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Roger news and articles

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TenHound
08-27-2005, 04:13 AM
Until now, Nick Boll. had best line on Roger - from Wimby this yr: "He moves like a whisper, and executes like a wrecking ball.

Just found line from guy I mentioned above - Rohit Brijnath - that goes w/it. Happily, It also concisely expresses Mirkaland's post:

Federer is seen as the player of the greatest tennis, but not yet its greatest player.

nobama
08-27-2005, 04:56 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/08/27/sports/tennis/27roberts.html?pagewanted=print

His Own Man
By SELENA ROBERTS
ROGER FEDERER's style is liquid or is it lyrical?

His seamless motion on the court is Gene Kelly "Singin' in the Rain" or is it a Twyla Tharp creation of choreography? He is effortless or is he breezy? He is virtuosity or is he fusion?

Only someone as self-aware and complex as Federer could so meticulously describe a playing method that defies a simple description.

"I call it more retro style, like go back to the roots, in a way, but in a modern way," Federer said yesterday over a pasta lunch at a restaurant in Midtown Manhattan. "It's like we all have these modern restaurants now, modern Indian, modern Arabic, modern this and that. I'm modern retro in an old style, you know, with new technology. Maybe this is why I have many admirers from old times, still.

"I'm very all-around, of course. Not the big weapon, let's say, but players who play me, they know what the weapon is. They know if they give me a short ball, it's gone, even if it doesn't look that dramatic. It's more of a fluid game, which has no scratches, you know, which is round and that makes it more dangerous. My ability is to be like a chameleon, maybe."

Federer can morph into any form at any moment, but he knows exactly who he is all the time. This is the splendor of autonomy.

Amid the homogenized, neatly packaged young phenoms who will alight at the United States Open beginning Monday, Federer is an original in thought, style and voice - no strings attached.

He has no agent, so Federer is free to turn down David Letterman, to write his own speeches, to be his own man. He is constantly aware of how his voice carries as the No. 1-ranked player in the world whether he is talking to the Swiss news media or opening the Nasdaq market, as he did on Thursday.

"I go up to the Nasdaq," Federer said, "and I think, what are you going to say? Just think about it a little bit: What message do you want to get out there? Are you just happy to be there? Is it an honor? What's the relation? I do think about what I'm doing; and why am I doing it.

"If it makes no sense or if it is only P.R. or whatever, if it's not credible, then I think that's very important to know. I believe that's my strength, because I don't talk when I don't think it's appropriate. I don't want, 'Well, it's Federer again; what he says, he's been talking enough weird stuff.' I don't want to be seen like that."

He has no agent, so he is in control of his image. He is free to pick out his clothes for a Vogue bash and choose his charitable missions without filtering his ideas through a corporate think tank.

He saw a need, for example, in South Africa - the birthplace of his mother, Lynette - and chose the children of New Brighton Township as his cause after recent visits left Federer alternately tearful and hopeful.

"There were little kids about 2 years old sitting in, like, a box with AIDS and H.I.V.," Federer said. "These little kids basically have no chance. They look so cute and you're like, wow, what can I do?

"We went into the schools, and then you see happy kids singing and dancing and everything, how happy they are to see you there. That makes you emotional again because you feel so welcome. So for me, you see, maybe it's seeing the happiness and the sadness being so close together."

Federer has no agent, so he has an entourage of about three, including his longtime girlfriend and manager, Mirka Vavrinec. He decides what fits into his tennis practices and what doesn't fit with his personality. But he wasn't always so well adjusted, so self-assured. Once, he was just another hothead prodigy with a nightclub existence and, yes, a management agency that orchestrated his life.

It is probably no coincidence that in 2003 - the same year he won Wimbledon, the first of his five majors - he decided to venture onward without an agent. In 2004, he even played without a coach.

"Two or three years ago, I mean, it was all tennis. Tennis or video games or TV," Federer said.

Once Wimbledon happened in 2003, once he fell to his knees on the grass and gently wept, he knew his life would change forever. He had a decision to make: Federer could either launch into the arrested development world of big-time pro sports or he could develop as a person with a world view.

Federer is introspective or is he mischievous? He is confident or is he self-effacing? Federer is the combination of many traits, but he is always true to himself. He may be missing out on millions in endorsement dollars without an agent, but autonomy has its rewards. He is free to define himself.

Fergie
08-27-2005, 08:41 PM
http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/news?slug=ap-usopen&prov=ap&type=lgns

Federer is "The Maestro'' as he heads into U.S. Open as big favorite

NEW YORK (AP) -- Everything seems to be clicking for Roger Federer.

He's won an Open-era record 22 straight finals, is 64-3 in matches this year, and has been No. 1 for 82 consecutive weeks. Some have dubbed him ``The Federer Express,'' others ``The Maestro.''

Which does he prefer as he heads into the U.S. Open as the prohibitive favorite?

"Maestro is pretty cool,'' he said with a grin.

Federer is the oddsmakers' favorite to win the Open, with Spain's Rafael Nadal and American Andy Roddick the next two choices. No. 7 Andre Agassi, the 1994 and 1999 champion, surely will be the sentimental favorite of the crowd. No one, not even Agassi, knows whether this will be his last U.S. Open.

Maria Sharapova comes into the Open as the women's top seed, but she's only the third choice among the oddsmakers behind fourth-seeded Kim Clijsters and No. 7 Justine Henin-Hardenne. Venus Williams, No. 10, is rated a better bet than her sister, No. 8 Serena, and No. 2 Lindsay Davenport.

The courts at the National Tennis Center are blue now rather than green, the money is bigger than ever, and for the first time fans can keep stray balls. There's a giant new draw board with a retro, manually operated touch. All the changes are signs of tennis' fan-friendly focus and burgeoning appeal.

And personable star players from around the globe, such as Federer, Nadal, Roddick and Agassi, along with Sharapova, Davenport, Clijsters, Henin-Hardenne and the Williams sisters, are ratcheting up worldwide interest in a sport that has seen its share of troubled times.

Federer spoke at a dinner in the days leading up to the U.S. Open, which begins Monday, about how his life and tennis had come together in the past two years -- how it all became less of a struggle than it had been when he was younger and still throwing rackets and tantrums.

"I know what I'm sacrificing for,'' he said. "It makes sense to me now. I really have my life in control. Everything is pink, no, I mean, how you say, rosy.''

That was a rare language mistake for Federer, who speaks English almost as fluently as he does Swiss-German, German and French.

Federer, already popular throughout Europe, is hoping to follow in the footsteps of the relatively few other European players who became equally popular in the United States -- such as Bjorn Borg, Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker.

"I would like to be loved, to have fans around the world,'' he said. "I had a moment last year when I felt people always wanted me to lose because I was winning too much. Now I think differently about that. Maybe losing in the Australian (to Marat Safin), but fighting and fighting, showed I was human. In Paris when I lost I felt the fans were for me. Those losses were so important to me. They made a difference in how fans see me and how I see the game.''

Doris Loeffel
08-27-2005, 09:20 PM
I like that last sentense!

Fergie
08-28-2005, 01:17 AM
UNICEF Praises ATP for Tsunami Relief Donations

ATP World No. 1 Roger Federer accepts special recognition from United Nations Children’s Fund at Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day

http://www.atptennis.com/shared/photos/other/atp_praises_unicef.jpg

UNICEF, the world's leading children's organization, today presented World No. 1 Roger Federer with a plaque as a token of its appreciation for the efforts of the ATP and pro tennis to rapidly raise funds to support UNICEF's relief efforts in south Asia immediately after the tsunami struck the region.

Federer accepted the framed photograph at the US Open's Arthur Ashe Kids' Day on behalf of all players, while World No. 2 Rafael Nadal added to the growing tally of ATP contributions by donating an additional $15,000 today.

“I'm very honored to accept this from a great organization like UNICEF,” said Federer, top seed at next week's US Open.

Charles J. Lyons, President of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF, made the special presentation to Federer. Lyons and Federer were introduced during the ceremony by Kids' Day host Summer Sanders, a UNICEF Ambassador who praised the work of the organization and the players who have helped support it.

Earlier this year the ATP launched a three-year global partnership with UNICEF, the United Nations Children's Fund, to harness the power of tennis to ensure the health, education and protection of every child. The partnership, called ACE (“Assisting Children Everywhere”) already has raised approximately $250,000, most of it directed to the survivors of the tsunami.

“The ATP, its players, employees and fans have raised significant funds and awareness to support our mission,” said Lyons. “As soon as the ATP and the players heard about the disaster, they wanted to help in any way they could. This partnership will continue to go a long way in helping children around the world lead happier, healthier lives and develop to their full potential.”

Lyons cited several players and highlighted the work of Federer, who organized a tsunami fundraising exhibition in March at the Pacific Life Open in Indian Wells—called ATP All-Star Rally for Relief—and secured the participation of nearly every Top 10 player in the world, including Andy Roddick, Andre Agassi, Lleyton Hewitt, Marat Safin and several leading Sony Ericsson WTA Tour players. Federer also donated money and memorabilia for fund-raising auctions. His on-going charitable work in South Africa on behalf of the Roger Federer Foundation was featured on the stadium's big screen.

“We all did individual things, but I wanted to get all of us together to do something as a group,” Federer said. “It was great fun, but more importantly it raised more needed funds for the tsunami victims.”

The USTA provided players participating in today's activities with the ability to donate money to the charities of their choice. Nadal donated the $15,000 to the ACE program that he earned as a member of the “losing” team at Kids' Day. “I'm a big supporter of UNICEF and the program that the ATP has developed with them to help children worldwide,” he said.

Among the other 2005 fund-raising activities by ATP players, Carlos Moya donated all of his prize money after winning the Chennai Open in January; Roddick, Hewitt and Agassi were among those donating signed racquets for on-line auctions; Gustavo Kuerten signed a pledge on behalf of the rights of children and adolescents to play sports in July at the Joinville Tennis C lub in Brazil; and ATP partner Penn Racquet Sports donated $50,000 to benefit UNICEF in a special segment on the "The Ellen DeGeneres Show“ in January. A Penn Racquet Sports ball — autographed by Taylor Dent, Jim Courier and Federer — and a racquet signed by Agassi were auctioned on eBay to raise additional funds.

SUKTUEN
08-28-2005, 11:42 AM
Fergie thankyou so much

Shabazza
08-28-2005, 11:50 AM
He is free to define himself.
exactly :yeah:

thx for those articles, a nice read :)

SUKTUEN
08-28-2005, 12:24 PM
Shabazza are you really a German?

How much do people go to visit Germany ?

Fergie
08-28-2005, 12:24 PM
Fergie thankyou so much
You're welcome! ;)

SUKTUEN
08-28-2005, 12:28 PM
You're welcome! ;)
fERGIE~~ your avarat is very ...... very sexy~!! :devil: :p

Fergie
08-28-2005, 12:30 PM
fERGIE~~ your avarat is very ...... very sexy~!! :devil: :p
Thanks ... I love that pic :drool:

SUKTUEN
08-28-2005, 12:35 PM
Thanks ... I love that pic :drool:
Me too~~~~ :lick: :lick: :lick: :lick: :lick: :lick: :lick:

Shabazza
08-28-2005, 12:50 PM
Shabazza are you really a German?

How much do people go to visit Germany ?
yep I'm 100% german ;)
don't know how many people visit Germany, but not so many I think :shrug:

SUKTUEN
08-28-2005, 01:08 PM
Is because go to Germany in expensive ?

RogiNie
08-28-2005, 01:21 PM
thanks for the articles! :)

avocadoe
08-28-2005, 01:56 PM
great articles, thanks so much...Roger you are the best :)

nobama
08-28-2005, 03:17 PM
He says Roger is sexually "wholesome" and Mirka is "maternal"...so I guess then he thinks Roger is dating his mother? :lol:

I disagree though that Marat gets into Roger's head. I think when Marat gets "hot" he's just a tougher opponent than Andy or Lleyton. And that was the case at AO this year. I don't think Roger is more nervous playing Marat than anyone else. I think the only one who maybe messes with Roger's head *right now* is Rafa.

http://www.observer.com/pageone_coverstory2.asp
By Matthew DeBord

Andy Roddick can’t crack Roger Federer. On that, virtually everyone agrees. But a more vital question tickling at the margins of American sport is: Why the hell can’t A-Rod even seem to make a match of his match-ups with Fed? By the end of next week, if form holds in Flushing Meadows, we might find out that Andy has it in him—to once again lift the U.S. Open trophy, and avoid going 1-for-11 lifetime against the tennis magician from Basel.

Or, at least, scrounge a lousy set or two off Fed. At least.

Two years ago, Andy Roddick was a Prince of Our City. His destiny was complete. A summer of titanic serving and pile-driver forehands had placed him center-court at Arthur Ashe Stadium on a balmy Sunday afternoon in early September, U.S. Open trophy triumphantly raised, the well-heeled fans of Flushing Meadow applauding his achievement. Pete Sampras had retired. Andre Agassi’s iron-man act was getting old. Andy would take up the torch of American men’s tennis. The future had arrived, and it was good.

Well, sort of. In Roddick’s mind, 2003 must now seem like a victory from another century. Or at least an era before Fed took over the game. Even though expectations that Roger Federer would be the first man since Rod Laver to claim the Grand Slam collapsed at this year’s Australian Open, no one wants to bet against the smooth Swiss in ’05.

It’s not hard to understand why. To watch Federer play the game is to witness something breathtakingly close to pure physical art. When Fed takes the court and the cameras scan the spectators, commentators can entertain themselves by picking out the tennis aristocracy that has gathered to watch the Great One practice his craft. This is the true measure of just how sick-good Federer is: The dominant players of bygone days insist on being mesmerized, in person and as a reverent group, by his vast talent. Sampras was greatly admired; he owns over twice as many Grand Slam titles as Federer. Agassi continues to amaze, winning tournaments in his mid-30’s. But Federer is a figure of awe. John McEnroe considers him the most impressive player he’s ever seen. Maria Sharapova has called him “Mr. Perfect.” Federer himself maintains that he knows what he does is—in his own word—“beautiful.”

Roddick has seen just how beautiful up close, in a pair of back-to-back losses to Federer at Wimbledon this year and last. The contrast between the two men verges on parody. The old server-and-volleyer-versus-baseliner match-up doesn’t apply. The difference is more aesthetic than athletic. Federer’s game is angelic and effortless, while Roddick’s is brutal, blunt, borderline ugly—and, these days, an essay in frustration. In an era in which most professional male tennis players often aim to strike the ball as aggressively as possible (to “hit the living crap” out of it, as Roddick says), Federer seems to consider a serve above 125 m.p.h. to be vulgar. He has even taken a position against the drop shot, which he considers beneath his standards. Two or three times in pretty much every match he plays, he causes fans to collectively catch their breath and opponents to shake their heads, mutter, gaze heavenward.

Roddick, of course, lives and dies by his 140-m.p.h.-plus serve, which provokes no shortage of head-shaking and muttering. He’s no counterpuncher, either. Andy wants to bring it, and bring it hard. This is a cruelly effective strategy against most opponents.

But when it comes to Federer, Roddick always looks confused. While Fed prepares to serve, delicately brushing back a stray lock of black hair so as to appear maximally unruffled before slashing the ball into a corner of the box, Roddick fidgets and wiggles and shimmies and sweats buckets. He understands that Roger has no weaknesses. But he desperately wants to make a rivalry out of the relationship. He has bent his mind to the task.

Makes sense. Roddick, in fact, is the opposite of a dumb jock. One of the more well-spoken and obviously intelligent men on the pro tour, he believes that he should have at least one Wimbledon trophy in the case by now, and probably a second U.S. Open title, too. Intellectually, however, he knows that this thing with Federer is a problem. Furthermore, he grasps that, currently, he is not the man for the job. But he shows up and does the work, plays the grueling summer hard-court circuit, tries to rack up the wins and keep his ranking close to No. 1.

Meanwhile, Federer’s true rival drifts in and out of the sport, competing at his leisure.

Marat Safin, the monumentally volatile, existentially tormented, hot-chick-dating Russian, is the only guy who can get into Fed’s head. Where the Federer-Roddick pairing is awkward and, at the moment, completely one-sided, the Federer-Safin match-up seems elegantly preordained. Fed’s regal strut and absolute self-possession perfectly counter Safin’s smoldering sound and fury, the cracked racquets, the violent, omnipresent sense of Slavic anguish.

Federer’s girlfriend-slash-manager, Mirka, is blond and maternal; his sexuality is abstract and, one suspects, wholesome. Safin, on the other hand, is a raw, libidinous force; his latest girlfriend, Dasha, is so darkly luscious that you can understand why he takes time off from the tour. It was Safin who handed Federer one of only three losses this year, in Australia (Safin beat Fed in the semifinals, then went on to deny local son Lleyton Hewitt the title). The great Swedish champion Mats Wilander insists that Safin is the only player capable of consistently challenging Federer. Safin is Federer’s Kryptonite.

But he isn’t the Anti-Fed. Rather, the two men seem intertwined, their destiny shared (for example, Safin’s coach, Peter Lundgren, used to work for Federer). A Federer-Safin match is fascinating—less a contemporary sporting spectacle, more a scene out of European history. Both men have the look and manner of Napoleonic cavalry officers. When they play each other, you wonder why they’re exchanging groundstrokes instead of discussing whether it should be pistols at 20 paces or sabers rather than rapiers. Safin plays an epically powerful all-court game, complemented by pantherlike movement. When he defeated Pete Sampras at the U.S. Open in 2000, he made Pistol Pete look about as bad as you could make him look. While Federer leaves the rest of the tour flat-footed and dumbstruck, when he takes on Safin, he begins to appear frail, rushed and slightly bewildered. (He has also shown some weakness against the Spanish teenage phenom, Rafael Nadal, who took him out at the French Open. But Nadal hasn’t really pulled a reliable hard-court game together yet, although he did bag a title in Canada a few weeks ago.)

A-Rod is the Anti-Fed. Two years ago, his brash, cocky, unconflicted style paid dividends. He was dating Mandy Moore. His youthfulness was fresh and energetic, ideally suited to New York and the raucous National Tennis Center crowds. His game, honed by Winning Ugly guru Brad Gilbert, was intimidating (that relationship, to the dismay of most, has since dissolved). He didn’t win so much as impose defeat.

But then Fed became Fed, and the planets realigned. Depending on how the seeding goes at the Open this year, Andy could meet Fed in either the semifinals or the finals. Which places Roddick in an almost perfect spoiler’s position: He’s the one who could prevent Mr. Perfect from playing the Mad Russian for the title. At the moment, Federer—who took a long break after winning Wimbledon—appears a tad rusty. And Safin? Well, he’s winning some and losing some. Hitting his heavy, punishing ball, calibrating his volcanic temperament. Preparing for Roger, his natural foe, against whom he’s already played two tremendous matches this year. Actually, it’s gotten to the point where he seems insulted to have to face anyone else.

Roddick, for his part, has struggled with some injuries. Still, he looked impressive in Cincinnati, at the second-to-last U.S. Open Series tournament before the Big Show. That is, until he ran into Fed in the final, whereupon he was swiftly dispatched in straight sets. “Roger started being Roger again, yada yada yada,” he said, quite literally as if he were reciting a script. Despite that, he senses down deep that he may have the competitive guts to be the U.S. Open champ again. That first serve, after all, is a Thor-like fulcrum of court-splitting terror. He may yet play his role. Besides, he owes it to New York to be less third wheel to Roger and Marat, and more the flashy kid who owned the town in ’03.

Doris Loeffel
08-28-2005, 06:12 PM
Well in two weeks time we know more ;)

Goo Roger goo!!

RogiFan88
08-28-2005, 07:43 PM
Nadal is the sole threat to Swiss master
By Clive White
(Filed: 28/08/2005)

As Andy Roddick got, as he is inclined to say, his butt kicked for the umpteenth time by Roger Federer in the Cincinnati Masters final last week, attention turned to the only man - other than the infuriatingly inconsistent Marat Safin - who just might disturb the calm authority of the peerless Swiss in New York this coming fortnight: Rafael Nadal.

Short of making Federer play left-handed there is no way of handicapping the brilliant Swiss, as, say, Michael Schumacher has been in motor racing this year by having to drive an uncompetitive car. Tennis, like any sport, desperately needs rivalries to sustain interest and since the brash young Nebraskan is clearly not up to the task - which is a pity because the sport needs an outstanding American for financial reasons - it falls upon the 19-year-old Spaniard to take up the cudgel.

This, of course, he has already done at the French Open this year, when he battered Federer into a fourth-set submission in fading light and inhospitable conditions. But this US Open should tell us whether he is going to throw down the gauntlet on a regular basis to the world's No 1 on a surface other than clay. The evidence is he will do and that New Yorkers - and not just the Latinos - will take him to their hearts as they did the last 'Raging Bull' to take on and beat the world's best: middleweight great Jake La Motta.

That evidence comes from a compelling climax to the Nasdaq-100 Open in Florida last April when a stunned Federer was taken to within two points of a straight sets defeat by Nadal, who was then only 18. "I definitely don't want to talk about the future of this guy!" Federer quipped prophetically. The Key Biscayne courts may not be as fast as those at Flushing Meadows, but it was an indication that the young Spaniard was capable of performing creditably on surfaces other than the red stuff.

Nadal had not had his feet back on terra firma until recently, when in Montreal he satisfied his aim of winning one hard-court title this year, beating Andre Agassi into the bargain. He may yet exceed his objective - he generally does. In his next tournament, in Cincinnati, he surprisingly went out early to Tomas Berdych, but at least he was in good company: the 19-year-old Czech had been the last player to beat Federer, at the Athens Olympics, before the Swiss embarked on a 26-match unbeaten run that encompassed his first US Open title last year and his fourth of five grand slam victories.

A little worryingly, Nadal twice required on-court treatment for a back problem against Berdych, but expects to be fully recovered in time for the Open, in which the No 2 seed has a favourable draw. A resurgent Greg Rusedski apart, possibly he should not be unduly tested until the quarter-finals, when he is scheduled to face the 35-year-old Agassi again. A projected semi-final meeting with Roddick would heap all the pressure on the American, who, crucially, lost to Nadal in the Davis Cup final in Seville last December.

The tantalising prospect of a rematch with Federer in the final would go some way towards alleviating the local disappointment of another New York final bereft of any Americans; even the women's showpiece last year was an all-Russian affair. Watching Federer and Nadal tangle horns once more would certainly satisfy the aficionados and help build that all-important rivalry, which at present stands at 2-1 in favour of the Majorcan - the youngster had audaciously beaten a sunstroke-affected Federer in their first meeting in Miami last year. Compare that, if you will, with the so-called Federer-Roddick 'rivalry', which stands at 9-1 in favour of the former.

Apart from his obvious attributes, like an intimidating strength and an extraordinary defensive game, Nadal has a self-assurance that makes even Federer look nervous. When his mentor, Carlos Moya, asked him a few years ago whether he would like to have a career like his, Moya said, "he said, quite seriously, that he aspired to more. And I knew that he would be a better player than I".

Apparently, Nadal's Spanish-based British soulmate Andy Murray said something similar to Tim Henman when the pair had dinner in Cincinnati recently. Whether or not Henman took it in the same spirit as Moya, he did at least pay the bill. Next time dinner could be on Murray, judging by the progress the 18-year-old is making. Since his Wimbledon agony and ecstasy he has won two Challenger tournaments, beaten another top 30 player - Taylor Dent - and taken a set off one of the world's top five - Safin.

This time last year he was competing in the junior event at Flushing Meadows - and winning it while an inspired Henman was on his way to his second slam semi-final in the space of three months. It may well transpire that Henman was then at the peak of his powers because ever since there has been a steady decline in his performance. By the time the British No 1 celebrates his 31st birthday on Tuesday week he will more than likely be out of this tournament and, more importantly, out of the world's top 30 too, whereupon life will become even trickier for a player we may soon be referring to as the British No 2, if not three.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml;jsessionid=SGYVT3O0QOTDLQFIQMGSM54AVCBQ WJVC?xml=/sport/2005/08/28/stwhit28.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/08/28/ixtenn.html

TenHound
08-28-2005, 08:22 PM
Clive tell us: "tennis desperately needs rivalries to sustain interest".

Thank you, Clive. I was bored to tears watching Roger crush Hewitt in NY last year in one of the finest displays of tennis ever. Similarly, this years Wimby Final v. Pandy, was almost unendurable. Please, somebody, anybody, rescue us from this.

nobama
08-28-2005, 08:33 PM
They're looking for anybody who might be able to knock Roger of his pedestal, and think they've found it in Nadal. What perplexes me is these "critics" say Roger needs a couple more years like this year and last to become the "greatest ever", but then in the same breath claim his domination is boring and mens tennis needs rivalry. I'm sorry but Roger's playing some of the finest tennis ever and beating the best players out there right now. Andy Roddick says Roger has shots that no one else has. For me there's nothing boring about that. I just like to watch him to see what he'll come up with next.

Daniel
08-29-2005, 12:43 AM
U.S. Open: Federer, Agassi admire each other's work

By Steve Wilstein

The Associated Press


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KATHY WILLENS / AP

No. 1 seed Roger Federer returns to New York this week to defend his singles title at the U.S. Open.



PAUL CHIASSON / AP

Andre Agassi seeks his ninth Grand Slam title at the U.S. Open, starting tomorrow in New York.



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NEW YORK — An intimate, get-to-know-you-better dinner with Roger Federer was, as might be expected, a relaxed but elegant affair, even if it was served in the middle of a shoe showroom.

White tablecloths and napkins. Sparkling silverware and stemware. Soft music on the stereo.

"I asked for lounge music," he said with an easy smile.

He sipped white wine and selected the catered menu — chicken parmigiana, spaghetti, New York cheesecake — just as he had chosen the colors on a computer, moments earlier, of his new Nike shoes — a black and red "Shox Cog," size 12.

Federer likes to be in control, on and off the court, in a whirlwind life that could easily spin out of control. He has no agent or publicist, and only a part-time coach in Tony Roche. Just turned 24, the Swiss star has long been making decisions on his own with the help of his girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec, and parents.

On this occasion, a few days before he would begin defense of his U.S. Open title, he wanted to open himself up in a way that is unique for any top athlete. Inviting a small group of reporters — one each from The Associated Press, CBS, Time, People (he will soon be named to People's 50 most-beautiful list) and a new avant-garde magazine, Flaunt — Federer talked about tennis and what makes him tick when he's not playing.

He spoke about how he loves to improvise on the court, why that helps him so much at Wimbledon, where he won his third straight title last month, and how he uses it to his advantage on hard courts such as at the U.S. Open. He spoke about being his own man in life and in tennis, not looking up to his coach for sympathy, encouragement or advice during a match.

He spoke about his foundation to help children in South Africa — his mother's native country — and about fashion, his personal line of men's cosmetics, his desire to really explore the places he visits and learn about their cultures.

"Just going from the courts to the airports, that kills me," he said. "It's like a lost weekend. I want to learn about the world and give the people much more of myself, to see what I'm going through, what I see in life.

"I think it matters more and more what people think of you. Tennis comes first, but the level of your fame should be at the level of your play. I only say something when I mean it. I want to be credible. That's important to me. To win everything you can is important, but is it only the athlete that is remembered? I have to do things outside. I want to be a guy with no regrets."




The next day, at the Adidas store nearby in lower Manhattan, Andre Agassi also did something unusual for him or any other top tennis player — agreeing to a one-on-one interview just days before a major tournament. Maybe it's all part of the sneaker wars — he, too, designed his own shoe with the help of computer technology — but in Agassi's case he was trying to bring attention to the charitable foundation that is so important to him.

Agassi, at 35, is the kind of man Federer aspires to be and is already becoming. He seeks not just to match or surpass Agassi's Grand Slam titles — Agassi has eight, Federer five. Rather, it is Agassi's grounded life and principles, his desire to make a difference in the world, that Federer admires. For Agassi, the feeling is mutual toward Federer.

"I respect anybody who gives of their time money or energy to make this world a better place for somebody else," said Agassi, whose foundation helps at-risk children with schools and programs in his hometown of Las Vegas. "And when I see somebody like Roger starting his foundation at this age, which is about when I started mine, I know one day he's going to say, as I do, 'I wish had I started it even earlier.'

"In 12 years, we've raised over $75 million, and every dime has gone to changing children's lives. And I always think that if I had started a couple of years earlier maybe that $75 million would be $85 million. That's a lot of lives.

"If I don't do this, what am I doing? It's the reason why I get up in the morning. It's the reason why I work so hard."

Daniel
08-29-2005, 07:03 AM
As Swiss tennis star Roger Federer prepares to defend his title at the US Open on Monday, his personal trainer tells swissinfo how the player has been shaping up.

Pierre Paganini followed Federer's progress during his recent six-week break. Last week Federer returned to the court to win in Cincinnati and starts the US Open as favourite.



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In July, shortly after winning his third consecutive Wimbledon title, Federer announced he would be taking time out due to a foot injury.

But six weeks later the world number one was back in top form, with a straight-sets win over Andy Roddick at the Cincinnati Masters - his 22nd tournament victory in a row.

This stands him in good stead for the US Open in New York, which is the final tournament of the tennis season. He has been drawn to meet Czech Ivo Minar in his first-round match.

Paganini says that Federer's break has allowed the player to face the rest of the season calmly and that he is well-prepared for the challenges which lie ahead.

swissinfo: What is Roger Federer's frame of mind ahead of the US Open?

Pierre Paganini: It's difficult for me to reply to that question because only Roger really knows the answer to that. But what I can say is that he not only has the necessary modesty to take his first matches seriously but also an enormous self-confidence to achieve the big things.

swissinfo: Does this mean that he has not yet recovered from his foot injury?

P.P.: His foot is fine. It was an inflammation but it was under control. Roger hadn't yet reached the critical stage with the injury but it was necessary to stop for prevention reasons. It's much better to take a break a bit earlier than when it is too late.

swissinfo: What did Federer do in the six-week break?

P.P.: "Rog" mostly took a holiday. Afterwards we planned together different fitness programmes according to how his injury progresses.

The final part of the work was mostly about his tennis training and trainer Tony Roche joined Roger for that. This mid-season break really allowed us to work on Roger's all-round fitness and on getting everything up to scratch.

Recuperation is really an active part of training, which Roger has understood. He knows his capabilities really well and he knows what's good or bad for him.

swissinfo: Is Federer now stronger physically than he has been in the past?

P.P.: There has definitely been a progression, especially between the ages of 20 and 24 when he progressed enormously. But that didn't happen on its own and you really have to salute Roger's self-sacrifice when it comes to fitness training and the efforts he makes to achieve a good all-round level of fitness.

It's impossible for a player to always be in peak condition. During the most difficult times a player's strength also resides in the quality of their tennis and in their mental toughness.

swissinfo-interview: Raphaël Donzel and Mathias Froidevaux

Stevens Point
08-29-2005, 10:54 AM
www.eurosport.com

Federer stalking McEnroe

World number one Roger Federer is on track to complete the most dominant season in the Open Era. With an incredible win-loss record of 64-3, Federer may well surpass John McEnroe's feat of winning 82 of 85 matches and 13 titles including two major championships in the 1984 season.




Twenty-one years ago, four-times U.S. Open champion McEnroe won 96.5% of his matches.

Last season Federer had a 74-6 record, winning the Australian Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open, at 92.5%.

Since a shock second-round loss at the Athens Olympics, Federer is 81-3 mark in the past 12 months.

Federer has 22 consecutive victories in finals, 20 of those titles coming in 2004-05 seasons.

The 24-year-olds latest triumph at the Cincinnati Masters came after a six-week break to rest sore feet.

No wonder the Swiss begins the defence of his U.S. Open title as favourite.

The Swiss who doesn't miss, Federer has the look of the first guy to win successive Opens since Aussie Patrick Rafter did so in 1997-98.

Some respected observers are already hailing Federer as the greatest of all time.

Federer, who takes a 18-match winning streak into his opening round match against Czech Ivo Minar, is one of those rare performers whom you want to watch from first stroke to last.

He's so smooth and creative, ghostly in the way he effortlessly shows up on the right spot at the right time.

However, Federer is human, a fact that gives hope to his covetous challengers. Marat Safin proved that in the Australian Open semifinals, and so did the effervescent "El Nino," Rafael Nadal, in the French Open semifinals.

Both having jammed Federer while going on to win those titles, exude more hope than most.

Stevens Point
08-29-2005, 12:03 PM
This article is more about Andy, but....

Roddick Beats Federer -- Not on Court, but in Endorsements

Switzerland's Federer May Be Top-Ranked Tennis Pro, but America's Roddick Seems to Dominate Ads.

By JOHN MARTIN, ABC news

Switzerland's Roger Federer may be the top-ranked tennis player in the world but America's Andy Roddick appears to be winning the race to the bank with lucrative endorsements.

On billboards, buses, bus stops, and subway cars and platforms in Melbourne, Paris, and London, Roddick's image has dominated the advertising messages displayed this year around the world's major international tennis championships.

Federer, while holding endorsements from one major sports apparel company, Nike, a major tennis company, Wilson, and three Swiss companies, is far less visible.

This, despite the fact that the 24-year-old Federer has beaten 22-year-old Roddick in all five championship finals they've played. In 11 tournament matches against Federer, Roddick has won only once, and that was two years ago in Montreal.

Roddick Is Everywhere

Yet now, amid the fanfare of the 2005 U.S. Open here in New York, Federer -- while making the television rounds, such as ringing the NASDAQ opening bell -- seems overshadowed, while Roddick is everywhere.

For American Express, Roddick glances out at Big Apple subway passengers under a tag line: "Has anybody seen Andy's mojo?"

For Lexus, Roddick stares down at visitors to a luxury automobile display just inside the gates of the National Tennis Center, where hundreds of thousands of patrons stroll during the tournament's two long weeks. He stars in a series of Lexus television commercials.

And for Lacoste, the French sportswear company, a giant image of Roddick smashes a backhand from atop a new Lacoste store at the side of Arthur Ashe stadium..

"He's close to $10 million per year," said Kenneth Meyerson of SFX Tennis, the sports marketing company which negotiates contracts for Roddick.

To be sure, Federer has earned almost twice the career tournament prize money ($18,236,073) as his erstwhile rival Roddick ($9,273,266). So far this year, Federer's earnings ($4,140,518) are almost four times greater than Roddick's ($1,526,385).

Federer's business affairs are managed by his mother, Lynette Federer, in Switzerland. His contracts include endorsements by three Swiss companies -- watchmaker Maurice Lacroix, food products distributor Emmi, and Swiss International Airlines.

In May, the Federer team switched public relations consultants. An e-mail request to Lynette Federer for an estimate of the value her son's current endorsements was not immediately answered.

For tennis fans, it is Federer's on-court skills that draw respect. But for corporate executives, it is Roddick's perceived ability to move merchandise which earns endorsements.

"You just have an easier product to market," says SFX's Meyerson, who may be unjustifiably modest, having negotiating deals for Roddick with Rolex, Parlux (fragrances), Babolat (racquets, shoes, strings), Microsoft X-Box and Sega, among other products.

Lacoste Deal

But the Lacoste deal has a special meaning. The company has a fabled name in tennis, but an indifferent marketing record in recent years.

"We were in discussions with Lacoste for 12 months," Meyerson said in an e-mail message.

When the deal was struck, it seemed an odd fit: Instead of Federer, who speaks four languages and dresses in stylish Continental suits, it was Roddick, a Nebraska-born American who previously wore John Deere-style caps and black sneakers. Suddenly, it was Roddick who appeared in an all-white, French-manufactured tennis outfit adorned with a familiar green alligator.

Yet the Lacoste-Roddick deal has a precedent involving the United States and the French company's namesake, Rene Lacoste, the world's top player in 1926 and one of four countrymen who dominated Davis Cup competition in the 1920s.

As a player, Lacoste revolutionized tennis wardrobes by borrowing a friend's polo shirt and putting his trademark alligator emblem on the chest. The idea for the logo came to Lacoste when a Boston sportswriter wrote that he covered the court "like an alligator," meaning he easily reached shots on both sidelines.

