more to what he has done than merely hitting the ball across the net.

"You are standing there in front of thousands of people and you're trying to play your best and sometimes it just doesn't go like that. It's difficult. When you go and work in an office you don't have the best day every day but in our job the physical and the mental strengths have to be there, and the private life has to be intact so you don't lose your mind during changeovers and start thinking about weird stuff," he says. "It's very hard to keep it up but I've set myself a goal that in 10 years I can go and do something else, maybe something totally different outside tennis, but whatever I do I want to enjoy it.

"I've always dreamed of winning Wimbledon, of being No1 in the world, of leading the rankings, and I have to enjoy these moments. You should never forget how thankful you should be to the sport."

He expresses his thanks through tirelessly working with the media in a way that puts some of his less successful locker-room colleagues to shame. He is renowned among communications and tournament staff for his willingness to do more than his fair share of interviews and his linguistic gifts mean that he frequently has to do so in German, French and English.

"I never dreamed of being famous when I was younger - I only ever dreamed of winning Wimbledon and holding up that trophy. I never imagined that it takes so much around tennis. The fans, they see you out on the court and maybe they think 'He's a great player' but I don't know if they realise how much we are doing off court in trying to improve the game and the image of the sport, which from my point of view are very, very important.

"I don't get too nervous before interviews but I do worry that I'm going to say the wrong thing, especially when I'm swapping between vocabularies."

Whether it is interviews or scything through an opponent out on the court, it seems that being Roger Federer is anything but easy.


Federer's year of wonders

Australian Open February 1

Dropped two sets during the tournament, beating Marat Safin in the final.

Dubai March 6

Beat Feliciano López in the final.

Indian Wells March 21

Beat the British No1 Tim Henman in the final.

Hamburg May 16

An impressive win on clay, beating Guillermo Coria in the final.

French Open May 29

Suffered only defeat in a grand slam, losing to Gustavo Kuerten in the third round.

Halle June 13

Beat Mardy Fish in final.

Wimbledon July 4

Successfully defended his title, beating Andy Roddick in the final.

Gstaad July 11

Won his first title on home soil, beating Igor Andreev in the final.

Toronto August 1

Won fourth successive event, again beating Roddick in the final.


Olympics August 17

Suffered his last defeat of the year in the second round at the Athens Olympics.

US Open September 12

Defeated Andre Agassi in a five-set classic at the quarter-final stage, Henman in the semi-finals and Lleyton Hewitt in the final for his third grand slam of the year.


Bangkok October 3

Beat Roddick in final yet again.

Masters Cup, Houston November 21

Dropped one set during tournament and beat Hewitt in the final.

2004 stats

His 11 titles were the most by a player ending the year as No1 since Ivan Lendl did the same in 1985.

Became first player since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three grand slam titles in a season.

Compiled records of 46-4 on hard, 16-2 on clay and 12-0 on grass.

Earned $6,357,547 (£3.35m), just short of record set by Pete Sampras in 1997 ($6,498,311).

nobama
12-07-2005, 07:01 AM
did anyone/everyone read Jon Wertheim's art. today - SI's tennis writer. It's posted over in main section of MTF? I can't figure out if he chose Roger as Men's player of the year. It looks like maybe a typo & his name was omitted. It says "Men's Player of the Year. No, Really?" Huh..?? Then Women's Player of the Year is next award - he names Kim. Then gives his reasons. Crazy.

Amusingly he also names Roger as Coach of the Year!!Maybe he meant that as a joke...as in 'you really have to ask?' And he should be coach of the year...I still think he coaches himself more than Rochey does.

SUKTUEN
12-07-2005, 07:20 AM
"We are very, very lucky to have him.” And so say all of us!

Absolutly Right~!!!!!!!!

Thankyou My LORD~!!! :worship: :worship: :worship:

RogiFan88
12-07-2005, 05:03 PM
As if we didn't know this but I'm posting anyway:

Federer and Nadal ruled 2005

Sports Network
12/6/2005 3:56:24 PM

Philadelphia, PA (Sports Network) - The great Roger Federer and Spanish sensation Rafael Nadal basically dominated men's tennis in 2005, while some big wins also came for talented Russian Marat Safin, gritty Argentine David Nalbandian and a couple of Croats.

Safin got the exciting season off with a bang by capturing the Aussie Open, which he did by beating heavy crowd favorite Lleyton Hewitt in the final at Rod Laver Arena. But his eye-popping win in Melbourne came when he stunned the mighty Federer in an incredible five-set semifinal, including a 9-7 fifth. The Fed was the reigning Aussie champ at the time and in the midst of a 26-match winning streak, which dated back to last year's U.S. Open.

Unfortunately for the two-time Grand Slam champion Safin, the oft-injured star was basically a non-factor following his Aussie success, as he battled knee problems and appeared in only one other final the rest of the year, losing to Federer on grass in Halle.

At the French Open, the 19-year-old Nadal, playing the best clay-court tennis of anyone in the world at the time, prevailed in Paris, with his key victory coming over Federer in the semis. Federer's loss to Nadal guaranteed that the Swiss would not duplicate his three-major-title season from 2004. Nadal went on to defeat Argentine and fellow lefthander Mariano Puerta in the Roland Garros finale to secure his first-ever piece of Grand Slam hardware.

The world No. 2 Nadal, who entered 2005 ranked 51st, was a brilliant 79-10 this season, including an ATP-co-leading 11 titles (along with Federer). The powerful southpaw from Mallorca was a sizzling 50-2 on clay, notching eight of his titles on the slowest of surfaces.

Clad in those clam diggers, Nadal also tied Federer this year by piling up four Masters Series shields, three of which came on his beloved clay, and split a pair of matches with Federer in '05, improving his career record against the sublime Swiss to 2-1. Federer overcame a two-sets-to-none deficit before charging back to top the raging bull in five sets in the final at the NASDAQ-100 Open in Miami, the so-called "fifth slam."

In one of several memorable matches this year, the electric Nadal outlasted Argentine speedster Guillermo Coria in a 5-hour, 14-minute epic five-setter at the Italian Masters in Rome.

Nadal and Federer combined to win three of the four majors and eight of the nine Masters Series events this season.

Wow!

The six-time Grand Slam titlist Federer finally picked up the major pace at his favorite event, Wimbledon. He corralled the coveted championship in overwhelming fashion for a third straight year and is currently riding a 21- match winning streak at the famed All England Club, including back-to-back victories over American Andy Roddick in the last two finals at SW19.

The two-time year-end No. 1 Federer also repeated at the U.S. Open, where he ended a Cinderella run by legendary American Andre Agassi with a four-set victory in a dream finale.

The 24-year-old Federer was an astounding 81-4, with his 11 titles, in 2005 and pocketed over $6 million just in prize money. He was going for a third straight Tennis Masters Cup championship last month when he got derailed by his nemesis Nalbandian, who shocked the supreme Swiss in five sets in the final in Shanghai after Federer ran out to a two-sets-to-none lead. In all fairness to Federer, he headed to Shanghai after being idle for six weeks, mostly due to an ankle injury that had him on crutches at one point.

Had Federer beaten Nalbandian in the Masters Cup final, he would have equaled John McEnroe's record 1984 campaign of 82-3. Federer's four '05 setbacks came at the hands of Safin, Nadal, Nalbandian and young Frenchman Richard Gasquet, who stunned the Swiss on red clay in a quarterfinal at the prestigious Monte- Carlo Masters.

Nalbandian still has to be credited with pulling off one of the biggest upsets of the year, however, as he fought back to dethrone the Swiss, halting Federer's finals winning streak at an amazing 24. Federer was also riding a career-best 35-match overall winning streak and had won his previous 14 Masters Cup tilts.

Oddly enough, Nalbandian wasn't even supposed to be on hand for his Shanghai surprise, but he joined the field following a rash of withdrawals, specifically one by an ailing Roddick.

Nalbandian is currently a surprising 6-4 lifetime against his former junior rival Federer, but had dropped his last four meetings with the elegant Swiss, including a round-robin match against him earlier in the week in Shanghai.

Despite reaching a second straight Wimbledon final, you would almost have to consider '05 an off year for the former No. 1 Roddick. Wouldn't you? Yes, he finished an impressive third in the ATP Race and won a lot of matches (59) and five titles, but none of the titles came at Grand Slams or Masters Series events and he bowed out in the second round or worse in half of the majors. He landed in the semis at the Aussie Open and the final at Wimbledon, but he dropped his second-rounder at the French and suffered an embarrassing opening- round loss against Luxembourg's Gilles Muller (who?) at his favorite tourney, the U.S. Open.

And let's face it, the 23-year-old American can't beat Federer, who's 10-1 in their lopsided lifetime series, including wins in the last six meetings, two of which came in 2005.

On the bright side, Roddick might not be the only quality under-35 American anymore, as the aforementioned Blake and Robby Ginepri turned in strong seasons by seemingly coming out of nowhere. The 25-year-old Blake compiled 35 match wins and a pair of titles in rebounding from a nightmarish 2004, while the 23-year-old Ginepri recorded 37 wins and a title and reached his first career Grand Slam semifinal at the U.S. Open, where he succumbed to the ageless Agassi in five entertaining sets at Ashe Stadium.

Another former No. 1, Hewitt, appeared in only 10 events in 2005, winning one in Sydney way back in January. He also lost to Federer in the Wimbledon and U.S. Open semis in a season that saw him slowed by some injuries. The fiery star also married fellow Aussie Bec Cartwright and the couple welcomed their first child, a daughter, into the world just last month.

Hewitt appeared to have recaptured his top form, but, unfortunately for him, a guy named Federer, and perhaps Nadal, will probably keep the Aussie from reaching the top of the rankings again.

By the way, Hewitt has lost his last nine meetings with the awesome Fed, after the Aussie had won seven of their first nine career clashes.

We can't forget to talk some more about the tennis ambassador that is Agassi, who suffered through back problems all year to go 38-12 with one title and the unlikely run in Flushing. Agassi required several cortisone shots just in order to compete off-and-on in '05.

The 35-year-old Agassi wowed the fans with his effort in the Big Apple, including an epic five-set quarterfinal victory over his previously red-hot fellow American James Blake. Agassi overcame Blake despite dropping the first two sets 6-3, 6-3 and ultimately came out on top by winning a frenetic fifth- set tiebreak.

The 20-year pro and eight-time Grand Slam champ will return for another season in 2006.

And in the quietest 56-match-win category, Russian Nikolay Davydenko wound up fifth in the ATP Race and played in the Masters Cup semis. He also reached the French Open semis and Aussie Open quarters.

Plenty of other young ATP stars appear to be on the rise, such as Gasquet, his fellow Frenchman Gael Monfils, Serbian Novak Djokovic and Czech Tomas Berdych, to name a few. The 20-year-old Berdych was the only player aside from Federer and Nadal to win a Masters Series tourney in '05, as the promising Czech landed the top prize at the at the Paris Masters last month. He upset hot Croat Ivan Ljubicic in the final there.

Just a reminder, Berdych was the guy who shocked Federer at last year's Olympic Games in Athens.

And last but not least, the year in men's tennis officially came to a close when Croatia captured its first-ever Davis Cup title by beating the host Slovak Republic 3-2 in the World Group final. The tie came down to a deciding fifth rubber, which saw instant hero Mario Ancic straight-set Michal Mertinak to prompt a national celebration in Croatia, which was once part of the former Yugoslavia. The tough Ljubicic wound up going an almost-immortal 11-1 in Davis Cup action this year (7-1 singles; 4-0 doubles), one win shy of McEnroe's record 12-0 mark back in 1982.

Croatia also became the first unseeded nation to win the Cup.

On the circuit, Ljubicic won 57 matches, including two titles, and appeared in eight finals for the year. Only Federer and Nadal reached more title matches in '05 and three of Ljubicic's finals setbacks came against, who else, Federer.

And I would be remiss if I didn't mention one of my favorite matches of the year, that marathon U.S. Open third-rounder between Italian journeyman Davide Sanguinetti and popular Thai Paradorn Srichaphan. The knockdown-dragout affair lasted for 4 hours, 24 minutes, with a severely-cramping Sanguinetti miraculously coming out on top under the lights in a fifth-set tiebreak.

The '06 season will get underway January 2 in Doha, Chennai and Adelaide.
http://www.tsn.ca/tennis/news_story.asp?ID=145942&hubName=tennis

nobama
12-07-2005, 07:18 PM
Someone posted the cover of SI in GM. Roger's name is on the cover. Apparently there is a story on him inside the magazine, and no it's not by John Weirtham. I'll have to buy the mag now, even though he should be the cover boy. :rolleyes:

RogiFan88
12-09-2005, 09:52 PM
Rogi's latest award:

Roger Federer lauréat de l'Académie française des sports

L'Académie française des sports a attribué son Grand Prix annuel au Suisse Roger Federer, "indiscutable Numéro Un mondial du tennis pour son talent et son esprit sportif", a annoncé le président de l'institution, Alain Danet, jeudi à Paris.

Le prix, qui récompense "à la fois le Numéro Un et une élégance morale indiscutable", a été attribué à l'unanimité du jury, a souligné Jean Durry, secrétaire général de l'Académie.

...

. Grand Prix de l'Académie des Sports (plus bel exploit sportif dans le monde): Roger Federer (Suisse - Tennis) pour ses 80 victoires en 2005;

...

http://www.tsr.ch/tsr/index.html?siteSect=600001&sid=6301082&cKey=1134057676000

Rogi won the Grand Prix for 2005 from the French Sports Academy as the undisputed World No 1 tennis player, for his talent and his sportsmanship. He was honoured not only for being No 1 but also for his "élégance morale indiscutable" -- literally his "undisputed moral elegance" -- you know what they mean. Rogi received the award for his 80 victories in 2005 [altho it is now 81!].

Well done, Rogi!! You deserve every accolade from around the world. ;)

SUKTUEN
12-10-2005, 10:35 AM
thanks

casillas_girl
12-10-2005, 07:37 PM
:yeah: great Roger! He deserves it!

nobama
12-11-2005, 02:08 AM
I see Shane Warne beat out Roger for BBC overseas sports person of the year. That's a bummer. Although he won it last year so maybe they didn't want to give it to the same person two years in a row. :shrug:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/cricket/4514838.stm

^Sue^
12-11-2005, 05:58 AM
I hope Roger can try his best at the upcoming Australian Open,yeah!!!

Minnie
12-11-2005, 10:33 AM
I see Shane Warne beat out Roger for BBC overseas sports person of the year. That's a bummer. Although he won it last year so maybe they didn't want to give it to the same person two years in a row. :shrug:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/cricket/4514838.stm

You know more than I do, Mirkaland, and I live in the UK :haha: Ah well, didn't expect Rogi to win it again this year. That means that boring game of cricket has probably won the 2 main awards then (I know Rogi likes cricket - supports the Oz team I believe. I've never understood it and when I watched a clip of him having a go at batting at the 2005 Oz Open and he said he knew what a 'Yorkie' was, I was impressed - I thought it was the name of a chocolate bar :lol:

lunahielo
12-11-2005, 10:40 AM
Originally posted by Minnie
I watched a clip of him having a go at batting at the 2005 Oz Open and he said he knew what a 'Yorkie' was, I was impressed - I thought it was the name of a chocolate bar

And I thought it was the name of a little dog! :)

nobama
12-11-2005, 10:09 PM
Is Roger going to win this award again this year?

http://www.sports-awards.ch/de/index.php

kjo
12-11-2005, 10:17 PM
From this week's Sports Illustrated:


Roger Federer: Swing Shift
In trouble in the U.S. Open final against Andre Agassi, the Swiss wizard reached deep and recovered his magic touch

By S.L. Price


Roger Federer stumbled. It was nearing 6:15 p.m., and he'd just dumped another routine backhand into the net. A shocked tennis world, a hopeful New York City crowd and a desperate Andre Agassi found themselves witnessing the sport's rarest sight: Federer, the epitome of grace under pressure, buckling as his game unraveled. So when that shot flopped into the net, giving Agassi a 4-2 third-set lead in a 2005 U.S. Open final deadlocked at a set apiece, and Federer finished the stroke with the slightest of trips, everyone at Arthur Ashe Stadium that September evening suddenly wondered: Is he actually going down?

Now here came Agassi. The 35-year-old son of a boxer pounded serves to his opponent's backhand like a middleweight working a cut and seized a 30-0 lead. The championship, a ninth Grand Slam singles title, seemed in Agassi's reach. Federer's serve had lost its customary bite, his ground strokes were a mess. He kept hitting short backhand slices for Agassi to feast on. "I had his back against the wall," Agassi would say.

"I started to feel it slipping," Federer says. "I definitely sensed, It's going his way here."

By any standard Federer had had a superb year going into the Open: the 2005 Wimbledon title, a 9-0 record in tournament finals (22-0 going back to July '03), just three losses in 67 matches. But two of those defeats had come at Grand Slam events -- the Australian and French opens -- and a loss in New York would have redefined the game's No. 1 player as vulnerable on the big stage. Federer needed this win. His ability to change tactics in mid-match has always been remarkable, but now he had to dig out quality shots on the run, against the toughest of opponents, with thousands screaming against him. And he did.

Yet, Federer admits, he almost can't take credit for the point that turned his year from superb to historic. At 4-2, 30-0 Agassi served to Federer's backhand again. Three strokes into the rally, Federer knew he had to do something special with his weakest weapon. And perhaps the most telling thing about him is that, at that crucial instant, he took a huge risk: He rolled a low-percentage inside-out backhand up the line. The shot wasn't clean. He shanked it, in fact. The ball veered, dipped and somehow landed in the corner. Federer hardly celebrated. He looked stunned and relieved, like someone emerging unscathed from a car crash.

"I got a little lucky," he says. "Let's say that shot goes out and it's 40-love. I'm not going to come back from there. It's 5-2 and a different match. But from 30-15 on I turned it around. It's all about staying in there and giving yourself a chance. The chance will come."

A lot of players say that, but Federer knows it. From 30-15 he broke Agassi with ease and then began grooving his serve for the first time all fortnight. Somehow, one bad shot had given tennis's greatest shotmaker his game back. But it took a bit longer for Federer to assume complete control. Four times he had Agassi, serving at 5-5, at break point, and four times Agassi escaped. "Federer's choking!" John McEnroe announced, but Agassi knew his chance was slipping away. Holding on for his tennis life, he ended the game by blasting a 118-mph serve down the T, then clenched his fist and shouted, "Yes!" The stadium shook. Here was the upset of the decade, the match of Agassi's career, the chance to win before his countrymen and retire in the best way possible, and....

Federer crushed him. This time luck had nothing to do with it. His serve now impregnable, he held easily at 5-6 to force a tiebreak. His backhand on form, he punished Agassi with it in the breaker, not a slice to be seen, finishing the 7-1 rout by rolling one last killer backhand and bellowing at the feel of it. Then he took the fourth set 6-1, becoming the first man in 68 years to win both Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in consecutive years. Afterward Agassi couldn't invent enough ways to say Federer was the best player he'd ever faced. "The standard and the options and the talent and the execution that he shows in all the biggest matches -- it's crazy," Agassi said.

Crazy? No. For the last year or so Federer has been using a phrase that in his Swiss-accented English sounds odd. "Oh, I played zik tennis there," he'll say, and to virgin ears it takes awhile for the nickel to drop: Sick, he said. I played sick tennis. He never really defined it, not in words anyway, until that Sunday in Flushing Meadow. You had to see it to believe it. Zik tennis, indeed.

Issue date: December 12, 2005

RogiFan88
12-11-2005, 10:22 PM
Thanks, kjo, but that article is almost more about AA than it is about our Rogi. Definitely NOT buying the SI mag. ;)

nobama
12-11-2005, 10:47 PM
Anyone heard this song... :tape: :haha:

http://www.telebasel.ch/php/videoarchiv/link.php?do=out&id=5764

nobama
12-11-2005, 10:59 PM
Some Roger videos I found...

http://www.telebasel.ch/php/videoarchiv/link.php?do=out&id=4918

http://www.telebasel.ch/php/videoarchiv/link.php?do=out&id=4910

http://www.telebasel.ch/php/videoarchiv/link.php?do=out&id=2084

http://www.telebasel.ch/php/videoarchiv/link.php?do=out&id=1567

http://www.telebasel.ch/php/videoarchiv/link.php?do=out&id=1403

http://www.telebasel.ch/php/videoarchiv/link.php?do=out&id=4914

kjo
12-11-2005, 11:08 PM
Rogifan, I agree but figured I'd post anyway. I guess this is how they are trying to make Roger interesting to the US audience.

nobama
12-11-2005, 11:13 PM
Thanks, kjo, but that article is almost more about AA than it is about our Rogi. Definitely NOT buying the SI mag. ;)I did break down and buy it. :o But as a consolation....no article on Tiger, Lance or Annkia. In fact aside from Tom Brady, I think Roger was one of only three others with a write-up. So it's better than nothing, I guess. Hopefully he can win the Swiss Sportsman for the third year in a row. :) Especially since the BBC overseas award went to Shane Warne.

Sjengster
12-12-2005, 12:01 AM
You know more than I do, Mirkaland, and I live in the UK :haha: Ah well, didn't expect Rogi to win it again this year. That means that boring game of cricket has probably won the 2 main awards then (I know Rogi likes cricket - supports the Oz team I believe. I've never understood it and when I watched a clip of him having a go at batting at the 2005 Oz Open and he said he knew what a 'Yorkie' was, I was impressed - I thought it was the name of a chocolate bar :lol:

If that's what he actually said, then he knows less about it than he thinks - it's actually a yorker. ;)

Roger does support the Aussie cricket team, but I won't hold that against him. :p The US Open victory came the day before we won back the Ashes, it couldn't have been a better two sporting days as far as I'm concerned.

Minnie
12-12-2005, 12:51 AM
If that's what he actually said, then he knows less about it than he thinks - it's actually a yorker. ;)

Roger does support the Aussie cricket team, but I won't hold that against him. :p The US Open victory came the day before we won back the Ashes, it couldn't have been a better two sporting days as far as I'm concerned.

Actually, I reckon its me that's probably got it wrong because I know zero about cricket (and care even less).

bokehlicious
12-12-2005, 07:01 AM
Is Roger going to win this award again this year?

http://www.sports-awards.ch/de/index.php

This year Lüthi and Lambiel will probably challenge Roger for this award... :( :p

nobama
12-12-2005, 11:41 AM
This year Lüthi and Lambiel will probably challenge Roger for this award... :( :pWell Roger won it in 2003 and 2004 so I guess three years in a row would be kinda tough. I wonder if he'll be there though?

bokehlicious
12-12-2005, 12:38 PM
Well Roger won it in 2003 and 2004 so I guess three years in a row would be kinda tough. I wonder if he'll be there though?

According to this he should be present in Bern fot the awards ceremony: "Roger Federer und Karin Thürig, die Sportler des Jahres 2004, sind auch für die "Credit Suisse Sports Awards 2005" unter den Nominierten. Die Wahl wird am Samstag, 17. Dezember, an der Fernsehgala (ab 20.05 Uhr auf SF1, TSR2 und TSI2) in der BEA-Halle Bern vorgenommen."

This year I think the two others guys deserve this award too, so I guess they'll change the winner (I personnaly bet on Lüthi, as he's swiss-german and Lambiel is swiss-french :o ) and show that Switzerland has not only one unique sportman :angel:

Skyward
12-12-2005, 01:22 PM
Lambiel doesn't deserve it. He won Worlds with a mediocre free program in the absence of Plushenko. IMO, it can not be compared to Roger's 2 Slams, No1 ranking, and 11 titles. I have no idea who Lüthi is. :o

Doris Loeffel
12-12-2005, 01:22 PM
Well to be honest I also believe it'll go to Lüthi this time. (Don't think Lambiel has a chance - not becouse he's form the french spoken part but becouse he "just won one event" the worldchampionship other than that he didn't win much.

And as already mentioned Roger won it in 2003 and 2004 and compared to the real big titles 2005 was not quite as good as 2004 (3 GS 1 TMC) to "just" 2 GS...

bokehlicious
12-12-2005, 01:35 PM
I have no idea who Lüthi is. :o

He's the next Valentino Rossi :o :rolleyes:

bokehlicious
12-12-2005, 01:38 PM
Well to be honest I also believe it'll go to Lüthi this time. (Don't think Lambiel has a chance - not becouse he's form the french spoken part but becouse he "just won one event" the worldchampionship other than that he didn't win much.

And as already mentioned Roger won it in 2003 and 2004 and compared to the real big titles 2005 was not quite as good as 2004 (3 GS 1 TMC) to "just" 2 GS...

I was joking about the language :p ... I also obviously find that Tom deserves it more than Stéphane :worship:

Skyward
12-12-2005, 02:05 PM
He's the next Valentino Rossi :o :rolleyes:

Oh,ok. Sorry, I don't follow motorcycle racing.

RogiFan88
12-12-2005, 02:36 PM
I'm w Doris, I think they'll give it to Luthi, who won in Valencia.

nobama
12-12-2005, 07:18 PM
I think if Roger doesn't win it's only because he won in 2003 and 2004. That's probably why he didn't win the BBC award....because he won it in 2004. I saw the video of him from last year. It was so cute, he was via satellite from Australia. His mother came on stage to collect the award and he smiled and waved to her. :)

SUKTUEN
12-12-2005, 11:10 PM
thnkas

Stevens Point
12-13-2005, 09:17 AM
www.foxsports.com

Federer's still the man to chase for '06

Matthew Cronin / tennisreporters.net


Now that Roger Federer has proven he's not invincible — when playing on one leg — hope springs eternal for the rest of the elite players in 2006.