So perhaps it isn't surprising after all that the French company chose an American player to help restore the lost luster of Lacoste clothing.

"I just had to buy something for my grandmother," explained Seamus Heaney, a 25-year-old shopper holding a Lacoste baseball cap for Roddick to autograph at the opening of a Lacoste boutique at the Macy's department store at New York's Herald Square.

Heaney's grandmother, a Connecticut resident, is an avid tennis fan, but her grandson says he isn't sure she is a Roddick admirer. But when he saw a sign proclaiming Roddick's presence at the shop's opening, he said, "I knew I should buy something here for her."

Roddick was the accidental beneficiary.

'Who's Roger Federer?'

Federer, who is becoming better known after winning three Wimbledon titles, is still by no means a household name.

When he visited NASDAQ headquarters and appeared on a CNBC business program, he was invited to step outside so photographers could take his picture in front of the stock market's Times Square headquarters.

On the sidewalk, a bicycle messenger stopped to watch. Diaby Oumar, a native of Mali, was asked if he would like to shake the hand of Roger Federer.

"Who's Roger Federer?" he asked.

"He's the number-one tennis player in the world," came the answer.

With that, Oumar stepped forward and the two men looked awkwardly at each other. Shutters clicked. The moment passed, and Roger and Diaby went their separate ways.

"Image is everything," Andre Agassi once proclaimed (in a television commercial for a camera). Yet, the lopsided rivalry in which Federer wins championships and Roddick wins endorsements suggests that images are not always what they seem.

Mrs. B
08-29-2005, 01:15 PM
as Boris Becker said, Roger is a real sportsman, he's not in for the money, nor fame, the guy really enjoys playing tennis and winning matches!

;)

lsy
08-29-2005, 01:27 PM
Not sure if this had been posted already as I haven't had time to read thru everything here....this is Rogi's interview transcript on 60 Minutes :
===========================================
Transcript: Hot stuff
August 28, 2005
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Nick Greenaway

Roger Federer

INTRODUCTION:
LIZ HAYES: We try our best to be detached observers but, Lord knows, sometimes it's not easy. Women in the audience will know exactly what I'm talking about when they hear the next two words — Roger Federer. Not only is he number one in the world, he is well on the way to becoming the greatest player of all time. And he's so beautiful to watch — in a purely tennis sense, of course. Those graceful clean strokes, the power, the sheer mastery of his game. No wonder Lleyton Hewitt is so spooked. But on the eve of the US Open, what is he doing in the sweltering heat of the Middle East? Come along and find out.

STORY:
LIZ HAYES: In the middle of an Arabian summer, Dubai is one of the hottest places on the planet. But it's here that the coolest man in world sport comes to train.

ROGER FEDERER: I'm going to sweat. Not only me. Also you guys, hey.

LIZ HAYES: The heat would kill a brown dog, and that's just the way Roger Federer and his coach, Australian legend Tony Roche, like it. Together, they are preparing for the cauldron of the US Open at Flushing Meadows. Just remind me again, Roger, why are we here in Dubai? What is the temperature?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, what is it … 44 maybe, and about 60 percent to 70 percent humidity. It is more because it's in the middle of Switzerland and Australia. A little closer to Switzerland.

TONY ROCHE: A little? I don't know about your geography.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. But it is a straight flight.

LIZ HAYES: Now, the best thing I've found so far is I reckon you could lose a couple of kilos just by standing still.

ROGER FEDERER: Look there. Tony's dripping...

TONY ROCHE: That's me. And I'm just feeding the ball.

LIZ HAYES: With training partner Luke, another Aussie on the court, it's clear Federer likes the antipodean connection. Is he the genius that you are quoted to have said he is?

TONY ROCHE: Well, I think he's such an all-round player, which is a little unusual in today's tennis. He sort of reminds me a lot of Rod Laver.

LIZ HAYES: He has described you as a genius. That was good of him, wasn't it?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, that's good. But he never tells it to my face, you know.

LIZ HAYES: He tells everyone else and not you. Do those comparisons make you feel nervous?

ROGER FEDERER: They make me hot. I don't know why I get hot.

LIZ HAYES: Did it?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. It's something — to be faced with a compliment like this, it's not so sort of the usual thing, you know. And I have a lot of respect for him, what he has achieved as a player, as a coach and everything and the way he is as a person. To hear it, it's very nice.

LIZ HAYES: Roger Federer may be the world's best player, but he knew Tony Roche could make him better. It took Federer more than a year to win Roche over, pursuing him all the way to his home in Sydney.

TONY ROCHE: I thought, gee, he is the number one player in the world and he is willing to come out a week before Christmas. And he actually left on Christmas Day. He had Christmas on the flight coming back. And I thought, well, you know, I've got to do something. I just can't say no.

LIZ HAYES: Those volleys, you need to pick them up a bit, Roger. He's doing OK, isn't he?

TONY ROCHE: Yeah.

LIZ HAYES: What can you do?

TONY ROCHE: Oh, well, you can always get a little bit more penetration and a little bit more stick on the ball and certainly work on his balance. Because he's such a great athlete, that when he comes in to the net, the only way that somebody should be able to get a ball past him is if they can hit it on the line.

LIZ HAYES: His demolition of Andy Roddick in this year's Wimbledon final confirmed the mantle of greatness rests easily on Federer's shoulders. It was his third straight Wimbledon finals victory. But it was much more than just a good old thrashing. It was a display of artistry that transcended mere sport. As former champions Boris Becker, John McEnroe and John Newcombe looked on, Federer took the game to a new level.

JOHN NEWCOMBE: At one stage, Roddick just looked over his coach's box and went, "What do I do?" It's almost like you're out there with a fighter and you hit him with the best punch you've ever thrown and the guy doesn't move and then just goes, bang and knocks you out.

ANDY RODDICK: You run out of options because he has become such a complete player so, you know, maybe I'll just punch him or something. I don't know.

LIZ HAYES: Roger Federer's parents exposed him to tennis when he was a toddler. And it seems even then, the boy and the racquet were made for each other. He was also a gifted soccer player, but at 12, decided tennis was his destiny.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. I always liked the idea of being in control. Like in tennis, you win or lose, it's you to blame. In soccer, I always felt like, 'Oh, the goalkeeper made this mistake. Why didn't he tackle that guy earlier?' I always find these excuses, even though I really enjoy the team sport.

LIZ HAYES: It was at about this time when a young Federer would meet another Australian coach — Peter Carter. The journeyman tennis player turned coach would have a huge and lasting impression on Roger's life.

ROGER FEDERER: I think he's had the most influence on my game as a coach. And, of course, next to my parents, maybe also as a person, you know. We had great times together. That's very clear. And he really actually, I think, teached me the beautiful technique I play today.

LIZ HAYES: But it was a fragile beauty. For all Federer's extraordinary talent and technique, the young Adonis had feet of clay and a very bad temper.

ROGER FEDERER: I was very up and down, I would say. When I would lose matches, I would cry very much especially. I would throw my racquet and scream around the tennis court. And then there was one stage — I think it was about 16 or 17 — I couldn't practice more for an hour or 1.5. And every time, I would lose my mind or they would send me off or I would walk off automatically myself because I knew what's going to come.

LIZ HAYES: If there was one thing above all else that forced Federer to get a grip and cool down it was the tragic death of friend and mentor Peter Carter, in a car crash, in August 2002.

ROGER FEDERER: That was a big, big shock for me. And it came at a really also a strange time. I was already not playing very well. And sort of, it's hard to say, but it sort of was a wake-up call for me, you know. I think that Peter would like to see me do better and finally focus on the game maybe. I took it that way and it really, really helped me.

GRAPHIC: Eleven months after Peter's death, Roger wins his first Wimbledon title.

COMMENTATOR: Well, he's done it. Roger Federer — what an effort. Overcome by emotion. A wonderful victory. It just shows you he looks so calm, cool and collected out there — the emotions and the turmoil going on inside him. He's very emotional and uptight inside.

LIZ HAYES: Those tears we saw at Wimbledon, were they in any way about Peter Carter as well?

ROGER FEDERER: Maybe a little bit. But I think more the emotions and just the happiness, the disbelief. More of that. But then maybe also, just a split second, obviously, about Peter, knowing that he would be very proud.

LIZ HAYES: I didn't even know you and I was sobbing with you. I mean, that's the impact you had.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. It was very emotional.

LIZ HAYES: How do you look back on that?

ROGER FEDERER: I almost felt bad after I cried so much. But you know.

LIZ HAYES: Federer became the first Swiss men's player to win a grand slam tournament and now has five to his credit. He is today's undisputed leader in world tennis.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Roger Federer has taken it to a new level at the moment, in the game, and that's what drives you. That's what motivates you.

LIZ HAYES: There could be no greater contrast in styles than that of Roger Federer and Australia's Lleyton Hewitt. One so measured and precise, the other all angst and aggression. They're friends off the court but great rivals on it.

ROGER FEDERER: I was struggling in the beginning with his way of acting on the court. You know, I was like, 'Why he is doing this into my face? Isn't it a little bit over the top?' and so on. I felt like he was almost attacking me personally, you know. But then I realised actually, well, he's just doing it to pump himself up, you know.

LIZ HAYES: You don't find him rude?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I don't think so.

LIZ HAYES: I am told that psychologically he can't beat you. You've basically beaten him mentally.

ROGER FEDERER: I have an edge over him at the moment. That's clear, you know.

LIZ HAYES: Indeed, Federer has beaten Hewitt the last eight times they've met.

JOHN NEWCOMBE: In my opinion, Lleyton has to admit to himself that he is psyched out by Roger right now, game wise. So he's got to overcome this attitude and he has to go out on the court and he's got to say, "Well, Roger, I don't care what I'm going to have to do. If I have to rip your throat out, I'm going to beat you."

LIZ HAYES: It's not just Hewitt. Every player is out to get Roger. But that's easier said than done. This is a world champion who keeps things very simple. No hangers-on, no entourage — just he and his girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec. For the past four years, she has travelled with him around the world, cheering him on, managing his commitments whilst electing to stay out of the limelight. So it's just he and the girlfriend?

JOHN NEWCOMBE: And Tony.

LIZ HAYES: (Laughs) Lucky Tony.

ROGER FEDERER: Tennis, I think the tennis life can be sometimes a very lonely life also at times. You know, you're just there and you're waiting for your matches. And there's a lot of waiting going on for us in the business. You know, if Mirka is there, we're having a good time all of us together. I never feel like I'm lonely. I never feel like the life is boring. You know, so for me, this makes it much easier.

LIZ HAYES: I imagine earlier in your career it was three-star hotels.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah. And in junior times, of course.

LIZ HAYES: At 24, Roger Federer has all the trappings of success. Like Andre Agassi, his name has become a brand, earning him millions. But he knows it's all really just about a man, a racquet and a ball. And that the legacy he leaves tennis should be just as important as the next grand slam.

TONY ROCHE: There's a lot of players out there that just want to take the money and don't really care where the game is going to be in 10, 15 years time where as I think Roger is very much aware of his responsibility to the game.

LIZ HAYES: He seems to us to be an extremely nice guy. Is what you see what you get?

TONY ROCHE: Yeah. Very much so.

ROGER FEDERER: You should never forget that, if you go, somebody else will take your spot. Tennis will live on, you know, but you won't. You're just there in the moment itself, you know. You can never be bigger than the game. And I think you always have to remember that. :worship:

The last part is the one I find most interesting about this interview.
I honestly dont' know how any idiots can think Rogi is bad for tennis with the kind of genuine interests he has for this game but then obviously I don't call those idiots for nth ;)

1sun
08-29-2005, 01:44 PM
Not sure if this had been posted already as I haven't had time to read thru everything here....this is Rogi's interview transcript on 60 Minutes :
===========================================
Transcript: Hot stuff
August 28, 2005
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Nick Greenaway

Roger Federer

INTRODUCTION:
LIZ HAYES: We try our best to be detached observers but, Lord knows, sometimes it's not easy. Women in the audience will know exactly what I'm talking about when they hear the next two words — Roger Federer. Not only is he number one in the world, he is well on the way to becoming the greatest player of all time. And he's so beautiful to watch — in a purely tennis sense, of course. Those graceful clean strokes, the power, the sheer mastery of his game. No wonder Lleyton Hewitt is so spooked. But on the eve of the US Open, what is he doing in the sweltering heat of the Middle East? Come along and find out.

STORY:
LIZ HAYES: In the middle of an Arabian summer, Dubai is one of the hottest places on the planet. But it's here that the coolest man in world sport comes to train.

ROGER FEDERER: I'm going to sweat. Not only me. Also you guys, hey.

LIZ HAYES: The heat would kill a brown dog, and that's just the way Roger Federer and his coach, Australian legend Tony Roche, like it. Together, they are preparing for the cauldron of the US Open at Flushing Meadows. Just remind me again, Roger, why are we here in Dubai? What is the temperature?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, what is it … 44 maybe, and about 60 percent to 70 percent humidity. It is more because it's in the middle of Switzerland and Australia. A little closer to Switzerland.

TONY ROCHE: A little? I don't know about your geography.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. But it is a straight flight.

LIZ HAYES: Now, the best thing I've found so far is I reckon you could lose a couple of kilos just by standing still.

ROGER FEDERER: Look there. Tony's dripping...

TONY ROCHE: That's me. And I'm just feeding the ball.

LIZ HAYES: With training partner Luke, another Aussie on the court, it's clear Federer likes the antipodean connection. Is he the genius that you are quoted to have said he is?

TONY ROCHE: Well, I think he's such an all-round player, which is a little unusual in today's tennis. He sort of reminds me a lot of Rod Laver.

LIZ HAYES: He has described you as a genius. That was good of him, wasn't it?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, that's good. But he never tells it to my face, you know.

LIZ HAYES: He tells everyone else and not you. Do those comparisons make you feel nervous?

ROGER FEDERER: They make me hot. I don't know why I get hot.

LIZ HAYES: Did it?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. It's something — to be faced with a compliment like this, it's not so sort of the usual thing, you know. And I have a lot of respect for him, what he has achieved as a player, as a coach and everything and the way he is as a person. To hear it, it's very nice.

LIZ HAYES: Roger Federer may be the world's best player, but he knew Tony Roche could make him better. It took Federer more than a year to win Roche over, pursuing him all the way to his home in Sydney.

TONY ROCHE: I thought, gee, he is the number one player in the world and he is willing to come out a week before Christmas. And he actually left on Christmas Day. He had Christmas on the flight coming back. And I thought, well, you know, I've got to do something. I just can't say no.

LIZ HAYES: Those volleys, you need to pick them up a bit, Roger. He's doing OK, isn't he?

TONY ROCHE: Yeah.

LIZ HAYES: What can you do?

TONY ROCHE: Oh, well, you can always get a little bit more penetration and a little bit more stick on the ball and certainly work on his balance. Because he's such a great athlete, that when he comes in to the net, the only way that somebody should be able to get a ball past him is if they can hit it on the line.

LIZ HAYES: His demolition of Andy Roddick in this year's Wimbledon final confirmed the mantle of greatness rests easily on Federer's shoulders. It was his third straight Wimbledon finals victory. But it was much more than just a good old thrashing. It was a display of artistry that transcended mere sport. As former champions Boris Becker, John McEnroe and John Newcombe looked on, Federer took the game to a new level.

JOHN NEWCOMBE: At one stage, Roddick just looked over his coach's box and went, "What do I do?" It's almost like you're out there with a fighter and you hit him with the best punch you've ever thrown and the guy doesn't move and then just goes, bang and knocks you out.

ANDY RODDICK: You run out of options because he has become such a complete player so, you know, maybe I'll just punch him or something. I don't know.

LIZ HAYES: Roger Federer's parents exposed him to tennis when he was a toddler. And it seems even then, the boy and the racquet were made for each other. He was also a gifted soccer player, but at 12, decided tennis was his destiny.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. I always liked the idea of being in control. Like in tennis, you win or lose, it's you to blame. In soccer, I always felt like, 'Oh, the goalkeeper made this mistake. Why didn't he tackle that guy earlier?' I always find these excuses, even though I really enjoy the team sport.

LIZ HAYES: It was at about this time when a young Federer would meet another Australian coach — Peter Carter. The journeyman tennis player turned coach would have a huge and lasting impression on Roger's life.

ROGER FEDERER: I think he's had the most influence on my game as a coach. And, of course, next to my parents, maybe also as a person, you know. We had great times together. That's very clear. And he really actually, I think, teached me the beautiful technique I play today.

LIZ HAYES: But it was a fragile beauty. For all Federer's extraordinary talent and technique, the young Adonis had feet of clay and a very bad temper.

ROGER FEDERER: I was very up and down, I would say. When I would lose matches, I would cry very much especially. I would throw my racquet and scream around the tennis court. And then there was one stage — I think it was about 16 or 17 — I couldn't practice more for an hour or 1.5. And every time, I would lose my mind or they would send me off or I would walk off automatically myself because I knew what's going to come.

LIZ HAYES: If there was one thing above all else that forced Federer to get a grip and cool down it was the tragic death of friend and mentor Peter Carter, in a car crash, in August 2002.

ROGER FEDERER: That was a big, big shock for me. And it came at a really also a strange time. I was already not playing very well. And sort of, it's hard to say, but it sort of was a wake-up call for me, you know. I think that Peter would like to see me do better and finally focus on the game maybe. I took it that way and it really, really helped me.

GRAPHIC: Eleven months after Peter's death, Roger wins his first Wimbledon title.

COMMENTATOR: Well, he's done it. Roger Federer — what an effort. Overcome by emotion. A wonderful victory. It just shows you he looks so calm, cool and collected out there — the emotions and the turmoil going on inside him. He's very emotional and uptight inside.

LIZ HAYES: Those tears we saw at Wimbledon, were they in any way about Peter Carter as well?

ROGER FEDERER: Maybe a little bit. But I think more the emotions and just the happiness, the disbelief. More of that. But then maybe also, just a split second, obviously, about Peter, knowing that he would be very proud.

LIZ HAYES: I didn't even know you and I was sobbing with you. I mean, that's the impact you had.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. It was very emotional.

LIZ HAYES: How do you look back on that?

ROGER FEDERER: I almost felt bad after I cried so much. But you know.

LIZ HAYES: Federer became the first Swiss men's player to win a grand slam tournament and now has five to his credit. He is today's undisputed leader in world tennis.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Roger Federer has taken it to a new level at the moment, in the game, and that's what drives you. That's what motivates you.

LIZ HAYES: There could be no greater contrast in styles than that of Roger Federer and Australia's Lleyton Hewitt. One so measured and precise, the other all angst and aggression. They're friends off the court but great rivals on it.

ROGER FEDERER: I was struggling in the beginning with his way of acting on the court. You know, I was like, 'Why he is doing this into my face? Isn't it a little bit over the top?' and so on. I felt like he was almost attacking me personally, you know. But then I realised actually, well, he's just doing it to pump himself up, you know.

LIZ HAYES: You don't find him rude?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I don't think so.

LIZ HAYES: I am told that psychologically he can't beat you. You've basically beaten him mentally.

ROGER FEDERER: I have an edge over him at the moment. That's clear, you know.

LIZ HAYES: Indeed, Federer has beaten Hewitt the last eight times they've met.

JOHN NEWCOMBE: In my opinion, Lleyton has to admit to himself that he is psyched out by Roger right now, game wise. So he's got to overcome this attitude and he has to go out on the court and he's got to say, "Well, Roger, I don't care what I'm going to have to do. If I have to rip your throat out, I'm going to beat you."

LIZ HAYES: It's not just Hewitt. Every player is out to get Roger. But that's easier said than done. This is a world champion who keeps things very simple. No hangers-on, no entourage — just he and his girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec. For the past four years, she has travelled with him around the world, cheering him on, managing his commitments whilst electing to stay out of the limelight. So it's just he and the girlfriend?

JOHN NEWCOMBE: And Tony.

LIZ HAYES: (Laughs) Lucky Tony.

ROGER FEDERER: Tennis, I think the tennis life can be sometimes a very lonely life also at times. You know, you're just there and you're waiting for your matches. And there's a lot of waiting going on for us in the business. You know, if Mirka is there, we're having a good time all of us together. I never feel like I'm lonely. I never feel like the life is boring. You know, so for me, this makes it much easier.

LIZ HAYES: I imagine earlier in your career it was three-star hotels.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah. And in junior times, of course.

LIZ HAYES: At 24, Roger Federer has all the trappings of success. Like Andre Agassi, his name has become a brand, earning him millions. But he knows it's all really just about a man, a racquet and a ball. And that the legacy he leaves tennis should be just as important as the next grand slam.

TONY ROCHE: There's a lot of players out there that just want to take the money and don't really care where the game is going to be in 10, 15 years time where as I think Roger is very much aware of his responsibility to the game.

LIZ HAYES: He seems to us to be an extremely nice guy. Is what you see what you get?

TONY ROCHE: Yeah. Very much so.

ROGER FEDERER: You should never forget that, if you go, somebody else will take your spot. Tennis will live on, you know, but you won't. You're just there in the moment itself, you know. You can never be bigger than the game. And I think you always have to remember that. :worship:

The last part is the one I find most interesting about this interview.
I honestly dont' know how any idiots can think Rogi is bad for tennis with the kind of genuine interests he has for this game but then obviously I don't call those idiots for nth ;)
that last quote, seriously tells it all. the man is soo level headed.

nobama
08-29-2005, 01:52 PM
that last quote, seriously tells it all. the man is soo level headed.Yeah, just more arrogance from Rog, right? ;)

RogiFan88
08-29-2005, 02:39 PM
USA TODAY is supposed to have some article on Rogi in today's issue...

RogiFan88
08-29-2005, 02:41 PM
Posted 8/28/2005 10:52 PM
Federer Express stops for a New York minute
By Steve Wilstein, The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Everything seems to be clicking for Roger Federer. He's won an Open-era record 22 consecutive finals, is 64-3 in matches this year and has been No. 1 for 82 consecutive weeks. Some have dubbed him "The Federer Express," others "The Maestro."

Top men's seed Roger Federer, right, talks shop with CBS' Mary Carillo. Federer opens Monday against the Czech Republic's Ivo Minar.
By Robert Deutsch, USA TODAY

Which does he prefer as he heads into the U.S. Open as the prohibitive favorite?

"'Maestro' is pretty cool," he said with a grin.

Federer is the oddsmakers' favorite to win the Open, with Spain's Rafael Nadal and American Andy Roddick the next two choices. No. 7 Andre Agassi, the 1994 and 1999 champion, surely will be the sentimental favorite of the crowd. No one, not even Agassi, knows whether this will be his last U.S. Open.

Maria Sharapova comes into the Open as the women's top seed, but she's only the third choice among the oddsmakers behind fourth-seeded Kim Clijsters and No. 7 Justine Henin-Hardenne. Venus Williams, No. 10, is rated a better bet than her sister, No. 8 Serena, and No. 2 seed Lindsay Davenport.

The courts at the National Tennis Center are blue now rather than green, the money is bigger than ever, and for the first time fans can keep stray balls. There's a giant new draw board with a retro, manually operated touch. All the changes are signs of tennis' fan-friendly focus and burgeoning appeal.

And personable star players from around the globe, such as Federer, Nadal, Roddick and Agassi, along with Sharapova, Davenport, Clijsters, Henin-Hardenne and the Williams sisters, are ratcheting up worldwide interest in a sport that has seen its share of troubled times.

Federer spoke at a dinner in the days leading up to the U.S. Open, which begins today, about how his life and tennis had come together in the past two years — how it all became less of a struggle than it had been when he was younger and still throwing rackets and tantrums.

"I know what I'm sacrificing for," he said. "It makes sense to me now. I really have my life in control. Everything is pink, no, I mean, how you say, rosy."

That was a rare language mistake for Federer, who speaks English almost as fluently as he does Swiss-German, German and French.

Federer, already popular throughout Europe, is hoping to follow in the footsteps of the relatively few other European players who became equally popular in the United States, such as Bjorn Borg, Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker.

"I would like to be loved, to have fans around the world," he said. "I had a moment last year when I felt people always wanted me to lose because I was winning too much. Now I think differently about that. Maybe losing in the Australian (to Marat Safin), but fighting and fighting, showed I was human. In Paris when I lost, I felt the fans were for me. Those losses were so important to me. They made a difference in how fans see me and how I see the game."

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2005 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

did someone already post this??

oneandonlyhsn
08-29-2005, 02:54 PM
ROGER FEDERER: You should never forget that, if you go, somebody else will take your spot. Tennis will live on, you know, but you won't. You're just there in the moment itself, you know. You can never be bigger than the game. And I think you always have to remember that.

Rogi :worship: I love that and I'm quoting it :D

1sun
08-29-2005, 03:02 PM
Yeah, just more arrogance from Rog, right? ;)
of course! what else would it be?! ;)

nobama
08-29-2005, 03:19 PM
USA TODAY is supposed to have some article on Rogi in today's issue...It was nothing important. The same AP article printed all over the net. A few pictures of him from last Thursday - one with Mary Carillo and one having lunch with John McEnroe.

Skyward
08-29-2005, 03:24 PM
http://www.latimes.com/sports/tennis/la-sp-tennis29aug29,1,4716475.story?coll=la-headlines-sports-tennis


Roger Federer of Switzerland wasn't in the interview room at the U.S. Open on Saturday when Serena Williams posed for pictures with her not-so-ready-for-prime-time dog, Jackie, or when top-seeded Maria Sharapova of Russia revealed it took nine months to develop her just-launched perfume with the oh-so-ingenious name, "Maria Sharapova." He didn't need to be.

The No. 1-seeded men's player and defending U.S. Open champion's off-court alertness is on a par with his sublime awareness between the lines. He knows divas wear Prada and don't mind talking about it.


"In men's tennis, it's still the game that counts more," said Federer, the two-time Wimbledon champion. "Maybe women's [tennis], it's sometimes a little bit more of their personality. Obviously, they're more sexy, let's say, they show more skin, all these sort of things, and they talk about more than that actually than their forehand and backhand.

"We've been asked much more about, 'What's your preparation? How's your backhand doing?' I get one question about fashion, basically. That's how it goes with us. But I think that's how it should be, to be honest."

That set up the natural follow-up from one reporter: "How's your perfume?"

"Perfume is still there," he said, laughing, of his own line, "RF-Roger Federer."

babsi
08-29-2005, 05:48 PM
Thanks for posting everyone :)

will slowly work my way trough it all :)

SUKTUEN
08-29-2005, 06:28 PM
:Dthanks

MissMoJo
08-29-2005, 07:13 PM
ROGER FEDERER: You should never forget that, if you go, somebody else will take your spot. Tennis will live on, you know, but you won't. You're just there in the moment itself, you know. You can never be bigger than the game. And I think you always have to remember that.
He's so insightful, respectful of his opponents and the sport :worship:

...when top-seeded Maria Sharapova of Russia revealed it took nine months to develop her just-launched perfume with the oh-so-ingenious name, "Maria Sharapova."
:haha: :rolls:

nobama
08-29-2005, 07:14 PM
ROGER FEDERER


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. What separates this tournament for you from the other Grand Slams? What kind of energy, different energy, as opposed to the other three does it bring for you?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, if I think of the US Open, it's more everybody's really ready, you know what I'm saying. It's a surface that everyone can play on. Normally we don't have that many injuries going into the US Open. Everybody's been in the States for quite some weeks and is really ready to do well at the last Grand Slam of the year.
That is, for me, that's why it makes it so tough to win here. Plus, you know, if you add all the conditions wind, rain, heat, humidity, the big city, the fans everything of that adds on top.

Q. Do you thrive on everyone always going after you? Does it ever get old for you?
ROGER FEDERER: Of what? Excuse me.

Q. Off the pressure people put on you all the time?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, pressure's there, you know, especially going into Grand Slams where you have a win from last year. I've experienced it on a couple of occasions. It's not the easiest thing to do, so you really want to, you know, not take any chances in your preparation and really focus on what's been working in the past and try to do that again without being, you know, too crazy.
For me, it's been working, you know. Since I'm No. 1, I've been playing with less pressure, I have the feeling. But obviously sometimes it comes back.

Q. Compared with last year when you had the American Masters tournaments, then the Olympics and here, this has been a very different summer for you. How do you compare that physically to how you're feeling now?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's different. Because I didn't play so well in Cincinnati and the Olympics, it actually gave me some time to rest, and I came actually into the US Open feeling really fresh.
Same this year, because I took some time off after Wimbledon and only played Cincinnati. So, honestly, I feel like it's pretty much the same, even though I did much less traveling than last year.

Q. Do you think that will be a normal part of your schedule?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, no. I mean, it is a chance that I took to just play Cincinnati. If I lose first round there, I have a problem, you know. I only have maybe one match or two matches under my belt going into the US Open, and that's just not enough, like what I said, you know, that everybody's so ready.
But, you know, first I have to also wait and see how this one goes. Could be I win Cincinnati and lose early here. I try not to make that happen, of course.

Q. The corporate things that are done here, are you aware of that, does it affect the tournament? In the luxury suites there are people doing business. There are a lot of corporations here.
ROGER FEDERER: I didn't even know that. I didn't know that. I thought they were here to watch tennis, you know, not business meetings.
The stadium is great. It's the biggest one we have in the world. There's some, you know, that is just so big like this one or Indian Wells, it's really overwhelming when you walk on center court. It's a different atmosphere, obviously, because it's so hard to fill that stadium up, so you always have this feeling of sort of being a little bit empty, but you still have 10 15,000 people in the stadium, which is a lot of spectators in the stadium.
Honestly, I like to play in this one and, you know, I showed how good I can play in this one last year.

Q. This stadium, do you think it affects your game at all?
ROGER FEDERER: Stadiums? I mean, different stadiums made me play sometimes different type of games, you know. Sometimes I have the feeling I'm squashed in a smaller court in center court; some seem so big, you know, as I say, I have a feeling I can't hit anything out of the ball. This one is for me sort of quite normal because of the big backdrop we have here.

Q. So you can more play your game here, you think?
ROGER FEDERER: No, no, I'm used to center courts (smiling).

Q. Have you completely taken care of all the physical problems you've had over the summer?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I think I gave myself a chance to let it heal, my feet. I'm happy the way things are. I came back so strong. I have much less pain and problems now than I used to have, so it was definitely a good thing to do.
Now we'll see, you know, heading into the US Open, it's a tough one of course on the hard courts, over five sets and maybe back it up, you know, if it rains and stuff every day.
So it will be interesting to see how I feel, how I cope with it. But I'm really happy to be back, you know, healthy. Because when you win, you want to come back and defend. You know, you always have to make sure you're healthy so you at least give yourself a chance.

Q. A question on Nadal: His rise to No. 2, is that in a way good for you because it creates another challenge for you? You wouldn't play him until the final, if you both got there, does it give you edginess you need to stay on top?
ROGER FEDERER: I'm happy to see him, you know, doing so well because I really think it's great for the game and he's had incredible success. At a young age like this, it is extraordinary, really. I'm a big fan of his game. You know, it's really different. It's something I haven't seen in basically never, you know. So this is always good when you get to see a new guy on the block.
I think it just adds even more spice to the men's tennis we already have with Roddick and Safin and Hewitt and Agassi and already now Nadal. I think it only helps men's tennis. I'm not too concerned playing him. For me it's a challenge more than being feared or anything.

Q. You've had such great success in your career, three Wimbledons, defending champion here, No. 1 for a year and a half or so. Was there ever a time earlier in your career where you had a sense of doubt, you thought you might not be able to make it to the very top?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I was stuck just a little bit outside of the Top 10 for a while where I was wondering what do I need, you know, to get up into the Top 10. I realized after I won Hamburg, my first Hamburg that I won, which was a big surprise on clay, I made it into the Top 10 and I think I became No. 8. I said, "That's what you need, you need the big titles." I really wanted to give myself an opportunity, also, to win a Grand Slam. I'm right away in contention with No. 1 in the world. This is when I start to realize, once I won Hamburg, I knew what it actually takes to be right on top. It's just not enough to play well, consistent, quarterfinals, semifinals, you got to win the titles.

Q. What was the key to winning Hamburg?
ROGER FEDERER: My game needed time, I think. It's not the Hewitt or Safin type of game. Mentally and physically, I just needed more time. I knew that if I do things right and don't put myself too much under pressure, because the media people, they were and some other people, you know, who think they're really smart they were doing it, too. I started to cope better when success came. Then once I had the really big break in Wimbledon, that took away a lot of pressure.

Q. You helped launch men's Vogue last night.
ROGER FEDERER: Two nights ago.

Q. Can you describe your fashion style. How would you describe yourself as a dresser?
ROGER FEDERER: It was really good fun. I had a great time, you know. We stayed out late, you know. But got to meet really nice people, interesting.
My style, I like quite elegant more and more. I'm very much into shopping the last especially two years. Got to meet Anna Winter, and of course you get inspired when you meet people like this. I like to dress up.

Q. Do you have a favorite designer?
ROGER FEDERER: I like Prada very much.

Q. You referred to Rafael Nadal as "extraordinary." Last year you was in the finals with Hewitt. Do you expect you gonna be in the finals with Rafael Nadal?
ROGER FEDERER: Oh, we're very far away from that. I don't like to think so far. I mean, there's very good players in the draw. I like to look down the draw a little bit, but I'm mostly concerned about my first round and mostly concerned about my half of the draw, you know, and Nadal is not in that section.
So I'll have a look at him, you know, how he's playing on the hard courts. Obviously, everybody's interested to see also how much success he can have on the hard courts after his incredible clay court season. I think it would be interesting to play him on hard courts at the US Open finals, but for him and for me, this is a long way.

Q. Would be good for the sport.
ROGER FEDERER: It would be good for the sport.

Q. In the time you're off, do you have a sneak at the papers and see what's going on, or do you cut yourself off completely from tennis and not think about what's going on?
ROGER FEDERER: I was really following Davis Cup.

Q. That's a shame.
ROGER FEDERER: Excuse me?

Q. That's a shame. We play you.
ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, but that was the ones we're not playing in, you know; we already lost. I was following that quite a bit. The smaller tournaments, not so much, you know. Then when I was in Cincinnati, obviously I saw, you know, the end of Toronto a little bit.
But I was following a little bit, you know. I heard sometimes, "Oh, he won," and, "He's playing well." That's really what I care about, not really who wins the tournament, but who's playing well, who's caused upsets, just to be on the ball a little bit.

Q. Did you spend any time on the court in that extended break?
ROGER FEDERER: I wasn't on the court for about a month, and then I worked out with Tony for eight days.

Q. Would that be the longest time you've ever not spent on court during your professional career apart from injuries, do you think?
ROGER FEDERER: Could be. Yeah, you could say that.

Q. Your popularity in Europe is very, very high. I know the ATP and probably a lot of Americans would like to see your popularity in the United States grow exponentially. Do you have any sense of whether or not you're more well known in this country than you were a year ago in terms of requests for interviews, publicity, television shows?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, absolutely. For me it's a big difference from still one year ago; I was more of a contender than anything else. Now people know me, the same level I have the feeling as Roddick and Serena, maybe not Agassi obviously because he's been around for so long.
But I can do many shows and everything I want, basically. Just have to knock on the door and say, Okay, I need to invest time. I'm not always ready to do that because my priority is tennis and not something else. That is what is difficult, I think, for the tennis player. We play eleven out of twelve months, to always go and do different stuff than tennis is not the easiest thing.
But I was curious to see how people will see me this year because I haven't really been back in New York since obviously the US Open. I feel there is a buzz.

Q. In Europe tennis can be as high as the No. 2 or No. 3 most important sport, in the United States it's more like No. 8 or No. 9, so there are fewer people following it. How do you use your personality to bring more people to the game in the United States?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, you attend Arthur Ashe Kids' Day, do interviews, try to be also in the papers so the people, they know that the US Open is being played. I think we have the biggest stadium in the world here, you know. So people that come out, they love the sport, you know.
I think it's more about more people watching it on TV. That is, I think, the problem here in the States. This one, to solve that problem, I don't know what you do. I'm not a television expert.

Q. Do you think tennis has taken a back seat to personalities? If so, why? In sports in general, after a while, the sport tends to take a back seat to the personality itself. I don't know if that's because of the nature of people.
ROGER FEDERER: The back seat of..? I don't know, sorry.

Q. Does it become second and no longer first as the sport itself?
ROGER FEDERER: You mean personality is first?

Q. Right.
ROGER FEDERER: I have the feeling that became in women's tennis much more important. I think in men's it's still the game that counts more. Maybe women's, it's sometimes a little bit more of their personality.
Obviously, you know, they're more sexy, let's say, they show more skin, all these sort of things, and they talk more about that than actually their forehand and backhand. We been asked much more about what's your preparation, how's your backhand doing, I get one question, you know, about fashion basically. That's how it goes with us, you know, but I think that's how it should be, to be honest.

Q. How's your perfume?
ROGER FEDERER: Perfume is still there (laughing).

Q. Has your name raised the profile of Switzerland?
ROGER FEDERER: I hope so.

Q. You haven't seen an increase in tourism or something?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I would like to know the numbers, but I could imagine (smiling).

Q. The floods in Switzerland, are they affecting you or your family or friends?
ROGER FEDERER: No, we got lucky. Well, my friends and family, we didn't have any issues. But it's been very bad, so I hope it's under control soon.

Q. Do you read about Canas' case during your rest?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I heard about it.

Q. What do you think about it?
ROGER FEDERER: Appropriate ban. No more I could say. It's a pity people have to do this.

Puschkin
08-30-2005, 09:39 PM
R. FEDERER/I. Minar

6‑1, 6‑1, 6‑1

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions.

Q. Were you concerned about being a "rain beater"?
ROGER FEDERER: I guess so. Relieved, of course, I'm through the rain because it was bad forecast. But more important, you know, is to get through no matter how many days it takes.

Q. Are you a morning person?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I don't play much in the morning any more. Mostly play the prime time hours, which means 3, 5, 7 o'clock. Coming out early today was different. Also when I practice, it's usually always afternoon. So, again, you have to change your plans. But it was a great start, you know. Very happy the way I played.

Q. When you get into the draw, third or fourth round, you've already had a couple matches. To start off a Grand Slam, first match, do you have some sort of special way of getting pumped or ready for that very first match? Jog half a mile?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I don't do anything extraordinary. I stick to what I always do, you know, no matter if it's a final or a first round. I have the same preparation. Just the only difference is I have more time before a first round, which means I have days and days. I want to get the rhythm. I want to see how the conditions are here. Is it more windy? Do the balls play different? I try to get the sense for that. Then adjust string tensions if I have to. I usually always arrive two, three hours before the match so I have enough time to eat, to tape, to just, you know, think about the match. Then off I go. It's a pretty simple routine, which I like to stick to.

Q. 16‑minute first set. Clearly you were ready to play today. Can you recall the last time you went on court for an opening match and just felt flat?
ROGER FEDERER: You know, it happens sometimes. You know, I think the first round in Wimbledon was tough this year. I had the feeling I was sort of heavy.

Q. This year?
ROGER FEDERER: This year, yeah. It was tough to get into. It was nerve‑wracking somehow this year. But I still came through. Nerves start to go away once, you know, I was up I would say a set and a break. Today was much easier from the start.

Q. Were you at all concerned about the rain in the second game, third set? Seemed like it was coming down, drops were harder.
ROGER FEDERER: We were very close. I think if the umpire says, "Well, let's have a seat," I'll sit down. But it wasn't raining so we had to go back inside, which was good. I mean, I'm happy we could play through. I'm so used to everything that I have no problem walking back to the locker room.

Q. But you weren't concerned at all in the back of your mind, "I don't want to slip, I don't want to get injured"?
ROGER FEDERER: No. Well, we always stop in time, so that doesn't happen. I mean, I was ready for delays today. Took some magazines along in case something goes wrong (smiling).

Q. Which ones?
ROGER FEDERER: All sorts of magazines.

Q. You like to be a primetime player. Was this a bit of an inconvenience to come out here at 11 a.m.?
ROGER FEDERER: I was a little bit surprised I had to come out at 11. But then again, it's good to know your time. Of course, if the rain comes along, you have a long day, okay. But yesterday they also announced average weather and it never rained. It's also good to know ‑‑ I think second would have been worse today because then you don't have no clue what's going to happen.

Q. You mentioned there isn't a player you fear. Are you as confident as you've ever been in your life?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. No, I mean, I don't see it as rough any more. When I lose to a player, for me, you know, as long as I give it a hundred percent, that's all I can do. If the guy's better on the day, that's okay, and I'll try next time. Where in the past, maybe years ago, I would lose and say, "Oh, no." I didn't feel like I gave it all I had or I didn't play like I should have. Then I started to really not like to play against a guy. But now I see more the challenge in it. Now because I've beaten all the guys maybe I've had bad records against, that eliminates the fear factor from other players.

Q. Is there any unique challenge to defending here?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, for me it seems that here all the players, it's a neutral surface. Australian Open is the first one, so everybody's a little bit ‑‑ nobody's really sure how they're going to play. Where here it's the last Grand Slam of the year, everybody wants to do well, everybody's been here in the States for some weeks. They're just waiting for this big occasion to come around. They're all coming out wanting to play their best, you know. So for me, the conditions changing every day, it seems one of the hardest to win.

Q. Svetlana made an early exit yesterday.
ROGER FEDERER: That concerned me, too. When I saw that, I was like, "Okay. Well, I better not mess this up, too."

Q. When you win a match as easily as you did today, do you learn anything about your level of play? Is it useful in any way?
ROGER FEDERER: Oh, yeah. I really had the sense I was returning very well, hardly giving him any points there, holding easy on my serve. The baseline, I didn't have the feeling I was in any rush at all. That's always obviously a good feeling to have from the start of a tournament. That doesn't happen very often going into Slams. I've always been looking for my rhythm early. And today it was there straightaway. That was good. Good signs, good feeling.

Q. Is there any difference walking the streets of New York this year? Do you get recognized more since you won last year?
ROGER FEDERER: No, the difference is there, yeah.

Q. A big difference this year as opposed to when you were here a year ago?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I don't know if it's 50% more or whatever. Sometimes it's extreme, sometimes it's nothing, which I'm happy about. Sometimes it's a little bit. Totally depends I guess who walks on the street at the same time as me.

Q. Now that you've had a chance to practice on this court and play a match on it, how friendly is this Stadium Court for somebody who hits with extreme topspin?
ROGER FEDERER: I really find it's nice out there. The sound of the balls in this stadium, with the high backdrop, yeah, it feels very comfortable. Of course, it's huge, you know. Like this morning when there's still a lot of people, but it seems empty. But the crowd really gets into it. I was enjoying to play out there. I always from the first moment I walk on this center court, I always had the feeling it's a nice one.

Q. How much is the topspin jumping off the court?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, we were playing flat today, but it definitely takes the kick and spin, definitely.

Q. You have a little bit of a different philosophy on coaching. Why do you not use a coach as much as some of the other players?
ROGER FEDERER: Hmm. I have a different ranking (smiling). I guess that's it, you know. :D

Q. Other guys with your ranking have had coaches.
ROGER FEDERER: I don't know about that. I don't feel like I need a guy all the time next to me telling me what I should eat and drink, when I should go to bed, you know. I think I know these things. For me the coach is there to be on court with me, that he's not late showing up for practice sessions, that he can help me how to improve my game. Not just bring my racquets to the stringer, book me a practice court. This I can do myself. I have the feeling maybe in this respect I have a different philosophy. I haven't been speaking much to Tony either, you know. I haven't spoken to him in three weeks. Basically maybe I'll call him tonight. We'll see.

Q. It's getting lonely?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah. We haven't been catching up too much. Still we have been in contact via messages. I don't know. It just seems like I don't need this.

Source: http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2005-08-30/200508301125436072187.html

SUKTUEN
08-30-2005, 09:40 PM
Puschkin thanks

Stevens Point
08-30-2005, 09:48 PM
Thanks for the interviews!! :D

Updated: Aug. 30, 2005, 5:27 PM ET
Ho-hum Federer still playing for history

By Greg Garber
ESPN.com

NEW YORK -- When Roger Federer plays tennis, there is always a chance you will see something extraordinary.

There was such a moment on Tuesday in his first-round match against Czech-born Ivo Minar.

In the fifth game of the second set, Federer was floating along, three feet behind the baseline, when Minar hit a scorching cross-court forehand that seemed to surprise him. Federer accelerated to his right, with swift and precise steps, and -- with the ball behind him -- flicked his wrist, almost violently.

That he even got his racket on the ball was a minor triumph, but his sliced shot managed to clear the net by a few inches and drop neatly inside the line. The crowd, merely polite to this point, gasped. That the shot didn't count -- Minar's ball was called out -- hardly seemed to matter.

Federer, the world No. 1 player for 83 consecutive weeks now, never seems out of sorts. In fact, there are times when the sublime Swiss player seems genuinely bored, unchallenged by the Ivo Minar or Takao Suzuki on the other side of the net. There are moments when you cannot help but wonder if he deliberately hits tantalizingly returnable shots -- just to see if his opponent can do enough to force an astonishing reply.

The sweat that began to darken the back of Federer's cobalt blue shirt in the third set was the only visible sign of stress in a 6-1, 6-1, 6-1 victory over Minar. In a bit of Zen symmetry, the match required only 61 minutes.

Federer has said he fears no other player in the game. Afterward, he was asked if he was as confident as he's ever been.

"Yeah," Federer said with a matter-of-factness that drew a laugh from the assembled reporters. "I mean, I don't see it as rough any more. When I lose to a player, for me, as long as I give it 100 percent, that's all I can do. If the guy's better on the day, that's OK, and I'll try next time.

"In the past, maybe years ago, I would lose and say, 'Oh, no.' I didn't feel like I gave it all I had. Then I started to really not like to play against a guy. But now I see more the challenge in it. Now because I've beaten all the guys maybe I've had bad records against, that eliminates the fear factor."

Federer is a genuine throwback. Amid the thrash and strum of the men's power game, he is an oasis of artistry. He is Greg Maddux -- seamlessly changing speeds and locations -- but with a 98-mph fastball.

Frankly, it's getting a little ridiculous.

Federer has now won 19 straight matches overall and 29 straight on hard courts. His last loss on the surface was to Marat Safin in the Australian Open semifinals -- it was 9-7 in the fifth set -- and that was eight months ago. His hard-court record for the season: 38-1. This explains why, with all due respect to Rafael Nadal and Andy Roddick, he is the overwhelming favorite here. That and his 139-9 record over the last two seasons.

Federer won three of the four Grand Slams in 2004; only a third-round loss to Gustavo Kuerten at Roland Garros prevented him from winning the natural Slam.

While this year has been relatively disappointing because he failed to win the first two Grand Slams, he has a chance to do something no one has ever done in the 37 years of the Open Era. A win here would give him the unprecedented double of back-to-back Wimbledon and U.S. Open titles. Laver, Connors, Borg or Sampras never did that.

Pity Minar, if you can find it in your heart. He has now played three Grand Slam singles matches -- two of them were against the world's No. 1 player.

When Svetlana Kuznetsova, the women's defending champion, lost in the first round Monday, Federer thought to himself, "OK. I better not mess this up, too."

And the fact that Federer, who plays most of his matches in prime time, was playing the first match at 11 a.m., didn't make him any more civil.

Federer was more efficient than usual, which, of course, is saying something (he made 10 unforced errors). When Federer actually misses a shot -- say, a rare mis-hit off the frame -- he shakes his head, almost involuntarily, as though he's surprised. There were only a few dramatic moments in the match. Federer sat spellbound between the second and third sets when an Andre Agassi career montage ran on the electronic screen at Arthur Ashe Stadium. When it started spitting rain early in the third set, Federer asked chair umpire Norm Chryst if he might consider a delay. Chryst, after scuffing his sneakers on the lines, declined. Later, during a changeover in the third set, Federer, along with the ballboys, became engrossed in the animated big-screen race between three tennis balls, flying over the five boroughs. He seemed happy when the gold ball, after a slow start, was the winner.

Federer, unlike most players, does not employ a coach. Tony Roche is a consultant, but Federer said he hasn't talked to him in three weeks. Why does he have a different philosophy?

"Hmmm," said Federer, a smile creeping onto his face. "I have a different ranking."

Somehow, he said it without sounding arrogant.

Greg Garber is a senior writer for ESPN.com.

Fergie
08-30-2005, 09:51 PM
Roger Federer on ESPN's Hot Seat Wednesday

Roger Federer takes time out from defending his U.S. Open championship to sit on the weekly “Budweiser Hot Seat” with Dave Revsine, debuting on Wednesday’s 6 p.m. ET SportsCenter.

SportsCenter‘s weekly “Budweiser Hot Seat” segment debuts on Wednesday’s 6 p.m. show and re-airs on the 11 p.m. program and during Thursday morning’s telecasts.

The ‘Budweiser Hot Seat” is a rapid-fire Q&A with a well-known sports personality, or a celebrity associated with sports, and covers a wide variety of topics including those of a professional and personal nature.

TV Schedule

Wednesday, Aug. 31 6:00 p.m. PT
Wednesday, Aug. 31 11:00 p.m. ET

SUKTUEN
08-31-2005, 08:41 AM
thanks

TenHound
09-01-2005, 02:28 AM
I stumbled over this, when I went to Newsday to see if they were pointing fingers in the right direction re New Orleans.

Surprise, someone in the American Press is saying what I've been saying for awhile - that Roger gets Seriously Disrespected Here in the Land of Power Worship. (It's Wed. nite & El Brute has had 2, count 'em, Prime Time, matches, Roger, Zero... .)

"A Virtuoso Like Federer Deserves More Respect", by Johnette Howard.

He is the defending champion of this tournament, the No. 1 player in the world, a man who, at 24 years old, is already touted as the best tennis player ever. That's all Roger Federer of Switzerland has going for him. And yet, Federer was asked to haul his bones out to center court yesterday to make his tournament debut at the definitely not-ready-for-prime-time hour of 11 a.m. The stadium was barely half full. Cars were still filing into the parking lots.

"I was little bit surprised," Federer admitted, though only when pressed. "I don't play much in the morning anymore."

A bigger egoist would have had a snit.

.....

Thank you Jonette.
(Sorry I don't know how to post a link. go to newsday. com to read it.)

Mrs. B
09-01-2005, 07:12 AM
tenhound, if you scroll back i think someone already posted this piece. :)

thanks for the interview and other articles!

PamV
09-01-2005, 12:21 PM
TenHound, this is so annoying. I really get the feeling that behind the scenes they WANT to help Nadal win this tournament and they WANT him to overtake the #1 spot. Last night J Mac said that if Nadal wins this tournament he would overtake the #1 ranking. That's not technically true. For one thing he's not taking into account that if Federer were to make it the final and lose, he would still have more points than Nadal. However, the whole way he discussed Nadal and never mentioned Roger in that discussion makes it sound like they are licking their chops hoping Nadal overtakes him. Why? Does Nadal have a big sports agency behind him?

I wonder if there is any way we fans can fight back against the system? I will try to find that article. Thanks.

Puschkin
09-01-2005, 12:31 PM
The title of this thread is Roger- news and articles;)

lunahielo
09-01-2005, 12:36 PM
Originally posted by PamV
Last night J Mac said that if Nadal wins this tournament he would overtake the #1 ranking. That's not technically true. For one thing he's not taking into account that if Federer were to make it the final and lose, he would still have more points than Nadal. However, the whole way he discussed Nadal and never mentioned Roger in that discussion makes it sound like they are licking their chops hoping Nadal overtakes him.
Oh, Pam~~~I am so glad someone else noticed this!! Whan JMac said that about the #1 , I was so mad~~I turned off the TV!
I was going to watch (and hope he would lose) Nadal a little~~to see how he was playing.
But~~~~~I was SO mad....... :(
I don't know why thay are so hyped up about him~~~sure, he is a good player and is producing some good tennis~~~but all of this talk about his *muscles, build,* yada yada yada..........and already calling him #1........makes me sick!
Is there anything, as fed fans, that we can do???

lunahielo
09-01-2005, 12:38 PM
Sorry I got off topic, Pushkin.. :(

PamV
09-01-2005, 01:04 PM
Oh, Pam~~~I am so glad someone else noticed this!! Whan JMac said that about the #1 , I was so mad~~I turned off the TV!
I was going to watch (and hope he would lose) Nadal a little~~to see how he was playing.
But~~~~~I was SO mad....... :(
I don't know why thay are so hyped up about him~~~sure, he is a good player and is producing some good tennis~~~but all of this talk about his *muscles, build,* yada yada yada..........and already calling him #1........makes me sick!
Is there anything, as fed fans, that we can do???

Here's the link TenHound's article:
http://www.newsday.com/sports/columnists/ny-sphow0831,0,6046650.column?coll=ny-sports-columnists

I don't think there is much we can do, other that write letters to people like the author of that article or Peter Bodo and any other sports writers we can think of. Maybe we should write directly to McEnroe also! The other thing I do is pray that Roger wins despite what ever they do to try to stop him.

I thought last night that Jenkins looked more stylish and "hip" than Nadal. Nadal's outfit looks like a throw back to the disco era. He has a sort of pissy face / diva aspect when he's playing and he can't win as easily as he likes.

If Nadal had played Muller 1st round he would have lost ! Yet ATP.com states Nadal continues on his "run" at the US Open. Yeah who wouldn't have a run facing Reynolds and Jenkins in the 1st and 2nd rounds? Jenkins is ranked in the 200's. Muller is ranked 69, but was a junior USOpen champ in 2001 and #1 Junior player.

yanchr
09-01-2005, 01:14 PM
Oh, Pam~~~I am so glad someone else noticed this!! Whan JMac said that about the #1 , I was so mad~~I turned off the TV!
I was going to watch (and hope he would lose) Nadal a little~~to see how he was playing.
But~~~~~I was SO mad....... :(
I don't know why thay are so hyped up about him~~~sure, he is a good player and is producing some good tennis~~~but all of this talk about his *muscles, build,* yada yada yada..........and already calling him #1........makes me sick!
Is there anything, as fed fans, that we can do???
I try to avoid watching him play cuz seeing his outfit will have already made me puke, not to mention that very likely his muscles, his Vamos, his twisting faces when hitting balls will closely follow up producing in me a sick stomachache.

Here our commentators frankly said Roger is so beautiful to watch while Nadal is not at all with tough running left and right for every ball. And one of the article commented his win against Jenkin was nothing special whileas the progression told us a lot about why and how there is still a long for him to catch Federer (Never I would say).

I'm off topic too Pushkin ;) :p

Puschkin
09-01-2005, 01:17 PM
I'm off topic too Pushkin ;) :p

I see, another one of those unable to write a post without mentioning Rafa :devil: (whom I appreciate a lot by the way)

yanchr
09-01-2005, 01:20 PM
I see, another one of those unable to write a post without mentioning Rafa :devil:
I've tried very hard not to, but... OK, I stop :p
(whom I appreciate a lot by the way)
:eek: :eek: :eek: :bigcry:
:wavey:

Puschkin
09-01-2005, 01:24 PM
:topic: ;) ;) It does not make me a worse fan of Roger seeing and appreciating tennis talent elsewhere

yanchr
09-01-2005, 01:28 PM
It does not make me a worse fan of Roger seeing and appreciating tennis talent elsewhere
Sure sure :p :wavey:

I'm not as stupid as supposing everyone has exactly the same taste as me. And I well accept that it's not necessary to understand everything, which in the end will exhaust me ;) :p

PamV
09-01-2005, 01:31 PM
I see, another one of those unable to write a post without mentioning Rafa :devil: (whom I appreciate a lot by the way)

It's natural to post about a match that we just saw last night. Why do we have to purposely try to avoid talking about Nadal? After the Roddick/Muller match we were talking about that.

Besides we were also commenting on a certain disregard that McEnroe showed for Roger by making that statement during the match last night.

Oh....actually I got confused, I thought this was the USOpen thread. So I guess discussing last night's match should have gone there.

lsy
09-01-2005, 03:03 PM
try to avoid watching him play cuz seeing his outfit will have already made me puke, not to mention that very likely his muscles, his Vamos, his twisting faces when hitting balls will closely follow up producing in me a sick stomachache.

Good continue to avoid watching so we don't have to read another posts whining about what you just did here ;)


If Nadal had played Muller 1st round he would have lost ! Yet ATP.com states Nadal continues on his "run" at the US Open. Yeah who wouldn't have a run facing Reynolds and Jenkins in the 1st and 2nd rounds? Jenkins is ranked in the 200's. Muller is ranked 69, but was a junior USOpen champ in 2001 and #1 Junior player

How about maybe if Rogi had played Muller he would have lost too? and seriously I don't even know what exactly was wrong with that "Nadal continues his "runs" statement by ATP here. There're plenty of articles which will talk about Rogi's first round wins like it's some inhuman performance at times too. Not like it's just on Nadal, just chill really.


I wonder if there is any way we fans can fight back against the system?

Seriously, fight vs what system? :confused: The whole conspiracy from the commentators/ATP/USTA/fans to make Nadal the USO Champion?


It's natural to post about a match that we just saw last night. Why do we have to purposely try to avoid talking about Nadal?

No you dont' have to, but there's also no need to blow up every thing about him and whine the about it like some of those things you did here.


Besides we were also commenting on a certain disregard that McEnroe showed for Roger by making that statement during the match last night.

Mcenroe had also said many times about Rogi being the greater player than Pete...with all regards that can be interpreted in many ways, but Pete has 14 slams and Rogi had 5, maybe Pete's fans will have lots to whine about with those statements too? Ok, let's face it, it's normal that people are going to jump onto other wagons when they do get a bit bored of seeing Rogi winning, not to mention they're the media after all, they want stories.

Besides, Rogi is doing great and he gets the respect he deserves from people who matter. There's no need to read into things and think otherwise. Coz the way I see it is the same reading those idiotic interview quesions that were brought up time after time about Rogi not being recognised etc etc etc...it's almost like that was exaggerated and at the end it does portray the image that yeah he's not when we know that's not true.

Sorry Pam, it just get tiresome reading these whining/complaining which is so much in this forum lately, some obviously valid but others can be just nitpicking. But it's a free forum after all, everybody can say anything they want :wavey:

and sorry puchkin, I went offtopic too :o

Blaze
09-01-2005, 03:16 PM
I don't like confrontations and don't mean to be rude but PamV I think you are too obsessed with Nadal. Do you have to find conspiracy theories in everything or bring up Nadal all the time?

I for one like your insight but all the time you always same to be comparing Nadal and Federer and it is getting tiresome.

yanchr
09-01-2005, 03:17 PM
You finally can't help...lsy :lol:

But unluckily you'll always have to bear what I have to rant about that piggy, so better along with me together :devil:

TenHound
09-01-2005, 05:02 PM
In total agreement, Yanchr. And no, this isn't off-topic rant. A properly run tournament would give at least equal weighting to showcase the #1, #2 seeds & the home country players. There would be a case to be made if Roger were featured on prime time tonight, or even if he played this morning. However, not only has Thuggy been Prime Time Twice, w/Roger none, but now they are even forcing him to play back to back days w/bad feet, but allowing Thuggy to play on his regular days. They are doing whatever they can to favor Thuggy. And word is the courts were even made slower this yr. to further favor him. THIS IS OUTRAGEOUS, and is the essential context in which this tournament is being conducted. If one cannot discuss this on this thread, then there is no point in having the thread at all.

TenHound
09-01-2005, 05:04 PM
Pls. note this is not About Thuggy. This is about the US officials. So, it should not offend people who like Thuggy. I'm sure he would want to win fairly as well, not because they fucked over his opponent.

ExpectedWinner
09-01-2005, 05:30 PM
. I'm sure he would want to win fairly as well, not because they fucked over his opponent.

They don't care. In 50 years nobody is going to remember who played a second round match on Friday. But the name on the trophy " S0-and-So" won the USO 2005 will be there forever. It's a jungle out there, the ultimate survivor game.

nobama
09-01-2005, 06:05 PM
Ok, to get this back to Roger...I just purchased the Men's Vogue magazine. Roger is towards the back of course (but so is coverboy George Clooney - most of the mag is advertising). I haven't read the article yet, but it appears to be someone following Roger around during RG. A couple nice photographs of him in very expensive Prada suits. I'll scan and post tonight if I can. And the article is not too long so if Andre's match is a blow out I'll try and type it up and post it too.

nobama
09-01-2005, 06:14 PM
Regarding Nadal, I too am sick of all the Roger v Rafa debates, comparisons, whatever. Yeah I'm pissed that at the scheduling that puts Roger on court at 11am when the stadium is half empty. But that has nothing to do with Nadal. And if Roger ends up playing back to back, so what? I don't think it's such a big deal. Especially if his second round match is anything like the first. He was only on court an hour or so.

I don't think there is a conspiracy to favor Nadal. But I do think people would like to see a true rivalry in mens tennis to make it more interesting. Andy and Lleyton are seemingly incapable of posing any challenge to Roger, and Marat is so hot and cold that's he's not in the picture either. The only one most people think can be a true rival to Roger is Nadal. He's a great player and of course when he's playing the commentators are going to talk him up. They do the same when Roger plays. If he gets the night match on Friday you'll hear McEnroe going on and on about how Roger's the greatest talent ever, yada, yada, yada. Just like he did at Wimbledon.

Some people need to stop being so obsessed with Nadal. Because it ends up making all Fed fans look like they're paranoid and worried about him. I certainly am not.

Shabazza
09-01-2005, 06:38 PM
Regarding Nadal, I too am sick of all the Roger v Rafa debates, comparisons, whatever. Yeah I'm pissed that at the scheduling that puts Roger on court at 11am when the stadium is half empty. But that has nothing to do with Nadal. And if Roger ends up playing back to back, so what? I don't think it's such a big deal. Especially if his second round match is anything like the first. He was only on court an hour or so.

I don't think there is a conspiracy to favor Nadal. But I do think people would like to see a true rivalry in mens tennis to make it more interesting. Andy and Lleyton are seemingly incapable of posing any challenge to Roger, and Marat is so hot and cold that's he's not in the picture either. The only one most people think can be a true rival to Roger is Nadal. He's a great player and of course when he's playing the commentators are going to talk him up. They do the same when Roger plays. If he gets the night match on Friday you'll hear McEnroe going on and on about how Roger's the greatest talent ever, yada, yada, yada. Just like he did at Wimbledon.

Some people need to stop being so obsessed with Nadal. Because it ends up making all Fed fans look like they're paranoid and worried about him. I certainly am not.
You're speaking my mind!

nobama
09-01-2005, 07:07 PM
In the Vogue interview they talk about how Roger pays Mirka a small salary, and then have a quote from her saying "I get everything I want. Roger is very generous." :yeah: And then a comment from his mother that because she does so much for him he spoils her a bit. Then also a comment from Roger that if Mirka's fed up with [being is PA] she doesn't have to do it. He just wants her to be his girlfriend (and again says he's not aware of any plans to get married).

Oh boy, I really need to find myself a man like this. I'd have no problem with someone spoiling me. :devil:

ExpectedWinner
09-01-2005, 07:18 PM
And if Roger ends up playing back to back, so what? I don't think it's such a big deal.

May be playing back to back is not a big deal (depends on how long Santoro's match turns out to be). But playing 6 best of 5 matches in a matter of 10 days versus 12 days can make a difference. It's enough that the USO has this dubious super Saturday that puts the guys of the second semi into a clear disadvantage.

Actually I want him to play on Friday morning. It'll give him more time to recover. I don't care about his popularity in USA. He's popular enough around the world.

lunahielo
09-01-2005, 10:20 PM
mirkaland, thanks for the article on Roger....I really appreciate all you post.
Where I live, it's hard to find magazines such as the new Vogue...so thanks a bunch.

I also am not worried about Nadal vs. Roger!!

PamV
09-01-2005, 10:21 PM
I don't like confrontations and don't mean to be rude but PamV I think you are too obsessed with Nadal. Do you have to find conspiracy theories in everything or bring up Nadal all the time?

I for one like your insight but all the time you always same to be comparing Nadal and Federer and it is getting tiresome.

My comments sprang from this article that TenHound brought up:

http://www.newsday.com/sports/columnists/ny-sphow0831,0,6046650.column?coll=ny-sports-columnists

It seems like people are more interested in picking on me than they are in discussing what that article said. Did anyone bother to read it?

I didn't just start talking about Nadal out of the blue. I was responding to what TenHound and Lunielo had said.

PamV
09-01-2005, 10:27 PM
Some people need to stop being so obsessed with Nadal. Because it ends up making all Fed fans look like they're paranoid and worried about him. I certainly am not.
If you encounter a post you don't like isn't it better to just ignore it and move on? Otherwise you are also repeating that you don't like the Federer v. Nadal debates and that is also tiresome. When several people all discuss not liking any debate or complaints then that just drags the whole issue out into several more posts. Maybe a better tactic would be to change the subject to something new and orignal so we have something else to talk about?

As for being worried, I am worried because the points between #1 and #2 are getting close. I don't care who knows that I worry. If some Nadal fans reads this....I also don't care.

nobama
09-02-2005, 12:21 AM
Scans from Men's Vogue. Enjoy. :)

TenHound
09-02-2005, 12:47 AM
Mirkaland, you're the one that got off on that - which was not the point of my post at all.

PamV
09-02-2005, 01:08 AM
Scans from Men's Vogue. Enjoy. :)

Thanks. I love those pictures.

nobama
09-02-2005, 01:13 AM
Mirkaland, you're the one that got off on that - which was not the point of my post at all.I wasn't responding specifically to your post. Just a general observation on the obsession with Nadal. It's one thing to be interested because #1 and #2 are so close. But when people start throwing out conspiracy theories about how the tennis powers that be are trying to do all they can to get Nadal to #1, I think that's ridiculous.

RogiFan88
09-02-2005, 01:14 AM
Thank you Mirkaland -- Rogi looking hot and cool at the same time! ;) Love to see him as the well-dressed, sophisticated man -- and he can carry it off beautifully! ;)

lunahielo
09-02-2005, 01:24 AM
Originally posted by PamV
I didn't just start talking about Nadal out of the blue. I was responding to what TenHound and Lunielo had said.
Yes, you were, Pam...........
Guys, we all are fans of Roger. I really can't see anything wrong in discussing things that are on our minds~~~I think we are all respectful of each other.
(Maybe this is the wrong thread) OK~~~ :)
I am sorry I posted what I did in this thread.

I, like everyone here want Rogi to keep his *1~~(& I have faith he'll do it)~ and again this is the wrong thread.:eek:
So....no more from me about this here. I promise. :)
Really !! :angel:

mirkaland, thank you soooooooooooooooo much!
Terrific pics. I am going to try to read the text~~~~~ ;)

Fergie
09-02-2005, 01:28 AM
Thanks for the scans Mirkaland :D

Ginger
09-02-2005, 01:29 AM
Thanks so much mirkaland! :worship:

I noticed that Roger uses Kenzo products and not the rf cosmetics products... :eek:

lunahielo
09-02-2005, 01:50 AM
I read the article. It was very, very nice.
I liked the part where it said *Federerphiles* seem to know one another~~ :)
I noticed the Kenzo products, too. Hummmm~~

Thanks again, mirkaland...so nice of you.

lunahielo
09-02-2005, 01:58 AM
When I said I read the article~~I was almost telling the truth. :eek:
I was getting ready to click on the last page...finish it and go to bed.........duh,
I couldn't get the last page to magnify!! :mad:

Any suggestions?
Anyway, I liked what I read.

PamV
09-02-2005, 02:10 AM
Yes, you were, Pam...........


For the record Lunahielo, I didn't bring up Nadal out of the blue. I was responding to what TenHound had said and his article. Later you responded to me about being glad that I noticed what McEnroe said about Nadal and the ranking during the Jenkins match. I then answered you back. That's how this got started. I think perhaps this gets out of context if one does not read the start of the thread and the article.

See orginal post of Ten Hound:

I stumbled over this, when I went to Newsday to see if they were pointing fingers in the right direction re New Orleans.

Surprise, someone in the American Press is saying what I've been saying for awhile - that Roger gets Seriously Disrespected Here in the Land of Power Worship. (It's Wed. nite & El Brute has had 2, count 'em, Prime Time, matches, Roger, Zero... .)

"A Virtuoso Like Federer Deserves More Respect", by Johnette Howard.

He is the defending champion of this tournament, the No. 1 player in the world, a man who, at 24 years old, is already touted as the best tennis player ever. That's all Roger Federer of Switzerland has going for him. And yet, Federer was asked to haul his bones out to center court yesterday to make his tournament debut at the definitely not-ready-for-prime-time hour of 11 a.m. The stadium was barely half full. Cars were still filing into the parking lots.

"I was little bit surprised," Federer admitted, though only when pressed. "I don't play much in the morning anymore."

A bigger egoist would have had a snit.

http://www.newsday.com/sports/columnists/ny-sphow0831,0,6046650.column?coll=ny-sports-columnists

Lunahielo, why appologize as if it was a sin that you mentioned Nadal and the McEnroe comment? What was so bad about that? Maybe I am bored reading commments about Mirka's weight so often, but I don't think I am the board monitor assigned to decide what's alright to say....so I let evey one talk. I think everyone can just read and ignore what they don't like.

soraya
09-02-2005, 05:35 AM
I completely agree with the newsweek columnist. thanks for posting it up tenhound. after a long day of work, I would have liked to sit back and relax while watching the virtouso entairtaining. But no, I have to suffer the ginepris, roddicks, agassis, blakes and all the other americans in the tour, It is unheard of not giving a player of roger's caliber a prime time air time. what is the excuse? Roger is not famous in America? so what, it is about time they widen their horizon and enrich themselves. I was not aware that Tennis became a regional sport where one should only cheer up the home town boy. In my opinion Americans should respect talent and creativity in players and not look at the lucrative side of the business. sorry for my ranting, i was looking forward seeing roger play, I was not able to see him perform since wimbledon.

soraya
09-02-2005, 05:39 AM
I meant newsday

oneandonlyhsn
09-02-2005, 06:08 AM
Thanks for the scans from Mens Vogue, wow Roger looking hot and sexy

TheMightyFed
09-02-2005, 08:00 AM
Thanks for the article, it's one of the greatest I've read about Roger, technical, not complacent, full of information... at the begining when he talks about Fed-maniac that record all his matches and rewatch them just for the pleasure, I recognized myself, and the beauty of this Ferrero-Rog match stroke me as well... :yeah: :yeah:

RogiNie
09-02-2005, 04:38 PM
thanks mirkaland! :hug:

RogiFan88
09-02-2005, 07:56 PM
America's men are suddenly in Vogue

Paul Harris in New York
Sunday August 21, 2005
The Observer

High fashion is a world of harsh judgments, where appearance counts for all. Now America's male population is about to face the ultimate fashion test - are you a Vogue man or not?
The answer will be yes for 200,000 lucky fashionistas. That's the number of men, carefully selected from the secret subscriber databases of publisher Condé Nast, who will be sent a free copy of Men's Vogue - a male version of the fashion magazine - when it launches in America next month. For those unlucky (and unfashionable) enough not to be picked, a further 400,000 copies will be distributed on the newsstands for the next three months.

The elaborately planned launch of the quarterly reflects the risk of including such slovenly creatures as men within the haute couture Vogue brand. Men's Vogue will now seek to clothe fashionable American men just as its sister publication has done for US women since it was founded in 1892. To set the tone, staring from the first issue's cover is the elegantly attired actor George Clooney.

The magazine is also hoping to capitalise on the growth in America of a trend towards men using beauty products. 'There is a growing vanity trend with American men. Perhaps this will tap into that,' said Gina Pia Bandini, editor-in-chief of the influential online magazine FashionFinds.com.

The magazine is aimed at the high end of the men's market. There is no place for the slacker dressed in jeans and a T-shirt sipping a Budweiser beer and doing his shopping at WalMart. Instead, the advertisers buying space in the first issue include luxury shops such as Bergdorf Goodman and Barneys. Alongside those ads are others for such must-have consumer items as Hinckley yachts, rare Scotch whiskies and Kiton suits.