Or does it?

David Nalbandian's 6-7(4), 6-7(11), 6-2, 6-1, 7-6(3) stunner of the world's No. 1-ranked player in the final of the Tennis Masters Cup does show off the fact that the cagey Argentine still has the Swiss' number on certain occasions. However, given how tired Federer was in the last three sets due to the fact that he was out seven weeks before Shanghai with an ankle injury, the result does not indicate that his top ranking is at serious risk — yet.

What it does demonstrate is that Federer has come back down to earth. His historical streak of winning 24 finals in a row is over, and even though he had one of his best seasons ever, he was unable to tie John McEnroe's all-time best match record of 82-3.

"I knew I was putting all those records on the line when I came," he said. "So that it happened is sort of, in a way, almost normal. It's just a pity now that I was so close."

With six Grand Slam titles by the age of 24, Federer has already worked himself into the discussion as being the best of all time in his sport, but in order to catch up to Pete Sampras' record of 14 Slam titles match him as a six-time year-end No.1, Federer needs to stay focused and his body healthy because, really, catching Sampras would not only prove to be a feat of brilliance, but one of mental staying power.

Eclipsing Sampras records means a good five more years of stellar play like his last two seasons, when he's won 22 of his 33 titles — including five Grand slams.

"Both years were fantastic," Federer said. "Totally different. I lost less matches this year, but I guess last year was better because of winning three Grand Slams (and) one Masters Cup. I can hardly do any better than that. But this year was just incredible because I was on so many streaks. (I) hardly ever lost a match. At times I felt invincible. That is a very hard feeling to get."

It's not only hard to get, but it's a feeling he may never get again, especially if the tour's up-and-comers and other established elite raise their personal bars.

Nalbandian is one of the few men who has shown that he has enough variety and willpower to trouble Federer, even when the Swiss star is on. The perennially injured Argentine looked like a sure-fire, top-five player when he emerged as a 20-year-old back in 2002 and reached the Wimbledon final. But as many big wins as he has racked up, he took some heartbreaking losses at the Slams.

Now, with his win at men's tennis's fifth major in Shanghai, Nalbandian may have developed enough confidence not only to be the best man in a very deep group of players, but to be a guy who can challenge Federer during all of 2006.

"I always play good in the big tournaments," said Nalbandian, who will end the year ranked No. 6. "I was in the quarters, semis, some finals. I feel that I can be up there at any moment."

There were three other men who bested Federer in 2005: Russian Marat Safin, who shocked the Swiss star in the Australian Open semis and then went on to win the title; Spanish teen and world No. 2 Rafael Nadal, who out-legged Federer in the French Open semis and then won the title, and French teen Richard Gasquet, who upset Federer in Monte Carlo.

All those players have enough talent to push Federer on great days, but whether they and anyone else can do it week in and week out on a variety of surfaces and locales is very much up for debate.

It's the young guns that may have the best shot.

Nadal has the firepower to dominate on clay and on slow hard courts, but he needs to step further inside the baseline and improve his serve if he is going to master quicker surfaces.

Gasquet has a beautiful all around game but a questionable head and heart. However, his fellow French teen, 18-year-old Gael Monfils, is tall, strong, fast and on the verge of a big breakout year. And don't forget 20-year-old Czech Tomas Berdych, who won the Paris Indoors tournament and can serve and groundstroke anyone off the court when he's in the proverbial zone.

The veteran contenders are all question marks.

Safin has won all surfaces except for grass, but has a troubling knee injury that he refuses to have surgery on — which will likely reduce him to being a part time player next year.

No. 3 Andy Roddick is 1-10 against Federer, and although he won five titles in 2005, he's now contending with a back problem and didn't win a Slam to Masters Series crown in '05 — not a becoming record for a one-time No. 1.

Aussie Lleyton Hewitt is likely to spend 2006 learning how to be a new father, and while Russia's Nicolay Davydenko and Ivan Ljubicic had standout seasons, both seem unsure of themselves at the majors.

The legendary Andre Agassi put some nice results together when he played, but with his chronic back and hip problems, it's doubtful he'll light the world on fire for more than a few weeks in 2006.

Nalbandian's Argentine compatriots — Guillermo Coria, Gaston Gaudio and Mariano Puerta — all slumped off the clay in 2005 and have never diversified enough to become feared players when they wipe the red dirt off their souls.

So unless Nalbandian, Nadal and the other young guns make a big charge next year, it will very likely be Federer looking down on the field once again. After 2006, we'll really know whether he can make a serious run at Sampras' records.

"No. 1 is going to be a huge priority for me," Federer said of 2006.

"It always starts with the Aussie Open, and that always gives you sort of a clue (of) how the season's going to be. Wimbledon, my whole career, will stay a huge goal. Maybe I can give myself another chance at the French Open. Those are my three goals. Other than that, I still have plenty of things I would like to achieve."

avocadoe
12-13-2005, 01:03 PM
nice to read an article...thanks...the tennis lull is lamosy half over...we should begin to get some training reports...I wonder if Cronin's right about Safin, ie no surgery?

MissMoJo
12-13-2005, 03:05 PM
Nalbandian is one of the few men who has shown that he has enough variety and willpower to trouble Federer, even when the Swiss star is on
umm...no

bokehlicious
12-13-2005, 03:10 PM
Do they mean that Roger was really 100% on in the Shangai final ? :eek:

SUKTUEN
12-13-2005, 03:20 PM
Do they mean that Roger was really 100% on in the Shangai final ? :eek:

WHAT???????????? :fiery: :fiery:

bokehlicious
12-13-2005, 04:24 PM
When I read that, it's my conclusion... "Nalbandian is one of the few men who has shown that he has enough variety and willpower to trouble Federer, even when the Swiss star is on"

Except Shangai, I don't remember a recent match in which David has really troubled Roger... :confused:

SUKTUEN
12-13-2005, 04:44 PM
Forget it~~~

nobama
12-13-2005, 11:37 PM
Did someone from GM write that article? Go back to the US Open match and then you'll see what happens to Nalby when Rogi is really on. I don't think anyone would say that Roger was 100%, or even 75% in the TMC final. And he still came within 2 points of winning that match.

avocadoe
12-14-2005, 01:52 PM
Roger was 44 percent at the Nalby final, tops...

SUKTUEN
12-14-2005, 02:27 PM
44% what ?

bokehlicious
12-14-2005, 02:29 PM
firt serve I think. With his injury he seemed to have problem with his serve (not only in the final)...

SUKTUEN
12-14-2005, 02:34 PM
his injury made him make have no ower to serve

SUKTUEN
12-14-2005, 02:34 PM
his injury made him make have no power to serve :sad:

tonia9
12-15-2005, 01:23 PM
From rf.com

OFF COURT - CREDIT SUISSE SPORTS AWARDS 2005


The elections for the Swiss Athlete of the Year will be held this coming Saturday. Roger has once again been nominated for the "Credit Suisse Sports Award" and is certainly hoping to win it for a third consecutive time after having taken it home in 2003 and 2004. His impressive season with 11 tournament titles, including two Grand Slams, and a large variety of records definitely gives him excellent chances.

And now it's your turn (if you live in Switzerland, that is)! The Swiss Athlete of the Year will be elected by the Swiss TV audience via TED during the show. The event will be broadcast live on Saturday, December 17, 2005, from 20.05 on SF1, TSR2 and TSI2 - so don't miss it!

The other athletes nominated in Roger's category are Stéphane Lambiel (Figure skating) and Tom Lüthi (Motorcycling).



I wish I could vote. :sad:

RogiFan88
12-15-2005, 02:37 PM
Just a bit of OLD gossip:

• Dr. Phil blew up backstage at David Letterman when producers informed him he'd play second fiddle to U.S. Open champ Roger Federer. He obviously didn't have one of his self-help books on hand.

http://www.jossip.com/gossip/david-letterman/index.php

SUKTUEN
12-15-2005, 03:59 PM
THANKS

Stevens Point
12-17-2005, 07:05 PM
Yahoo, Reuters

YEARENDER-Tennis-Federer in a class of his own again

By Martyn Herman

LONDON, Dec 16 (Reuters) - Roger Federer's defeat in the last match of 2005 ended 11 months of virtual invincibility that had stamped his name all over tennis for the second year in succession.

Spanish teenager Rafael Nadal's amazing claycourt streak and Kim Clijsters's return from injury to claim a first grand slam title briefly turned the spotlight off Federer.

Croatia's thrilling Davis Cup triumph over Slovakia gave the year a novel finale, as did the news of an imminent return for former world number one Martina Hingis.

For sheer sustained brilliance, however, Federer was in a class of his own despite a Masters Cup final defeat by David Nalbandian that ended a 35-match winning streak.

The fact that the Swiss maestro arrived in China barely able to walk after an ankle injury but still reached the final, coming within one win of John McEnroe's professional-era record of 82-3 for the year, speaks volumes for his pedigree.

His five-set defeat by Argentina's Nalbandian ended a run of 24 consecutive victories in finals, an amazing record bolstered by successful defences of his Wimbledon and U.S. Open crowns and nine other titles in a year that pocketed him more than six million dollars in prize money alone.

Of just four defeats, two came in the semi-finals to the eventual winners at the Australian and French Opens.

An inspired Marat Safin proved his equal in a thriller in Melbourne before the unpredictable Russian took out Lleyton Hewitt in the final to claim a second grand slam title.

Nadal then bullied Federer into submission on the Roland Garros clay, blunting the world number one's magic with an awesome display of skill and aggression.

The ferocious young Spaniard floored Argentina's Mariano Puerta in four brutal sets in the final to become the first debutant to win the French Open since Mats Wilander in 1982.

FRUSTRATING YEAR

Nadal is now Federer's closest challenger, especially as Andy Roddick's form stagnated during a frustrating year for the American gunslinger.

He did reach the Wimbledon final, only to be swatted aside for the second year running by Federer.

"I don't know many people in history who could beat him," Roddick said afterwards of the player he now trails 10-1 in head-to-heads.

Like Roddick, another former world number one Hewitt has fallen under Federer's spell, losing their last nine encounters.

Veteran American Andre Agassi has also bowed to the new king, although the 35-year-old eight-times grand slam champion showed flashes of his vintage best to push Federer hard in a memorable U.S. Open final.

Sadly Agassi's creaking back will limit his appearances in what most feel will be the final year of his illustrious career.

When Federer scans the horizon for long-term challengers to his supremacy other than Nadal, he will see French duo Richard Gasquet, who beat him at Monte Carlo, and Gael Monfils, as well as fast-rising teenagers Andy Murray from Britain and Serbian upstart Novak Djokovic.

The women's game was dominated by stunning comebacks, with Belgians Clijsters and Justine Henin-Hardenne, Frances's Mary Pierce and Venus Williams all scaling the heights to prove their doubters wrong.

Serena Williams, however, ended the year outside the world's top 10 for the first time since 1998, despite bagging her seventh grand slam title at the Australian Open.

Henin-Hardenne, dogged by injury and illness for much of 2004, blazed to victory at the French Open with a rapid demolition of a tearful Pierce, who herself had rediscovered her best form after years in the wilderness.

LONGEST FINAL

Wimbledon's enthralled fans witnessed an astonishing women's final between Venus Williams and Lindsay Davenport.

The American sluggers went toe to toe in the longest women's singles final at the All England Club, 14th seed Venus prevailing after nearly three hours of Centre Court warfare.

It ended a run of five consecutive defeats in grand slam finals for Venus stretching back to 2002, all to her sister.

The 30-year-old Pierce produced another stirring run at the U.S. Open, reaching the final for the first time, but received another thrashing, this time by Clijsters.

The Belgian won 6-3 6-1 to lose the unwanted tag of being the best player not to have won a grand slam, just months after returning from a career-threatening wrist injury.

Remarkably she began the year ranked outside the top 100, marking her return in sensational style by becoming only the second woman to win Indian Wells and Miami back to back.

Davenport held off a strong challenge from Russian Maria Sharapova to finish the year as world number one for the second year running, despite not winning a major for nearly six years.

The veteran claimed six titles in 2005, again proving the yardstick for consistency.

The question next year will be who out of Clijsters, Sharapova, any number of other Russian tyros, the Williams sisters or even charismatic Frenchwoman Amelie Mauresmo can displace her.

Former world number one Hingis, who will play at the Australian Open after a three-year break from the game, will add an intriguing sub-plot to 2006.