The content is in a similar vein. It focuses on themes such as the redesign of a New York townhouse belonging to Nathaniel Rothschild and a photographic portrait of modern artist John Currin in his downtown Manhattan studio. There is a lengthy piece examining the fashions and mores associated with English weekend shooting parties under the headline: 'A Bloody Good Time', an article on wine and another on tennis player Roger Federer and what's inside his tennis bag.

It is a long way from the dominant men's market titles of Maxim, FHM and Stuff, which sell millions of copies to men in their twenties with a focus on scantily-clad women, drinking and gadgets. Men's Vogue's business plan is aimed at readers aged 35 and above who earn at least $100,000 a year and are put off by the tone of the rest of the men's magazine market.

The magazine, which hits newsstands on 6 September, is the latest addition to the Vogue empire, headed by revered Vogue magazine editor Anna Wintour. Two years ago, Condé Nast launched Teen Vogue with its emphasis on high fashion for teenagers. Wintour is also reportedly mulling Vogue Living, which would have an emphasis on general lifestyle.

The editor of Men's Vogue is Jay Fielden, a protege of Wintour. Texas-born and 35 years old, he is the son of a dentist and a ballet teacher, he began his career in the typing pool of the New Yorker, another Condé Nast mainstay. He was hired in 2000 as arts editor of Vogue by Wintour.

One of his toughest tasks will be to convince American men that they actually need a style bible, especially one with a name that is so strongly associated with a women. 'As macho brand names go, doesn't Men's Vogue sound more or less like Men's Ladies' Home Journal?' wrote one fashion journalist scathingly.

The elite men's market is a crowded one. A year ago Vitals magazine was launched by Condé Nast rival Fairchild, with a pitch to the luxury living market. It was joined by Cargo, which also has a focus on high-end shopping and the area is already inhabited by magazines such as GQ and Vanity Fair. That means tight advertising revenues in a ruthlessly competitive market.

But there are signs that US men might be ready for their own Vogue. Even in small-town America male fashion trends, such as an obsession with physical fitness, waxing and skin care, are becoming the norm rather than the exception.

For all that, there are signs that America's women may disapprove. A recent survey of 2,000 readers by Playgirl magazine on what they looked for in a man found a distinct preference for men who were rough around the edges, not neatly groomed and presented. 'It's the average Joe who came out on top,' said Playgirl editor Jill Sieracki.

You are a Vogue man if ...

1. You shave - and not just your face. In fact, a real Vogue Man is not afraid to wax.

2. You agree that facials are not just for girls.

3. You think yachts and rare whiskies are potential purchases.

4. You buy wine by the vintage, not the price tag.

5. You care about the world of interior design.

6. You think fast food is something Other People eat.

7. You have your suits tailored.

8. A six-pack is not something you drink, but sculpt working out at the gym.

9. You care about shoes as much as Carrie from Sex and the City - and you are not afraid to show it.

10. NY-LON is your transatlantic route, not a pair of synthetic tights.


http://observer.guardian.co.uk/international/story/0,6903,1553333,00.html

Shabazza
09-02-2005, 08:13 PM
I'm not a Vogue man at all, though the article about Roger was great reading ;)

SUKTUEN
09-02-2005, 09:01 PM
RogiFan88 thanks

Mrs. B
09-03-2005, 01:19 PM
World number one Roger Federer overcame a tougher-than-expected test, beating crafty Frenchman Fabrice Santoro 7-5 7-5 7-6 to reach the third round where he will face Belgium's Olivier Rochus. Federer made 32 unforced errors during the match finding tough to return the 32-year-old's serve.

Santoro had Federer rattled and irritable at times with a dazzling array of shot-making, but the Swiss found his best tennis when it mattered to advance to a meeting with Olivier Rochus, the 27th seed from Belgium.

"I had a blast out there today," Federer said. "Rarely the crowd gets into a match like they did tonight. The way he plays, the way I play, I knew it could be a great one."

The top seed looked on course for a comfortable victory when he stormed to a 5-1 lead but Santoro, the world number 76, broke back twice and Federer needed a third break, in the 12th game, to clinch the set.

The Swiss saved three break points in the seventh game of the second set before again breaking to win it, and then played a stunning tiebreak in the third, winning it 7-2 and ending up with an incredible 73 winners on the night.

"I could have closed it out earlier, but he played good tennis," Federer said. "The conditions were tough tonight, it was quite windy and it was tough to get it past him, particularly when he was coming to the net.

"He's tough to break because he has so many options. He mixes it up very well, that's the best part of his game."

Santoro, who hit some shots that left Federer smiling at their sheer audacity, said he had performed to his very limit.

"I can't play any better than I did tonight," he said. "I was a little nervous before the match because if you play even a little under your level against Roger then it's over in an hour.

"I was so happy to play a tiebreak in the third set and then in about two minutes the score was 6-0 for him."

source: Eurosport

Mrs. B
09-03-2005, 01:23 PM
Federer made to work by Santoro

US Open results
Defending champion Roger Federer was given a tough passage into the third round of the US Open before overcoming Fabrice Santoro 7-5 7-5 7-6.
The Frenchman produced a dazzling array of shots to regularly rattle the world number one and cancel out a 5-1 deficit in the opening set.

But Federer broke again in the 12th game to round off the set.

He won the second set by the same scoreline before a sublime tie-break in the third, which he won 7-2.

"I always enjoy playing against him," said Federer. "He gave me a lesson that first time I played him (in 1999).

"He sizzled me with his slices. It's so different playing against him. We had a great match."

bbc sport

nobama
09-03-2005, 01:32 PM
"I had a blast out there today," Federer said. "Rarely the crowd gets into a match like they did tonight. The way he plays, the way I play, I knew it could be a great one."So did everybody watching, Roger! :yeah: Thanks for the entertainment...oh and thank you Fabrice too! :worship:

avocadoe
09-03-2005, 02:15 PM
So did everybody watching, Roger! :yeah: Thanks for the entertainment...oh and thank you Fabrice too! :worship:

I sure did. Such good humored men even in competition and power, made me feel great :) I love the leftie Frenchie (not as much as Roger, of course, but a lot)

When we went to Indian Wells a couple of years ago we were watching Fabrice practice, he was playing a set against Kafelnikov, I think, and Fabrice hit one of his amazing slice a banana on my left hip strokes for a winner, and I exploded with a heart felt, "Extraordinare!" and I was rewarded with a personal response, he walked over to get a look at the voice, and giving me that engaging gat-toothed smile, patted his pockets and bowed as if it say, "Thanks, I can do that all day."

They should have done a collage of all the odd and strange positions Fabrice ended up at the end of points, lol. There were a lot of great ones, win or lose.

Stevens Point
09-03-2005, 04:37 PM
R. FEDERER/F. Santoro

7‑5, 7‑5, 7‑6

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions in English.

Q. Did you enjoy that match?
ROGER FEDERER: I did, yeah. It was good. Yeah, we've played on several occasions. Every time I thought it was different conditions, different crowd. Today was maybe the best, you know, next to the Davis Cup we played in France. But obviously you can expect it with the result I had there. The crowd were very quiet. But here was great. They were backing him up. No, I had a blast out there today because rarely the crowd really gets into a match like this. I knew it from the start, this could be a very interesting match, the way he plays, the way I play. This is a night session at the US Open, I knew it could be a great one.

Q. When you started out with the 5‑1 advantage, did you suspect it could be a quick match?
ROGER FEDERER: Yes, I did. But he fought his way back into the match and deserved it to be close. I could have closed it early earlier. Same in the second set, I thought. But he played good tennis. I thought the conditions were tough because there was a lot of wind. His slice was staying low. I had my difficulties to get past him, especially when he was coming to the net.

Q. What's so difficult about his serve? You seemed to have some problems returning it.
ROGER FEDERER: I thought I was returning it pretty good in the first set. After that, I was a little disappointed, you know, because he's not a big server. He serves very flat, you know, and the ball stays low. Especially I think in the wind, like today, it's tough to get it down on him, get the timing, get the rhythm. I thought as the match went on, he actually started to serve better and better. In the beginning, he missed a few volleys to help me out. That didn't happen any more in the end. Even though he's not a big server, whatever, he's tough to break because he's got so many options. Always you think he's going to stay back. He comes in. You think he's going to come in. He stays back. He always mixes it up very well. That is his main strength in his game, I think.

Q. How much are you looking forward to the World Cup qualifying match against Israel tomorrow? Will you watch it?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I guess they won't show it.

(Hopp Schwiiiiiiz!!!!!!!!!!!)

Mrs. B
09-03-2005, 04:58 PM
SP, i'm sure someone from the FCB will send Roger an sms with the results. ;)

babsi
09-03-2005, 07:49 PM
Thanks for posting the interview Steven :)
That´s when you have a late match - not much news stories about it.

Tomorrow of course it will all be - Nadal is out,Nadal is out!Blake unstoppable - not that I mind,reading that story :)

Mrs. B
09-03-2005, 08:16 PM
Federer Puts on Another Virtuoso Display
by Brian Cleary
Friday, September 2, 2005

In front of nearly-packed house of highly appreciative tennis fans in Arthur Ashe Stadium, Roger Federer put on yet another virtuoso display of all-court tennis, taking out a pesky Fabrice Santoro of France 7-5, 7-5, 7-6. The No. 1-ranked Federer has now only lost one set in his last nine Grand Slam matches.

While Federer seemed mostly in control, despite the close score, the 32-year-old Frenchman, who hits two-fisted off both sides, tested him throughout. He had three break points on Federer’s serve in the all-important seventh game of the second set, only to see Federer pick up his game to fend them off, hitting two forehand winners in the process.

Santoro, ranked No. 76 and playing in his 14th US Open, clearly had the crowd on his side. But siding with Santoro wasn't because the New York fans did not like Federer. In fact, they were highly appreciative of his marvelous shot-making, clearly aware that the Swiss champion, being talked about routinely as the greatest player ever, is the best show in town right now. At one point, the crowd was so excited, they started doing the wave.

If anything, it seemed like the crowd, sensing Santoro’s insurmountable task, felt even a little sorry for the Frenchman. They moaned when close balls hit by Santoro were called out, prompting Federer to raise his arms at one point, as if to say, “What can I do?’’ After another great shot by Federer, one fan called out, “Hang in there, Santoro.’’

Federer, who hit an amazing 73 winners on the night, compared to just 29 by Santoro, continues his quest to become the first man in the Open Era to win Wimbledon and the US Open back-to-back for two consecutive years. He next plays the No. 27-seeded Olivier Rochus of Belgium.


from the USO website

nobama
09-03-2005, 08:28 PM
http://www.tennis.com/Tennis_World_Blog/index.asp

Fabrice, Meet Andy...
Posted 9/3/2005 @ 1:57 PM

I don’t know how John McEnroe and his crew in the booth handled it, but last night's match between Roger Federer and Fabrice Santoro was one of those great occasions that speaks volumes about the nature and spirit of tennis. It started with the Andre Agassi-grade ovation Roger Federer got as he strolled onto the blue mosh pit of Arthur Ashe stadium.

It was great to see the generally ethnocentric American crowd respond like that; it suggested that even the McEnroe and Connors worshipping New York folks are vaguely aware of this cat-quick, cool Swiss kid.

Santoro, on whom Pete Sampras bestowed the nickname, The Magician, was a perfect foil to Federer, in that his game doesn’t really threaten the Mighty Fed, but he’s artful and clever enough to goad Federer into bringing out his most creative side. . . Oh, drop shot from the baseline, off an overhead, Fabrice? Okay, how about this: a sliced backhand approach off your big forehand — and inside-out to boot. . .

What a field day for the geeks!

As Federer said:


. . .but here it was great. They (the crowd) were backing him up. I had a blast out there because the crowd really get into a match like this. I knew it from the start, this could be a very interesting match, the way he plays, the way I play. This is a night session at the U.S. Open. I knew it could be a great one.


Great one indeed — and the right time for it, before a record night-session crowd of 23,352.

When it was pointed out to Santoro that he has two wins over Federer, and asked what the best tactics to employ against him are, Santoro said:


No, I think no one has a tactic to beat Federer today. No one has a tactic. I beat him once, in 1999, I think, and once in 2002. Since that day in Madrid, October 2002, I lost six times in a row, and I didn’t win a set.
Last year, I played – I think – two great matches against him, and I didn’t win a set. Tonight again, I think I can’t play better than what I did, and he’s still better than me.


Join the gang, Fabrice. By the way, have you met Andy? Oh – no, Rafa's not here yet, but he may be on his way. Want to try his cell?

The match was such a collegial, entertaining clash that for the first time anyone could remember, USA’s Michael Barkann interviewed both players after the match.

What a great advertisement for the sport.

SUKTUEN
09-04-2005, 06:45 PM
thanks Mrs.B~~~lunahielo your avarat~~!

Doris Loeffel
09-04-2005, 07:42 PM
http://www.tennis.com/Tennis_World_Blog/index.asp

I
The match was such a collegial, entertaining clash that for the first time anyone could remember, USA’s Michael Barkann interviewed both players after the match.



I wish we could have heard that interview but our (otherwise quite good comentators) keept talking away over it....

thanks for all the great articles

Stevens Point
09-05-2005, 01:25 PM
www.usopen.org


Federer Fends Off Pesky Rochus to Advance
by Mike Dempsey
Sunday, September 4, 2005

The unparalleled dominance Roger Federer has exhibited over the men's tennis world for almost two years advanced unabated Sunday night, as the Swiss dynamo beat No. 27 seed Olivier Rochus 6-3, 7-6 (6), 6-2 at Arthur Ashe Stadium.

Even without his game in top form, Federer beat the 5-foot-5 Belgian by coming through in the big moments.

Federer won the first set after being tied with Rochus 3-3, taking just 23 minutes and appearing to be in control. Sixty-four minutes later, Federer squeaked out the second set with an 8-6 tie-break. The last time Federer lost a set in a Grand Slam event was earlier this summer at Wimbledon, in the round of 16 against Nicolas Kiefer, a streak of ten matches. Kiefer will have a chance to take another set off Federer as the two are slated to face each other in the fourth round.

The No. 1 seed then took the third set in typical Federer fashion, combining a masterful serve with slicing ground strokes. The little Belgian put up a fight, scurrying to as many balls as he could, but ultimately succumbed to Federer's peerless shot-making.

The Swiss master is now 41-1 on hard courts this year and has not lost to any player ranked outside the top 10 since the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens. He has won 31 consecutive matches on the surface since losing to Marat Safin in the semifinals of the 2005 Australian Open.

With Rafael Nadal and Safin out of the draw (Nadal was ousted by feel-good American James Blake, and Safin withdrew prior to the tournament with a knee injury), the only two players to beat Federer in a Grand Slam this year are removed from his path.

Puschkin
09-05-2005, 01:33 PM
quoting
Federer Fends Off Pesky Rochus to Advance
by Mike Dempsey

The Swiss master is now 41-1 on hard courts this year and has not lost to any player ranked outside the top 10 since the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens. He has won 31 consecutive matches on the surface since losing to Marat Safin in the semifinals of the 2005 Australian Open.


Gasquet was top ten in Monte Carlo? :confused:

Stevens Point
09-05-2005, 01:34 PM
Gasquet was top ten in Monte Carlo? :confused:
I think this author meant on hard court.

TenHound
09-05-2005, 10:37 PM
Ollie, the Little Giant that Could. Wish the Tennis Gods hadn't been so cheap when it came to doling out his height genes!

nobama
09-06-2005, 11:00 AM
Here's a link to video of Roger on the Australian TV program 60 Minutes. Good interview, although it would've been nice to hear from Mirka too. I suppose though she prefers to stay out of the spotlight. Does she speak English as well as Roger?

http://g.msn.com/0VD0/39/83?m=News&mi=60%20Minutes&i=b1c755a4-4f43-4481-9e6f-227dbfcb7b16&p=AUnews_AU60minutes

nobama
09-06-2005, 11:31 AM
Here's another video from earlier this year. Roger says he'd like to meet Madonna and Sean Connery someday.

rtsp://real.atptennis-global.speedera.net/real.atptennis-global/Roger_Federer.rm

Stevens Point
09-06-2005, 12:36 PM
Here's a link to video of Roger on the Australian TV program 60 Minutes. Good interview, although it would've been nice to hear from Mirka too. I suppose though she prefers to stay out of the spotlight. Does she speak English as well as Roger?

http://g.msn.com/0VD0/39/83?m=News&mi=60%20Minutes&i=b1c755a4-4f43-4481-9e6f-227dbfcb7b16&p=AUnews_AU60minutes
Thanks for the link! :) My browser firefox doesn't operate the msn videos, so I will take a look with Internet Explorer later.

I haven't seen Mirka talk in English (have seen an interview in Swiss German). In the DVD Replay, there were a couple of scenes where Mirka says "thanks" and "bye" but it doesn't mean she can speak English, but I guess she is able to speak English because she is the one who makes appointments and so on for Roger (like telephone management, etc)....

Nocko
09-06-2005, 12:37 PM
Here's a link to video of Roger on the Australian TV program 60 Minutes. Good interview, although it would've been nice to hear from Mirka too. I suppose though she prefers to stay out of the spotlight. Does she speak English as well as Roger?

http://g.msn.com/0VD0/39/83?m=News&mi=60%20Minutes&i=b1c755a4-4f43-4481-9e6f-227dbfcb7b16&p=AUnews_AU60minutes
Thank you very much, mirkaland. :worship:
It's really nice. Everything is nice. intervews, training scene in Dubai, old time pics,etc... Only one thing I regret is--- this link has only 13min., not whole program. Anyway, thanks again. :hug:

babsi
09-06-2005, 12:51 PM
Thank you,mirkaland :)

nobama
09-06-2005, 01:05 PM
Thanks for the link! :) My browser firefox doesn't operate the msn videos, so I will take a look with Internet Explorer later.

I haven't seen Mirka talk in English (have seen an interview in Swiss German). In the DVD Replay, there were a couple of scenes where Mirka says "thanks" and "bye" but it doesn't mean she can speak English, but I guess she is able to speak English because she is the one who makes appointments and so on for Roger (like telephone management, etc)....Well in the link above they do have a clip of her saying "how are you" or something like that but it doesn't sound as fluent as Roger's English.

Stevens Point
09-06-2005, 01:36 PM
Well in the link above they do have a clip of her saying "how are you" or something like that but it doesn't sound as fluent as Roger's English.
She has a charming voice, doesn't she? I like her voice!! :)

onm684
09-06-2005, 01:37 PM
mirkaland,thank you very much for these links:worship: :worship:
I have to study English more especially listening..:sad: :banghead:

PamV
09-06-2005, 01:39 PM
Thanks for the link! :) I haven't seen Mirka talk in English (have seen an interview in Swiss German). In the DVD Replay, there were a couple of scenes where Mirka says "thanks" and "bye" but it doesn't mean she can speak English, but I guess she is able to speak English because she is the one who makes appointments and so on for Roger (like telephone management, etc)....

There is a segment that was filmed about Roger last year after winning the USOpen. The Tennis Channel crew follow him around NYC and interview him. Mirka speaks in English quite well. She has a sweet voice and a cute accent.

Stevens Point
09-06-2005, 01:45 PM
Mirka speaks in English quite well. She has a sweet voice and a cute accent.
That's what I thought, and yes she has a sweet voice! :D

nobama
09-06-2005, 05:53 PM
She has a charming voice, doesn't she? I like her voice!! :)I've not heard her speak enough to be able to say.

SUKTUEN
09-06-2005, 05:55 PM
y
es

Whistleway
09-06-2005, 06:55 PM
thanks mirkaland. great stuff. and many of those younger pics came right from MTF. ;)

Daniel
09-06-2005, 09:07 PM
Thanks mirkaland :D

Minnie
09-06-2005, 11:20 PM
Here's a link to video of Roger on the Australian TV program 60 Minutes. Good interview, although it would've been nice to hear from Mirka too. I suppose though she prefers to stay out of the spotlight. Does she speak English as well as Roger?

http://g.msn.com/0VD0/39/83?m=News&mi=60%20Minutes&i=b1c755a4-4f43-4481-9e6f-227dbfcb7b16&p=AUnews_AU60minutes

Thanks v much for this Mirkaland. :worship: My friend in Oz emailed telling me about this programme but never thought I'd get to see it! Thanks again. :wavey:

nobama
09-06-2005, 11:33 PM
Thanks v much for this Mirkaland. :worship: My friend in Oz emailed telling me about this programme but never thought I'd get to see it! Thanks again. :wavey:I wish we could see the whole thing though. I have John McEnroe's interview with Roger today on my TV, but I don't know how to get it on my PC otherwise I'd post it here. It wasn't very long, but nice anyway.

Stevens Point
09-07-2005, 01:51 AM
Federer not sharp but through to quarters
by Erin Bruehl
Tuesday, September 6, 2005

Nicolas Kiefer showed flashes of brilliant play in his fourth-round match against No. 1 seed and Roger Federer, and became the first man in this Open to win a set against the defending champion. However, Kiefer also struggled with unforced errors and was not able to take advantage of many of Federer's mistakes. Federer finally won the match, 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-4 in Arthur Ashe Stadium.

Kiefer, the No. 38 ranked player from Germany, got off to a strong start, breaking Federer in his first service game to take a 2-0 lead as the Swiss uncharacteristically missed several shots, hitting them long instead of hitting corners, or wide instead of just inside the lines. However, Federer broke back in the next game, this time taking advantage of Kiefer's mistakes as he hit several balls into the net.

Kiefer continued to commit costly errors the rest of the set, despite scoring three of his 12 aces. He struggled particularly with his serve as he completed just 36 percent of his first serves in the opening set. Federer, although not especially sharp, broke him once more to win the opener.

The second set started with Kiefer going up 3-0 before Federer broke back and won three consecutive games, despite not looking nearly as sharp as he had in his three previous matches in this tournament. After Federer broke in the fifth game, the set stayed on serve to 6-6. Kiefer prevailed 7-3 in the tie-break to hand Federer his first set loss of this Open. It was also Kiefer who handed Federer his last set loss in a Grand Slam match, in the fourth round at Wimbledon earlier this summer.

The two stayed on serve until the seventh game of third set, when Federer started to hit the kinds of shots that made him No. 1. He started to move Kiefer more around the court and his shots started falling inside the lines for winners.

Federer's serve also began to improve, as his first-serve percentage went from 57 percent and 48 percent in the first and second sets to 78 percent and 88 percent in the third and fourth.

Kiefer actually led Federer in winners for the match, 48 to 43, but also led in unforced errors, 46 to 33. Kiefer also hit 11 double faults.

Federer broke Kiefer in the third game of the fourth set to take a 2-0 lead, as Kiefer missed shots long and wide, and double-faulted.

Federer won the match in just over three hours, earning a spot in the quarterfinals for the eighth time in his last ten Grand Slams. He is now 7-3 in his career vs. Kiefer. He will take on either David Nalbandian or Davide Sanguinetti in the quarters.

Daniel
09-07-2005, 02:34 AM
NEW YORK (AP) -- Roger Federer sneered, tossed his racket in disgust. Horror of horrors, he lost a set.

For most of the U.S. Open, the defending champion and top seed had seemed to sleepwalk through his matches, playing only as well as necessary, waking up and painting lines when pressed. He made up shots as he went along -- a sprinkling of aces at various speeds and angles, a backhand pass that got him out of trouble, a volley that came out of nowhere between yawns.

That was enough until he got into a little trouble against Nicolas Kiefer on Tuesday. Suddenly Federer had a reason to elevate his game and stir some emotion. Now he swept in toward the net, pounded winners from the baseline, stopped wasting time and effort.

Under just the hint of pressure, Federer produced his best tennis of the tournament to beat Kiefer 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-4 and land safely in the quarterfinals. Match point was a masterful final stroke -- an inside-out forehand crosscourt that Federer tucked neatly in the corner, far from Kiefer's reach.

"Federer's play, for him, is like a B, B-plus, which for anyone else is an A-plus," former champion John McEnroe said after leaving the broadcast booth. "For him, he hasn't really played as well as he's capable of. He's been unsettled a couple of times. Today was one of those matches. Sometimes you don't play your best, but the real champions win when they're not playing their real best."

The 24-year-old Federer lost only one set on the way to his third Wimbledon title two months ago, and that also was against Kiefer, who gives him tough matches but can't quite win. Federer has beaten the German six straight times, four of them this year.

After losing the second-set tiebreaker when he netted a backhand half-volley, Federer found himself in difficulty at 3-3 in the third when he faced double break point at 15-40. His answer: a 120 mph service winner to save one break point, a brilliant backhand crosscourt pass to save another. Kiefer made two errors after that and his opportunity was gone.

"That game was huge, absolutely," Federer said. "I was not so happy the way I was playing, especially in the second set. Third was getting better, especially after that pass. I really felt that shift in momentum. I took advantage of that. In the fourth set, I started to feel like I'm really in control again where I didn't feel that way at all before. I had the feeling actually momentum was all on his side."

Like an artist standing back to admire his work, Federer watched a replay on the giant screen of the backhand pass that saved break point.

"I knew the moment I hit it that the ball is going to be in," he said. "I knew that he's not going to be there, and I knew that I'm back in the game, back in the match. I knew the importance of that shot. It was important from then to hold and not let it slip away. So I did well there."

As dominant as Federer has been on grass the past few years, he's no less the ruler of hard courts. He's won 32 straight matches on the surface and is 42-1 on it this year, his lone loss coming in January against Marat Safin in the Australian Open semifinals. Overall this year, Federer is 68-3.

Federer next plays 11th-seeded David Nalbandian or Davide Sanguinetti. The Swiss said he would prefer Nalbandian, "because I have a bad record against him."

McEnroe liked that.

"Most guys would like to play the guy they have the winning record against," McEnroe said. "That's what you love about Roger -- he embraces the challenge."

Nalbandian holds a 5-2 record against Federer, though Federer won the last two meetings in 2003 and '04.

"I like to play against guys who have beaten me, especially early in the career, try to get them back," Federer said. "He was a tough opponent for me for a long, long time."

Lleyton Hewitt, the 2001 champion and runner-up to Federer last year, reached the quarters for the sixth straight year with a 6-1, 6-4, 6-2 win over No. 15 Dominik Hrbaty, who drew more attention for his pink peekaboo shirt than his play.

"It made it a lot easier for me to beat him today," Hewitt said. "I just couldn't lose to a bloke wearing a shirt like that."

Hewitt advanced to play Jarkko Nieminen, who became the first Finn to reach the quarters in a Grand Slam event with a 6-2, 7-6 (6), 6-3 victory over Spain's Fernando Verdasco.

Daniel
09-07-2005, 02:35 AM
NEW YORK - Roger Federer finally got a scare in the U.S. Open. Looking more mortal than the guy who has dominated tennis the past two years, Federer dropped his first set in the Open before putting Nicolas Kiefer of Germany away 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-4 on Tuesday to earn a spot in the quarterfinals.

"So far in this tournament, I haven't lost set before," Federer said. "When it happens, you're not ready for it."

Federer will play 11th-seeded David Nalbandian or Davide Sanguinetti.

"Nalbandian, because I have a bad record against him," Federer said when asked if he had a preference.

Lleyton Hewitt scored one for the fashion police in making the quarterfinals for the sixth straight year. He won 6-1, 6-4, 6-2 over No. 15 Dominik Hrbaty, who drew more attention for his pink peekaboo shirt than his play.

The 2001 champion and runner-up last year now plays Jarkko Nieminen, who became the first Finnish man to reach the quarters in a Grand Slam event with a 6-2, 7-6 (6), 6-3 victory over Spain's Fernando Verdasco.

"I wouldn't wear it. But it made it a lot easier for me to beat him today," Hewitt said. "I just couldn't lose to a bloke wearing a shirt like that."

It was ladies night at Arthur Ashe Stadium, with No. 1 Maria Sharapova taking on fellow Russian and ninth-seeded Nadia Petrova, and fourth-seeded Kim Clijsters facing No. 10 Venus Williams.

Federer has hardly been tested in the Open — or this year, for that matter. He's 68-3, unbeaten since the French Open semifinals, and has won 32 straight matches on hard courts — moving him ahead of Ivan Lendl and behind only Pete Sampras in the Open era. Federer can break Sampras' record if he wins the tournament.

But Federer looked vulnerable early against Kiefer, whom he'd already beaten three times this year. Federer's timing was off as he repeatedly hit shots a touch too long or dumped them into the net, and his game lacked its usual flair. He even tossed his racket once, a rare show of emotion on the court.

Federer finally returned to form in the third set. With the set tied 3-3, Kiefer reached double break point when Federer netted a forehand. But Federer rallied, drilling a 120-mph service winner, then yelling "Come on!" after hitting a crosscourt pass to get the score back to deuce. Kiefer made two unforced errors as Federer closed out the game.

Federer broke Kiefer the next game, then served out the set as Kiefer slipped awkwardly racing for a shot in the corner on set point. Though Kiefer made him work for the final set, Federer seemed more like himself with dazzling shots no one else can make.

Maybe it's the proximity to the Garment District, but the Open seems to be the spot for fashion statements. Three years ago, Tommy Haas was ordered to change after he showed up in a sleeveless muscle shirt. Now, of course, all the kids are wearing them.

ToanNguyen
09-07-2005, 03:19 AM
Very nice article about Roger. Very true

Who's No. 1? It's Federer, in Many Ways

By SELENA ROBERTS

Published: September 7, 2005

THE meaning of a number depends on who is No. 1.

As an ex-No. 1, Lleyton Hewitt pulled off a rarity for him as he scurried around Arthur Ashe Stadium yesterday without offending a linesman with a slur, infuriating his opponent with an obscene gesture or irritating the crowd with his excessive "C'mons."

He didn't have enough time. It took only 94 minutes for Hewitt to dispense of Dominik Hrbaty in the fourth round of the United States Open. So Hewitt had to save his typically tasteless remarks for later, when he poked at the holes designed and cut into the shoulder blades of Hrbaty's fashionista shirt.

"I wouldn't wear it, but it made it a lot easier for me to beat him," Hewitt said, adding, "I just couldn't lose to a bloke wearing a shirt like that."

Hewitt is unvarnished, irascible and impolitic. In other words, he hasn't changed a bit since he was the No. 1 player in 2001 and 2002, back when he created a trail of charged feuds with players and legal disputes with the ATP.

He is as self-absorbed as always. In a year when he referred to an umpire with a gay slur, in a season when he nearly fought with a Davis Cup opponent, Hewitt also revealed the depths of his inner control freak. According to Australian reports, Hewitt sold the media rights to his spring engagement, summer wedding and wife's pregnancy. So far, no autographed pictures of sonograms have surfaced on eBay.

The current No. 1, Roger Federer, followed Hewitt onto the stadium court, able to reach into his bag of liquid strokes to frustrate Nicolas Kiefer, winning in four sets while maintaining his trademark calm. Later, always the gentleman, he complimented Kiefer.

Federer took his No. 1 ranking as a responsibility, not a perch of entitlement, maturing into a player of thought, action and social awareness. Would he ever dabble in politics?

"Like Ahnold?" he said in a Schwarzenegger-esque accent during a recent lunch. "I don't think so. I'm more into, in general, helping people. Like Muhammad Ali does for the world.

"Think about the world not only like 'God Bless America' sort of thing but God bless the world, because we're all together. We're living on the same world, you know? And not alone. Sometimes people forget. This is why we have fights all over the world. Of course you can't stop them, but still pick an issue, maybe in the future. Of course it goes into politics a little bit. Maybe. Who knows what I'll do? But I don't really see this sort of role. I'd like to be more of an ambassador."

The difference in depth between Hewitt and Federer, and the divergence in their approach to No. 1, is certainly two parts personality, but at least one part entourage. Hewitt is surrounded by a bevy of yes men and sycophantic handlers, while Federer has chosen a liberating, agent-less existence, grounded by a girlfriend/manager who will tell the emperor off.

Perspective is a choice. And the choice of some top players was revealed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. One after another, past and present No. 1 players - athletes of high visibility and influential voice - have displayed how sheltered they are by their guffawing circle of advisers.

If advised correctly, Serena Williams would not have celebrated herself as a philanthropist by offering $100 per ace to hurricane relief when her dog, Jackie, travels in a designer handbag that costs many times that much.

If anyone in her management group had prepped her, Venus Williams would not have used an unfortunate line like, "I really don't watch the news," when asked about the devastation in New Orleans.

If she could separate herself from her packaging, Maria Sharapova might have something to add on an issue outside of her perfume launch.

True, athlete activism has been rendered a quaint notion when so many sports icons continue to adopt the lucrative Michael Jordan theory on social causes. As told in Sam Smith's 1995 book, "Second Coming," Jordan was asked why he wouldn't support a black Democratic candidate to unseat Jesse Helms in North Carolina. "Republicans buy shoes, too," Jordan said.

Social conscience may have nearly flatlined in sports, but perspective doesn't have to be buried with it. It is no coincidence that the most introspective responses to Hurricane Katrina came from Andre Agassi, an ex-No. 1, and Lindsay Davenport, the current No. 1.

Agassi is handled by one man, Perry Rogers, a childhood friend who isn't afraid to tell his client the truth. The player's box for Davenport is usually filled by a coach, maybe her husband and, at times, her mother.

Agassi and Davenport do not shut themselves off with a fortress of cling-ons. Agassi and Davenport do not seek the advice of shameless sycophants.

Perspective is a choice of all those who ascend to No. 1. The perch can be treated as a responsibility - as Federer sees it - or as a pulpit of entitlement, as Hewitt once responded to it.

Perspective is not American, European or Australian. The meaning behind the world's No. 1 is universally lost or gained in the number of yes men.

Mrs. B
09-07-2005, 09:06 AM
Federer took his No. 1 ranking as a responsibility, not a perch of entitlement, maturing into a player of thought, action and social awareness. Would he ever dabble in politics?

"Like Ahnold?" he said in a Schwarzenegger-esque accent during a recent lunch. "I don't think so. I'm more into, in general, helping people. Like Muhammad Ali does for the world.

"Think about the world not only like 'God Bless America' sort of thing but God bless the world, because we're all together. We're living on the same world, you know? And not alone. Sometimes people forget. This is why we have fights all over the world. Of course you can't stop them, but still pick an issue, maybe in the future. Of course it goes into politics a little bit. Maybe. Who knows what I'll do? But I don't really see this sort of role. I'd like to be more of an ambassador."

Perspective is a choice of all those who ascend to No. 1. The perch can be treated as a responsibility - as Federer sees it - or as a pulpit of entitlement, as Hewitt once responded to it.

Perspective is not American, European or Australian. The meaning behind the world's No. 1 is universally lost or gained in the number of yes men.

:cool: :cool: :cool:

Puschkin
09-07-2005, 09:38 AM
quoting NEW YORK (AP) and RF himself.

"I knew the moment I hit it that the ball is going to be in," he said. "I knew that he's not going to be there, and I knew that I'm back in the game, back in the match. I knew the importance of that shot.

So did I ;) . 7th game, third set.

Doris Loeffel
09-07-2005, 10:18 AM
You just could sence it that that shot was going to turn the game around. And it sure did!!

Stevens Point
09-07-2005, 12:52 PM
New York Times

Federer Finds Dents in His Armor

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Published: September 7, 2005

Nicolas Kiefer, who has faced Roger Federer enough lately to know, said that when it came to tennis and Federer, "We're on earth, but he's playing on a different planet."
Skip to next paragraph


The facts and figures certainly support that point of view now that Federer has been ranked No. 1 for 83 straight weeks and has won his last 22 finals. Yesterday at the United States Open, he crunched some more numbers by extending his hardcourt winning streak to 32 matches, beating Kiefer in the fourth round, 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-4.

Despite securing safe passage, there were significant stretches of this rough-and-tumble encounter when Federer looked more like an earthling than the smooth-moving extraterrestrial whose soon-to-be-vanquished opponents often look content to be just part of the day's entertainment.

Kiefer, a versatile German who was once a member of the top 10, has come as close as anyone to making Federer nervous this summer. He was the only player to win a set from him at Wimbledon this year, and he won another in the second round in Cincinnati last month before Federer managed to return the stars to their traditional alignment.

He gave Federer more trouble yesterday, and after his aggressive tactics and combative approach earned him the second set, he kept his chin up in the third, as well, and kept hammering away and pushing forward to net, where his light touch was quite a contrast to his stern countenance and rugged frame .

Meanwhile, Federer was searching for his bearings: shanking forehands off his racket frame, hitting flat-footed backhands into the net and struggling to make sense of Kiefer's heavy, if not particularly speedy, serve

Though Kiefer earned a code violation for an audible obscenity in the first game of the third set, Federer was the one with more reason to mutter under his breath, and his fans could not fail to notice, shouting out to him in the three languages he speaks - English, French and German - to get his world-class act together.

He was still not heeding their desires when he fell behind, 15-40, on his serve at 3-3. He saved the first break point with a big first serve that Kiefer could not handle. But Kiefer took control of the second break point and hit a fine approach shot deep. Federer glided to his left. He was late arriving to the ball, but lunged and hooked a one-handed backhand passing shot for a winner that Kiefer, despite all his reconnaissance work on Federer this year, had no idea was coming.

It was the signal that Federer's visit to earth had come to an end. "It was huge," Federer said. "I knew the moment I hit it that the ball is going to be in. I knew that he's not going to be there, and I knew that I'm back in the game, back in the match. I knew the importance of that shot."

Kiefer got the hint, too. "That's the reason why he's No. 1: because he makes these shots, these important shots, when he needs it," said Kiefer, who would lose that game, then lose his serve and edge in the next.

The rest was heavy-hitting postscript, although Kiefer did hit one of the shots of the tournament: a full-swinging sidearm swipe in the eighth game from way out of court that followed a flat trajectory past the stunned Federer for a winner. "I don't know how he did it," Federer said. "It's basically impossible, you know, because it's a smash from hip height."

There were bemused smiles all around before Federer resumed winning the points that mattered. "It's been all right," Federer said of his play thus far here. "It's not been bad, but it's definitely not been fantastic either."

More could be required in the quarterfinals, when Federer, the top-seeded and defending champion, will face the 11th-seeded David Nalbandian of Argentina, who defeated Italian 33-year-old Davide Sanguinetti, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-2.

Nalbandian, who has been Federer's rival since they were juniors, is one of the very few men who still has a winning record against him. Although Federer has won their last two matches, Nalbandian won their first five. They have not played since 2003. "I think nobody is invincible," Nalbandian said. "He's gotten to No. 1 and stayed there, but I'm playing well. We have a lot of history, and I think when you know someone well, the ranking doesn't really exist. Anything can happen."

The other quarterfinal in the top half of the draw will match third-seeded Lleyton Hewitt of Australia against unseeded Jarkko Nieminen.

Hewitt needed five sets to shake free of the net-rushing Taylor Dent in the third round, but he advanced much more comfortably yesterday with a 6-1, 6-4, 6-2 victory over the veteran Slovakian baseliner Dominik Hrbaty. Nieminen defeated the explosive, erratic Spaniard Fernando Verdasco, 6-2, 7-6 (6), 6-3.

Hewitt, who won this title in 2002, is into the quarterfinals here for the sixth straight year, but Nieminen is in uncharted territory as the first player from Finland to reach the final eight in a Grand Slam. He is an angular newlywed with a shock of blond hair who has had to make regular road trips to neighboring Sweden for training purposes because of the shortage of Tour-level players in his native country.

"I don't see the reason why we couldn't have more good players," said Nieminen, who defeated Andre Agassi in the first round of this year's French Open. "But of course in Sweden they have a huge tennis culture that we don't have in Finland."

Hrbaty has been a regular subject of conversation at Flushing Meadows this year. That is not because of his powerful ground strokes or sunny disposition but because he is the first man on Tour to wear a tennis shirt with two large holes cut into the back of it. "It's just the design," he said. "They pay me to wear it, and I wear it. You don't sweat as much as in the classic shirts."

Perhaps not, but it is not a look that many of his peers are eager to imitate, even in an avant-garde year when the Spanish teenager Rafael Nadal has managed to push clamdigger pants back onto the fashion agenda. "I wouldn't wear it, but it made it a lot easier for me to beat him today," Hewitt said. "I couldn't lose to a bloke wearing a shirt like that."

babsi
09-07-2005, 02:11 PM
Thanks,Steven - hey,I have to thank you alot latly - how is school doing ;)

Mrs. B
09-07-2005, 02:30 PM
great writeup by Calrey but correction:

last time David and Roger played was not in 2003 (where he gave Nalby a bagel) but at last years' quarterfinals, AO, where Roger won in 4. and he won the title too.

SUKTUEN
09-07-2005, 06:40 PM
thanks Daniel

Doris Loeffel
09-07-2005, 07:04 PM
Mirkaland that link was great thanks - it's great to see that Roger finally gets the respect and attcion he deserves.

Puschkin
09-07-2005, 07:07 PM
Still no post-match interview up on the US-open site????

RogiNie
09-07-2005, 07:10 PM
no.. still not.. very strange..

Doris Loeffel
09-07-2005, 08:27 PM
hehe Puschkin that's timeing - but doesn't change a thing - no interview :(

lunahielo
09-07-2005, 09:45 PM
Thanks for the article, Stevens~~~~~~ :)

Stevens Point
09-07-2005, 10:56 PM
Thanks,Steven - hey,I have to thank you alot latly - how is school doing ;)
Your welcome! :D

I am still having summer vacation, but things are getting started. Slowly, but it is getting busier again... :)

topspin_baby
09-08-2005, 04:40 AM
guys...just wondering if you have roger's post-match interview against kiefer? thanks!!

BTW lunahielo..lvoe your avatar! :)

lunahielo
09-08-2005, 11:53 AM
Originally posted by topspin_baby
BTW lunahielo..lvoe your avatar!
Thanks~~ :)

luna

SUKTUEN
09-08-2005, 06:02 PM
thanks

Nocko
09-08-2005, 06:18 PM
So did I ;) . 7th game, third set.
:rolleyes: wowow cut from 2-1 to 4-3 of 3rd set. I couldn't watch that important moment. :( :mad:

Stevens Point
09-08-2005, 10:06 PM
:rolleyes: wowow cut from 2-1 to 4-3 of 3rd set. I couldn't watch that important moment. :( :mad:
This is the 3rd set 7th game, the most important point of Roger (in the whole match, I can say...)

http://real.xobix.ch/ramgen/sfdrs/vod/spak/spak_20050906_003.rm?start=0:17:33.358&end=0:18:10.978

Kiefer had 2 break points and Roger saved one, this video is when Roger was facing another bp and see how he saved this one...

Nocko
09-08-2005, 10:12 PM
This is the 3rd set 7th game, the most important point of Roger (in the whole match, I can say...)

http://real.xobix.ch/ramgen/sfdrs/vod/spak/spak_20050906_003.rm?start=0:17:33.358&end=0:18:10.978

Kiefer had 2 break points and Roger saved one, this video is when Roger was facing another bp and see how he saved this one...
Wow, This backhand passing shot looks like Wimby final. Great, Rogi. :kiss:

Thanks Stevens! :worship: :worship: :worship:

Stevens Point
09-09-2005, 02:17 PM
Updated: Sep. 9, 2005, 1:16 AM ET
Hewitt realizes road to title goes through Federer

By Darren Rovell
ESPN.com

http://espn-att.starwave.com/media/ten/2005/0908/photo/g_hewitt_195.jpg http://espn-att.starwave.com/media/ten/2005/0908/photo/g_federer_195.jpg

NEW YORK -- Lleyton Hewitt knows that there's no easy way to win a grand slam title.

Not only has he fallen short in his last 11 attempts, but the 24-year-old Australian has lost to the eventual champion in the last six major tournaments. Half of those losses were to Roger Federer, whom Hewitt will now face in the U.S. Open semifinals.

"If you're going to win the majors, you're going to have to beat him somewhere along the line," Hewitt said of Federer.

Although Hewitt needed five sets against Jarkko Niemenen on Thursday and Taylor Dent in the fourth round, he's still the guy who has the best chance of taking out Federer. Their 18th career meeting was solidified when Federer took 100 minutes to beat David Nalbandian in three sets on Thursday night.

Federer has dominated Hewitt of late, having defeated him eight straight times dating back to their meeting in the fourth round of the 2004 Australian Open. In fact, Hewitt has not won a set from the world's top ranked player in their last five meetings. But Hewitt, at his best -- armed with speed, ability and the necessary mental fortitude -- could give Federer more trouble than any of the remaining players.

"He's good enough with his base to beat me on a day when I'm not on," Federer said.

Federer, who has won Grand Slam titles everywhere but on the Roland Garros clay, has proven that he's very consistent on all surfaces. He has only lost three matches this year and is now 33-0 on hard courts this season.

Over the course of their careers, however, Hewitt actually has a better winning percentage than Federer on the courts in Flushing Meadows. Hewitt's 34-5 record represents a men's draw high of prevailing in 87.2 percent of his matches.

"The court surface, I think suits my game pretty well," said Hewitt. He says the pace of the ball coming off the ground is similar to the courts he played on while growing up in Australia.

Hewitt and Andre Agassi, who has an 81.7 percent winning percentage throughout his 20 years of playing in this tournament, are the only active players who have fared better at the USTA National Tennis Center than Federer. With his win over Nalbandian, Federer's career record in New York is now 22-5 (81.4 percent wins).

That Hewitt has played in two five-set matches might suggest that he's not as sharp as in years past. But in 2001, the year he won it all here, he also was forced to play a fifth twice.

Hewitt knows that beating the defending champion will be a monumental task.

"No one has been able to find the exact formula to topple him just yet," Hewitt said.

Said Federer: "I've been standing in his way and the more chances that he gets, the more chances he has to beat me."

Darren Rovell, who covers sports business for ESPN.com, can be reached at darren.rovell@espn3.com.

Stevens Point
09-09-2005, 03:23 PM
Still no post-match interview up on the US-open site????
guys...just wondering if you have roger's post-match interview against kiefer? thanks!!
If you are still interested in post match interview of Kiefer match, you can see it here, couldn't find the written version.

http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/20050906.html

TenHound
09-09-2005, 05:29 PM
Lisa Dillman in LA Times has Great Headline:

Federer Adds to His Snap Count

He snapped the offending instrument — his racket — in two pieces after losing the second set to defending champion and top-seeded Roger Federer of Switzerland. Really, not an easy thing to do. The racket head looked rather lonely just sitting there. And so did Nalbandian.

lunahielo
09-09-2005, 05:50 PM
TenHound or anyone??
Know where I can find the lyrics to the song 'Grand Slam Man'?

Thanks.

luna

Elizabeth
09-10-2005, 01:14 AM
Thanks~~ :)

luna

"Originally posted by topspin_baby
BTW lunahielo..lvoe your avatar!"

I do too. Could you please post it full size?
Thank you
Elizabeth

TenHound
09-10-2005, 05:22 AM
The Superb Eleanor Preston weighs in (Tennis Life):

The World No.1 was in imposing form against Nalbandian, a player he admits used to be something of a bogeyman for him. He had to be, for the Argentine was a break up in the first two sets and his willfulness and clever use of spin and placement often had Federer mistiming the ball.

To other players this might prompt a crisis of confidence, to Federer it was little more than a temporary irritant. He simply concentrated harder, ran a little faster and, like a mechanic tinkering with a Ferrari, gave his game a tune up. By the time he had won the second set and gone up a break in the third, Nalbandian was sighing deeply and doubtless mentally flicking through JFK – Buenos Aires flight schedules.

TenHound
09-10-2005, 05:54 AM
For Americans :(

How to stop Roger Federer - ESPN Page 2

The plan: Put FEMA director Michael Brown in charge of Federer's scheduling.

Why it will work: Federer shows up for Sunday's final … on Tuesday.

SUKTUEN
09-10-2005, 03:23 PM
that

babsi
09-10-2005, 04:51 PM
For Americans :(

How to stop Roger Federer - ESPN Page 2

The plan: Put FEMA director Michael Brown in charge of Federer's scheduling.

Why it will work: Federer shows up for Sunday's final … on Tuesday.

Sad thing,is that it would,very likely be true - the guy was fired from organizing horse shows - now,that´s an achievment! - leads you directly to beeing in charge for millions of lifes!

Stevens Point
09-11-2005, 12:27 AM
For Americans :(

How to stop Roger Federer - ESPN Page 2

The plan: Put FEMA director Michael Brown in charge of Federer's scheduling.

Why it will work: Federer shows up for Sunday's final … on Tuesday.
I post the whole thing here..

www.espn.com

How to Stop Roger Federer
By Patrick Hruby
Page 2

It just ain't fair.

Roger Federer makes tennis look easy. Too easy.

During the U.S. Open quarterfinals on Thursday night, opponent David Nalbandian -- a man who has a winning career record against Federer -- was so flummoxed after dropping the first two sets that he decapitated his racket with a mighty sideline smash.


Federer won the next set 6-0. Right idea, wrong result.

Like we said, it just ain't fair.

Of course, Nalbandian's frustration is hardly unique. So far in the tournament -- and really, for most of the season -- the top-seeded Federer has yet to be challenged, let alone threatened.

His opponent in Saturday's semifinals? Lleyton Hewitt, who has dropped eight consecutive matches to Federer, the last five without winning a set.

Oy.

In the interest of actual competition, something needs to be done. Something drastic. Something, anything, to level the playing field.

The Detroit Pistons had the Jordan Rules. College basketball once outlawed the dunk, the better to slow Lew Alcindor. Augusta National attempted to "Tiger-proof" its golf course (lotta good that did).

With all that in mind, Page 2 offers the following suggestions to make Federer struggle. Or at least break a hearty sweat…

No-Fault Serves
The plan: Limit Federer to a single service attempt. Actually, we suggested as much in a previous Page 2 article on the dumbest rules in sports.

Why it will work: Pretty tough to put it out wide or down the "T" at 120-plus mph when you have no margin for error.

Potential complications: Still wouldn't be fair. Since when does Federer need a margin for error?

Give Him Wood
The plan: Force Federer to play with an old-school wooden racket.

Why it will work: Sans a standard graphite/composite boom stick, the Swiss star will get blown off the court. And that's in the junior draw.

Potential complications: Ongoing United States-Canada lumber trade war means wood could prove pricey; the Sierra Club might get worked up; Tennis Hall of Fame may not have an extra wooden racket to spare. Also, we'd feel pretty bad if Federer got a splinter in his palm. Good luck getting one of those out.

Hand Him a Beer
The plan: Turn the nation's top tennis tournament into glorified company softball game by having Federer play with a beer in one hand and a racket in the other.

Why it will work: By the fifth set, Federer should be pretty bombed. Besides, Heineken is a longtime Open sponsor. Synergy, baby!

Potential complications: Federer hits a one-handed backhand, which means he could probably still swing while nursing a longneck; Heineken-branded beer cozies tough to find; matches involving Federer unlikely to go five sets.

Dirty Up the Court
The plan: Cover the Arthur Ashe Stadium court with thick, gooey mud.

Why it will work: Of Federer's three losses this season, two came on clay. Do the math.

Potential complications: Rafael Nadal, who beat Federer in the French Open semifinals, is already out of the tournament; more importantly, will the imported dirt be blue?

Go to Commercials
The plan: Have Federer star in national advertising campaigns for American Express and Lexus.

Why it will work: Have you seen Andy's mojo?

Potential complications: Like AmEx will ever build a major promotion around a tennis player again.

Make It a "Family" Affair
The plan: Stock Federer's friends box with the trio of buxom blonde models who looked on -- spilled over, really -- from Marat Safin's box at the 2002 Australian Open.

Why it will work: After dropping the Aussie final to heavy underdog Thomas Johansson, Safin seemed nonplussed, offering thanks to "my family over there." Hey -- if that was your "family," you'd be distracted, too.

Potential complications: By now, Safin's stunners probably have finished stripping their way through college.

Hire Larry Brown
The plan: Federer hasn't worked with a full-time coach in years; LB is always willing to explore new employment opportunities.

Why it will work: New York media will swarm Brown, making Federer jealous and irritable; Federer sure to roll eyes when a know-it-all basketball coach lectures him on "playing the right way."

Potential complications: Brown could dump Federer before U.S. Open final to coach his opponent.

Apply Chloroform
The plan: Put a few drops on a handkerchief, and hold over Federer's mouth. Presto! Instant unconsciousness. You know, like in "The A-Team."

Why it will work: Let's see you hit a forehand winner now, Mr. Fancy Pants tennis man!

Potential complications: In reality, it takes more than a few drops of chloroform to knock someone cold. Spiking Federer's milk -- a la B.A. Baracus -- might be more effective.

Call on FEMA
The plan: Put FEMA director Michael Brown in charge of Federer's scheduling.

Why it will work: Federer shows up for Sunday's final … on Tuesday.

Potential complications: Brown declines offer, and instead decides to resume prestigious former career as chief rules enforcer for the Arabian Horse Association, since that no-good clown Ronald McDonald already has the Chief Happiness Officer post at McDonald's locked up.

Show Football Instead
The plan: Put a Sunday afternoon NFL game on the Ashe Stadium Jumbotron.

Why it will work: Federer bails on tennis to watch football … just like the rest of America.

Potential complications: Scoreboard operators mistakenly show Chicago-Washington game. Blah!

Patrick Hruby is a Page 2 columnist.

oneandonlyhsn
09-11-2005, 05:04 AM
What a bunch of idiots, Roger likes football as in soccer not the American kind :rolleyes: and that wasnt funny :(

oneandonlyhsn
09-11-2005, 05:06 AM
If you are still interested in post match interview of Kiefer match, you can see it here, couldn't find the written version.

http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/20050906.html

I can never get the interviews to play, I click on it, only a small file loads which my Windows player wont open or any other player for that matter :sad:

Stevens Point
09-11-2005, 09:18 AM
I can never get the interviews to play, I click on it, only a small file loads which my Windows player wont open or any other player for that matter :sad:
Hmm, you might want to check if your Windows Media Player is higher than Version 6.4. You can download the latest Windows Media Player Version 10 in www.windowsmediaplayer.com

Mrs. B
09-11-2005, 09:45 AM
What a bunch of idiots, Roger likes football as in soccer not the American kind :rolleyes: and that wasnt funny :(

not funny at all.

Stevens Point
09-11-2005, 10:36 AM
Matthew Cronin's Picks: Men's Final
by Matthew Cronin
Saturday, September 10, 2005


1-ROGER FEDERER (SWI) V. 7-ANDRE AGASSI (USA)

Most of the US is hoping for a minor miracle here because Agassi has dropped seven straight matches to the Swiss, including in the 2004 US Open quarterfinals. The crowd will have to play into the contest in a big way because Agassi doesn't match up that well against Federer, except on the backhand side. Federer has a better serve, volley, forehand and is substantially quicker. The Swiss hasn't lost a final in his last 22 attempts and really believes that he's a more effective shotmaker at crunch time.

However, it's not like Federer has had a perfect tournament and he was pushed by both Nicolas Kiefer and by Lleyton Hewitt. His backhand has been sporadic and he's frequently rushing his shots when under pressure. Sure, he's pulled out his best stuff when necessary, but Agassi's highest level can be suffocating and if Federer doesn't serve well and if the Las Vegan can serve great, this could be highly competitive match.

In order to have a significant chance in this match, Agassi is going to have to take a lot of chances. Anytime he can get control of a rally, he'll have to go for shots because Federer can turn a point around in a split second. When Agassi used to beat Federer, he pounded into his backhand and will have to do so again, even if Roger zones on it for a set or two.

When the Swiss is at his best, he has no real weaknesses, but the feeling here is that he won't find perfect form on Sunday. If he doesn't, Agassi will find a few ways to pick on him, because he's a master of mid-match strategy.

Andre believes that his legs won't fail him on Sunday, even after having to win three five-setters in a row. But he'll only have a 24-hour turnaround for this one so if this one does go five, don't expect the 35-year-old to be dashing around for balls.

All credit to Agassi for putting on one of the best shows this tournament has seen over the past 15 years. In this day and age of an endless list of fleet, big hitters, reaching a Slam final is an amazing achievement. But Andre will not go any further than that, because at crunch time, Federer won't let go of the moment like Malisse, Blake and Ginepri did. Fed will seize the day and win an intense four-setter and defend his US Open title.

oneandonlyhsn
09-11-2005, 10:43 AM
Hmm, you might want to check if your Windows Media Player is higher than Version 6.4. You can download the latest Windows Media Player Version 10 in www.windowsmediaplayer.com

Thanks sweetie :hug: I had version 10 but apparently my plugins were out of date, now its working beautifully

Stevens Point
09-11-2005, 10:45 AM
Thanks sweetie :hug: I had version 10 but apparently my plugins were out of date, now its working beautifully
Good to hear!! :D

Stevens Point
09-11-2005, 12:27 PM
Federer dominates in win over Hewitt
By Greg Garber
ESPN.com

NEW YORK -- Lleyton Hewitt has a nice little life going.

At 24, he has won more than $15 million playing tennis. He's married to a lovely woman, Australian soap star Bec Cartwright. He has two Grand Slam singles titles and finished the year as the No. 1 player on two occasions.

There's this one minor problem. Just one. He can't beat Roger Federer.

History is overrated but, in this case, it is instructive:

Hewitt beat Federer in eight of their first 10 matches, from 1999-2003. Over the last two years, Hewitt has now lost nine straight matches to the stylish Swiss player, five in Grand Slams. After the second set on Saturday, Hewitt had lost 17 consecutive sets to Federer.

Federer handled Hewitt again, 6-3, 7-6 (0), 4-6, 6-3, in a three-hour match. He will met Andre Agassi, a winner over fellow American Robby Ginepri, in Sunday's final.

"What better final could I wish for?" Federer said. "An American in a U.S. Open final. I'm looking forward to it."

Believe him. The odds against a storybook ending are immense. Not only is Agassi an American, he's a 35-year-old American -- old in an historic Grand Slam sense -- but Federer holds a terrific ace in the hole. He has won 22 consecutive finals. That is a statistic that almost doesn't seem possible.

The big news? Hewitt actually won a set, no doubt sending Robin Williams and Nicole Kidman, among others in attendance hoping for some kind of match, into hysterics. That this was cause for celebration underlines Federer's greatness.

"He's proved he's a little human in this match," said CBS commentator John McEnroe.

Really?

Hewitt is the game's scrappiest player. He is pathologically engaged in every point. And yet, Federer is the one guy he can't solve.

"He's a hell of a shot-maker, the best shot-maker I've ever seen," Hewitt said. "He can pull the trigger anywhere on the court. No one's really been able to put him under pressure for the last couple of years."

The second set illustrates the point nicely. Federer, with a ghastly array of shots (if you are Hewitt, sublime if you are not), saved each and every one of five set points to force a tiebreaker. With the match very clearly on the line, Federer did what he always seems to do. He raised the level of his game somewhere past astonishing.

The final score was 7-0.

"That's how it goes, huh?" Federer said. "That was luck, I think. Because five set points normally don't come out. I was in some rough situations there, but in the end I think he deserved that set. But tennis can be tough sometimes."

Particularly when it is played by Federer.

It is rare when a top player takes each and every tiebreak point from a peer, but, then again, Federer, at 24, has no peer. The shutout was eerily reminiscent of the two bagels Federer threw at Hewitt in last year's U.S. Open championship final. Hewitt was thoroughly embarrassed, 6-0, 7-6 (3), 6-0.

This semifinal, for Hewitt, was an upgrade. After he won the third set with some flashy, hustling plays, the thought persisted: what if he had converted just one of those set points in the second?

"I would have made it a lot nicer, a lot more comfortable, I feel like, getting myself into the match at a set all and try to put some pressure on him for there," Hewitt said.

It was a moot point, because Federer broke Hewitt in the sixth game of the fourth set and that was the end of it. Despite what some people might think, the 12 foot-faults called against Hewitt (a terrible price to pay for funky-looking silver shoes), did not compromise the final result.

After reaching the semifinals at the Australian Open and the French Open, Federer won Wimbledon in July and now has a remarkably good chance to win the U.S. Open. If he does, it would mark his sixth Grand Slam title in the last 10 contested.

Now, that is dominance.

The win raised Federer's record to a nearly impeccable 70-3. More history: John McEnroe holds the best won-loss percentage in a single season (.965), based on an 82-3 record. With three more tournament wins, Federer could eclipse that mark.

Federer acknowledged that, like Agassi, he asked United States Tennis Association officials to place his semifinal match first. Agassi, for some reason, got the nod.

"Phone call, I don't know," Federer said, smiling.

That means Agassi, 11 years older than Federer, will have a little more than three hours' more rest than the defending champion.

"I mean, it could be crucial," Federer said with a straight face. "I don't think so, but …"

Federer, in his post-match news conference, was asked what the best ending would be for the 2005 U.S Open.

"Depends how you look at it, huh?" he said, smirking. "It's a very different setup. Young against older. A guy whose career is towards the end, another guy's been dominant.

"So, depends if you like dominance or not."

Greg Garber is a senior writer for ESPN.com.

SUKTUEN
09-11-2005, 02:29 PM
Stevens Point thanks

babsi
09-11-2005, 04:40 PM
Thank you,Steven - you will need as much rest as Roger,when this GS is over ;)

RogiFan88
09-11-2005, 04:45 PM
A. AGASSI/R. Ginepri
6‑4, 5‑7, 6‑3, 4‑6, 6‑3

An interview with:
ANDRE AGASSI

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Tough time with the first serve during portions of this match. I was curious, A, how you were able to overcome it, and, B, what was the problem today?
ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, yeah, no question. Well, I think a couple things. I think, first of all, playing at night, then two days off, it's a whole different rhythm, having the two days off. It's a whole different set of ‑‑ whole different environment, playing the day versus night. So I think also, too, the way Robby returns, you know, he stands way inside the baseline. He gives you what seems to be big holes out there, and he sort of teases you to hit the spot. And if you start pressing a little bit, you can get into trouble because he puts a lot of pressure on your second serve. Eventually I started to relax more on the serve. But the match was a bit patchy, but it was a function of who was going to string those points together at the right time in each set.

Q. Considering the three five‑setters, considering where you were ten weeks ago, the opportunity to go out there and play in this final, what does it mean to you?
ANDRE AGASSI: How do you find words for what this means? This has been some of the greatest memories I've ever had on a tennis court. I'll have these memories with me the rest of my life. I mean, you know, to be in the finals at age 35 just means you're going to have to put up with me a lot longer (smiling).

Q. Did you request the earlier match? Are you just happy it worked out that way? Can you bring us through how this worked.
ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, well, I certainly requested ‑‑ everybody puts in their request for what they want. You know, with ‑‑ it's a good decision, actually. I mean, I think that two Americans playing, you know, I think it does help to play the first match. You know what time you're getting out there, you don't get so emotionally involved in the other match. I mean, had we played after that, you sit there and you watch it, it's hard not to care, but you guys are distracting me from that now, which is nice. And then, you know, that couple extra hours helps a lot. Plus, too, psychologically, if you're out there in the fifth set and the guy you're playing, the winner of, is sitting there waiting, that's also a factor. I was fortunate to get that today.

Q. You've had three consecutive five‑setters. How do you feel physically and mentally going into the final?
ANDRE AGASSI: You know, I felt decent out there in the fifth. I mean, there was nothing to speak of that was of any concern. I stepped up when I needed to. The fifth set was the best set of tennis the whole match, so that's also a good sign. You know, I feel pretty good now. I mean, 24 hours is not a lot of time. It's not an ideal situation, to play three five‑setters going into the finals, especially here. This is one of the reasons why this is the most difficult tournament to win. But it's a great problem to have, you know. I mean, listen, I'd sign up for that any day, to have a chance in the finals, regardless of today. But it's not ideal.

Q. If you could write the script for the semifinal match that's takes place right now, would it read something like, "Extremely long, exhausting five‑set thriller, Hewitt takes it in the fifth‑set tiebreaker"?
ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, and then, "Stubs his toe on the way out of the stadium" (laughter).

Q. Tomorrow, against a tremendous player like Lleyton or the most dominant player in tennis, is the key going to be strokes, legs, your mind or heart?
ANDRE AGASSI: Well, you're going to need all of them to win tomorrow, regardless of which one of these guys it is, especially if it's Roger. I mean, it's going to need to be everything. I mean, this is the finals. The best are left so...

Q. You feel you have lots left in the tank and can bring it?
ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, I might surprise you a little bit. I might surprise you (smiling). I feel good. I'm certainly going to be looking forward to it. Mentally, you know, just being out there is going to take care of that. And physically, I'll be able to make somebody earn it, that's for sure.

Q. It seems that age is always an issue in sport. It seems then in tennis the age of the players are decreasing. What kind of advantage does it give to you, to be older?
ANDRE AGASSI: Oh, yeah, I don't know if there's much of an advantage. You get to a point of sort of diminishing returns. It's great to have the experience, but, you know...

Q. Maybe tactics on the court?
ANDRE AGASSI: Well, I think you always learn how to be better. So everybody gets better by the year. More years are better, but you have to physically be healthy, you have to be moving well so you can decide what you're going to do, you know.

Q. Maybe focus, too?
ANDRE AGASSI: Sorry?

Q. The focus.
ANDRE AGASSI: Well, a lot of guys are focused. Nadal is 19 years old and you won't find anybody more focused than that.

Q. What do you remember about 1986 here?
ANDRE AGASSI: Oh, just first‑round loss to Jeremy Bates, four sets.

Q. Do you remember coming in? What were your impressions, your first US Open?
ANDRE AGASSI: It just was very distracting for me, you know. Being in the city and then coming out to play the match, I couldn't believe how quick the match went. It was probably close to three hours, but it just felt like it flew by. Almost like the first Davis Cup match I ever played.

Q. Aside from Robby's physical arsenals, his forehand, serve, ability to cover the court, in your opinion, could you assess the intelligence he has on the court at age 22.
ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, he's come a long ways. You know, if anything, I used to say that he was irresponsible with his talent because he would pull triggers that, you know, that he should have showed more discipline on. But now, you really see his patience, his thought process out there. He's taking calculated risks, you know, and he knows when to lay off the ball, when to work it, when to step up and take a chance. He's playing a lot smarter, which doesn't give you those free points that make the difference. At the end of every set, it used to be his downfall. I played him three tough sets here last year, but just a few bad decisions sets things away. Now he's not giving you those.

Q. During the fifth set, what mental adjustment did you make?
ANDRE AGASSI: No, I just tried to keep working and just, you know, just keep executing. You want to step up. You want to hit your shots. You want to, you know, hope the ball bounces your way, really. I mean, I got that break, which was key. I played a good game to break him there. Great service game straight after that to consolidate, 5‑2. Made him work to hold serve, 5‑3, then served a good game out so...

Q. Do you think respect of the opponent or respect of you matters in the fifth set against young players?
ANDRE AGASSI: Well, I mean, respect isn't something you demand, it's something you earn, you know. My goal is to earn the respect in the fifth set and from my opponent, and that's a daily effort.

Q. What do you admire most about Federer's game? And if he is the opponent tomorrow, what's your perspective on the challenge that he presents for you that maybe nobody else does at this stage?
ANDRE AGASSI: Well, the challenge is real simple, you know. Most people have weaknesses and most people only have one great shot. I mean, Federer doesn't have weaknesses and has a few great shots. So that equates to a problem (laughter). I mean, I could lie, I could say something else, but...But he's earned that respect. That means you go out in the match and you address it with urgency and you have to play well, you know. He's not the first guy to make you feel that way, but he's certainly the guy that's doing it better than anybody now.

Q. Do you know what it takes to beat him? Is it a matter of executing it? Or are you still looking for answers?>

ANDRE AGASSI: You hit it in that corner and that corner and that corner and that corner over and over again, and you beat him. But you got to do it.

I mean, listen, there's no weakness to speak of, but it is ‑‑ sports is a function of executing, you know. The guy plays great defense, plays great offense. He has a great hold game and he has a great break game. You play a bad match against Pete, you lose 6‑4, 7‑5. You play a good match against Pete, you lose 6‑4, 7‑5. You play a good match against Federer, you lose 6‑4, 7‑5. You play a bad match against Federer, you lose 1 and 1.

Q. I believe you said you continue playing for the competition itself, your love of the game. You have not been fixated on the end result, the trophies and adding to the titles. Now that you're this close to that possibility, is it important to not think about the title? Does your motivation change at all, mindset?
ANDRE AGASSI: Winning is a by‑product of doing a lot of things right. That's decision‑making, scheduling, training, preparation, fitness, all of that. And it's also about, you know, every point inside a match. So for me tomorrow, it's not going to be about the trophy until I'm holding it. It's about, "What am I doing the first point, second point?" It's a challenge and overcoming all the obstacles that are required to get through a match. Certainly winning is something you always want and always strive for. But you can't lose sight of the Xs and Os and the execution of every shot.

Q. Three years ago Sampras won this tournament and then we never saw him again, as you remember the final. Would you rather tomorrow win and say bye‑bye to all of us, or lose and play all next year?
ANDRE AGASSI: (Smiling). I'd rather win and play all next year (laughter).

Q. Too easy.
ANDRE AGASSI: That's what I'd like to do.

Q. If you should be really honest, what do you think your chances are tomorrow if you're playing Federer in the final?
ANDRE AGASSI: I mean, you could ask any sports bookie and they're going to tell you what the odds are. But for me, it's about keeping my head down and focusing on the things that I do well and things that have gotten me here. You know, making him do everything he does as good as he can. So I don't know what my chances are, we'll find out tomorrow. We're only 24 hours away from that.

Q. If you play at your top level, the level you played in the fifth set today, the match against Blake, can you push him?
ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, well, we'll find out. I certainly hope so. I will certainly hope so.

Q. When you get the shot, are you in a lot of pain, do you try to avoid that, you push it back, and then you get the shot and is there a process where you just start feeling better and better and better? When you take your Cortisone shot?
ANDRE AGASSI: Oh, oh, the shot, okay.

Q. I mean, obviously, nobody really likes to get those shots.
ANDRE AGASSI: No, they're not fun.

Q. But can you just talk about the progression.
ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, it's nine minutes of agony, and then when you're done there's a numbing agent so immediately you're going to feel better, immediately you're going to have no feeling but you've got to resist the temptation of continuing on it for a few days. Then when you start up again, there's a dramatic difference. You can tell right away, you know. It could last a few days, it could last a few weeks. In my case the first one lasted three months. The next one only lasted a few weeks. Then this one's lasted since just after LA, so we're going on, I don't know how many weeks that is, maybe six weeks, yeah. Six weeks now. So I think it varies depending on exactly how close they get, depending on how you're impinging it, the wear and tear on it. Yes, right after the injection it always feels great. Sometimes for a very short period of time. Ideally you want to be able to get a few months out of it.

Q. Right now there is no problem?
ANDRE AGASSI: Cool‑down I feel it. Cool‑down. Again, I know this process all too well. I feel it on cool‑downs and then that pain increases, and then that pain gets to a point where I start to feel it on the court, and then once I'm feeling it on the court, it escalates very quickly because it's irritated, it's telling you it's irritated and you're continually doing something to it. So it's a process that you can't guarantee how long that's going to take. But once I feel it on the court, it is a quick escalation.

Q. In the early '90s, did you imagine you'd be doing this in 2005 or sitting on an island with a frozen drink?
ANDRE AGASSI: No. No, I did the island/frozen drink thing in '97, so... (laughter). So that was out of my system. No, I never thought I would be doing this.

Q. Have you been able to sit back and smell the roses at all during this run, or is it just all about winning that next match and the next one?>

ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, it's ‑‑ that's a great question, Peter, because I really feel like I've taken this in, you know. I haven't sort of stressed myself out with all the preparation that does go into it. I haven't ignored it. But through it, I've enjoyed being in the city with my children and wife and seeing some shows and taking in some good dinners. You know, I feel very removed from the pressure of it all, or from, you know, the demands of it all. I think that's allowed me to enjoy it even more.