SUKTUEN
12-18-2005, 09:08 AM
yes, he is

Dirk
12-18-2005, 04:43 PM
Just a bit of OLD gossip:

• Dr. Phil blew up backstage at David Letterman when producers informed him he'd play second fiddle to U.S. Open champ Roger Federer. He obviously didn't have one of his self-help books on hand.

http://www.jossip.com/gossip/david-letterman/index.php

Actually Phil came out first. :sad:

Dirk
12-18-2005, 04:44 PM
Did someone from GM write that article? Go back to the US Open match and then you'll see what happens to Nalby when Rogi is really on. I don't think anyone would say that Roger was 100%, or even 75% in the TMC final. And he still came within 2 points of winning that match.

Yes and you got mad at me for not bowing down to David's great victory. :rolleyes:

nobama
12-19-2005, 04:28 AM
Yes and you got mad at me for not bowing down to David's great victory. :rolleyes:No I don't believe I did that. But the fact is that Roger chose to play and as long as he walks on the court and plays the result is legit. But does that make me think Nalby would be able to trouble a fully fit Roger? Of course not.

prima donna
12-19-2005, 04:30 AM
Ciao :)

Dirk
12-19-2005, 04:57 AM
No I don't believe I did that. But the fact is that Roger chose to play and as long as he walks on the court and plays the result is legit. But does that make me think Nalby would be able to trouble a fully fit Roger? Of course not.

That is good to know. I just was pissed Roger got beat by the weaken Cup champion in history. :(

SUKTUEN
12-19-2005, 07:23 AM
I don't know why this guy will "win " Roger~~~~!!

Stevens Point
12-19-2005, 10:55 AM
Another similar article about the year 2005

Yahoo

Tennis 2005: Federer again dominates, women's game baffling
December 18, 2005

By Aaron Rennie
SportsTicker Tennis Editor

BRISTOL, Connecticut (Ticker) - Seemingly nothing in women's tennis made sense in 2005. Just about the only thing in the men's game that didn't make sense was Roger Federer's season-ending loss to David Nalbandian.

While the women's game saw the Williams sisters both win a Grand Slam yet fail to qualify for the year-ending WTA Tour Championships, Federer left his mark on the ATP Tour with one of the most dominant seasons in history.

The sweet-swinging Swissman was coming off a 2004 campaign that saw him go 74-6 with victories in the Australian Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open. The first man to win three Grand Slams in a year since Mats Wilander in 1988, Federer did not lose a match following the Summer Olympics in Athens, leading to talk he possibly could win all four majors in 2005.

However, Federer's quest to join Rod Laver and Don Budge as the only men to pull off the feat ended abruptly in Melbourne in January as he fell to Russian Marat Safin in a five-set thriller in the Australian Open semifinals. Safin went on to defeat Aussie Lleyton Hewitt to win his second career major.

Federer also came up short in the French Open, running into a claycourt buzzsaw in Spanish teen Rafael Nadal, who bested the world's top-ranked player in four sets in the semifinals en route to the title.

But instead of turning desperate after failing to win either of the year's first two majors, Federer coolly dispatched every opponent over the next 5 1/2 months. He capped his third straight undefeated grasscourt season with a straight-sets victory over Andy Roddick in the Wimbledon final, then bested another American in rejuvenated Andre Agassi in four sets to defend his U.S. Open crown.

After helping Switzerland get back in the Davis Cup World Group with a triumph over Britain, the 24-year-old Federer cruised to the title in Bangkok with a finals victory over Scottish teen Andy Murray.

Just when it seemed no man on earth could beat him, Federer suffered an ankle injury in practice, one that derailed him for six weeks.

He returned at the year-end Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai, beating Nalbandian, Ivan Ljubicic and Guillermo Coria in the round-robin stage and posting his first career 6-0, 6-0 victory over Gaston Gaudio in the semifinals to run his winning streak to 35 matches since his loss to Nadal on June 3.

But he ran out of magic against Argentina native Nalbandian in the final, blowing a two-set lead before losing in a fifth-set tiebreaker. As a result, he was unable to match John McEnroe's record winning-percentage mark, set during an 82-3 campaign in 1984.

"I feel like I've had a great year and a great tournament," Federer said after the loss. "Disappointment is always there because I don't lose very often, you know. I still get that feeling. It's good like this. I came much closer than I ever thought I would come to this tournament victory."

Federer also had his Open Era-record streak of 24 consecutive finals wins snapped. He had not lost a championship match since falling to Jiri Novak in Gstaad on July 13, 2003.

Perhaps the biggest revelations on the men's tour were the 19-year-old Nadal, who matched Federer with 11 tournament victories and reached No. 2 in the world rankings, and Ljubicic, who led Croatia to its first Davis Cup crown after going 11-1 in the year-long competition.

The women's game in 2005 was baffling to say the least, with four different players winning majors, another claiming the WTA Tour Championship and yet another finishing the year ranked No. 1.

Following numerous injuries and shaky performances over the previous two years, Serena Williams captured her seventh career Grand Slam title with a victory over fellow American Lindsay Davenport in the final after saving three match points against Russian Maria Sharapova in the semifinals.

But her resurgence was short-lived as she had a largely forgettable 2005. She did not qualify for the year-end championship after failing to finish in the top eight in the points race.

Venus Williams came out of a multi-year funk to stun Davenport in the Wimbledon final, saving a match point en route to her third triumph at the All-England Club and fifth major. But like her younger sister, she also disappeared in the second half of the season and did not earn a spot in the WTA Tour Championship.

After missing much of 2004 and the early part of 2005 with an energy-sapping virus and a knee injury, Belgian Justine Henin-Hardenne won her second French Open title and fourth major with a rout of revitalized Frenchwoman Mary Pierce. But she lost in the first round of Wimbledon to Eleni Daniilidou of Greece and did not do much the rest of the year.

One of the many feel-good stories of the year belonged to Henin-Hardenne's compatriot and rival, Kim Clijsters.

After enduring a painful breakup with Hewitt, her fiancee, at the end of 2004 and missing the beginning of the year after undergoing left wrist surgery, Clijsters ended her reputation for choking in big events by capturing her first Grand Slam at the U.S. Open, where she cruised past Pierce in the final. Clijsters earned the biggest payday in women's sports history - $2.2 million - for having claimed the major after winning the U.S. Open Series.

Another player with a reputation for choking, France's Amelie Mauresmo, went nearly six months without a tournament title before claiming two in the last two weeks of the year, including the Tour Championship, where she beat countrywoman Pierce in the final to finish the year ranked third in the world.

Although Pierce came up short in two major finals and at the Tour Championship, the 30-year-old finished fifth in the world, matching her career-best year-end ranking.

Davenport, meanwhile, still has not won a major since the 2000 Australian Open. However, the 29-year-old finished the year No. 1 by capturing six titles, including three after the U.S. Open.

Maria Sharapova suffered from a pectoral strain in the second half of the season and failed to add to her 2004 Wimbledon title. But the Ravishing Russian reached at least the quarterfinals at all 15 events she played - falling to the eventual champion at all four majors - and briefly became the first Russian-born player to reach No. 1 in the world.

After Russians claimed the final three Grand Slams in 2004, they claimed none in 2005.

Players to keep an eye on in 2006 include rising teenagers Nicole Vaidisova, Ana Ivanovic and Sania Mirza, whose game and garb fly in the face of the religious beliefs of her native India.

But the most intriguing development in the women's game may be the return of Martina Hingis, the 25-year-old "Swiss Miss" who announced she will be returning from a three-year retirement. In addition to her court savvy, the five-time Grand Slam champion always seems to make splashes with her refreshingly candid interviews.

But no matter how unbeatable certain women's players looked for stretches in 2005 - most notably Henin-Hardenne and Clijsters - it is doubtful one will dominate the WTA Tour the way Federer has over the past two years.

After all, Federer has won 97 of his last 101 matches, blowing match points in two of the defeats and being two points away from victory in his loss to Nalbandian. But at the very least, the Argentine has given the rest of the ATP Tour hope for 2006.

"I think I surprised all the world, beating (Federer) with his record, the No. 1 of the world," Nalbandian said. "He doesn't lose matches almost, so it's really incredible."

Whether he or anybody else on tour can step up his game to consistently beat Federer is another matter entirely.

nobama
12-19-2005, 02:36 PM
Federer and Clijsters named ITF world champions

LONDON (Reuters) - Switzerland's Roger Federer and Belgian Kim Clijsters were named 2005 world champions by the governing body of tennis (ITF) on Monday.

World number one Federer is the sixth man to win the award for two consecutive years after Bjorn Borg, John McEnroe, Ivan Lendl, Pete Sampras and Lleyton Hewitt, the ITF said in a statement.

He won 11 titles including Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in 2005.

Clijsters finished the season ranked second behind Lindsay Davenport after a superb comeback from a wrist injury.

She won the U.S. Open, her first grand slam title, after starting the year ranked outside the top 100.

SUKTUEN
12-19-2005, 02:51 PM
Congrat Federer and Clijsters named ITF world champions~!! :D :D :D

RogiNie
12-19-2005, 04:33 PM
:yeah:

SUKTUEN
12-19-2005, 04:36 PM
I really don't understand why Swiss not give the award to Roger~

bokehlicious
12-19-2005, 05:26 PM
I really don't understand why Swiss not give the award to Roger~

It seems to be a little polemic in swiss press after this... People who voted in front of their TV didn't care a lot about sport, and Tom is a young fresh boy...

IMO that doesn't reflect who's really the best swiss sportler... There is only one Roger :cool:

Stevens Point
12-20-2005, 12:05 AM
www.allafrica.com

Federer, Isinbajena Are the Best

December 17, 2005
Posted to the web December 19, 2005

James Bakama
Kampala

ROGER Federer and Jelena Isinbajewa have won the ISK sports personalities of the year vote.

Tennis player Federer and pole-vaulter Isinbajewa polled 116 and 103 points respectively in a vote involving sports scribes from the world's leading media houses.

Stuttgart based German Sports News Agency (ISK) released results yesterday. This year's poll was the 59 edition of the annual vote.

Federer (top) dominated the tennis scene while Isinbajewa set her 18th world record this season. She is getting closer to legend Sergey Bubka's 35 world records.

Every media house submitted names of five outstanding sportsmen and women.

Long distance sensation Kenenisa Bekele, Sebastian Loeb, Federer, Fernando Alonso and Justin Gatlin were in that order of performance, The New Vision's pick. In the women's, it was Tirunesh Dibaba, Carolina Kluft, Annika Sorenstam, Kirsty Coventry and

nobama
12-20-2005, 03:03 AM
Anyone seen this before? I think it's in German...perhaps someone can give us non-german speaking fans an idea of what it's about? I think it's about Roger's favorite holiday places....

http://www.reiseblick.ch/rb/fileadmin/user_upload/pdf/federer.pdf

Puschkin
12-20-2005, 06:49 AM
It is a rather superficial interview about holiday places. Roger says he prefers places with beaches where it is warm, like Thailand, South Africa, Dubai and the Maledives. He underlines that privacy is very important to him during holidays. He speaks about his favourite travels, one to Australia when he was a kid and his first holiday with Mirka, which he considered as a "test" for their relationship. He speaks a lot about Asia as a region with great potential and he says his favourite food is Japanese, even if he had not gone to Japan so far. and he talks about his foundation. That's the gist of it. BTW: The article must be more than a year old.

rachelzszs
12-20-2005, 08:31 AM
I really don't understand why Swiss not give the award to Roger~
Hey, dear...
Relax..
Maybe his luck goes to AO:lol:

nobama
12-20-2005, 11:50 AM
It is a rather superficial interview about holiday places. Roger says he prefers places with beaches where it is warm, like Thailand, South Africa, Dubai and the Maledives. He underlines that privacy is very important to him during holidays. He speaks about his favourite travels, one to Australia when he was a kid and his first holiday with Mirka, which he considered as a "test" for their relationship. He speaks a lot about Asia as a region with great potential and he says his favourite food is Japanese, even if he had not gone to Japan so far. and he talks about his foundation. That's the gist of it. BTW: The article must be more than a year old.Thanks. :)

SUKTUEN
12-20-2005, 03:32 PM
It seems to be a little polemic in swiss press after this... People who voted in front of their TV didn't care a lot about sport, and Tom is a young fresh boy...

IMO that doesn't reflect who's really the best swiss sportler... There is only one Roger :cool:
Really ?? Thanks for your help, :D

I nissunderstand that Swiss is not Love Roger as so much~~~ :sad:

Stevens Point
12-20-2005, 10:58 PM
More things for us to read before the new season starts... :)

www.slam.canoe.ca

Federer dominates in 2005
By CHRIS LEHOURITES

LONDON (AP) - Roger Federer ruled men's tennis with panache for a historic second straight year in 2005, while a string of old favourites split the major titles on the women's circuit. After three Grand Slam victories in 2004, Federer became the first man in 67 years to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in consecutive seasons. His six major titles tied him with Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker for Grand Slam titles among Open era players, and one behind John McEnroe and Mats Wilander.

"I amaze myself that I can back it up one tournament after another, keep on playing well," 24-year-old Federer said at the U.S. Open. "I wonder why I always play so well, especially on the big occasions. It just seems to click for me."

But for losing the final of the season-ending Masters Cup in Shanghai - ending a record of 24 successive finals victories since July 2003 - the Swiss star would have tied McEnroe (82-3 in 1984) for the most dominating season ever.

As it was, all four of Federer's losses were memorable.

He had a match point on Marat Safin in the Australian Open semifinals, but the Russian prevailed in 9-7 in the fifth set and beat Lleyton Hewitt in the final for his second major title. However, Safin declined then disappeared because of knee problems.

In April at Monte Carlo, Federer squandered three match points against Richard Gasquet, who would go on to rise from out of the top 100 into the top 20, in which the French player was the only teenager beside Rafael Nadal.

Nadal matched Federer with 11 titles, and broke the season record of nine for a teenager by Mats Wilander in 1983. By April Nadal and his fashionable pantaloons were in the top 10, and after beating Federer on his 19th birthday in the French Open semis, he became the first man in 23 years to win at Roland Garros on debut.

Many observers hoped Federer's defeat to Nadal marked a budding rivalry. Beside Nadal (2-1), only Nalbandian (6-4) in the top 10 had a winning record against the Swiss.

Nalbandian burnished his credentials when he interrupted a planned fishing holiday, trekked to China from Argentina, and came from two sets down to beat Federer in a thrilling five-set season finale.

The Argentine was also responsible for another stunning victory, when he defeated Hewitt in Sydney to clinch a Davis Cup quarter-final. Croatia won the Davis Cup in the fifth rubber over Slovakia in a first-time final for both.

It was an up-down season for Toronto's Daniel Nestor. He finished 2005 with four doubles titles and $351,958 US in earnings but he and partner Mark Knowles were forced to drop out of the French Open semifinal after Nestor suffered a wrist injury that eventually required surgery. He and Knowles were also involved in a lawsuit against the ATP over proposed rule changes to the doubles game. Nestor finished the 2005 season ranked eighth in the world.

Meanwhile, the Canadian Davis Cup team was relegated back to Americas Zone Group I play after a 3-2 loss to Belarus in a World Group playoff in September.

The Fed Cup went to Russia for a second straight year, but unlike in 2004 when they dominated the Slams, the Russians' spotlight was reclaimed by the Williams sisters and Belgians in a year of comebacks.

American Serena Williams, without a major in 18 months, captured her seventh Grand Slam title at the Australian Open, but would reach only one more tournament semis because of left leg problems, and finished out of the top 10 for the first time since 1998.

Venus Williams ended a nearly four-year-old Grand Slam drought when she stared down a match point and overcame Lindsay Davenport to win her third Wimbledon, in the longest and one of the most stirring women's finals.

Belgian Justine Henin-Hardenne, back from a virus and knee injury which crippled her 2004, won the French Open during a year-best 24-match winning streak then hamstring problems pinched the rest of her schedule.

Kim Clijsters, who didn't start until late February after wrist surgery in mid-2004, led the year with nine titles, including her first major at the U.S. Open. She'd lost her first four major finals. The Belgian rocketed from an injury ranking of 134 to No. 2, and narrowly missed No. 1 which was held for most of the year by Davenport.

The American won six titles, and set aside retirement after reaching the finals of the Australian Open and Wimbledon. Davenport joined Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova and Steffi Graf as the only Open era players to finish the year No. 1 at least four times. She briefly gave it up to Maria Sharapova, who became the first Russian and fifth youngest No. 1 ever.

Sharapova reached the quarter-finals or better at all 15 of her tournaments.

Mary Pierce appeared in her first Grand Slam finals in five years at the French and U.S. Opens, and compatriot Amelie Mauresmo finally broke through in a big final when she beat Pierce in the season-ending WTA Championships. Another serious comeback was on the cards when Martina Hingis planned to end a four-year retirement in January.

Nobody, however, rang the veterans' bell louder than American Andre Agassi. A career-threatening back injury undermined his French Open and sidelined him from Wimbledon, and a lingering ankle injury is threatening to keep him from next month's Australian Open.

But at his 20th U.S. Open, the sport's best showman won three straight five-setters to become the oldest finalist in 31 years. Then Agassi passed Federer to lead by one break in the third set, and grasp at an upset. But the Swiss magician rallied and cruised to victory in four sets.

After battles with Pete Sampras, McEnroe, Jimmy Connors, Ivan Lendl and the like, Agassi had the grace to say of Federer: "He's the best I've ever played against."

RogiFan88
12-21-2005, 02:59 AM
20.12.2005
OFF COURT - FINAL PREPARATION

Dear fans

I am off to Australia today after having spent some time in Switzerland. I have only played 5 tournaments since Wimbledon so you can imagine that I am really looking forward to getting onto the court again. At the same time I have lost some of my routine, of course, but am hoping for a good start into the new season. My foot also seems to be ready for the challenge, which is great.

I have worked hard on my fitness with Pierre Paganini these last weeks and am very happy with the result. I am now on my way to Down Under where I will work on my tennis skills with Tony Roche during 10 days.

My goals for the coming year certainly are to win Wimbledon for a fourth time - which would be amazing - and to stay number one. Everything else is a bonus on top of that. I will try to win every match I play; and I am not expecting the same dominance as this past year.

See you soon!
Yours

Roger

http://www.rogerfederer.com/

nobama
12-21-2005, 03:05 AM
Yea! He's working with Tony! In Shanghai he said he would see Tony at Kyoonge, but it looks like plans have changed. The only sad thing is it's another year where he can't spend Christmas at home. Tony said last year Roger celebrated it on the plane. :sad:

MissMoJo
12-21-2005, 03:14 AM
Too bad he can't spend the holidays at home, but hopefully mirka and his mom will be with him during that time.
My goals for the coming year certainly are to win Wimbledon for a fourth time - which would be amazing - and to stay number one.
I thought he said earlier this year that RG was ? :confused:

bokehlicious
12-21-2005, 07:45 AM
I thought he said earlier this year that RG was ? :confused:

No I think he said that winning RG one day would be amazing for his carrier achievements, but it is not his n°1 target for 2006...

cris1085
12-21-2005, 10:22 AM
It's very sad for all these young men to stay so far away from their home at Christmas but it's the price for the success and Roger is very successful in all the tournaments.

nobama
12-21-2005, 11:35 AM
Too bad he can't spend the holidays at home, but hopefully mirka and his mom will be with him during that time.

I thought he said earlier this year that RG was ? :confused:One day, but not necessarily a goal for 2006.

Hopefully he will have family around for the Holidays, even if it is in Australia. It's really sad that these guys have no real off-season where they have a chance to spend time with family and friends. The little time they have off is spent preparing for the new season.

lsy
12-21-2005, 03:45 PM
My foot also seems to be ready for the challenge, which is great.

Great. This is what I worry the most.


My goals for the coming year certainly are to win Wimbledon for a fourth time - which would be amazing - and to stay number one.

:yawn:...same goal again???

....NO....JUST KIDDING! That will be great! But what about RG :secret:


See you soon!
Yours
Roger

CAN'T WAIT!!! :yippee:

RonE
12-21-2005, 04:49 PM
Good to hear- I was a littleworried about his injury resurfacing but thats good news to hear.

In previous interviews this year he did say that his first three priorities for this year AO, RG and the big W. On the other hand, I can understand him not coming outright and saying that RG is his main goal as that would put a lot of pressure on him and unnecessary pressure at that.

I am disappointed, however, that he said he would make changes to his schedule on clay for 06 as he felt he has a real shot at winning the French and wants to give himself the best possible chance, however his schedule has remained the same.

TheMightyFed
12-21-2005, 04:58 PM
Good to hear- I was a littleworried about his injury resurfacing but thats good news to hear.

In previous interviews this year he did say that his first three priorities for this year AO, RG and the big W. On the other hand, I can understand him not coming outright and saying that RG is his main goal as that would put a lot of pressure on him and unnecessary pressure at that.

I am disappointed, however, that he said he would make changes to his schedule on clay for 06 as he felt he has a real shot at winning the French and wants to give himself the best possible chance, however his schedule has remained the same.
Yeah quite conservative, but let's not forget that he's competing for records, and we cannot ask him to put some atainable records or titles at risk just to shoot for more uncertain goals... It's a bit like asking Schumacher to do the Paris-Dakar... he could win it, but he must first exploit his full potential in F1 !

RonE
12-21-2005, 07:21 PM
Yeah quite conservative, but let's not forget that he's competing for records, and we cannot ask him to put some atainable records or titles at risk just to shoot for more uncertain goals... It's a bit like asking Schumacher to do the Paris-Dakar... he could win it, but he must first exploit his full potential in F1 !

Well apparently he has his own priorities like you say, however I find it odd that he wouldn't put RG as his main priority now as he will no doubt be able to win Wimbledon in years to come but for RG he has a shorter time frame- he needs to win it in the next 3-4 years otherwise he won't win it at all IMO. And completing a career grand slam is a much more impressive feat if you ask me, even if it comes at the expense of one Wimbledon title. But, like I said earlier it's his priorities and therefore his schedule.

RonE
12-21-2005, 07:23 PM
Mind you, just to close the point- yes it is a conservative clay schedule however in recent years he has not played more than 2 TMS events in one year on clay. If he will actually play all 3 (and he has more time this year to prepare for Monte Carlo than he did last year even if he goes far in Miami) and does well in them that should be good enough. Too much play on clay on the other hand is not too good either as it is very physically taxing and he would be too worn out for RG.

Dirk
12-21-2005, 07:28 PM
Roger has said Wimbledon, RG, and number one are his 06 goals.

nobama
12-21-2005, 11:36 PM
Roger has said Wimbledon, RG, and number one are his 06 goals.On his latest website message he didn't mention RG.

nobama
12-21-2005, 11:48 PM
Roger said in Shanghai (can't remember if it was an interview or press conference after one of his matches) that his schedule was staying the same. I suppose he figures why mess with a good thing. And I'm sure he doesn't want to give the impression he's so desperate to win RG that he'd plan his whole schedule around it. I'm just glad to hear that Tony Roche will be spending more time with Roger in '06 than he did in '05. I think I read he's committed to 14 weeks.

nobama
12-22-2005, 03:48 AM
Interesting article....I like what he said about Roger. And intersting that Nike's interest in Tennis seems to be waining yet the two best players in the world wear their stuff.

http://www.tennis.com/Tennis_World_Blog/index.asp

Here’s an interesting excerpt from an email I received from a friend of TW, who asked not to be identified:


On another note -- here's an end-of-year question: is Nike losing interest in tennis? Off the top of my head, they've allowed Agassi, Hewitt and Mauresmo to get away this year, and passed on Roddick as well. Doesn't upset me the slightest, but it does seem like Becker's mid-90s spectre of Wimbledon as a "Nike house" is now passé. Was Phil Knight's interest in tennis the driving force all along?
.

The thing that struck me about this email was the bit about Becker’s prediction, something I now recall vividly. Back then, Becker raised the legitimate if unsubstantiated concern that Nike had become such a powerful force in the game that it could leverage special concessions for its players - things like ideal start times and preference on court assignment - from tournament promoters and directors. Who was going to stand up to Nike, given the make-up of the promotional Holy Trinity (television, players, tournament directors) if all the top players were in the stable, and Nike aired so many of the commercials in any given telecast?

Of course, the preferential treatment wouldn’t have been done for the benefit of the player as such, but for the product (Nike). The genius in Becker’s accusation was that he saw it amounted to the same thing. The major component of any large sponsor’s agenda is exposure and visibility. The implication was that Nike had become, or was becoming, the Microsoft of tennis, holding its competitors in a stranglehold, making it impossible to do business in tennis without going through Nike and thus solidifying the company’s virtual monopoly (Internet Explorer, anyone?) - while enriching Nike clients.

These days, one can only wish that Boris were spot-on in his suspicions, for the substance of the observation I quoted above seems true. Nike’s interest in tennis does seem to have waned, and for the same simple reason that always pertains in business: self-interest. The company determined that it would get a better return on its investment in sports other than tennis. That’s fine - Nike, like any company, is responsible first and foremost to its stockholders. But it’s another good reason for all tennis fans to be skeptical about fair-weather tennis friends, as well as gift horses.

Whims, fads, even specific personalities all have a limited shelf life; if you’re into tennis because it’s said to be cool, or because some hot chick or studly boy warrior addresses your inner stalker, you’ll be out of tennis when golf becomes the sport de jour or your idol gets in touch with his or her inner clownfish.