Q. Do you take pleasure in defying what most people think of a 35‑year‑old athlete should be doing?
ANDRE AGASSI: You know, I don't know what that would be. I tell you what I do take pleasure in is accomplishing things that I question myself. That's what I take pleasure in. You know, I've been asked for a long time now well, "When are you going to stop? When are you going to stop?" Had I stopped, I wouldn't be here, you know. So for me, it's about pushing yourself and pushing yourself, and I know there comes a time and a place when you have to decide that that's it. I don't know when that's going to be, and I certainly don't even know, you know, what the reasons are going to be for that. But, you know, I need to work, and this is my work. This is what I do. I'm a tennis player, and I'll do it as hard as I can as long as I can, from how I see it right now.

Q. Speaking of fitness, you're an inspiration to all of us older people. I just wanted to know a little bit about your fitness regimen.
ANDRE AGASSI: I wouldn't know how to answer that, you know. It's been, you know, 35 years, my strength coach, Gil, has studied and become the greatest at what it is he does. And all his knowledge has led to a series of decisions over the last, you know, 20 years that have kept me able to do this, you know. So to say I could write down on a piece of paper what my routine is, it wouldn't be worth the paper it's written on. It's not about a routine, it's about a way of life, it's about a commitment, it's about knowing where to push yourself and when to cut yourself slack, you know. And if you miscalculate those decisions, you're in a crash course ‑‑ you have a recipe for disaster. There's nothing worse than somebody who has the heart and the mind to accomplish great things physically, but don't have a plan that works for them so they never see the results. Then you see others that get the results but it leads them right into a brick wall where they burn out and crash, you know. I mean, both those are, you know ‑‑ both of those are crimes, you know. When you have somebody that wants to do it, you need somebody that can help make those decisions that leads you down that road, and that's what Gil's done for me.

Q. The other night, James said it was the most fun he had losing a tennis match. Robby today did not seem to be having that kind of fun. When you look at both of these players, you're talking about smelling the roses, do you want to give them some advice about taking the time and smelling the roses?
ANDRE AGASSI: Not ‑‑ I wouldn't make the assumption that I do it better than them, to be honest, you know. I really wouldn't. Especially James. I mean, here's a guy that every time I see him, I aspire to his perspective on life that, you know ‑‑ I've never seen him ‑‑ I've never seen him not rise above ‑‑

Q. I was referring to Robby, I'm sorry.
ANDRE AGASSI: I couldn't speak to Robby either. The standard of the match that was played today was more patchy than James. I mean, there's a lot to be said for a match where two guys feel they've played as well as they can and it was what it was. But, yeah, I wouldn't ‑‑ I couldn't assume that it's lost on Robby. I mean, he's a guy that has had a great summer and he's looked like he's found something he can rely on now from here on in.

Q. Correct me if I'm wrong, the last time you were in the final here was against Pete. Obviously the crowd there was split 50/50 that day. Tomorrow, no matter who you play, they're pretty much all going to be rooting for you. How much will that help, particularly with how much they've been behind you and carried you along throughout the tournament?
ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, well, that's going to help a lot. It's brought me this far and it's helped me get through three five‑setters. You know, it's invaluable, sometimes, what the crowd can offer to you as far as inspiration and motivation to just reach a little deeper. So, you know, it's going to be a great day. It's a lot to feel good about, and certainly a lot to look forward to.

Q. Like you say, you've zoned a little bit out of your career at times. When did you fully become comfortable with saying, "I'm a tennis player, that's what I do."
ANDRE AGASSI: When I was 141 in the world. Just check dates for that. I think it's somewhere at the end of '97, is that right?

Q. What have you been told about how much Cortisone your body can take? The fact that you have to go through that, how does that enhance feelings that you're on borrowed time?
ANDRE AGASSI: Yeah, in this particular case, the doctor is comfortable with four injections a year. Because we're not injecting tendon or joints, you know, this is a nerve that's through bone so there's not a lot of deterioration or downside that happens as a result of it. It's not a way to live as a way of life, but if I didn't thrash myself around on the tennis court with 22‑year‑olds... (laughter)... I wouldn't need it, period. I mean, I would be fine. I'm not sort of disabled in my everyday life, but it's when I demand what I demand out of my body that I fall shy of the standard that's needed to be at your best. So I can do about four a year, but not as a way of life, for a few years.

Q. Does it enhance the feeling you're on borrowed time?
ANDRE AGASSI: You know, listen, who knows what the reason is for what you can do or not. I mean, I have seen guys healthy that just run out of something and their career changes, you know. I'm certainly not above that. So I feel like I've been on borrowed time for a while.
FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

Daniel
09-11-2005, 11:26 PM
Federer surges past Agassi to win U.S. Open

By STEVE WILSTEIN, AP National Writer
September 11, 2005

AP - Sep 11, 7:28 pm EDT



NEW YORK (AP) -- Roger Federer, a man of panache and unparalleled perfection in finals, withstood Andre Agassi's spirited upset bid to capture a second straight U.S. Open and sixth Grand Slam title.

Federer responded to his few moments of pressure by reeling off seven straight points in the tiebreak that turned the match around, then blew Agassi away in the fourth set to win 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (1), 6-1 Sunday and run his stunning record in finals to 23-0.

Federer moved into a tie with Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker for Grand Slam titles among Open era players, and one behind John McEnroe and Mats Wilander. Pete Sampras holds the record with 14 Grand Slam titles, but at 24 years old Federer could well have a shot at that.

Federer shrieked and leapt in the air when Agassi's backhand return looped long on the championship point. The two men, who have the highest of respect for each other, shook hands warmly at the net.

Though the 35-year-old Agassi was the oldest U.S. Open men's finalist in 31 years, age had less to do with the difference in this match than Federer's sheer strength, variety of serves, and superior balance of attacks from the baseline and the net that wore down Agassi.

The Swiss forced the action, going for winners more aggressively, dancing around the court with poise, unrattled even when Agassi had him down a break at 4-2 in the third set. For a while there, Agassi seemed to be on the verge of pulling one of the great upsets in sports history -- on the order of Muhammad Ali's shockers over Sonny Liston and George Foreman.

An 8-1 underdog, Agassi was just a few months removed from a career-threatening back injury that shot crippling pain down his right leg, led to his loss in the first round of the French Open and caused him to skip Wimbledon. He was playing a man who doesn't lose in finals, is at the peak of his game and health, and is coming off his third straight Wimbledon championship.

If this was Agassi's last U.S. Open after 20 straight-- he won't decide until the end of the year whether to retire -- it was remarkable even in defeat.

``It's been a tough road, but it's been a great road,'' Agassi told the cheering crowd. ``Roger played way too good today. Congratulations Roger, well done.

``This certainly isn't easy to do at any age, especially 35. It's been a privilege to compete against so many great champions over the last couple of decades or so. Without exception, Roger has been one of most enjoyable to compete against. Thank you New York for the last 20 years. It's been a great ride.''

Federer became the first man in the Open era, which started in 1968, to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open back-to-back for the second consecutive year. Three players have done it twice, though not in consecutive years: Jimmy Connors, McEnroe and Sampras. The last player to accomplish the feat was Don Budge in 1937-38.

Federer beat Agassi for the eighth straight time over the past two years after losing their first three meetings. Three of Federer's victories in that streak have come at Grand Slam events, including the quarterfinals of the U.S. Open last year and the Australian Open this year.

``This is probably the most special Grand Slam final in my career,'' Federer said. ``To play against Andre in New York, it's a dream.

``I had to play my best match of the tournament. It happened I played my best in the finals, as usual. I don't know how I do it, but it definitely feels great every single time.''

Stevens Point
09-12-2005, 12:44 AM
Updated: Sep. 11, 2005, 8:22 PM ET
Federer wins second straight U.S. Open championship
Associated Press

NEW YORK -- Roger Federer, a man of panache and unparalleled perfection in finals, withstood Andre Agassi's spirited upset bid to capture a second straight U.S. Open and sixth Grand Slam title.

Federer responded to his few moments of pressure by reeling off seven straight points in the tiebreak that turned around the match and then blew Agassi away in the fourth set to win 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (1), 6-1 on Sunday and run his stunning record in finals over the past two years to 23-0.

"This is probably the most special Grand Slam final in my career," Federer said. "To play against Andre in New York, it's a dream."

Federer moved into a tie with Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker for Grand Slam titles among Open era players, and one behind John McEnroe and Mats Wilander. Pete Sampras holds the record with 14 Grand Slam titles, but at 24 years old Federer could well have a shot at that.

Federer shrieked and leapt in the air when Agassi's backhand return looped long on the championship point. The two men, who have the highest respect for each other, shook hands warmly at the net.

"It's been a tough road, but it's been a great road," Agassi told the cheering crowd. "Roger played way too good today. Congratulations Roger, well done."

Though the 35-year-old Agassi was the oldest U.S. Open men's finalist in 31 years, age had less to do with the difference in this match than Federer's sheer strength, variety of serves and superior balance of attacks from the baseline and the net that wore down Agassi.

The Swiss star forced the action, going for winners more aggressively, dancing around the court with poise, unrattled even when Agassi had him down a break at 4-2 in the third set. For a while, Agassi seemed to be on the verge of pulling one of the great upsets in sports history -- on the order of Muhammad Ali's shockers over Sonny Liston and George Foreman.

An 8-1 underdog, Agassi was just a few months removed from a career-threatening back injury that shot crippling pain down his right leg, led to his loss in the first round of the French Open and caused him to skip Wimbledon. He was playing a man who doesn't lose in finals, who is at the peak of his game and health and who is coming off his third straight Wimbledon championship.

If this was Agassi's last U.S. Open after 20 straight -- he won't decide until the end of the year whether to retire -- it was remarkable even in defeat.

"This certainly isn't easy to do at any age, especially 35," Agassi said. "It's been a privilege to compete against so many great champions over the last couple of decades or so. Without exception, Roger has been one of most enjoyable to compete against. Thank you New York for the last 20 years. It's been a great ride."

Federer became the first man in the Open era, which started in 1968, to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open back-to-back for the second consecutive year. Three players have done it twice, though not in consecutive years -- Jimmy Connors, McEnroe and Sampras. The last player to accomplish the feat was Don Budge in 1937-38.

Federer beat Agassi for the eighth straight time over the past two years after losing their first three meetings. Three of Federer's victories in that streak have come at Grand Slam events, including the quarterfinals of the U.S. Open last year and the Australian Open this year.

"I had to play my best match of the tournament," Federer said. "It happened I played my best in the finals, as usual. I don't know how I do it, but it definitely feels great every single time."

Federer drew first blood when he broke Agassi for a 4-2 lead in the first set, but putting that set away wasn't easy. Agassi fended off three set points in his next service at 5-2 and won it with an ace. Federer needed five more set points when he served before he nailed down the set with a 123 mph service winner.

"He plays the game in a very special way that I haven't seen before," said Agassi, who played so many memorable matches against Sampras and other champions. "I think he's the best I've played against. He's the only guy I've ever played against you hold serve to go 1-0 and you think all right, good. And I'm not just making fun of it.

"There's a sense of urgency on every point, on every shot. It's an incredible challenge. I certainly didn't have enough today," he said.

Rather than shrink away, Agassi briefly showed the stuff that helped him win eight major titles. He broke Federer for a 2-0 lead in the second set, hammering a forehand return crosscourt that came back to Federer faster than his 111 mph serve. Agassi held serve the whole set and raised hopes of an upset when he broke Federer again in the last game.

This was a crafty, sharp Agassi, sometimes creeping in five or 10 feet inside the baseline to surprise Federer with short-hop returns, sometimes serving and volleying. Agassi lobbed for some points, won others with drops.

The crowd had been on Agassi's side from the start, greeting him with chants of "Let's go Andre" and chanting his name. But Federer asserted himself again, and after one exchange of breaks midway through the third set, the Swiss bulled his way through the tiebreak.

Agassi was well aware of Federer's record in finals -- and mightily impressed by it.

"That stat alone is pretty crazy," Agassi said. "You're talking about the best that are left in the tournament and he's winning that many times in a row."

Losing the tiebreak the way he did and getting run over in the fourth set was enough to demoralize Agassi and make him think back about his trip to get this far -- possibly ending his Grand Slam journey in New York, a city he hated when he first came as a young man with big hair, a big game and a different attitude.

"They can't ever take away from what I'm leaving here with and that's the memory of thousands of people pulling for me and showing appreciation for something I care dearly about," he said.

Going out with a loss would hurt, he said, but he put it in perspective.

"The first thing you have to assess is why did you lose," he said. "I just lost to a guy that's better. There's only so long you can deny it. He's the best I've ever played against."

Federer earned the $1.1 million top prize and distanced himself further from the rest of men's tennis world in the ATP Tour rankings. Agassi picked up $775,000, including $225,000 as the runner-up in the U.S. Open Series.

Federer won his 10th tournament this year and 32nd title overall -- 20 on hard courts. He ran his 2005 record to 45-1 on hard courts and 71-3 overall, the most dominant year by a man since McEnroe went 82-3 in 1984. Federer's 35th straight hard-court victory also broke Sampras' mark, set twice, of 34 straight.

TenHound
09-12-2005, 01:19 AM
roger's int. not up yet, but AA's is. I highly recommend it. It's virtually all about Roger :)

What's particularly Interesting, is that he says the Roger is the Best player he's played. Then when pressed - Pete has 14 blah blah - AA basically says yes, but there's a lot of luck & other factors that go into that. In short, AA's agreeing that Roger's the best Ever & that Num. Majors Won is Not the Holy Grail of The God of Tennis!!

Stevens Point
09-12-2005, 03:05 AM
Congrats, Roger!!! :D :D :D

Press Conference after Final beating Andre Agassi

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Congratulations.
ROGER FEDERER: Thank you (smiling).

Q. Out on the court, if I heard you correctly, you said it was the most pleasurable Grand Slam final in your career. If you could elaborate a bit on that and sort of your emotions after the win.
ROGER FEDERER: Well, what I meant with it is maybe the most well, I think depending on how you look at it, but the most special one for me, you know, to play Andre in the final of the US Open. Still maybe one of the only living legends in tennis we still have, you know, next to Martina Navratilova on the women's side, and him.
To play him, you know, in this situation, you know, him being towards the end of his career, me being on the top of my game, and getting the chance to play him on such an occasion, that's what I meant with it being really special today. I mean, I couldn't speak too much yesterday, you know, looking into it, because, you know, I still had to focus on the match.
But I knew that this was going to be very special.

Q. That living legend just said you were the best tennis player he ever played and reiterated it at least two times in his press conference. How does that make you feel?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, nice. He's given me many nice compliments over the years, so I really appreciate that.
Yeah, I'm amazed I could hang with him throughout the last few years with him. You know, he got me a few times early in my career where he made me look like a little schoolboy. Now that I could turn it around, it's for me fantastic. So sort of we can have an even battle, you know. It's really nice.
I look up to him, you know, because he's been around for so long, and for his results. So a lot of respect from my side.

Q. Talking about legends, in 2003 you beat Pete Sampras in Wimbledon. He was an icon at that time.
ROGER FEDERER: 2001.

Q. 2001, okay. He was kind of untouchable there. Now you beat another icon. How do you rate these two matches? Does it mean the same for you?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I was much more nervous going into the Sampras match, obviously. Not only was that the first time I ever played Sampras, it was the only time as well, but also my first time on Centre Court at Wimbledon. Obviously, that is very special.
So it's very different, you know, Wimbledon, US Open, finals, you know, fourth round. So it's hard to compare those two.
But for me, I've always looked much more up to Sampras than to Agassi. Didn't pay that much attention to Agassi, but thank God he was around longer so I got to know him better for his results, for him as a person. Now I enjoy playing as much against him like when I did against Pete.

Q. You've got six Grand Slam titles now, so you join with Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker. They're your idols.
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, they're my idols.

Q. How do you feel?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, that's fantastic. When I heard that today, that was for me something very special because, yeah, tying your idols, isn't that great? You know, I think it's every little boy's dream. I made it come true today in a memorable final for me, and I still got something left I think in my career.
So hopefully I can beat those records. That will be even better (smiling).

Q. It seems like you are always unbeatable. What do you think it takes to beat you besides luck?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, well, the three matches I lost, and two of them I had matchpoint, you know, so they got a little lucky.
But, no, I don't know really. I amaze myself that I can back it up one tournament after another, keep on playing so well, and especially on hard court and grass court. Clay obviously is a little bit of a different story. But still also there I gave myself a chance to win the French.
But, yeah, I wonder why I always play so well, and especially on the big occasions, like I said on center court. It just seems to click for me. It's really through, I think when I was down 4 2 in the third, I really started to feel like my serve's coming back, you know. That's the first time I felt that throughout the whole tournament. That it happened then, I was quite pleased about that.

Q. It seems like you didn't go to the net as much as you usually do. At the end of the second set, you didn't have one point at the net.
ROGER FEDERER: Did I win it?

Q. No, no, you didn't have any the second set.
ROGER FEDERER: Not any, okay, okay.

Q. Was Andre forcing you to do that?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, obviously it's hard to attack on his shots because it's so flat and deep. So obviously that's not a shot where you can approach on.
He's very good on defense. You know, he plays the angles very well, so it makes it hard to come to the net. I wasn't in the mood to serve and volley too much, so I wanted to stick with him from the baseline and try to come through this way.
In the end, it's the result in the end that matters. So I'm very pleased. Obviously, I wish I could be serve and volleying, too, but right now I don't think I would.

Q. You talked about how some of the players you faced and beaten are your idols. Andre is in that category. Was there any point today when you looked across the net and thought, "Maybe I should just let the old man have one"?
ROGER FEDERER: No (smiling). No, that really only happened this one time when I played Sampras. I was warming up and, you know, I looked across the net and I couldn't believe it was Sampras, you know. That's the only time it really happened.
I had some when the draw came out in Basel back in '99, you know, I couldn't believe I was going to play Agassi. I thought, "Okay," he was on his way back, but still he was a superstar. For me to play him then, that was very special.
Once you play more than I don't know how many times, it's still special. But it's not you don't fear anybody anymore. You still have the respect, but it's a match like another one as well. Circumstances are very different. 24,000 people are behind him. It's the finals, you know. So, no, I didn't have that feeling.

Q. I am from Russia and I think that Marat Safin is the single rival for you. Is that correct?
ROGER FEDERER: (Smiling). I wish I could say yes for you, but... (laughter).
I feel like there's a whole group of guys chasing me right now. He's one of them, let's put it that way.

Q. We love you in Russia.
ROGER FEDERER: Okay.
I didn't understand, but all right (laughter).

Q. We love you in Russia.
ROGER FEDERER: Oh, is that what it is? All right. Thank you (smiling).

Q. Could you just take a moment and talk about the one or two qualities you most respected in Pete and the one or two qualities that you most respect in Andre.
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I can only go as far as players, you know. I don't know them good enough personally, so that would be something strange for me to do, you know, to tell them how they are, their character is. I can only tell you how they are on the court.
They both seem very respectful, you know, to the game and to their opponents. Obviously, they have a very different game. I think we see both games, they're very dominant in what they do: Agassi from the baseline, and Pete at the net and with his serve, you know. So they have totally different qualities, but they had similar careers.
For me, Sampras' career is quite extraordinary, you know. So it's hard to compare, you know, one to the other. I think that would be also wrong to do, but I think it's great they had such a fantastic rivalry throughout the years, you know.
Obviously, as soon as Andre goes for me, also it's a pity that he goes because I wish I could play more of him.

Q. Did you learn anything about yourself these past two weeks, and did you learn anything about your game during this tournament?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I was playing to win, basically, so it wasn't how should I say? I wasn't trying out things, you know. I'm saying it's just too important to actually change up your game. In the beginning of the tournament I wish I could play a little bit more aggressive, but that somehow didn't really work for me, so I had to really be careful. I played a few tricky matches, you know, with Santoro and Rochus and Kiefer. I lost maybe my game a little bit throughout those matches.
But bounced back well with Nalbandian. It was a tough one against Hewitt.
So I really played to win. I'm happy that worked out. Especially today, I really started to feel like I can play more aggressive return, play a more defensive return. Today is really the first time I felt like I can actually use all my shots, and that wasn't the case up until this match today.

Q. How are you going to celebrate this title? Will you go back to Switzerland? What are your plans?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, well, that's the plan, you know. I've got Davis Cup back in Geneva coming in a little bit, ten days' time or so.
Yeah, I'm not making any detour. I'm going straight to Switzerland from here.

Q. New Yorkers are usually a generous crowd. Today did Andre's fan club bother you?
ROGER FEDERER: They were very generous for him, yeah (smiling).

Q. That's what I mean. Did it bother you?
ROGER FEDERER: No, it was all right. It was little bit more than I expected on his side, but, you know, that's I guess how it is.
But no problems. I still enjoyed every second.

Q. Do you feel yourself as the best player in the world?
ROGER FEDERER: Excuse me?

Q. Do you feel like the best player in the world?
ROGER FEDERER: Right now, yeah (smiling). But the best player of this generation, yes. But not nowhere close to ever, because, yeah, just look at the records that some guys have. I'm a little kooky (smiling).

Q. Twenty three wins in the final. Breaking the record of Borg and McEnroe. You are the best player ever.
ROGER FEDERER: Well, in this in this particular stats, yes. Also maybe final appearances and final wins, you know, the winning percentage, in Grand Slam finals. There's records I'm proud of. I'm happy I have some records because it makes it more fun for me, you know, not only to play against the other guys, sometimes to play against history occasionally.
I still cannot believe how well I've been playing over the last few years and that it just keeps on going, you know. It's incredible because last year was fantastic with the three Grand Slams and the Masters Cup and all the other titles. Now to back it up with an almost same fantastic season, you know, even have chance to maybe improve it.
But after the two first semifinals, you know, in Grand Slams this year, to come back and win the next two, it's for me quite a surprise no matter what.

Q. Are you going back to Thailand to play the Thailand Open?
ROGER FEDERER: Yes, I am.

Q. What do you expect for this?
ROGER FEDERER: Oh, it was a great tournament they had last year. I really enjoyed it. It was a tough field. We had a great semifinals with Paradorn and Marat and Andy in the semis, and myself.
I think I really like Thai people, you know, so I guess that's also one of the reasons why I'm going back there.

Q. A lot of people, when they first look at your game, just say, "Fantastic, this guy is the ultimate shot maker," and just put you way at the top. Now you're winning title after title, the weeks at No. 1, three Wimbledons, back to back, etc. and now Andre comes in and says you're the best he's ever played. At what point will you just say, "Okay, I'm the best"?
ROGER FEDERER: Hmm... well, he just played me, you know, so I don't know. If it changes if you ask him in five years' time, you know.
Him saying that I'm, let's say, better than Sampras, you know, I'm little surprised, you know. But, you know, he says what he thinks is right, you know. I don't think he would be lying in here. Yeah, I appreciate it very much. It's fantastic to be compared to all the players he's played, you know, throughout his career. We're talking about the best, you know, some are the best in the world or of all time. To be compared to those is great, you know. And it's still going, so I still have chances to get there and to improve.

Q. Was there ever a point where you didn't want to play tennis, or you had other interests in life and now when you reflect back on that are you glad that you stuck with it?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, there's always times I think in a player's career where he just wants to do something else or walk away from the game because too many losses, too much traveling, whatever, you know.
So I was joking around quite serious at one stage I thought, you know, just hang up my racquet and go away and just not be so frustrated. That was back in maybe '99, when I almost cracked the Top 100 and was stuck at 120 in the world for about six months and was just not good enough, basically, to make the next step. That was for me very hard. I really thought I tried to work extra hard on it. The work didn't pay off straight away.
But then, you know, when the wins come back and also the pleasure obviously comes. Everything is much easier.
So for me then to have cracked the Top 10 and win Wimbledon, that really gave me a boost. Now I look back and go, "What the hell did I do before? Why didn't I enjoy tennis before?" It's crazy that it needs a Wimbledon championships sometimes for me to realize that.

Q. Which of the younger players do you foresee can give you trouble in the near future, if any?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, we have quite a few around. I think the two guys who beat me this year, Gasquet and Nadal.

Q. The fact that this hasn't been asked 9/11, playing on the 11th of September, playing against an American legend, I mean, you could feel quite a bit of palpable patriotism out on the court today. Any special reflections?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, the date, obviously, is hard. Not only for Americans, I think for the whole world to see that.
But I think, you know, people came to see tennis, you know, and for me, I saw the greater matchup with Andre in the US Open finals more than the date. That is left for those who are very sad, you know.
I didn't lose any close friends, so for me it's different. But everybody was shocked, you know, obviously. I think once we were out there, it was a normal sort of thing, you know, just that they were backing him up like crazy, which I totally understand, because they wanted him to win so badly. That's the usual thing that happens.

Daniel
09-12-2005, 03:46 AM
Thanks, i like it very much :)

babsi
09-12-2005, 07:16 AM
Thanks alot :)

Very nice to read :)

lsy
09-12-2005, 01:16 PM
Q. I am from Russia and I think that Marat Safin is the single rival for you. Is that correct?
ROGER FEDERER: (Smiling). I wish I could say yes for you, but... (laughter).
I feel like there's a whole group of guys chasing me right now. He's one of them, let's put it that way.

Q. We love you in Russia.
ROGER FEDERER: Okay.
I didn't understand, but all right (laughter).

Q. We love you in Russia.
ROGER FEDERER: Oh, is that what it is? All right. Thank you (smiling).



:haha: :haha: this exchange is too funny...what's so difficult to understand about "we love you in Russia" Rogi? :haha:

and this reporter is rather funny to say that to him out of nowhere too :lol:

RogiFan88
09-12-2005, 04:32 PM
Swiss Over Feta
Posted by Christina Kim

The pun will make sense later. Tennis maestro Roger Federer's win at the U.S. Open this year has cemented his career among those of legends. The Federer Express's performance over Andre Agassi (6-2, 3-6, 7-6 [7-1], 6-1) makes this his 35th consecutive win on a hardcourt surface, breaking a record that was held by 1990s tennis posterchild (and sweaty Greek) Pete Sampras. Get the joke, now?

"Better than sex"

UPDATE: Looks like Andy's mojo took him straight to the Lacoste show at New York Fashion Week after getting his preppy-crocodile ass kicked in the first round by unseeded Gilles Muller.

11 September 2005
http://browndailysqueal.com/archives/001340.html

RogiFan88
09-12-2005, 04:35 PM
September 12, 2005
Federer in top gear as Agassi runs on empty
From Neil Harman, Tennis Correspondent in New York

HE TRIED, my goodness how hard he tried, but Andre Agassi, battling the march of time in his own bones and the march towards immortality of Roger Federer, was finally and comprehensively beaten in the final of the US Open at Flushing Meadows last night. Staring into his towel at the end, you wondered what thoughts were racing through his mind and when he thanked New York for “a great ride these 20 years”, it may have been a farewell speech.
Federer, gracefully flowing at the end of the match, took his second successive Open title — and became the first man since Donald Budge, of America, in 1938 to win Wimbledon and the Open two years back-to-back — with a 6-3, 2-6, 7-6, 6-1 victory over a man 12 years his senior who never gave up believing that he might write the most improbable of all the colourful chapters of his career.

This was Federer’s sixth grand-slam final and his sixth win, it was his 23rd consecutive victory in finals across the world on every conceivable surface. There are no questions left to be answered about this remarkable man, who plays with a magical mastery. Agassi was sufficiently in the match that he led the third set 4-2 but, unfortunately for him, it was as if he had prodded the hornet’s nest with a stick. The winners then buzzed all around him.

It had been a solemn day in the city, on the fourth anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Centre, a strange mixture of the rawest emotion and compelling anticipation.

Federer had said that the outcome mattered from whatever side you approached it. “It’s a guy whose career is towards the end and another guy who is dominant. So it depends if you like dominance or not,” he said.

One-eyed Americans aside, few gave a 35-year-old who had been forced to play three successive five-set matches to reach the final much chance of staying with the best player in the world.

It seemed even more unlikely when Federer broke first, in the sixth game of the match, in which Agassi served a couple of aces. Serving to stay in the set at 5-2, Agassi demonstrated the first signs that this may not be a straightforward afternoon. He was 40-0 down and saved those three set points; Federer raced to 40-0 at 5-3 but his fifth, sixth and seventh set points disappeared before, on the eighth, a service winner gave him the lead.

But he came out sloppily at the start of the second set and Agassi, refocusing and with a look of deep intent in his face, was beginning to strike the ball with venom. He snaffled Federer’s first service game and, having been three break points down, held on to move 3-0 ahead. Much as the Swiss plugged away, he was the man who was missing, he was the one who looked disconcerted and vulnerable. The twohanded backhand was a good deal more secure than the single-hander.

Agassi, who, as he has matured, has kept his on-court emotions in check, could not help himself as he collected the second set, waving a fist at Darren Cahill, his coach, who responded in kind. The third set may have begun quietly but was to burst into life when Agassi, stepping up then skipping back to receive serve to keep Federer guessing, played enough with the No 1 seed’s mind to bring up three break points. A couple of vicious serves saved two but on the third, Federer looked nervy and netted with a cross-court backhand drive.

At 4-2, 30-0, the crowd was salivating at the prospect of a second set for their hero. Federer, knowing that could be his lot, stepped up the pace and nailed a couple of forehands deep and true. It sucked a lot of the life out of the place, but soon the stadium was reenergised as Agassi fought off four break points in the eleventh game. A few minutes later a sense of normality was restored when Federer, as is his wont, played the tie-break in the manner of a champion, allowing Agassi just one point, an audacious backhand drop shot on the first.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,5205-1776719,00.html

12 September 2005 11:04 Home > Sport > Tennis
Sublime Federer topples Agassi
By John Roberts in New York
Published: 12 September 2005
Those who wondered if the 35-year-old Andre Agassi would be able to make a match of last night's US Open men's singles final against Roger Federer were pleasantly surprised by the American's stamina.

It was not until the third set that Federer was allowed to dictate matters in pursuit of his sixth Grand Slam singles title - one that would make him the first man successfully to defend both the Wimbledon and United States championships since Donald Budge in 1938.

Agassi, who had played three five-set matches in a row, was watched by one of his admirers, Lance Armstrong, the seven-times winner of the Tour de France. And Agassi made the world No 1 look less than supreme for the best part of three sets. It was only then that Federer sprinted away to triumph, 6-3, 2-6, 7-6, 6-1 after 2 hours, 20 minutes.

Agassi matched Federer move for move in the opening five games, only to be broken for 4-2. The tenacious American then saved seven set points - three on his own serve at 2-5, and five more as Federer served for the set. Serving solidly, scurrying, retrieving, and causing his opponent to make errors, Agassi won some remarkable points with angled drives and exchanged drop-shots.

Although Federer converted his eighth set point with a service winner after 34 minutes, Agassi, emboldened by his ability to make his opponent work for points, took a 3-0 lead in the second set.

He broke for 2-0 with a searing cross-court forehand and then again demonstrated his fighting spirit by erasing three break points in the third game, Federer returning a second serve long on Agassi's first game point. Agassi broke a second time to level the match after 67 minutes, converting his second set point at 5-2 with another punishing service return.

By now, Federer's normally dominating style was wavering. It took an Agassi break for 4-2 in the third set, returning a second serve, to jolt Federer into concerted action. He broke back with a cross-court backhand from an Agassi net-cord - one of the Swiss star's few decent backhands for several games - and held for 4-4.

Agassi frustrated Federer by saving four break points at 5-5, but when the set went to a tie-break Federer unleashed his shots as confidently, just as he did in his second-set semi-final shoot-out against Lleyton Hewitt. Federer, who did not drop a point in that one, cracked Agassi 7-1.

That was the prelude to Federer's ferocious finish. He won the opening five games of the fourth set, and although Agassi delayed the inevitable in the next game, Federer then held serve to win the match.

Those who wondered if the 35-year-old Andre Agassi would be able to make a match of last night's US Open men's singles final against Roger Federer were pleasantly surprised by the American's stamina.

It was not until the third set that Federer was allowed to dictate matters in pursuit of his sixth Grand Slam singles title - one that would make him the first man successfully to defend both the Wimbledon and United States championships since Donald Budge in 1938.

Agassi, who had played three five-set matches in a row, was watched by one of his admirers, Lance Armstrong, the seven-times winner of the Tour de France. And Agassi made the world No 1 look less than supreme for the best part of three sets. It was only then that Federer sprinted away to triumph, 6-3, 2-6, 7-6, 6-1 after 2 hours, 20 minutes.

Agassi matched Federer move for move in the opening five games, only to be broken for 4-2. The tenacious American then saved seven set points - three on his own serve at 2-5, and five more as Federer served for the set. Serving solidly, scurrying, retrieving, and causing his opponent to make errors, Agassi won some remarkable points with angled drives and exchanged drop-shots.

Although Federer converted his eighth set point with a service winner after 34 minutes, Agassi, emboldened by his ability to make his opponent work for points, took a 3-0 lead in the second set.
He broke for 2-0 with a searing cross-court forehand and then again demonstrated his fighting spirit by erasing three break points in the third game, Federer returning a second serve long on Agassi's first game point. Agassi broke a second time to level the match after 67 minutes, converting his second set point at 5-2 with another punishing service return.

By now, Federer's normally dominating style was wavering. It took an Agassi break for 4-2 in the third set, returning a second serve, to jolt Federer into concerted action. He broke back with a cross-court backhand from an Agassi net-cord - one of the Swiss star's few decent backhands for several games - and held for 4-4.

Agassi frustrated Federer by saving four break points at 5-5, but when the set went to a tie-break Federer unleashed his shots as confidently, just as he did in his second-set semi-final shoot-out against Lleyton Hewitt. Federer, who did not drop a point in that one, cracked Agassi 7-1.

That was the prelude to Federer's ferocious finish. He won the opening five games of the fourth set, and although Agassi delayed the inevitable in the next game, Federer then held serve to win the match.
http://sport.independent.co.uk/tennis/article312045.ece

RogiFan88
09-12-2005, 04:36 PM
Flawless Federer ends Agassi's American dream
Stephen Bierley at Flushing Meadows
Monday September 12, 2005
The Guardian

In the end the 11-year age gap was just too much for Andre Agassi to bridge. Had the 35-year-old American held his serve when leading 4-2 in the third and pivotal set he might, energised by a crowd of nearly 24,000 in the Arthur Ashe Stadium, have pulled off a remarkable victory. But Roger Federer broke back for 4-3 and never looked back, winning 6-3, 2-6, 7-6, 6-1.
So the Swiss world No1 retained his title and became the first man in Open tennis history to win Wimbledon and the US Open back to back in consecutive years. "Roger forces you to live on the edge," said Agassi, who did everything he could to upset Federer's rhythm, and quell his fires.

Agassi was asked if Federer has improved since this time last year, and he replied, with a smile: "I'm afraid so." Yet for nearly three sets Agassi pushed the now six-time grand slam champion to the extreme limits. Aggression tempered with patience was Agassi's game plan. On Saturday he had watched Australia's Lleyton Hewitt become only the second player at this year's championships to take a set off the world No1 in semi-finals, the other being Germany's Nicolas Kiefer in the fourth round. All players know that to stand any chance of beating Federer his backhand and the second serve need to be attacked, even though these are only relative weaknesses.
Against his old foe, Pete Sampras, Agassi was always aware that he could play to the top of his form and still lose, and exactly the same applied to Federer this time. Until the autumn of 2003, the American held a 3-0 career advantage; since then he has lost eight in succession, including a five-set quarter-final here last year, and a straight-sets defeat at the same stage in this year's Australian Open. Federer had his number.

It was immediately apparent that there was an extra snap to Federer's shots, and extra bounce in his legs from the moment the final began. Agassi had been desperately hoping to start quickly himself, and although his did very little wrong, Federer was not to be denied, hitting forehand winners of sumptuous grace and irresistible power and accuracy.

Agassi could already feel the wall against his back and fought doggedly to resist, so much so that it took the Swiss eight attempts to close out the opening set in 34 minutes. Encouraged, Agassi ripped back at the start of the second, hustling and scrambling, and hitting hugely penetrating winners of his own of the forehand to hold serve and then break.