The funny thing is that at the time that Becker made his comments about Nike, tennis already was in a recession. It was no longer the happening thing (sorry, I couldn’t think of a better word), although it continued to produce the one thing it has never failed to churn out: interesting personalities radiating the aura that burns most intensely in champions of individual sports, the closest thing in athletics to movie-grade idols. Nike continued to suck what it could from the game, and we once again have proof of the old adage, don’t ever think things can’t get worse.

People frequently talk about what tennis “needs” in order to recapture the glory days - a more comprehensible tour, a commissioner, rivalries, a broader appeal, reliable champions who are also role models. . . My feeling is that the game needs to be “cool” again (actually it is, in some places, but that’s another discussion), but in a very specific way. We need to scale back and focus on exactly why tennis is such a fine, fine game (for me, that all starts with the fact that no sport features a better balance between the purely physical and purely mental challenges of competition), and then celebrate those who are great at it in ways that never stray too far from that home base.

Not sure what I mean? Okay, exactly what is Maria Sharapova selling when she appears in an ad on behalf of a cell phone maker? Cell phones, yes. Her own beauty, certainly. Tennis? What’s tennis got to do with anything?

Another way to put it: we need to distinguish tennis - and those who play it at the highest level - from other athletes, rather than lump them in together in a lame attempt to show that tennis is not the wussie sport it’s made out to be (Hey, Roger wears a swoosh on his shoulder, just like a Miami Hurricanes linebacker, so he must be cool!). It would be better for us, as a game and a culture, to recognize who we are and stand by it. If Anna Kournikova wasn’t the most well-known female tennis player, ever, she was right up there among them, only difference being that the others were something she was not: big-time champions. This tells us something, but I’m not sure it’s something we could change, even if we wanted.

Still, the thing I love about Federer - and in this he seems different from “crossovers” stars (ugh, how I loathe that expression!) like the sisters, Venus, Serena and Maria - is that, wittingly or not, he seems to be all about tennis. When Joe Average sees Federer, he knows who’s in his line-of-sight. Yeah, that tennis guy from, from. . .oh, wherever the hell he’s from. . .

You know, I’ve been wondering what it was that bugged me so about all those slick, cutting -edge, MTV-grade commercials Nike used to churn out left and right (Michael Jordan flying through the air, in slow motion, enroute to a slam dunk, while a child’s bicycle falls and classical music plays - geez, gimme a break, the only thing missing is that stupid floating trash bag from that stupid American Beauty flick).

But I know it now. They were really made for their own sake, to realize the pretensions of a handful of, what, Starbucks-slugging, flannel-clad, mountain-biking, digitally literate hipsters in some Portland loft? It was a Nike orgy of self-infatuation. At the same time, Nike was spending its cool capital, morphing into a downmarket brand that no self-respecting flannel-clad hipster in Portland would be caught dead wearing.

You could say it was a heck of a ride. You could also say it was a big fat waste of time. On the other hand, maybe it’s a lot simpler. Maybe my friend is right. Maybe it was all as simple as the fact that Phil Knight, the genius behind the Nike empire, just happened to be into tennis.

It was a cool sport at the time, right?

Dirk
12-22-2005, 05:11 AM
I don't get the point of the article but I hope Roger never leaves Nike.

Puschkin
12-22-2005, 07:32 AM
And I'm sure he doesn't want to give the impression he's so desperate to win RG that he'd plan his whole schedule around it.

Good point!

nobama
12-22-2005, 11:56 AM
I don't get the point of the article but I hope Roger never leaves Nike.I don't really get it either (although it seems kinda anti-Nike). But I don't see Roger leaving Nike anytime soon. They just worked with Roger's charity to build some sports facility in South Africa. Which is interesting because the reason Agassi left Nike was supposedly due to them not willing to support his charitable foundation.

avocadoe
12-22-2005, 01:44 PM
Agassi's cost more, I think, and he got a higher bid elsewhere...the point of the article is a look inside corporate motives, and how tennis does or doesn't fit into the scheme of a particular company. The writer or friend of the writer is wishing tennis would market itself as tennis pure and simple. Not likely, but a nice idea. Some of the paragraphs of prose are really good/funny/ and Hunter Thompsonesque...Thanks :)

SUKTUEN
12-23-2005, 04:22 PM
yes, I love Nike too, I also want Roger never left Nike like Sampras

nobama
12-26-2005, 03:28 PM
http://www.ussa.edu/news/2005/12/26/aoy.asp
Federer Top Athlete; Armstrong, Patrick Top USSA Voting
26 December 2005

Roger Federer, USSA's Athlete of the Year.
Tennis champion Roger Federer of Switzerland was the top overall vote getter and was named the 2005 Outstanding Athlete of the Year by the United States Sports Academy after a world-wide internet election hosted by USATODAY.com.

Lance Armstrong was named Male Athlete of the Year for the second straight year, while race car driver Danica Patrick was named Female Athlete of the Year. Female voters outnumbered male voters by a 2-to-1 ratio during the first week of voting in an election that ran from Dec. 1-24. This gave Patrick a lead she would not relinquish. Overall, the ballot received tens of thousands of votes from sports fans around the globe.

The Athlete of the Year is the culmination of the Sports Academy’s yearlong Athlete of the Month program, which recognizes the accomplishments of men and women in any sport around the globe on a monthly basis. USSA holds online voting for the Athlete of the Month in which an international voting committee comprised of former athletes, media, sports organizations and governing bodies.

To view results from the Athlete of the Year, please visit http://www.usatoday.com/sports/front.htm or http://www.ussa.edu .

Tennis star Kim Clijsters finished second in the women’s balloting, followed by the 2003 Female Athlete of the Year, LPGA golfer Annika Sorenstam. PGA golfer Tiger Woods finished second for Male Athlete of the Year, followed by San Antonio Spurs forward Tim Duncan.

Federer was the first man in the Open Era to win the U.S. Open and Wimbledon in back-to-back years, with the Open being his 10 th tournament title of the 2005 season.

Aside from Federer, Armstrong dominated the rest of the field among male athletes, in the same manner he dominated the Tour de France for the entire 21 st century to this point. Armstrong earned Male Athlete of the Year honors after winning his seventh straight Tour de France – by far an unprecedented feat in his sports most prestigious race – eight years after recovering from a near-fatal battle with cancer. He retired after the victory.

Top female athlete Patrick, the IndyCar Rookie of the Year, was the highest starting and finishing woman in the 89-year history of the Indianapolis 500. She placed fourth in both the race and the time trials.

Male runner up Woods became the PGA’s career money leader after winning his fourth Master’s and second British Open while placing in the top five in all four of the majors. Duncan was the first player since Michael Jordan to be named Most Valuable Player in each of his first three appearances in the NBA finals and the first ever to be name to the All-NBA Team and All-Defensive Team in each of his first eight seasons.

Female runner-up Clijsters of Belgium won her first career Grand Slam title at the U.S. Open in September and recorded eight first-place finishes in 2005 and a career total of 30. Sorenstam of Sweden, the LPGA’s leading money winner for 2005, won three tournaments in March before winning six more in the next seven months.

The 2005 male ballot included Armstrong, Tom Brady, Reggie Bush, Tim Duncan, Jermaine Dye, Federer, Matt Leinart, Peyton Manning, Bode Miller, Asafa Powell, Aaron Peirsol, Tony Stewart and Tiger Woods. The female ballot included Clijsters, Natalie Coughlin, Tirunesh Dibaba, Yolanda Griffith, Gao Jun, Deena Kastor, Nastia Liukin, Patrick, Paula Radcliffe, Irina Slutskaya, Sorenstam, Venus Williams and Yelena Isinbayeva.

Since 1984, the American Sport Art Museum and Archives, a division of the Sports Academy, has recognized outstanding athletes and artists in all sports through its Awards of Sport program. USSA presents awards each year to pay tribute to those who have made significant contributions in sports through their athletic, coaching, administrative or artistic achievements.

Last year, as the leading overall vote getter in the male and female categories, swimming sensation Michael Phelps won the 2004 Outstanding Athlete of the Year. Fellow Olympian Carly Patterson received the most votes in the women's category to take home 2004 Female Athlete of the Year honors, while Armstrong won the men's category and 2004 Male Athlete of the Year.

USATODAY.com is an award-winning news and information Web site that is updated 24 hours per day, seven days per week. Each month, millions of unique monthly visitors access USATODAY.com News, Money, Sports, Life, Technology, Weather and Travel sections which combine the best of USA TODAY news and information and the latest breaking news with cutting-edge interactive features, information graphics and multimedia functions including audio, video and live Webcasts. USATODAY.com is owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE:GCI). For more information, please visit www.usatoday.com.

TenHound
12-26-2005, 10:36 PM
Happy End of Yr. to All........

re Nike - pls. note that one yr. ago Nike had 4 top players on its payroll - AA, RF, RN, & LH. All sustained foot injuries this yr, 2 serious. 2 have fled Nike. The sooner the others do, the better - until they redo them...they're too grippy now. Babolat, the new Kid on the block, looks to be the most interesting, as they've teamed up w/Michelin, giving them the mandate to design the soles. This strongly suggests to me that industry insiders understand there's a serious problem w/the shoes now - which would NOT be discussed publicly, if at all possible.

SUKTUEN
12-27-2005, 06:19 AM
Congrat Roger Federer be the Top Athlete again and again~!

You Are the BEST~! :inlove: :woohoo: :yeah: :yeah:

Oizo
12-27-2005, 12:58 PM
Roger is Eurpean sportsman of the yert :D :dance:

Nocko
12-27-2005, 02:27 PM
:bigclap: :bigclap: :bigclap: :bigclap:

nobama
12-27-2005, 05:52 PM
Roger is Eurpean sportsman of the yert :D :dance:Where did you see that?

Stevens Point
12-27-2005, 07:39 PM
Where did you see that?
I haven't found any article of this in English, but there are some in German... Some news angences chose Roger and Jelena Isinbajewa as Europe's Athletes of the year.

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=2843628&postcount=312

SUKTUEN
12-28-2005, 03:40 AM
Congrat Roger be Eurp Best Sport Man~! :bigclap: :bigclap: :bigclap: :woohoo: :banana: :banana:

Stevens Point
12-28-2005, 07:16 PM
www.msnbc.msn.com

Federer wasn't perfect, but was dominant
Star missed out on Aussie, French titles, but won Wimbledon, U.S. Open

SportsTicker
Updated: 6:20 p.m. ET Dec. 27, 2005

Seemingly nothing in women’s tennis made sense in 2005. Just about the only thing in the men’s game that didn’t make sense was Roger Federer’s season-ending loss to David Nalbandian.

While the women’s game saw the Williams sisters both win a Grand Slam yet fail to qualify for the year-ending WTA Tour Championships, Federer left his mark on the ATP Tour with one of the most dominant seasons in history.

The sweet-swinging Swissman was coming off a 2004 campaign that saw him go 74-6 with victories in the Australian Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open. The first man to win three Grand Slams in a year since Mats Wilander in 1988, Federer did not lose a match following the Summer Olympics in Athens, leading to talk he possibly could win all four majors in 2005.

However, Federer’s quest to join Rod Laver and Don Budge as the only men to pull off the feat ended abruptly in Melbourne in January as he fell to Russian Marat Safin in a five-set thriller in the Australian Open semifinals. Safin went on to defeat Aussie Lleyton Hewitt to win his second career major.

Federer also came up short in the French Open, running into a claycourt buzzsaw in Spanish teen Rafael Nadal, who bested the world’s top-ranked player in four sets in the semifinals en route to the title.

But instead of turning desperate after failing to win either of the year’s first two majors, Federer coolly dispatched every opponent over the next 5 1/2 months. He capped his third straight undefeated grasscourt season with a straight-sets victory over Andy Roddick in the Wimbledon final, then bested another American in rejuvenated Andre Agassi in four sets to defend his U.S. Open crown.

After helping Switzerland get back in the Davis Cup World Group with a triumph over Britain, the 24-year-old Federer cruised to the title in Bangkok with a finals victory over Scottish teen Andy Murray.

Just when it seemed no man on earth could beat him, Federer suffered an ankle injury in practice, one that derailed him for six weeks.

He returned at the year-end Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai, beating Nalbandian, Ivan Ljubicic and Guillermo Coria in the round-robin stage and posting his first career 6-0, 6-0 victory over Gaston Gaudio in the semifinals to run his winning streak to 35 matches since his loss to Nadal on June 3.

But he ran out of magic against Argentina native Nalbandian in the final, blowing a two-set lead before losing in a fifth-set tiebreaker. As a result, he was unable to match John McEnroe’s record winning-percentage mark, set during an 82-3 campaign in 1984.

“I feel like I’ve had a great year and a great tournament,” Federer said after the loss. “Disappointment is always there because I don’t lose very often, you know. I still get that feeling. It’s good like this. I came much closer than I ever thought I would come to this tournament victory.”

Federer also had his Open Era-record streak of 24 consecutive finals wins snapped. He had not lost a championship match since falling to Jiri Novak in Gstaad on July 13, 2003.

Perhaps the biggest revelations on the men’s tour were the 19-year-old Nadal, who matched Federer with 11 tournament victories and reached No. 2 in the world rankings, and Ljubicic, who led Croatia to its first Davis Cup crown after going 11-1 in the year-long competition.

The women’s game in 2005 was baffling to say the least, with four different players winning majors, another claiming the WTA Tour Championship and yet another finishing the year ranked No. 1.

Following numerous injuries and shaky performances over the previous two years, Serena Williams captured her seventh career Grand Slam title with a victory over fellow American Lindsay Davenport in the final after saving three match points against Russian Maria Sharapova in the semifinals.

But her resurgence was short-lived as she had a largely forgettable 2005. She did not qualify for the year-end championship after failing to finish in the top eight in the points race.

Venus Williams came out of a multi-year funk to stun Davenport in the Wimbledon final, saving a match point en route to her third triumph at the All-England Club and fifth major. But like her younger sister, she also disappeared in the second half of the season and did not earn a spot in the WTA Tour Championship.

After missing much of 2004 and the early part of 2005 with an energy-sapping virus and a knee injury, Belgian Justine Henin-Hardenne won her second French Open title and fourth major with a rout of revitalized Frenchwoman Mary Pierce. But she lost in the first round of Wimbledon to Eleni Daniilidou of Greece and did not do much the rest of the year.

One of the many feel-good stories of the year belonged to Henin-Hardenne’s compatriot and rival, Kim Clijsters.

After enduring a painful breakup with Hewitt, her fiancee, at the end of 2004 and missing the beginning of the year after undergoing left wrist surgery, Clijsters ended her reputation for choking in big events by capturing her first Grand Slam at the U.S. Open, where she cruised past Pierce in the final. Clijsters earned the biggest payday in women’s sports history -$2.2 million - for having claimed the major after winning the U.S. Open Series.

Another player with a reputation for choking, France’s Amelie Mauresmo, went nearly six months without a tournament title before claiming two in the last two weeks of the year, including the Tour Championship, where she beat countrywoman Pierce in the final to finish the year ranked third in the world.

Although Pierce came up short in two major finals and at the Tour Championship, the 30-year-old finished fifth in the world, matching her career-best year-end ranking.

Davenport, meanwhile, still has not won a major since the 2000 Australian Open. However, the 29-year-old finished the year No. 1 by capturing six titles, including three after the U.S. Open.

Maria Sharapova suffered from a pectoral strain in the second half of the season and failed to add to her 2004 Wimbledon title. But the Ravishing Russian reached at least the quarterfinals at all 15 events she played - falling to the eventual champion at all four majors - and briefly became the first Russian-born player to reach No. 1 in the world.

After Russians claimed the final three Grand Slams in 2004, they claimed none in 2005.

Players to keep an eye on in 2006 include rising teenagers Nicole Vaidisova, Ana Ivanovic and Sania Mirza, whose game and garb fly in the face of the religious beliefs of her native India.

But the most intriguing development in the women’s game may be the return of Martina Hingis, the 25-year-old “Swiss Miss” who announced she will be returning from a three-year retirement. In addition to her court savvy, the five-time Grand Slam champion always seems to make splashes with her refreshingly candid interviews.

But no matter how unbeatable certain women’s players looked for stretches in 2005 — most notably Henin-Hardenne and Clijsters — it is doubtful one will dominate the WTA Tour the way Federer has over the past two years.

After all, Federer has won 97 of his last 101 matches, blowing match points in two of the defeats and being two points away from victory in his loss to Nalbandian. But at the very least, the Argentine has given the rest of the ATP Tour hope for 2006.

“I think I surprised all the world, beating (Federer) with his record, the No. 1 of the world,” Nalbandian said. “He doesn’t lose matches almost, so it’s really incredible.”

Whether he or anybody else on tour can step up his game to consistently beat Federer is another matter entirely.

nobama
12-28-2005, 08:17 PM
Stupid headline. :mad:

SUKTUEN
12-29-2005, 09:26 AM
what is not perfect???? :mad: :mad: :mad:

nobama
12-29-2005, 12:08 PM
I see Lance Armstrong has won the Associated Press (AP) sportsman of the year award for the 4th time. Roger came in 3rd or 4th I think, along with Tiger Woods. I understand beceause this is an American organization they probably wouldn't choose someone like Roger. But it is frustrating because I sometimes think they don't understand how impressive his results are and how difficult it is to win a grand slam - and Roger's won 6 in three years! Maybe if more of these sports writers actually played tennis they'd realize how difficult it really is, and therefore, how impressive it is to only lose 4 matches out of 85 played.

Has Reuters come out with their list yet? Hopefully Roger can top that one - I think he did last year.

peteslamz
12-29-2005, 05:25 PM
Just a part from the article:
For the whole article http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/more/12/28/bc.cyc.apmaleathlete.ap/index.html


Armstrong, of course
Lance wins fourth straight AP Male Athlete of the Year
Posted: Wednesday December 28, 2005 4:50PM; Updated: Wednesday December 28, 2005 6:02PM

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) -- Lance Armstrong takes fewer bike rides these days. He even describes himself as out of shape since retiring after his seventh consecutive Tour de France victory in July.

But he remains unbeatable.

Armstrong was honored Wednesday as The Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year for the fourth straight year. He is the only athlete to be selected by sports writers four times since the honor first was awarded in 1931.

Armstrong received 30 of the 83 votes cast. Heisman Trophy-winning running back Reggie Bush of Southern California was second with 23 votes, and Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning was third with eight, followed by tennis star Roger Federer and golf's Tiger Woods with seven each.

peteslamz
12-29-2005, 05:33 PM
Well... At least Roger is already being recognized by the press and I think he is the only non-American among the nominees. I also think we cannot do anything about this awarding process by the American press because as you can see the history list of awardees, they always favor American sportsperson as winners. :rolleyes: To make things worse, a tennis player hasn't won the award since JMac won it way back in 1981. :eek:

Chiiko
12-29-2005, 10:52 PM
Please vote fot Roger! (See below right side of the top-page)
http://www.eurosport.de/

:help:

tonia9
12-29-2005, 11:28 PM
Voted :)

Already 65% ! :eek: :woohoo:

Minnie
12-29-2005, 11:37 PM
Yet another award on its way to Rogi :bounce: :bigclap:

Stevens Point
12-29-2005, 11:54 PM
Another article by MSNBC...

www.msnbc.msn.com

Federer flirted with perfection
Swiss star's dominance one of 2005 highlights on men's tour

COMMENTARY
By Bud Collins
NBC Sports
Updated: 6:07 p.m. ET Dec. 28, 2005


Bud Collins

How near did Roger Federer come to a perfect 2005? Incredibly, he was merely four shots from the greatest single-season winning percentage in 22 years.

Just missing Martina's mark
That mark is .989 (86-1 match record), compiled by the (continuing) Grande Dame of the game, Martina Navratliova, loser of just one match in 1983.

Nobody has posted an unbeaten season since Hall of Famer Alice Marble closed out with two of them, in 1939 and 1940.

While Federer lost a total of four matches in 2005, he held match points in two of them (against Marat Safin at the Australian Open, and against Richard Gasquet at Monte Carlo).

Moreover Federer served for the year-end Masters title at Shanghai at 6-5, 30-0 in the fifth set against David Nalbandian, losing 6-7 (4-7), 6-7 (11-13), 6-2, 6-1, 7-6 (7-3).

His fourth loss was a plum picked by “El Nino” -- the sizzling kid phenom Rafael Nadal -- in four sets in the French Open semifinals, the day the young left-hander turned 19. (Federer should avoid opponents' birthdays. He was gift-wrapped for Marat Safin's 25th at Melbourne).

What a splendid rivalry the Swiss-Spanish tangle of Federer vs. Nadal should be in 2006 as Nos. 1 and 2 square off. Nadal's 42 length ascension from No. 44 at the close of 2004 was a triumph of muscle, speed and heart.

Winning the French Open as a teenager, Nadal drew favorable comparisons to Bjorn Borg, who won it at 18 in 1974, and Mats Wilander and Michael Chang, who were 17 in 1982 and 1989 respectively when they won it.

Although the French Open was Nadal's most important title, he had 10 others, equaling Federer's pile, the most championships since Thomas Muster's stash of a dozen in 1995.


Taking aim at Sampras
Suppose Federer had won those three very-tight matches? He would have been 84-1 -- a .988 winning percentage. As it was -- proving he is human -- his .953 (81-4) is second to John McEnroe's .965 (82-3) in 1984.

Like McEnroe, Federer carried Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. By winning those magnificent prizes for the second successive year, the Swiss who doesn't miss, became part of an extremely rare triumvirate. Only a couple of males had preceded him in doing that: Americans Bill Tilden in 1920-21 and Don Budge in 1937-38.

Where does that leave Federer in a race that some feel has begun -- pursuing Pete Sampras? A long way off in accumulating major titles. Sampras has the record 14, Federer has six. However, at Federer's age, 24, Sampras also had six. Federer and his innumerable partisans can dream, can't they?

Stevens Point
12-30-2005, 12:05 AM
Please vote fot Roger! (See below right side of the top-page)
http://www.eurosport.de/

:help:
You can also vote for him on the other Eurosport websites.. It is interesting... anotehr language, different result....

www.eurosport.com
http://it.eurosport.com
http://eurosport.tf1.fr
www.eurosport.es

TenHound
12-30-2005, 04:24 AM
Yawnnnnnnn........I'm so bored w/the one-dimensional retards who can only imagine one yardstick for achievement. Numbers Majors won.

I hrd. interview w/Brad Gilbert yesterday on radio - actually he was guest hosting a show over the holidays. He was inevitably asked to compare The Two. He said unequivocally that Roger would have beaten Pete in straight sets had he played Pete in Pete's Prime. Said Roger is faster, moves better, has better bh & even running fh. Said Roger would take away Pete's serve.

kjo
12-30-2005, 04:54 AM
Hi guys,
I wasn't sure where to post this, but FYI just in case any of you folks are in the U.S. and get the Tennis Channel - tommorrow night (12/30) at 11 pm they're showing 2001 Hopman Cup doubles - JMGambill/Seles v. Hingis / ROGER!
I'm going to be out of town but will try to record it - it's my first chance to see Roger play when he was so young, and w/ Seles and Hingis added in, I'm excited!

peteslamz
12-30-2005, 08:44 AM
Hi guys,
I wasn't sure where to post this, but FYI just in case any of you folks are in the U.S. and get the Tennis Channel - tommorrow night (12/30) at 11 pm they're showing 2001 Hopman Cup doubles - JMGambill/Seles v. Hingis / ROGER!
I'm going to be out of town but will try to record it - it's my first chance to see Roger play when he was so young, and w/ Seles and Hingis added in, I'm excited!

Is there any chance that you can upload the video through megaupload? :)

SUKTUEN
12-30-2005, 12:42 PM
I Voted~!!!

Roger is 64 % now~! :devil:

avocadoe
12-30-2005, 02:21 PM
I did just now...he has a looooooong way to go, lol, as Alpine skier waaaaaaaa ahead. I found it near the bottom of the page on English page...

SUKTUEN
12-30-2005, 03:01 PM
I did just now...he has a looooooong way to go, lol, as Alpine skier waaaaaaaa ahead. I found it near the bottom of the page on English page...
how many % Roger has now?

bokehlicious
12-30-2005, 03:03 PM
how many % Roger has now?

You can check it at any time on their site Suktuen ;)

Fortunately Roger is an easy leader on the ES german website (63%) :cool:

SUKTUEN
12-30-2005, 03:05 PM
You can check it at any time on their site Suktuen ;)

Fortunately Roger is an easy leader on the ES german website (63%) :cool:

Thankyou~!! I can check it ? where? :D :D

bokehlicious
12-30-2005, 03:08 PM
Thankyou~!! I can check it ? where? :D :D

www.eurosport.com and you vote one more time for Roger... Your vote won't be valid a second time but then you can see the actual score ;) :D

SUKTUEN
12-30-2005, 03:22 PM
ok,, I understand now~~thanks

^Sue^
12-30-2005, 03:26 PM
vote for what???may i know??:)

SUKTUEN
12-30-2005, 03:28 PM
vote for Roger~~~

bokehlicious
12-30-2005, 03:29 PM
vote for what???may i know??:)

Eurosport sportman of the year ;)

On the previous page of this thread, SP posted the different ES links (depens on the language)

SUKTUEN
12-30-2005, 04:05 PM
Eurosport sportman of the year ;)

On the previous page of this thread, SP posted the different ES links (depens on the language)
yes~~sue~~~vote for our tennis king~! :D :devil: :devil:

^Sue^
12-30-2005, 04:17 PM
how to vote???