Prior to the final he had played three successive five-setters, and this by the man who missed two months this year after losing in the first round of the French Open with a sciatic nerve problem that has needed cortisone injections to keep him playing. Yet as the second set unfolded in his favour there was not the least suggestion of him tiring. Quite the reverse. It was Federer who suddenly appeared vulnerable, particularly on the backhand, and Agassi levelled.

Federer shook his head and tried to compose himself in the third set, but could find no way of stopping Agassi who was returning serve, always his forte, with supreme verve and depth. At 4-2 down it seemed the impossible might happen, and that Agassi would go on to take his third US Open title and ninth slam.

Nobody heard the sound of the mighty rushing wind, but almost out of nowhere Federer almost lifted Agassi off his rather aged legs. He had always been struggling on his serve, without Federer being able to take advantage. Now he did.

The American held on until the tiebreak, only to be brushed aside 7-1. Tiredness seeped into Agassi's body, mistakes multiplied, and Federer went for the kill. His opponent was a spent force now. He managed to make Federer serve it out, but was the last gesture of a thoroughly weary man.
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1568009,00.html

RogiFan88
09-12-2005, 04:37 PM
Federer enjoys 'greatest' victory

Roger Federer said Sunday's US Open victory over Andre Agassi was the best of his six Grand Slam victories.

Federer won 6-3 2-6 7-6 (7-1) 6-1 to retain his title, and admitted: "This is the most special one for me, to play Andre in the final of the US Open.

"He's one of the only living legends in tennis we still have.

"To play him in this situation, with him towards the end of his career and me on the top of my game - I knew that this was going to be very special."

The victory was Federer's eighth in a row against the 35-year-old American, but the world number one said he still relished the battle.

"I'm amazed that I could hang with him throughout the last few years," said Federer.

I wonder why I always play so well, especially on the big occasions
Roger Federer

"He got me a few times early in my career where I maybe looked like a little schoolboy.

"For me, that I could turn it around is fantastic and we can have an even battle.

"I look up to him because he's been around so long with great results. There's a lot of respect from my side."

And Federer remains at a loss to explain an ability to rise to the occasion that has seen him win an incredible 23 straight finals.

What more can be said about Federer that has not been said already
From JJ

"I still can't believe how well I have been playing in the last couple of years," said Federer.

"I amazed myself that I can back it up one after another. I wonder why I always play so well, especially on the big occasions."

Story from BBC SPORT:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/sport1/hi/tennis/4236402.stm
Published: 2005/09/12 01:57:57 GMT
© BBC MMV

Peerless Federer retains US crown

Defending champion Roger Federer dashed American hopes of a fairytale victory for Andre Agassi with a four-set victory in Sunday's US Open final.

The world number one, 24, won 6-3 2-6 7-6 (7-1) 6-1 to claim the sixth Grand Slam title of his career.

Federer had looked in serious trouble at a break down in the third but hit back immediately.

And the Swiss star found his best form in the tie-break before sweeping through the fourth set to victory.

"For me the this was the most special Grand Slam final in my career," said Federer afterwards. "To play against Andre in New York, it's a dream.

"I had to play my best match and I did it again in the final. I don't know how I do it."

Thank you New York, it's been a great 20 years
Andre Agassi

Agassi admitted: "It's been a tough road but Roger played way too good today, so congratulations to him and well done."

At 35, Agassi was the oldest finalist since a 39-year-old Ken Rosewall won just two games in losing to Jimmy Connors in 1974.

And the Las Vegan must have feared a similar fate in the early stages as Federer quickly found the smooth rhythm that saw him lose just two sets on his way to the final.

Federer broke in game six and, after missing seven set points, eventually clinched the opening set.

But Agassi broke immediately in the second with some heavy returning and saved three break points on his way to clinching the second set with another break.

I hope you keep on playing and we can have some more enjoyable matches
Federer to Agassi

If ever Federer was there for the taking it was now, and the American sent the crowd wild when he went 4-2 up in the third set on his third break-point chance.

Capitalising on chances against the Swiss is another matter, however, and Federer hit back immediately.

He failed to convert four break points in a dramatic 11th game but, with the match hanging in the balance, found his best form to win the tie-break 7-1.

What more can be said about Federer that has not been said already
From JJ

Agassi's chance had gone and he looked very much a spent force in the fourth, which disappeared in a blizzard of Federer winners.

The champion finished the American on his third Championship point with a winning serve, screaming in celebration of yet another major title.

"I'd like to congratulate Andre on a great run and I hope you keep on playing and we can have some more enjoyable matches," aaid Federer afterwards.

Agassi's future has been the subject of much discussion and he sounded like he may be signing off when he said: "Thank you New York, it's been a great 20 years."

Story from BBC SPORT:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/sport1/hi/tennis/4234164.stm
Published: 2005/09/11 23:07:02 GMT
© BBC MMV

RogiFan88
09-12-2005, 04:39 PM
Agassi Falls to Young Star
Pool photo by Andrew GombertIt was Andre Agassi’s 20th United States Open, but all that experience fell short as Roger Federer, left, successfully defended his men’s singles title. More
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Published: September 12, 2005

It was one of Andre Agassi's finest performances in a United States Open final, and it was the latest unmistakable sign of Roger Federer's tennis greatness that Agassi still lost in four sets yesterday.

Suzy Allman for The New York Times

Roger Federer won the United States Open and Wimbledon this year and went to the semifinals of the Australian Open and the French Open. Go to Article More Photos >
The match was an intergenerational tussle and contrast in styles between Federer, the flowing 24-year-old from Switzerland who is dominating the sport, and Agassi, the 35-year-old father of two from Las Vegas who remains, despite his fragile back, the game's strongest personality.

As the shiny-domed, tightly wound Agassi racewalked along the baseline between points in his familiar pigeon-toed fashion with his fans shouting encouragement at him on a first-name basis, Federer's body language was much quieter as he languidly shook his hair out of his eyes and picked at his strings. But once the ball was smacked into play, each was in a spectacular hurry to break down the other's defenses.

The top-seeded Federer did not play his best in this 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (1), 6-1 victory, but he played close enough to his best in the critical phases of the third and fourth sets to win his second consecutive United States Open and run his record in Grand Slam finals to 6-0.

"It is disappointing to lose, but the first thing you have to assess is why you did lose, and I just lost to a guy who's better," Agassi said. "There's only so long you can deny it. He's the best I've ever played against."

Agassi, the oldest men's finalist at the United States Open in 31 years, had experienced something similar here as a younger man: giving his all and finding himself with the runner-up's silverware against a clutch-serving opponent with a beauty of a running forehand.

But Federer has moved seamlessly into the larger-than-life space left behind by Pete Sampras, Agassi's now-retired rival, who beat him here in the final in 2002. And at 24, Federer is going places with his smooth-moving game that Sampras never managed to reach.

"Pete was great; I mean no question," Agassi said. "But there was a place to get to with Pete. You knew what you had to do. If you do it, it could be on your terms. There's no such place like that with Roger."

Agassi speaks from plenty of hard-won, or better put, hard-lost experience. This defeat was his eighth straight against Federer, and though it was considerably closer than his three lopsided losses earlier this year, he was fortunate to win a game in the final set. Agassi was soon back in his customary role of explaining Federer's phenomenal talent.

"He's the only guy I've ever played against where you hold serve to go 1-0, and you're thinking, 'All right! Good!' " Agassi said later, getting a laugh from his audience. "And I'm not just making fun of it. I'm literally telling you the way it is. He can hurt you at any point."

Federer is well aware of his special powers, and though he generally does an effective job of negotiating the delicate line between honesty and diplomacy, it is becoming difficult for him to avoid the obvious. He has now won his last 23 finals, something no other man has done in the 37-year Open era. He is the first in the Open era to win Wimbledon and the United States Open back to back in consecutive years. He also reached the semifinals at the other two Grand Slam events this year, the Australian Open and the French Open.

"I've always looked much more up to Sampras than to Agassi," Federer said. "Didn't pay much attention to Agassi, but thank God he was around longer so I got to know him better: for his results, for him as a person. Now I enjoy playing as much against him like when I did against Pete."

Over the years, and there have been 20 of them now at the Open, Agassi has often been tight-lipped and caustic in defeat. But there was no trace of bitterness in his voice after this Grand Slam final, his first since he won the Australian Open in 2003 and quite possibly his last.

He arrived here with a suspect back, having lost in the first round at the French Open and withdrawing from Wimbledon. But he fought his way through a draw that opened up nicely for him and reached the final by beating three unseeded yet dangerous shotmakers in a row in five sets: Xavier Malisse, James Blake and Robby Ginepri. But Federer is the most dangerous shotmaker.

"He was ready for the battle, but I think we'd be kidding ourselves if we totally ignored the fact that it's a 35-year-old body," Gil Reyes, Agassi's fitness coach, said.

Agassi Falls to Young Star
(Page 2 of 2)

Still, 35 has its advantages. Old enough to appreciate the significance of this latest run, Agassi walked on the court before each match savoring the atmosphere, making eye contact with fans, some of whom with memories good enough to recall his long-haired, quick-tempered younger years, when he did now-unimaginable things like spitting on the chair umpire Wayne McKewen.

'The Dominator' on Display

But the ambivalence about him has evolved into genuine warmth, and as Agassi's name was announced during the warm-up with Federer, most of the 24,797 fans in attendance stood and applauded, and there was more of the same after match point.

"Over the last 20 years I've come full circle," Agassi said. "It's been an amazing journey and discovery of each other as I've grown up out here. And to be here at an age where I can take in that sort of love and be at an age where I can embrace it is a tremendous feeling."

To Agassi's credit, this match was not defined by nostalgia. It brimmed with low-trajectory, high-velocity winners, timely first serves and lunging defense. With Agassi leading by 4-2 in the third set, it was beginning to seem possible that he would win a third singles title here.

But in the next game, Federer accelerated at 30-30 and produced consecutive winners to break Agassi's serve. Federer won his next service game at love to get back to 4-4. Though Agassi managed to save four break points on his serve at 5-5, they were soon in a tie breaker.

Agassi won the opening point with a backhand drop shot, but on the next point he missed a forehand return off a high-bouncing second serve and moaned in disappointment. Federer reeled off the next six points, taking a two-sets-to-one lead.

It had happened so quickly that the crowd needed more time to realize that its favorite had lost control of his destiny. Agassi postponed the inevitable at 0-5 in the fourth set by saving two match points and holding serve. But in the final game, Federer held at love, finishing off the victory with a kick serve that Agassi returned long with the two-handed backhand that had played a vital role in his eight major titles.

It remains to be seen whether Agassi will play in another major. He has had three cortisone injections in the last eight months to calm the lower-back pain caused by an inflamed sciatic nerve. He was the oldest man in the singles draw here and the oldest finalist in any Grand Slam event since Ken Rosewall reached the final here in 1974 at age 39.

But Agassi made it clear, despite the fact that his back was tightening on him again during the award ceremony, that he would like to continue playing next season.

"As of now, my intention is to keep working and keep doing what it is I do," he said. "You know, the only thing better than the last 20 years will be the last 21 years."

It will be a tough act of his own to follow. Even in defeat, this run in New York was one of the most irresistible of his career, and when it ended, he made his way off the court and into the tunnel, where his 3-year-old son, Jaden Gil, was waiting for his customary postmatch hug.

"Daddy, who did you play with?" Jaden said.

It could have been a long answer, but Agassi chose to keep it simple. "Somebody with long hair," he said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/12/sports/tennis/12men.html?pagewanted=2&ei=5094&en=849f02e26ee90537&hp&ex=1126584000&partner=homepage

RogiFan88
09-12-2005, 04:39 PM
Federer's 'most special' Grand Slam
Robert Lusetich
13sep05

THE old man had given all he had, fought his heart out for New York and for all the other Captain Ahabs of the world who, against all odds, refuse to quit chasing their white whales.

As Andre Agassi left Arthur Ashe Stadium maybe for the last time, his eyes moist, blowing kisses to a crowd which yearned for one more magical afternoon with him, he found the embrace of his children, four-year-old Jaden and his sister, Jaz, who is almost two.
"Daddy, you played tennis?" asked Jaz.

"Daddy, who you play with?"

Agassi took a moment to cast his mind back over a sun-soaked afternoon in which he had played so heroically but still lost.

"Somebody with long hair, honey," he replied.

Just moments later, Agassi stood before the world's media and was a great deal more expansive on the very great Roger Federer, who had beaten him 6-3 2-6 7-6 (7-1) 6-1 in 2hr20min to win his second straight US Open.

"There's only so long you can deny it," said the 35-year-old American of a man who had won his sixth Grand Slam in a little more than two years and, still 24, may threaten Pete Sampras's record of 14.

"He's the best I've ever played against. He plays the game in a very special way I haven't seen before. He does things that others just can't do.

"If I play that way against anybody, I would be favouring myself."

Agassi, of course, had Sampras as his foil for much of a career which spanned legends such as John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg, Jim Courier and Ivan Lendl, as well as the Lleyton Hewitt generation.

"There's other guys - I've played a lot of them, I mean, so many years - (against whom) there's a safety zone, there's a place to get to, there's something to focus on, there's a way," Agassi said. "But (with Federer) anything you try to do, he potentially has an answer for and it's just a function of when he starts pulling triggers necessary to get you to change that decision.

"There's nowhere to go and if you do what you're supposed to do, you feel like it gives you just a chance to win the point."

The young Swiss master has now won a record 23 consecutive finals - including all six in slams, where he has lost just two sets - and stretched his 2005 record to 71-3 (bear in mind he held match points in two of those losses) which is the best season for a man since McEnroe went 82-3 in 1984.

He also broke Sampras's record of 34 straight wins on hardcourt and became the only man in the Open era to win the Wimbledon-US Open double in consecutive years.

"It's scary how good he is," McEnroe said so succinctly.

Federer, a respectful man and a great ambassador for the sport, called this his "most special" Grand Slam because it was the US Open against "a living legend" in Agassi.

He also was pleased to have equalled the career majors haul of Edberg and Becker, his idols.

"Tying your idols, I think it's every little boy's dream," Federer said. "I made it come true today in a memorable final for me, and I still got something left, I think, in my career.

"So, hopefully, I can beat those records. That will be even better."

But he remained even-keeled about his place in history.

"The best player of this generation, yes, but nowhere close to ever, because, just look at the records that some guys have. I'm a little cookie."

The match itself was a higher-quality version of the semi-final Federer played against Hewitt.

Like Hewitt, Agassi preyed on Federer's only known weakness - if that is the word - which is a tendency to miss on the backhand when the ball is bouncing high.

The ageless one - who has had four cortisone shots this year for a chronic sciatic nerve problem - should have been struggling after three consecutive five-setters. But it is a testament to his determination and physical conditioning that he ran as hard as ever.

But Federer tends to dress his best on Sundays and, even though Agassi saved seven set points, Federer served out the first set.

Three set points on Agassi's serve and the 35-year-old refuses to go down, saving them, then finishing with an ace to get the crowd back into the match.

But with a patriotic crowd at fever pitch, Agassi responded like a man who knew this moment, at his age, may not come again.

He hit a series of breathtaking returns off Federer's serve and with two breaks took the second set, squaring the match.

The third set was always going to be pivotal because Federer has only really been stretched once in those 23 finals victories. Rafael Nadal, earlier this year in Miami, was the only opponent to take Federer down after three sets and force him to win in five.

Agassi was magnificent and had a 30-love lead in the eighth game, already up a break. Federer, who had at that point 21 unforced errors on the backhand side against only four winners, majestically stroked a backhand winner down the line to break Agassi right back, taking the momentum away.

"I had his back against the wall to some degree but he just figured that to be a cue for him to do something else," Agassi said.

Federer won eight straight points, then - as he did against Hewitt the day before - shredded Agassi in the tiebreak, 7-1, with an array of winners off both wings.

The sense was palpable that Federer was rolling and growing in confidence. He played his best tennis of the tournament in the final set, hitting 18 of his 69 winners (35 more than Agassi).

"I wonder why I always play so well, especially on the big occasions," Federer said.

"It just seems to click for me."
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/printpage/0,5942,16579687,00.html

RogiFan88
09-12-2005, 04:40 PM
Federer again looks to Roche
Paul Malone
13sep05

TENNIS superman Roger Federer's next goal is to convince coach Tony Roche to work with him again for at least a dozen weeks next year.

Federer said he was not sure if Roche wanted to maintain an arrangement under which the Australian has travelled on a restricted schedule with the world No. 1 since late last year.
Roche watched on television in Sydney as Federer downed Andre Agassi yesterday.

He has kept in touch through text messages and phone calls to Federer, who won three grand slam titles last year without a coach.

"Next year, I guess we work leading up to the Aussie Open, but after that nothing is certain, you know," Federer said yesterday.

Federer's sixth grand slam win was the second since he began working on a consultancy basis with Roche, who will meet him at the Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai in November.

"I hope it will pretty much be the same sort of schedule we had this year," Federer said.

"Schedules can always change, but I think that's what I'm looking at. I don't want to get too far ahead of myself to say he will also do the French Open and Wimbledon.

"I hope it's a long-term decision he made, but if he changes his mind, I understand."

Federer revealed in his French language media conference he had thought he was going to lose to Agassi's groundstroke artillery when the match was tied at a set apiece and the American led 4-2, 30-0 on serve.

"Then I got my game back and suddenly victory swam back into sight," Federer said.

Discipline did not come easily to Federer and he said he had been quite serious about quitting tennis in 1999, when he finished the year ranked No. 64.

"I was joking around quite serious at one stage (to) just hang up my racquet and just not be so frustrated," he said.

"I was stuck for about six months and wasn't good enough to make the last step. Work didn't pay off. With wins, the pleasure comes back.

"I look at why the hell I didn't enjoy tennis before. It's crazy you had to win Wimbledon to realise that."

Ivan Lendl, who was coached by Roche in the latter stages of his career, said Roche was the best man to help Federer lift his standards further.

"Talent is dangerous to have if you take it for granted. Tony was fantastic at preparing me for the majors and getting my feet going well," Lendl said.
http://www.heraldsun.news.com.au/printpage/0,5481,16582970,00.html

RogiFan88
09-12-2005, 04:41 PM
Federer trumps Agassi resistance
By Bud Collins
New York
September 13, 2005

Swiss Roger Federer celebrates winning the US Open title.
Photo: Reuters

THERE are times when one guy goes home with the cup and the serious cash when, nevertheless, you can put a W beside the other guy's name.

That is what happened yesterday at the highly populated concrete abyss in Flushing Meadows called Arthur Ashe Stadium. Sure, Roger Federer, the Basel Dazzle, showed 24,797 gawkers why he is every bit the virtuoso on strings as Yo-Yo Ma. Hijacking the US Open title for the second year in a row, Federer shipped the silver chalice with his name on it and $1.4 million in gold back to Switzerland.

It was enough to set cowbells ringing across his small homeland, the kind of ominous chimes he induces within the skulls of his opponents.

Yes, he rang Andre Agassi's bells for two hours 20 minutes, and came off with a 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (7-1), 6-1 win, his 10th title of the year. But one had to score the afternoon a W for Agassi, too, for his was a triumphant performance of resistance, of stonewalling for a long time that Richard Nixon would have envied.

Andre Kirk Agassi, a 5-1 short-ender with London bookmakers, is 35 years old, and was gracing his 20th Open. He had won three consecutive five-set marathons on the unforgiving asphalt, the last one 24 hours before confronting Federer.

What Agassi did in stalking the champion, hindering, laying traps, and leading him, 4-2, in the third set — hanging on into the tiebreaker — brought to mind the legend of the little Dutch boy plugging the hole in the dike with a finger. Boldly, Agassi fired harmful groundies, duelled crosscourt in fierce forehand and backhand exchanges, and won many of them. He even charged and volleyed, and was at his most stubborn in escaping break points — 14 of 18.

But Agassi didn't have enough fingers to control all the leaks that began to spring. Nobody does. When the tiebreaker arrived, Federer, the virtuoso on strings, was playing the ominous Danse Macabre for Agassi, who had held him off for almost two hours. Federer's first serve (a spectacular 76 per cent) began to spurt aces and winners all over the place, and the dike gave way. Federer, who had baked Lleyton Hewitt with two bagels in last year's final (6-0, 7-6, 6-0), tried to roll one at Agassi, who ducked two match points in the sixth game to avoid a cream-cheesing.

No tears for Agassi, please. He had outdone 126 of the field, and played the saboteur better than anybody else could, mulling it over thoughtfully as always. "I had fun, the crowd was great, but the first thing is assessing a loss … the other guy was better," he said. "He plays the game in a very special way I haven't seen before.

"There's a sense of urgency in every point. It's an incredible challenge. There's nowhere to go. You know, there's nothing to do except hit fairways, hit greens and make putts. I mean, every shot has that sort of urgency on it."

A lot of people can play great matches, but Agassi was awed that Federer does it in major finals. This was his sixth, and now he's clearly on the trail of Pete Sampras' record — 14.

"Pete was great," Agassi said. "No question. But there was a place to get to with Pete, you knew what you had to do. If you do it, it could be on your terms. There's no such place like that with Roger.

"The only thing different that I could conceive to make him better is everything he does — and make him six-foot-five."

Federer was just as respectful. "Getting a chance to play Andre — maybe he and Martina Navratilova are our only living legends — and in the final of the US Open, this was a very special occasion."

Federer praised himself, too, but it didn't come off as immodesty. "I amaze myself that I can play so well on the big occasions," he said. "It just seems to click for me."

Incredibly, he has won 23 straight finals, an Open era record. "When I was down, 4-2, in the third, I began to feel my serve was coming back, the first time I felt like that in the tournament," he said.

He needed it to tame Agassi. Federer began to paint lines like Mondrian with serve, backhand, and forehand. He raised his game as though impersonating Atlas. Thus he activated an alarm clock as well as those cowbells, ending Agassi's "surreal dream" that he cited after overcoming James Blake from two sets down in the quarter-finals.

There was greatness in the air as a pink dusk appeared at the last match point and the sun vanished with Agassi's marvellous roadblocking. Federer is the greatest of his generation, but the leftover man from an earlier generation retains a tinge of greatness, too, and they made it a memorable generational clash.

BOSTON GLOBE

TAKE IT AS FED
Age:

■ Has won a record 23 straight finals and a record 35 matches on hardcourts
■ Is on a season-best 25-match winning streak
■ The first man since Donald Budge in 1938, and first in professional era, to win back-to-back Wimbledon and US Open titles
■ The first man since Patrick Rafter in 1998 to successfully defend US Open title
■ Has been world No. 1 for 84 straight weeks

ROGER FEDERER 24; Ranking: 1
Grand slam titles: 6 (Wimbledon 2003-05, US Open 2004-05, Australian Open 2004)
Career titles: 32
2005 titles: 10;
2005 win-loss record: 71-3
Prizemoney: career: $25 million; 2005: $7 million
http://www.theage.com.au/news/tennis/federer-trumps-agassi-resistance/2005/09/12/1126377257590.html?oneclick=true

RogiFan88
09-12-2005, 04:42 PM
Federer thrills the Big Apple to the core
September 13, 2005

New York: Roger Federer took it in his stride as the inevitable comparisons between the Swiss superstar and the game's greats swept through Flushing Meadows after Sunday's US Open final.

A shellshocked Andre Agassi rated Federer above Pete Sampras, who holds a record 14 major titles, as the best player he had seen after the world No.1 made history with a 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (7-1), 6-1 triumph.

In winning his sixth major, Federer became the first man since Don Budge in 1938 to capture back-to-back Wimbledon and US Open crowns. But the most mind-boggling of Federer's records is his 23 straight successes in finals, almost double the long-time benchmark of 12 jointly held by John McEnroe and Bjorn Borg.

"That's crazy," said Agassi, claiming it took the perfect match to beat Federer, who now has an astonishing 71-3 for the year.

The Swiss is being hailed the Tiger Woods of tennis, so it was fitting Agassi should use golfing parlance to describe the task of finding a way to bring him down.

"There's nowhere to go. You know, there's nothing to do except hit fairways, hit greens and make putts. I mean, every shot has that sort of urgency on it," Agassi said.

"Pete was great, no question. But there was a place to get to with Pete. You knew what you had to do. There's no such place like that with Roger.

"He can hurt you at any point. You're serving at 30-0, he wins the point … so there's a sense of urgency on every point. It's an incredible challenge."

Federer was honoured to receive such a compliment from a legend like Agassi, an eight-times major champion.

"This is probably the most special grand slam final in my career, to play against Andre here in New York," Federer said. "I had to play my best match of the tournament again. And, unfortunately [for Agassi], it happened again."

Federer, a keen student of his sport's history, considered himself "the best player of this generation, yes, but not nowhere close to ever".

"Because, just look at the records that some guys have. I'm a little cookie," he said.

Just holding serve against Federer is a relief, Agassi said, and little wonder after the American played some of the finest tennis of his life.

After serving at 30-love with a 4-2 lead in the third set, the two-time champion looked to have the titleholder in deep trouble. But, seemingly in the blink of an eye, Federer stung Agassi to break back for 3-4 before taking the tie-breaker and racing through the final set in just 23 minutes.

Australian Samantha Stosur, meanwhile, teamed up with American Lisa Raymond to snare the women's doubles crown. Stosur overcame mid-match jitters to serve out a 6-2, 5-7, 6-3 victory over Russian Elena Dementieva and Italian Flavia Pennetta.

AAP
http://www.smh.com.au/news/tennis/federer-thrills-the-big-apple-to-the-core/2005/09/12/1126377255470.html?oneclick=true

[B]Federer untouchable for now, says Nadal
Mon Sep 12, 2005 10:40 AM BST
By Alastair Himmer

BEIJING, Sept 12 (Reuters) - World number two Rafael Nadal said on Monday he was still a long way off catching Swiss master Roger Federer at the top of the world rankings.

French Open champion Nadal paid tribute to Federer's successful defence of his U.S. Open title at the weekend but the Spanish teenager believes he has time on his side.

"Roger Federer is the best player in the world. He wins everything," Nadal told reporters in Beijing at this week's China Open.

"He's lost only three matches this year. It's amazing. I can't be number one this year but I'm still very young. I'm 19 years old and I have many years to be number one."

Nadal has won nine ATP tour titles this year -- just one fewer than Federer -- but is looking to bounce back quickly from his shock third-round exit at the U.S. Open.

"I'm still happy with my season," said Nadal, who plays Taiwan's Wang Yeu-Tzuoo in his Beijing opener on Tuesday. "I've won a lot of tournaments and that gives me confidence. I'm improving every year. It's a normal evolution."

Nadal has already qualified for the year-ending Masters Cup in Shanghai but he pledged to try and prove he was more than a clay court bully for the rest of the season.

"I know I can play well on hard courts," he said. "I won in Montreal and I've won a lot of matches. It's just my mentality. I need to be more aggressive, especially on grass and indoors.

"What's most important to me now is to improve and improve."

Argentina's Guillermo Coria and David Nalbandian, as well as fellow Spaniard and mentor Carlos Moya, are among those who stand in Nadal's way at the $1.1 million China Open.

The women's tournament begins on Monday with five of the world's top 10 players involved.
http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=tennisNews&storyID=URI:urn:newsml:reuters.com:20050912:MTFH51 815_2005-09-12_09-39-12_T354888:1

RogiFan88
09-12-2005, 04:42 PM
I need you Rochey: Federer
September 13, 2005

TENNIS superman Roger Federer has appealed to Australian coach Tony Roche to work with him again for at least a dozen weeks next year.

Roche watched on television in Sydney yesterday as Federer tore down ageing Andre Agassi 6-3 2-6 7-6 (7-1) 6-1 and he kept in touch with a few text messages and phone calls with Federer, who won three grand slam titles last year without a coach.

Federer's win came on a day Australian Samantha Stosur won her second grand slam doubles title to become the nation's only two-time major winner in 2005.

Stosur, who had broken through for the Australian Open mixed doubles title with her fellow Queenslander Scott Draper in January, held serve to clinch a 6-2 5-7 6-3 win for with new doubles partner, American Lisa Raymond, over Russian Elena Dementieva and Italian Flavia Pennetta.

Federer revealed to The Daily Telegraph he was not sure if Roche wanted to maintain an arrangement where he has travelled on a restricted schedule with the world No. 1 since late last year.

"Next year, I guess we work leading up to the Aussie Open, but after that nothing is certain, you know," Federer said.

Federer's sixth grand slam win was his second since he began working on a consultancy basis with Roche, who will meet up with him at the Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai in November, and the Swiss star said he does not intend working with a different coach.

"I hope it will pretty much be the same sort of schedule we had this year," he said.

"Schedules can always change, but I think that's what I'm looking at.

"I don't want to get too far ahead of myself to say he (Roche) will also do the French Open and Wimbledon.

"I hope it's a long term decision he made, but if he changes his mind, I understand."

Federer revealed in his French language press conference that he had thought he was going to lose under Agassi's groundstroke artillery when the match was tied at a set apiece and the American veteran took a 4-2, 30-0 lead on serve.

"I thought I was going to lose, but then I got my game back and then suddenly victory swam back into sight," Federer said.

Agassi's conditioner Gil Reyes said he hoped Agassi's sixth US Open final convinced him to play next year, starting with the Australian Open.
http://dailytelegraph.news.com.au/story/0,20281,16577752-5001023,00.html

Skyward
09-12-2005, 04:43 PM
http://www.tennis.com/Tennis_World_Blog/index.asp

Speak, Andre
Posted 9/11/2005 @ 11:44 PM

You all saw the U.S. Open men’s singles final (if you didn’t, you can get the details here) so you don’t need me to delve into the blow-by-blow or the X’s and O’s. Bottom line: Andre Agassi was serving at a set each and 4-2, 30-love, when Federer struck the blow that turned the match around.

There was a moment there, a seam in reality, when it looked as if the impossible, having morphed into the improbable, almost became the unthinkable—35-year-old Agassi out-hitting and outwitting Roger Federer for the title.

Given that both men couldn’t win, the four-set Federer triumph was the most satisfying outcome. A player for the ages beat a champion of the ageless, and the most striking thing about it played out an hour or so after the match, in the press interview room.

Think about this: At a time when American tennis is in deep trouble, a 35-year old icon from Las Vegas—a five-time finalist and two-time champion—made a stirring, enchanted run for his national title. But all anyone—including said 35-year-old icon—could talk about afterwards was Federer, the champion who joined Don Budge and Bill Tilden (no slouches, they!) as the only men to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open back-to-back, for two years running.

Agassi's interview was the greatest tribute you could imagine to the game and character of Roger Federer. So I decided in this post to simply take the transcript from Agassi’s press conference and, with a cosmetic tweak here and there for clarity, let it speak for what Federer accomplished last night, for where he stands as a player, and—last but by no means least—for the graciousness of Agassi.

Here are Agassi’s words:


You know, he's the best I've ever played against. There's nowhere to go {with your shots or strategy}. You know, there's nothing to do except hit fairways, hit greens, and make putts. I mean, every shot has that sort of urgency on it—and, if you do what you're supposed to do, you feel like it gives you a chance to win the point. That's just too good.

I had a set apiece, 4-2, 30-love serving, and he hit an inside out backhand mishit that found the line. Then I hit a net cord to set him up {to win the next point, leading to a break of serve}. That's the thing, you know, it doesn't take much with him. He can break a match open, or he can get back into it right away. But I would say that normally if I play that way against anybody, I would be favoring myself.

There's other guys you play—I've played a lot of them {over} many years—there's a safety zone, there's a place, something to focus on, there's a way. But anything you try to do, Roger potentially has an answer for—and it's just a function of when he starts pulling the triggers necessary to get you to change to that decision.

He plays the game in a very special way. I haven't seen it before. I'm just speaking of the standard and the options and the talent and the execution that he shows in all the biggest matches. It's crazy. What has he won, 24 straight finals, something like that? Twenty-three? I'd be hard pressed to think of anybody that's ever done that.

I've seen a lot of people play special matches arbitrarily, you know, just out of nowhere, just played a great match. He certainly has done that a number of times against me. But it's different when you play somebody in the finals of a Slam, that's the place where you can really assess someone effectively. And I’ve never seen that {degree of excellence} in anyone before.

Pete was great. I mean, no question. But there was a place to get to with Pete. You knew what you had to do. If you do it, {the match} could be {played} on your terms. There's no such place like that with Roger. I think he's the best I've played against.

{Roger} is the only guy I've ever played against where, if you hold serve to go 1-0, you're thinking, "All right, good."

At this point, the press erupted with laughter, and even Andre seemed amused by his frank confession. But he didn’t want it to be taken as a quip. He didn’t want to be seen as the proverbial clown, crying inside while making others laugh. So he went on:


I'm not just making fun of it, I'm literally telling you the way it is. Roger can hurt you at any point. You're serving 30-love, he wins the point. It's 30-15, the pressure you feel at 30-15 is different than anybody else. So there's a sense of urgency on every point, on every shot. You know, it's an incredible challenge.

You know, I certainly didn't have enough today. I know three five setters {in my last three matches} doesn't help. But it's still a standard Roger sets out there that you got to exceed, exceed yourself all the time.

The questions focused a little more narrowly on the X’s and O’s in the next portion of the interview.


I certainly like {the match-up of} my backhand to his backhand, or I certainly like that as a better option than my backhand to his forehand.

But, you know, with that being said, he hit an inside out winner at 30-love, 4-2 in the third set that found the line. He hit a few up the line. He hits that short chip, moves you forward, moves you back. He uses your pace against you. If you take pace off, so that he can't use your pace, he can step around and hurt you with the forehand.

Just the amount of options he has to get around any particular stage of the match where maybe something's out of sync—it seems to be endless. His success out there is just a mere reflection of all the things that he can do. The only thing I could conceive of that would make him more difficult is him 6'5". He's, you know . . . he does things that others just can't do.


Matt Cronin then observed that going into the tiebreaker, Andre had been getting results going to Roger’s backhand with the kick serve. But on the fourth point, Roger hit a big backhand down the line for a service return winner. Two unforced errors by Andre quickly followed, and that was it—Roger bolted out and closed the match in no time.


Well, he always elevates, you know, in tiebreakers. You'll always see that when he plays, he takes his chances. But I was using the kick serve effectively against the wind—sorry, I mean with the wind. In that particular stage, I was serving once in the tiebreak on that side and I was against the wind. And it was a second serve.

That's my point, I was safe for a long time out there just hitting a dumpy second serve to the backhand and getting into the point. Then at any point he can decide, "Well, I want to make you worry about that." He had the breeze on his back. He just stayed through that ball and hit it up the line. It was pretty much past me.

And those next couple of points—you know he's going to step up, you have that little extra pressure to do a little bit more with the ball, to push it through the wind, and to get it deep because you don't want to leave anything hanging against him on either wing. And, you know, you make a couple errors because you're trying to play too good.

So anything that you're trying to execute out there only lasts for a period of time till he makes the adjustment. Then you have to change it. All the while, everything you're planning on doing, you have to do well and you have to do it start to finish. So that's, you know, you can only say it so many ways. You know, that's too good.

What then, can be done? Is there a way to beat Roger? Can you do something, or hope he stutters in some aspect of his game, and how realistically can you hope for that?


Well, something needs to be off one way or another. You need to play the craziest tennis you've ever played or he needs to be doing something off because, you know, you have to do it for such a long period of time. And while I believe I can do that, you always got to look at it for what it is and you say, "This guy's won that many finals for a reason."

I mean, that stat alone {23 consecutive final wins} is pretty crazy. I mean, you're talking about the best that are left in the tournament and he's winning that many times in a row . . . . It is what it is but you do step on the court feeling like you have to play a perfect match. Of course, he has to execute. I mean, he has to do what he does. But if he does, you have to play a perfect match.

And what about the way he ran away with the fourth set, just pulled away like a five-speed sports car racing one with only four gears?


That fourth set getting away was really just a testament to his standard and how he can raise his game and why you can't give him the lead. All the great players, you can't give them a lead. They stretch a match open quickly. And, you know, he's definitely one of those.