SUKTUEN
12-30-2005, 04:18 PM
how to vote???
find the link ~vote at the right handside

^Sue^
12-30-2005, 04:41 PM
thanks..

amierin
12-30-2005, 05:10 PM
Hey guys someone posted on GM that there's a rumor about Roger not being fully recovered and hinting that he may miss the AO? Do you guys have any info on this?

bokehlicious
12-30-2005, 05:27 PM
Hey guys someone posted on GM that there's a rumor about Roger not being fully recovered and hinting that he may miss the AO? Do you guys have any info on this?

According to this message he wrote on his website on December 20, it really sound like a bad rumour... Anyway we'll see on court in Doha in a few days :)


"I have worked hard on my fitness with Pierre Paganini these last weeks and am very happy with the result. I am now on my way to Down Under where I will work on my tennis skills with Tony Roche during 10 days."

ExpectedWinner
12-30-2005, 05:30 PM
Amerin, why are you asking here? :devil: Go to GM and ask that dude Galaxysomething. He sits on the forum 24 hours and gives non stop "hot updates" about Nadal. A couple of days ago he proclaimed Nadal to be in the worst shape out of "the rest of them". So, Roger and other players must have been sending him their off season training reports. :devil:

amierin
12-30-2005, 05:31 PM
According to this message he wrote on his website on December 20, it really sound like a bad rumour... Anyway we'll see on court in Doha in a few days :)


"I have worked hard on my fitness with Pierre Paganini these last weeks and am very happy with the result. I am now on my way to Down Under where I will work on my tennis skills with Tony Roche during 10 days."

Thanks.

nobama
12-30-2005, 05:33 PM
Probably just a rumor. The press has gone nuts lately hyping rumors and assuming anyone not 100% or missing a warm-up event won't play AO. They've already done that with Nadal and Safin. But as far as we know Roger isn't pulling out of Doha so I would take that rumor with a huge grain of salt. How would a French newspaper really know what his fitness is anyway?

ExpectedWinner
12-30-2005, 05:45 PM
How would a French newspaper really know what his fitness is anyway?

How do newspapers usually get their info?

Interviews with the direct source, leaking info from family members, friends/enemies :devil: , training partners, tournament directors, etc.

SUKTUEN
12-31-2005, 08:49 AM
hope he is already to play well now

Stevens Point
12-31-2005, 02:11 PM
www.sundaytelegraph.news.com.au

Federer's secret hit-out
By Leo Schlink
January 1, 2006 ( :cool: in Australia it is already the year 2006)

THE world's greatest tennis player Roger Federer jetted out of Sydney last night after a top-secret 10-day training camp at coach Tony Roche's private court in preparation for an Australian Open assault.

In a show of his determination and drive for success, Federer spent New Year's Eve aboard an Emirates Airlines flight bound for Dubai, where he will try to defend his Qatar Open title in Doha from tomorrow.

Speaking exclusively to The Sunday Telegraph last night, Federer said he was in Sydney purely for "business".

"It would be nice to be home for Christmas in the snow but it's just better practice facilities here," he said. "Even though I still enjoy the Christmas, here is very different. I am outdoors, whereas at home it would be zero degrees and I'd be practising indoors ... it's all about business.

"You've got the hardcourt which we don't have in Switzerland and I have a coach here which I don't have in Switzerland."

Federer and girlfriend Mirka spent Christmas day with Roche and his family at Roche's north shore home. :)

"I spent Christmas with Tony's family, which was nice. It was a very intense week for us but we had a good time together," he said. "Working closely with Tony helps my game."

Still bitterly disappointed by his semi-final loss to eventual champion Marat Safin at the centenary Australian Open at Rod Laver Arena, Federer has stunned those around him with his training intensity.

"I hope I can get a better start to the year," he said.

"Last year I was in the semi-finals of the Australian Open and it was good. But having match point (against Safin), I could have easily gone one or two steps further.

"I'm anxious to see what is going to happen this year. To have such a great year last year and to back it up, it's not going to be easy."

Federer left his luxury city hotel in Sydney early each morning to make the journey to Roche's private court.

Completing up to three sessions a day with a mentor who does not tolerate slackers, Federer slept on Roche's couch between sessions to recover. After eating lunch and sometimes dinner at Roche's home, Federer then travelled back to central Sydney to rest.

The peerless Wimbledon and US Open champion is chasing a 34th title in Doha to continue what shapes as an ominously driven preparation for the Australian Open.

Federer, already the winner of six grand slam events, is desperate to reclaim the Australian Open title as arch-rival Lleyton Hewitt prepares to go one step further than last year.

Federer will fly back to Australia for the Kooyong Classic in Melbourne from January 11-14 before tackling the Australian Open, where Safin is unlikely to be able to defend his title because of nagging knee problems.

Federer lost just four matches last year in a tour de force marked by 11 title victories, including two grand slams.

Safin (Australian Open), Frenchman Richard Gasquet (Monte Carlo), Spaniard Rafael Nadal (French Open) and Argentine David Nalbandian (Tennis Masters Cup) were the only players to beat the Swiss genius.

Federer sneaked into Australia in December 2004 to tap into Roche's incomparable practice court savvy.

Roche was rewarded mid-year for his input when Federer lifted the Wimbledon and US Open trophies.

He described the fluent right-hander as on a par with Australian gun Lew Hoad, and praise doesn't come any higher.

Roche believes there is scope for improvement in Federer's game – the second serve and volleying. Roche is seen to be expert in teaching both skills. The pair will work together for 14 weeks this year.

Hewitt this week begins his quest for a third Adelaide title before switching his attention to Sydney, where he will bid for a record fifth singles crown.

He will then zero in on Rod Laver Arena where last year, sore and exhausted, he succumbed to an inspired Safin and a groin injury to lose the final in four sets.

The Sunday Telegraph

nobama
12-31-2005, 02:54 PM
So what does Mirka do when Rogi is training all day, sleeping on Tony's couch in between sessions? Maybe she spent time with Tony's wife? I thought it was quite nice of them to share their family Christmas with Roger. I remember reading that one of the reasons Tony accepted the coaching offer was because Roger flew all the way down there, having Christmas on the plane, so Tony really felt he couldn't say no.

nobama
12-31-2005, 03:00 PM
How do newspapers usually get their info?

Interviews with the direct source, leaking info from family members, friends/enemies :devil: , training partners, tournament directors, etc.Well it appears that Roger was in intense training for 10 days at Tony Roche's home in Australia (unless Leo Schlink is just exaggerating to make his story more exciting), so whatever info they got at this point is BS I think. From everything Roger's said, since his Holiday after Shanghai he's been working very hard with his fitness trainer, and now his coach. That's not what we've been hearing out of the Nadal and Safin camps.

RogiFan88
12-31-2005, 03:09 PM
I thought Rogi and Mirka might have spent Christmas w the Roches! ;)

nobama
12-31-2005, 04:00 PM
Well I don't know who else they'd spend it with...unless just by themselves at the hotel. I can't imagine either ones family flying all the way down there just for Christmas.

SUKTUEN
12-31-2005, 04:33 PM
Rogi and Mirka might have spent Christmas w the Roches???

That looks Great~! :inlove:

Minnie
12-31-2005, 05:44 PM
My friend in Australia told me they would probably be spending Christmas with the Roche family - sorry I didn't post that news before. Thanks for the article Ste - they print nothing but positive things about Rogi here so you can all see how much he's loved by the UK media. We are just about to head into the last few hours of 2005 - so wish everyone here a very happy and healthy New Year! :bigwave:

SUKTUEN
12-31-2005, 05:46 PM
I think Roger will be happy has many friends together in Christmas

Stevens Point
01-01-2006, 12:05 PM
Reuters

New year means business as usual for Federer

DOHA (Reuters) - The new year means business as usual for world number one Roger Federer whose resolution is simply to continue to dominate the tennis tour.

"I don't feel like it is the beginning of a new season. There is hardly any break between seasons," Federer told reporters when he arrived at Doha International Airport on Sunday for the defense of his Qatar Open title.

"The tennis calendar is almost round-the-year. It's almost continuous, so much so that I don't feel anything new," the Swiss said.

The Wimbledon and U.S. Open champion will start the new season by chasing his 34th career title at the $1 million Qatar Open, which begins on Monday.

"I had a good run in 2004 and I was able to match it in 2005 too. Obviously I am aiming at a repeat of that in 2006 as well," he said.

Since being beaten in the Masters Cup final by David Nalbandian in the season-ending Masters Cup, Federer, who played in the Shanghai event despite an ankle injury, has been training hard with coach Tony Roche in Sydney.

"We spent Christmas together but a lot of time was spent on the court for an intense preparation for 2006," Federer said.

The Swiss ace, who admitted he was disappointed by the loss to Nalbandian and by his defeat by eventual champion
Marat Safin of Russia in the Australian Open semi-finals, said he felt he could continue to dominate the game in 2006.

"It's a huge priority for me to maintain the number one ranking during 2006. The Australian Open, in two weeks' time, should provide the clue as to what lies ahead in 2006," he said.

In Doha, Federer is drawn to meet Czech wild card Ivo Minar in the first round and faces a probable second-round clash with former champion Fabrice Santoro of France.

In the quarter-finals, Federer should face third-seeded Frenchman Richard Gasquet, who beat him at Monte Carlo last year, and could meet number six Olivier Rochus of Belgium in the semi-finals.

The bottom half of the draw is headed by world number five Nikolay Davydenko of Russia, who is expected to have an easy run until the semi-finals where his opponent could be fourth-seeded Frenchman Sebastien Grosjean.

nobama
01-01-2006, 01:15 PM
Rogi seems to be putting a lot of pressure on himself over AO. Not sure what I think about that....:unsure:

SUKTUEN
01-01-2006, 04:15 PM
Rogi seems to be putting a lot of pressure on himself over AO. Not sure what I think about that....:unsure:
don't worry ~~Roger has wonderful power to forget the pressure~~ :D
I only worry about his leg :sad:

ExpectedWinner
01-01-2006, 09:18 PM
unless Leo Schlink is just exaggerating to make his story more exciting

LOL. It's possible, considering how they managed to bring "the arch-rival" Hewitt into this article.

Stevens Point
01-02-2006, 01:41 AM
Excerpt from

www.foxsports.com

Sixteen not-so-sweet predictions for 2006
Matthew Cronin / tennisreporters.net

1. Will Roger Federer win the calendar year Grand Slam?

No, but the dominant Swiss No. 1 will win the only Grand Slam title that still eludes him, the French Open. Federer — who's won five Grand Slam titles during the last two years — is finally showing some physical wear and tear, but mentally, he still has a tremendous amount of hunger and wants to prove that he's the best of all time.

The 24-year-old can't do that convincingly unless he wins the only major played on clay. With the right amount of patience and varied attack, he has the goods to reign in Paris. He'll also win the Australian Open again, but will have his winning streaks stopped at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open.hmmmmm...... :shrug:

Oriental_Rain
01-02-2006, 04:03 AM
I hope he win the RG

nobama
01-02-2006, 05:22 AM
LOL. It's possible, considering how they managed to bring "the arch-rival" Hewitt into this article.I don't put anything past the Aussie press. All their stories seem to be a lot of hype.

Puschkin
01-02-2006, 07:13 AM
quoting Reuters
In the quarter-finals, Federer should face third-seeded Frenchman Richard Gasquet, who beat him at Monte Carlo last year, and could meet number six Olivier Rochus of Belgium in the semi-finals.


Since when do number 1 and 3 meet in the QF? :confused:
If anything else in this article is as carefully researched as the QF predictions...... :rolleyes:

lunahielo
01-02-2006, 12:32 PM
I just found this~~~ :)

Federer named L'Equipe's "Champion of Champions"

www.chinaview.cn 2006-01-02 19:34:50


PARIS, Jan. 2 (Xinhuanet) -- Swiss tennis star Roger Federer has been named "Champion of Champions" for 2005 by French sports daily L'Equipe.

The world No. 1 received 676 points in a vote by L'Equipe journalists placing him well ahead of second placed Valentino Rosso the world motorcycle champion from Italy who got 387 points.

Third place went to Formula 1 world champion Fernando Alonso of Spain (324 points) with Ethiopian distance runner Kenenisa Bekele in fourth (250 points).

The 24-year-old Federer dominated men's tennis in 2005 completing a Wimbledon/US Open double for the second straight year and compiling an 81-4 winning record along the way.

Federer is the only the second tennis player to win the L'Equipe award in its 25-year history after Andre Agassi in 1999.

"Roger Federer is admirable not only for his successes," L'Equipe commented. "He also is the incarnation of perfection on a tennis court -- powerful and at the same time elegant.

"He is without doubt the leader of a new generation of champions in all sports early in this new century."

luna