I mean, you know, this is not—a match is a complicated thing. There are a lot of ebbs and flows in it. But ultimately, the person that brings the most, the most amount of times, you know, is going to win. Roger just brings a lot all the time for all the options he has. And while there are periods that you can have him on the fence, his options when he's on the fence are better than most.

You know, I had him. I had his back against the wall to some degree at one set all, 4-2, 30-love serving, but he just figured that to be a cue for him to do something else.

Oh, sure. Everybody's beatable, I mean, on any given day. How many matches—what's his record this year? He's lost three times?

A reporter relayed the numbers: 70 wins, 3 losses. Two Grand Slam titles. (Add a new record, surpassing Sampras by one win, for consecutive matches won on a hard court, 35.) Then he asked if Roger was beatable.


He's lost three times. He's won, 70? Yeah, he's definitely beatable . . .

At this point, laughter echoed again. Andre, showing the instinct of a guy working one of the Big Rooms in Vegas, waited for a beat.


I just don't like those odds.

More laughter, after which Andre said:


But, I mean, in sports you have to execute, you know. You can't phone in the result or else everybody could have just stayed home and barbecued this Sunday. You can't phone in the result. You have to show up and you have to do it and that's what he has to do.

So you can't just say he's full of talent, you have to give him his respect for hard work and discipline and commitment and the mindset that it takes to step on the court being the favorite every time, to step in the finals hoping today's not the day that something goes wrong, like you're talking about. And he does it over and over again.

You have to respect not just his abilities, but you also have to respect what that goes into. And it’s in the mindset. It is the focus. It is the, you know, the knowing when to play, when not to play. It's pulling out of tournaments as you prepare to peak for other tournaments. You know, he's made a lot of good decisions, and he certainly is maximizing all the arsenal that he has.

And I can't say it surprises me because I don't know him. But it certainly amazes me . . .

Enough said, don’t you think?

Skyward
09-12-2005, 05:20 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/justin_gimelstob/09/12/open.memories/index.html

Roger Federer is on his way to becoming the greatest ever. Federer is playing tennis at a level that never has been seen before. On Sunday, a month after turning 24, he won his 23rd consecutive final and his sixth Grand Slam. The most impressive part of his dominance is how easy he is making the game look against the greatest players in the world.

Agassi summed it up best when he said, "Federer doesn't have a weakness and he has a few great shots, so that equates to a problem." Agassi also went on to laud Federer as the best he's ever played. That says it all when you consider Andre's long career and the scope of players against whom he has competed. If you look at the statistics, they're mind-boggling: Against the greatest returner in the history of tennis, Federer nailed 76 percent of his first serves, hit 19 aces and didn't double-fault once. He hit more than 60 winners over four sets.

I've had the privilege of playing against Federer twice, both matches early on in his career: in Heilbronn, Germany, in 1999 and Miami in 2000. Even then it was apparent how physically talented he was. It was obvious to me that his future success would hinge on his ability to rein in his arsenal of weapons on the court and figure out how to best use those technical and physical skills. The only other variables were how well he would deal with adversity and the emotional challenges of confronting greatness.

I'd say he's done all right. He has mastered completely all aspects of the game. His forehand and serve are devastating. His volleys are among the best in tennis and his backhand -- which is his weaker side -- has improved so much that there is no area for opponents to attack. But what really sets him apart is his movement and his understanding of the game. His speed and court coverage give him more time to hit the shots he wants, and his court vision allows him to use his variety to perfection.

babsi
09-12-2005, 05:46 PM
You are posting faster then one can read - not that I´m complaining - thank you :)

PaulieM
09-12-2005, 07:02 PM
" i need you rochey: federer"
that headline made me laugh. i just got this image of roger pleading with tony in my head :rolls:

TenHound
09-12-2005, 07:44 PM
W/all the articles, some of which I'll set aside to savor later, I want to be sure this great line from Neil Harman doesn't get lost:

This was Federer’s sixth grand-slam final and his sixth win, it was his 23rd consecutive victory in finals across the world on every conceivable surface. There are no questions left to be answered about this remarkable man, who plays with a magical mastery. Agassi was sufficiently in the match that he led the third set 4-2 but, unfortunately for him, it was as if he had prodded the hornet’s nest with a stick. The winners then buzzed all around him.

PaulieM
09-12-2005, 07:54 PM
W/all the articles, some of which I'll set aside to savor later, I want to be sure this great line from Neil Harman doesn't get lost:

This was Federer’s sixth grand-slam final and his sixth win, it was his 23rd consecutive victory in finals across the world on every conceivable surface. There are no questions left to be answered about this remarkable man, who plays with a magical mastery. Agassi was sufficiently in the match that he led the third set 4-2 but, unfortunately for him, it was as if he had prodded the hornet’s nest with a stick. The winners then buzzed all around him.
i like that one! thanks. :)

Stevens Point
09-12-2005, 10:46 PM
This article is about the DC tie vs Great Britain.

www.reuters.com

No rest for U.S. Open champ Federer
Mon Sep 12, 2005 4:02 PM ET171

By Bill Barclay

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Roger Federer has little time to rest on his latest laurel.

The 24-year-old Swiss took his grand slam tally to six by retaining his U.S. Open title with a four-set win over 35-year-old Andre Agassi on Sunday.

But unlike after his third successive Wimbledon triumph in July, when he took a month and a half off, the world number one has barely a week to prepare for an intriguing Davis Cup playoff tie against Britain.

The winners of the tie, which will be played in Geneva on clay starting a week on Friday, will secure their place in the elite World Group for 2006.

Having won a record 35th consecutive hardcourt match by beating Agassi on Sunday, Federer admits it will not be easy to adjust to clay.

The Swiss team chose to play the match on tennis's slowest surface because it is the one the British players are usually least comfortable on, even though it has also been Federer's least successful surface.

"All I want to do is get back in the World Group and the best chance I think was on clay," said Federer. "I'm putting myself through this strain of moving from one surface to the other because I want to help out my country as much as I can.

"We have more chance to win on clay than other surfaces when (British player) Greg Rusedski might be a little more dangerous. So I hope to take him a little more out of play with that."

MURRAY FACTOR

Federer admitted the Swiss team had not factored in the emergence of British 18-year-old Andy Murray at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open when they chose the surface. Murray trains on clay in Spain.

"We didn't know about Murray that well when we picked the surface," Federer said. "But no matter what surface you play on against Murray, he's become a great player throughout the last few months.

"It's tougher than expected all of a sudden. But I still feel like we're the big favourites. :D

"I still feel very fresh. I have reserves left in my tank."

Speaking in a sports bar on Times Square on Monday, the Swiss faced inevitable questions about whether his priority now was to reel in Pete Sampras's record of 14 grand slam wins.

At his current rate of two a year - he won both Wimbledon and the U.S. Open this year and last - he would match the American's mark by the age of 28.

"He is still far off. He's got some margin," Federer said.

"But I don't like just to look at the slams as the only thing that matters. For me it means the other tournaments, when I'm competing against the best players or playing in front of thousands of people, don't really matter. I don't like it.

"I have 32 titles and six of them are grand slams so you see the majority are other tournaments."

Perhaps the Swiss's most extraordinary record so far is his 23 consecutive wins in finals.

On Monday, though, he did offer a ray of hope for his opponents.

"You can't keep it up all the time. It's hard on you mentally and physically. It's a draining sport," Federer said.

"I expect myself not to be at the top at some point."

RogiFan88
09-13-2005, 04:53 PM
The U.S. Open
Court Couture
Dana Mason of Mason's Tennis Mart on tennis fashion.

What’s selling out at the moment?
Women like bright colors and prints—flirty but classic. Polo’s tennis-apparel line is classic, collared, and logo’d, but they do low-cut halters, too. Nike’s totally changed; it’s not so athletic-looking anymore, and it’s the most popular brand in the store. It’s more fashion-forward; everything is a little bit shorter, a little bit tighter. The colors are great—pinks, greens; they’re doing florals for the first time.

Have the skirts gotten shorter over the years?
Yes, extremely. They’re very short.

What are you supposed to wear under them?
Court shorties—little spandex shorts with pockets on the side, where you keep your tennis balls.

Is it okay to just wear the court shorties?
Definitely not. That’d be like playing in your underwear.

Do people shop here for off-court outfits ?
All the time. And they get full wardrobes. I’ll see girls on the street in a cute pleated tennis skirt and heels. Our ruffled skirts are really popular.

What’s a tennis-fashion faux pas?
There are some things that are clearly not meant for the court. Serena’s catsuit outfit was a disaster. Her lace-up boots were not meant for tennis; they looked like they were meant for other activities.

Who would you like to see come out with a tennis line?
Roberto Cavalli. I’m sure the Williams sisters would love animal-print tennis skirts.

What’s the hot new material now?
Dri-fit. It’s a wicking material, so it takes away all the sweat from your skin. Cotton is too heavy.

And the accessory?
Visors. They’re really making a comeback, with interchangeable ribbons so you can match any outfit.

Your store is filled with the heavenly aroma of fresh tennis balls.
To be honest, those are horrible chemicals you’re inhaling. Now we have these limited-edition jumbo-size balls that the players sign at the U.S. Open. So that’s what you’re smelling.

Who’s the most attractive player?
Roger Federer. For girls, Maria Sharapova. She has a great girlie look on the court, but she also looks like she’s there to play, not just to show off.

Have you ever tried the tennis-ball back massage?
No, but I know what you’re talking about! There’s a physical-therapy place across the street, and patients come right before their appointments to buy balls. What is it?

You roll around on a tennis ball. It’s a great auto-back-massage for single people.
Ah, that’s what it’s for. Hmm.
http://www.newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/urban/strategist/everything/tennis/12528/index.html

trying to find more stuff and photos on Rogi at Fashion Week...

Stevens Point
09-13-2005, 05:15 PM
trying to find more stuff and photos on Rogi at Fashion Week...
Thanks for the articles! :)

All I know is there are two pictures from the fashion week in GettyImages site. Go to GettyImages editorial, and type Fern Mallis; Roger Federer at search.

nobama
09-13-2005, 06:03 PM
trying to find more stuff and photos on Rogi at Fashion Week...I posted photos of him at fashion week a few pages back.

RogiFan88
09-13-2005, 06:26 PM
yes, thanks, I saw them! ;)

Fergie
09-14-2005, 01:13 AM
Federer ready to stare down history

BRISTOL, CONNECTICUT (TICKER) -- Less than 24 hours after Andre Agassi called him "the best I've ever played against," Roger Federer said he was not content to rest on his laurels.

The world No. 1 from Switzerland could be excused for wanting to take a break. After all, on Sunday he overcame eight-time Grand Slam winner Agassi - and 24,000-plus fans rooting for the American - in four sets, 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (7-1), 6-1 - to become the first man to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open back-to-back in consecutive years.

Early Monday afternoon - after a photo shoot and prior to taping "Late Show with David Letterman" - Federer met with approximately 25 members of the international media at the ESPN Zone in New York's Times Square to discuss his sixth Grand Slam victory, his future plans and his place in history.

Sunday's triumph was Federer's 35th straight hardcourt victory, an ATP Tour record, and his 87th in 88 matches on the surface since the start of last year's U.S. Open. It also was his record 23rd straight victory in a final, a streak that dates to 2003.

"I'm happy to face history and records," Federer said. "History is the challenge for me."

Federer was in rare trouble in Sunday's match, with Agassi breaking for a 4-2 third-set lead. But the top seed immediately broke back, was dominant in the tiebreak and nearly blanked the seventh seed in the fourth set. When Agassi could not handle his serve on match point, Federer leapt in the air and swung his arms in excitement.

It was a rare sign of emotion from the normally reserved Federer, who continued to celebrate well into the night with about 10 of his friends.

"I had a nice dinner," Federer said. "I let the evening unfold, flow. I like to sit in a chair with a wine glass. When I woke up, I thought, 'Why didn't I go to bed at 11?' I came back at 3 and went to bed at 5."

Federer next was to fly back to Switzerland to prepare for his homeland's Davis Cup playoff against Great Britain. The losing team will not be in the 16-team World Group next year.

"(We want to) get back in the World Group," he said. "I want to help out my country and my team as much as I can."

Last year, Federer only played in two tournaments after the U.S. Open, the Thailand Open in Bangkok and the year-end Tennis Masters Cup. This time, Federer has a much more ambitious slate.

"(I have the) Davis Cup in Geneva in 10 days' time," he said. "(I have) Bangkok straight after, (then) Madrid, in my hometown in Basel, Paris, then Shanghai. That's what I committed to. "Last year I pulled out of Madrid with fatigue ... (but) my plan is to play."

With Sunday's win, Federer improved to 71-3 this year, and he blew match points in two of those defeats, to eventual winner Marat Safin of Russia in the Australian Open semifinals - his last hardcourt defeat - and to Richard Gasquet of France in the quarterfinals of Monte Carlo on clay. Overall, he has won 25 straight matches since falling to eventual champion Rafael Nadal of Spain in the French Open semifinals.

Despite his amazing 145-9 mark since the start of 2004, the 24-year-old realizes he will not be the world's top player forever.

"I expect myself not to be at the top at one point," Federer said. "It's hard mentally and physically. It's a draining sport. To me it's normal that Tiger (Woods) can't keep it up, or (Spanish soccer power) Real Madrid."

Unfortunately for the rest of the ATP Tour, Federer - who took six weeks off after beating American Andy Roddick in the Wimbledon final - isn't drained now, and doesn't figure to be anytime soon.

"I took my rest after Wimbledon," he said. "I still feel very fresh. I have reserves left in my tank."

nobama
09-14-2005, 02:02 AM
It was a rare sign of emotion from the normally reserved Federer, who continued to celebrate well into the night with about 10 of his friends.

"I had a nice dinner," Federer said. "I let the evening unfold, flow. I like to sit in a chair with a wine glass. When I woke up, I thought, 'Why didn't I go to bed at 11?' I came back at 3 and went to bed at 5." :lol:

Billabong
09-14-2005, 02:25 AM
Thanks for these new articles:D:yeah:

PaulieM
09-14-2005, 02:29 AM
"I had a nice dinner," Federer said. "I let the evening unfold, flow. I like to sit in a chair with a wine glass. When I woke up, I thought, 'Why didn't I go to bed at 11?' I came back at 3 and went to bed at 5.
i always knew roger was a wild party animal ;)

PaulieM
09-14-2005, 02:32 AM
Who’s the most attractive player?
Roger Federer.
i couldn't agree more! :inlove:

lunahielo
09-14-2005, 03:29 AM
Great articles, everybody.
Thank you so much............... :)

SUKTUEN
09-14-2005, 10:05 AM
thankyou so much

babsi
09-14-2005, 10:27 AM
BIG Thank you :)

Jimena
09-14-2005, 03:14 PM
Maybe someone here can help me (pleeeeeeaaaaaase!). I've been looking for the interview John McEnroe did with Roger some time last week on USA network. I missed it and I don't know where to find it. I heard it was awesome. Is there a transcript available somewhere? Or (better yet) a clip?

Thanks in advance to anyone who might respond!

TenHound
09-15-2005, 04:28 AM
I saw interview & didn't think there was much special about it. The only w/Mary was more fun 'cuz she really Adores him, underlined underlined!!

In any event, I stopped by to share this less happy note. Consider yourself warned by Roger in advance:

"It's normal that them (Australia) or Tiger Woods or Real Madrid (lose more) when they play all the time. It makes me more impressed about what I've achieved the past few years... You can't keep it up all the time. It's too much to ask from yourself, year in and year out, winning two or three grand slams a year like I have been."

(from Herald Sun)

;( :(

nobama
09-15-2005, 11:16 AM
I saw interview & didn't think there was much special about it. The only w/Mary was more fun 'cuz she really Adores him, underlined underlined!!

In any event, I stopped by to share this less happy note. Consider yourself warned by Roger in advance:

"It's normal that them (Australia) or Tiger Woods or Real Madrid (lose more) when they play all the time. It makes me more impressed about what I've achieved the past few years... You can't keep it up all the time. It's too much to ask from yourself, year in and year out, winning two or three grand slams a year like I have been."

(from Herald Sun)

;( :(
Everything he said here is true. What he's done so far is amazing, but it will be difficult to keep it up. But we know the motivation is there, Roger won't easily give up his #1 spot.

Billabong
09-15-2005, 12:38 PM
BIG Thank you :)

I love your sig:) Great song:)

onm684
09-15-2005, 03:06 PM
I can't understand correctly this Chinese article. But I guess that Rogi goes to Shanghai on 3rd Oct.
Is it correct?
Anyone can correct that if I'm misunderstanding.:worship:
http://www.masters-cup.com.cn/news/2005-09-02/1722260.shtml


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http://image2.sina.com.cn/qc/ul/2005/0902/U1243P355DT20050902175931.jpg

yanchr
09-15-2005, 03:14 PM
I can't understand correctly this Chinese article. But I guess that Rogi goes to Shanghai on 3rd Oct.
Is it correct?
Anyone can correct that if I'm misunderstanding.:worship:
Yes, you are right. He will come to Shanghai on 3rd Oct to take part in the ceremony launching the new tennis stadium for TMC and then hold a fan meeting. The ad says the first 400 fans who buy the so-called mini package tickets (meaning any two tickets on different RR days) can get the entrance permit :D

So any plan? ;)

RogiFan88
09-15-2005, 03:37 PM
that's right after Bangkok...

yanchr
09-15-2005, 03:52 PM
that's right after Bangkok...
Yes, it is. I guess that's another reason he will go to Bangkok. If he doesn't go to Bangkok, I think most probably he won't drop by in Shanghai. Anyway, it's too much distance and seems ridiculous to travel from Europe to Asia and back to Europe just for a ceremony...

RogiFan88
09-15-2005, 04:32 PM
15 September 2005 12:30 Home > Sport > Tennis
Agassi believes Federer is the best of all time
By John Roberts in New York
Published: 13 September 2005

Andre Agassi left behind the rapturous cheers of 24,797 spectators and moved inside Arthur Ashe Stadium on work-weary legs to be greeted by his wife, Steffi Graf, and children, Jaden and Jaz, due to turn four and two respectively next month.

"Daddy, who did you play with?" Jaden wanted to know. "Somebody with long hair," Daddy told him.

Elaborating for the media, who had watched in amazement as the 35-year-old from Las Vegas belied his age in a final to savour, Agassi declared Roger Federer to be simply the best he had ever played against in a career spanning 20 US Opens.

The 24-year-old Swiss world No 1's hair is not as long as when he won the US Open for the first time a year ago, but his game is even more luminous and has more volume. This was evident as he wore down the spirited Agassi, 6-3, 2-6, 7-6, 6-1, on Sunday night.

"You step on the court feeling like you have to play a perfect match," Agassi said. He then payed Federer the ultimate compliment of rating him above Pete Sampras, who retired here in 2002 after winning a record 14th Grand Slam singles title and was world No 1 for a record six years in a row.

"Pete was great, no question," said Agassi, who lost 14 of 34 matches against the Californian. "But there was a place to get to with Pete, you knew what you had to do. If you do it, it could be on your terms. There's no such place like that with Roger."

In Federer's case, Agassi said, opponents reach a point of no return. "With other guys you play - and I've played a lot of them over so many years - there's a safety zone, there's a place to get to, there's something to focus on, there's a way. Anything you try to do [Roger] potentially has an answer for, and it's just a function of when he starts pulling the triggers necessary to get you to change to that decision. He plays the game in a very special way. I haven't seen it before.

"He's the only guy I've ever played against where you hold serve to go 1-0 and you're thinking, 'All right, good'. And I'm not just making fun of it, I'm literally telling you the way it is. He can hurt you at any point. You're serving 30-love. He wins the point. It's 30-15. The pressure you feel at 30-15 is different than [playing] anybody else. So there's a sense of urgency on every point, on every shot.

"It's an incredible challenge. I certainly didn't have enough today. Playing three five-setters doesn't help. But it's still a standard out there that you've got to exceed yourself all the time."

Agassi excelled himself for three sets. Though broken for 4-2 in the opening set, he went on to save seven set points, and then picked himself up in the second set, winning the first three games en route to levelling the match. He raised home hopes by breaking for 4-2 in the third set, only to lose the tie-break, 7-1. And he continued to try everything he knew as Federer sped through the fourth set.

In winning sixth Grand Slam titles - the same number as Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg, and two less than Agassi - Federer also became the first man to successfully defend the Wimbledon and US Open titles since the American Donald Budge in 1938. That was the year Budge accomplished the sport's first Grand Slam.

For Federer, who has now won a record 23 finals in a row, beating Agassi here was a personal milestone. "This is the most special final for me," he said, "to play Andre in the final of the US Open. He's one of the only living legends we have who is still playing, next to Martina Navratilova on the women's side.

"To play him in this situation, towards the end of his career, me being on the top of my game, made it really special."

For three sets, Agassi's agility, resilience and alertness, lured Federer into making errors, particularly on the backhand, but the maestro prevailed.

"When I was down 4-2 in third set," said Federer, "I felt my serve began to click again. It was the first time that had happened in the whole tournament." Smiling, he added: "I was quite pleased it happened then."

Inevitably, Agassi was asked about retirement. "As of now," he replied, "my intention is to keep working and to keep doing what it is I do. You know, the only thing better than the last 20 years will be the last 21 years."

When the dust from his latest adventure settles, Agassi will sit down with his coach, Darren Cahill, and his fitness trainer, Gil Reyes, and discuss his schedule. For now, the show stays on the road.

http://sport.independent.co.uk/tennis/article312279.ece

RogiFan88
09-15-2005, 04:33 PM
Untouchable Federer floating in a different zone

Federer 6-3, 2-6, 7-6, 6-1 Agassi

Stephen Bierley in New York
Tuesday September 13, 2005
The Guardian

Andre Agassi, the winner of eight grand slam titles and one of only five men to have won all four majors, was unequivocal. "I think Roger is the best I've played against. To watch him evolve has been amazing." For 2½ sets the 35-year-old American, with a near-24,000 Flushing Meadows crowd baying their support, pushed Federer to what appeared to be his limits. Having squared the match, Agassi led 4-2 in the third set and 30-0 on his serve. "Normally if I play that way I would be favouring myself," he said later. "Then he hit an inside-out backhand mishit that found the line and I hit a net cord to set him up. It doesn't take much with him to break a match open.

"There's nowhere to go. With other guys there is a safety zone, there's a place to get to. Against Roger anything you try to do, he has the answer. He plays the game in a very special way that I haven't seen before. And he does it over and over again."
By beating Agassi 6-3, 2-6, 7-6, 6-1 Federer became the first man to win back-toback Wimbledon and US Open titles two years running in the Open era, and also extended his run of winning finals to 23. "It's crazy," said Agassi. "There are periods in a match when you can have him against the fence, but his options are better than anybody else. I had his back against the wall to some degree at 4-2, but he just figured that to be the cue for him to do something else."

Federer believed that it was at this point he began to serve much better. "I hadn't felt it was right all through the tournament, but suddenly it clicked." He also began to hit his backhand with greater venom, suddenly stepping into Agassi's second serve and arrowing the ball past him before he could move. Until 6-6 in the third set Agassi felt he was still in with a shout, only for Federer to elevate his game to an entirely higher level in the tie-break which he won 7-1.

And that was that. The 11-year age gap was breached wide open and Agassi could no longer cope. Indeed, the overwhelming sense afterwards was that even if Federer had lost the third set he would still have gone on to take his sixth slam. "He can hurt you at any point," said the American. "The pressure you feel against him is different to anyone else, and the number of options he has seems endless. He does things the others just can't do."

Not that Agassi will give up trying. He has already laid down his plans for next year, and apparently intends not to play the clay-court season. He has no need of extra money for himself and his family, but continues to pour money into his charitable foundation, which helps educate at-risk children in Las Vegas. "There's a lot I can enjoy now whereas before I was too busy worrying about winning," he said. "I stepped out against Roger and looked forward to it, and I feel good about the fact that I did everything I could to beat him. Feeling that I have been appreciated for these last two week has been priceless for me."

This sixth slam title puts Federer on a par with Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg in modern times and, providing he remains fit, he will surely take the total into double figures, something that only Bill Tilden (10), Bjorn Borg and Rod Laver (11), Roy Emerson (12), and Pete Sampras (14) have achieved.

"Pete was great, no question," said Agassi. "But there was a place to get to with Pete, you knew what you had to do, and if you did it the match could be on your terms. There's no such place like that with Roger."

http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1568728,00.html

onm684
09-15-2005, 06:42 PM
Thank you, yanchr:worship:
But I can't go to Shanghai on the day. I have to wait until 14th Nov.
I hope that Rogi have a good time with his fans at Shanghai.

TenHound
09-16-2005, 12:46 AM
Background on Roger's Final v. AA - Payback for Miami '02.

Charles Bricker

Hard to get a glove on Federer
Published September 13, 2005



NEW YORK · There was a palpable similarity between Roger Federer's win over Andre Agassi for the U.S. Open title and the match these men played for the Nasdaq-100 Open champ-ionship in 2002, and the object lesson that came out of that Key Biscayne final was very much on Federer's mind a day after he won his sixth Grand Slam title.

Agassi had won in South Florida by 6-3, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, but only after Federer was up a break at 4-3 in the fourth set and thinking, naturally, in optimistic terms about the fifth.

"He was the favorite in my eyes, and I'd never beaten him before," Federer said, recalling that loss a day after his second triumph in a row at the U.S. Open.

"Besides, it's Agassi. He's got the experience and an incredible record in Miami. He was up two sets to love, and then I started really getting into the match.

"I thought I was about to turn it around. And in about 10 minutes in the fourth set, I got broken back and before long we were playing the final stroke.

"I saw what the best guys can do," said Federer, who was only 20 at the time. "They're like boxers. Two punches and it's over."

It took Federer more than two punches and a bit more than 10 minutes to subdue Agassi on Sunday afternoon at Arthur Ashe Stadium. But in a general sense, his victory was very similar to Agassi's win three years ago -- the last time, incidentally, Agassi beat Federer, who has won their past eight encounters.

Agassi was up a break, serving for 5-2 in the third set on Sunday and a two-sets-to-one lead. But in an astonishingly short span of time, Federer recovered the break, forced a tiebreak (which he won 7-1) and roared through the final set in 23 minutes.

One punch to the gut and a right cross to the chin. Agassi was out, and Federer had won his 71st match of the year against three losses.

Lesson learned. It doesn't matter if you're just treading water for most of three sets or behind on points. A couple of big blows and you score a knockout.

How did Roger become this good? Why him and not Lleyton Hewitt or Andy Roddick? The answer lies in Federer's pastiche of shots. "That's my big weapon," he said, smiling proudly. "I can change it up and keep them guessing."

But to get to this point Federer had to take some lumps along the way, as he did from Agassi on that day on Key Biscayne, or the straight-set loss to Luis Horna in the first round of the 2003 French Open -- a match that caused him to seriously think about how he wanted to play tennis and what his personality needed to be on court.

"There are many milestones where I learned lessons," said Federer. But there was no big bang, where everything suddenly congealed, where he suddenly became a champion.

Certainly he looks unbeatable on a hardcourt or grass. In fact, he's lost only one of 46 hardcourt matches this season, to Marat Safin in the semifinals of the Australian Open, and he had a match point in that one.

But to beat him, you have to overpower him, as Safin did with his big game that day.

For much of this match, Agassi hit with the sort of authority that gives Federer trouble. He is capable of many changes in tactics, but there isn't much he can do in the long rallies, where Agassi's reliable backhand is driving him deep and where Agassi's hard, flat, deep forehands don't give him a lot of choices.

Where Federer was able to make some tactical changes was on Agassi's serve. Surprisingly to many, he kept playing the blocked returns that have given Roddick and Hewitt so much trouble.

Until the gut feeling hit him that it was time dig a little deeper into his bag of weapons.

Suddenly, in the tiebreak, instead of blocking or chipping returns deep to the baseline, which Agassi had been handling easily, Federer began hitting returns to the corners, taking a bit more risk. "I think I surprised him on a couple of points," said the champ.

Twenty-three minutes later Agassi was on the canvas, being counted out, and Federer had won another major. There may yet be lessons for him to learn, but, for the most part, he's the teacher now.


Bruce Jenkins in SF paper also had a good line on Roger, comparing him to the rest of the guys, he said that "He was like Baryshnikov in a room full of penguins"!!

lunahielo
09-16-2005, 01:36 AM
"He was like Baryshnikov in a room full of penguins"!!
Wow!
Double wow!!!

They keep inventing more and more descriptive commentary
about this guy.
Thanks for the article, Ten Hound

Mrs. B
09-16-2005, 08:39 AM
and here's that article...

Federer is a throwback to a better game
Bruce Jenkins

Tuesday, September 13, 2005

New York -- One after another, generations of young girls ignored the greatness of Martina Navratilova. If they had any notion of emulating her spirited athleticism, they were quickly talked out of it by coaches. One wonders now, with Roger Federer presiding over men's tennis: Does tennis youth even care?

Like Navratilova, Federer plays a different sport than virtually all of his contemporaries. He's a flashback to tennis films from the 1950s and '60s, when players raced wildly about the court, inventing and improvising as they went. He'll hit a sliced backhand on one shot, go with topspin on the next. If the spirit moves him, he'll charge the net as a tactical ploy or a change of pace. The forehand could be a bullet, a deep-floating undercut or a drop shot -- always a time and place.

And his opponents? Bang. Bang. And more bang. Variety? Here's your variety -- first a forehand, now the two-handed backhand. How's that for genius?

Think about it: Where else in sports do clips from the distant past reveal more athletic movement than today's live action? In basketball, once you've seen Michael Jordan or Julius Erving, the old-time films are comically bad. As much as everyone enjoys vintage NFL Films, there's no approaching the blinding speed of today's game.

Now take Maria Sharapova, Lindsay Davenport, Andre Agassi or even that theatrical clay-court wonder, Rafael Nadal: Enthralling as the style can be at times, most everything happens at the baseline. Match their footage against the celluloid of Rod Laver, Jack Kramer, Billie Jean King or Althea Gibson, and it's downright tedious in comparison.

After losing in the U.S. Open semifinals, Sharapova claimed she needs to improve her physical conditioning. Gracious, she has no idea. Force her into the all-court regime that once defined tennis excellence, and she'd probably consider retirement. Serena Williams, in her current state, wouldn't be too thrilled, either.

Without question, modern-day equipment has players hitting the ball so hard, it takes a special player to undertake net-charging risks. It can be done, though. Navratilova handled each new wave of talent that came her way, and Federer stands out like Baryshnikov in a room full of penguins. Maybe Federer was influenced by Martina's style in his youth, but none of his female contemporaries were -- and I mean, zero. Justine Henin-Hardenne hits a fabulous one-handed backhand, but there isn't a serve-and-volley threat anywhere on the women's horizon.

It's so easy to both learn and teach the game at the baseline. It's the only way to go, from the beginning. For every Pete Sampras, who was convinced by coach Pete Fischer to switch to a one-hand backhand, there are millions of players content to play monotone. Gather all the continents of the tennis universe, and there's probably one grade-school kid who doesn't just admire Federer, but aspires to play exactly like him. With any luck, there's a coach who feels the same way. Maybe they'll find each other.

SUKTUEN
09-16-2005, 09:22 AM
Yes~~!! :devil:

Roger will go to Shanghai in Oct 3~!!!!! :haha: :haha: :crazy: :rocker: :banana:

My web Fiends will go to see him and talk to him~!! :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

Daniel
09-21-2005, 03:18 AM
Thanks Miro;s love :D

Stevens Point
09-21-2005, 01:37 PM
www.foxsports.com

Federer advocates more tourney play in Africa
09.21.2005


GENEVA (AP) - More top-level tennis tournaments in Africa would raise awareness of the continent's problems and help promote the sport, the top-ranked Roger Federer said Wednesday.

"I think maybe (there should be) more tournaments in Africa, if not exhibitions," Federer said. "There's one in Morocco. Maybe we can do some further south."

The Swiss tennis star, who won the U.S. Open earlier this month, is able to focus on humanitarian activities after recently signing with management agency IMG.

"What I wish from tennis is that the players unite more than try to do everything individually," Federer said.

"We play all around the world, which gives us a great opportunity to be everywhere."

Federer was speaking as an ambassador for the U.N. International Year of Sport at a press conference. The U.N. General Assembly designated 2005 as the year to encourage sport to promote education, health, development and peace.

Federer has set up a foundation in South Africa, where his mother is from, to help children receive a better education and two hot meals a day. He said tennis commitments that occupy him for 11 months a year prevent him from expanding into other countries.

"If I am there, it can sometimes have a very different impact," Federer said. "I can inspire people."

Adolf Ogi, special adviser to U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan and a former president of Switzerland, said that sport could build bridges - like South Korea and Japan co-hosting the 2002 World Cup.

When the Pakistan cricket team toured India recently, the leaders of the two nations arranged a meeting, Ogi noted.

"Sport can test what is possible for the politician," Ogi said. "Sport is an instrument, an important instrument for a better world."

Stevens Point
09-21-2005, 11:02 PM
Also one more related article from UN Geneva website.

www.unog.ch

NUMBER ONE TENNIS STAR ROGER FEDERER REVIEWS INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF SPORT AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION WITH ADOLF OGI
21 September 2005

Roger Federer of Switzerland, the world’s top-ranked tennis player and Spokesperson for the International Year of Sport and Physical Education 2005 (IYSPE 2005), today reviewed the commemoration of the International Year with Adolf Ogi, Special Adviser to the United Nations Secretary-General on Sport for Development and Peace and former President of Switzerland.

"The objective of the Year is clear," said Mr. Ogi, thanking the Swiss tennis star for his support. "Sport can help us achieve the Millennium Development Goals. Sport is a universal language and teaches positive values and necessary lessons for life. The power of sport for development and peace must be recognized."

Mr. Federer said that he had joined forces with the sports marketing agency IMG for reasons including a strengthening of his philanthropic activities. Mr. Federer presently supports the organization IMBEWU in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, where children are provided education and a hot meal daily.

Mr. Federer and Mr. Ogi also viewed a photo exhibit for the IYSPE 2005 that opened this week at the UN’s Palais des Nations.

Mr. Federer and Mr. Ogi also recorded an announcement in support of the upcoming UN 60th Anniversary Concert "Youssou N’Dour & Friends: United Against Malaria". Their public service announcements supporting the global campaign against malaria will be shown at the concert and aired on Swiss and international television stations broadcasting the event worldwide. "One million deaths a year from malaria is unacceptable," said Mr. Ogi in his public service announcement. "That is why the sports world is mobilizing against malaria."

Stevens Point
09-21-2005, 11:16 PM
One more UN article with Roger in it. A great article. :worship:

HIGHLIGHTS OF PRESS CONFERENCE BY UN SPECIAL ADVISOR ON SPORT FOR DEVELOPMENT AND PEACE AND SPOKESPERSON FOR INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF SPORT AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION (BILINGUAL)
21 September 2005

Adolf Ogi, Special Adviser to the United Nations Secretary-General on Sport for Development and Peace and Under-Secretary-General, and Roger Federer, the world’s top-ranked tennis player and Spokesperson for the International Year of Sport and Physical Education 2005, today gave a joint press conference at the United Nations Office at Geneva on the work carried out so far under the International Year of Sport and Physical Education 2005.

Adolf Ogi, Special Adviser to the United Nations Secretary-General on Sport for Development and Peace, said the International Year of Sport and Physical Education was now in full swing. The second half of the year was beginning, and it was time to review the achievements so far. He wished to thank Roger Federer, the Spokesman of the Year, for being present for the review, and said he was to be congratulated for the results of the Year as well as for his impressive victory at the US Open. Roger Federer had been present at the UN Headquarters in New York with the Secretary-General for the launch of the Year on 5 November 2004. Since that date, hard work had been done to mobilise Governments, politicians, the sports industry, NGOs, civil society and others. The objective of the Year was clear - sport could help to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. It was a universal language that taught universal values and necessary lessons for life, and its power in this respect should be recognised.

Mr. Ogi said he was very proud of the achievements so far this year. Governments were increasingly recognising sport as a means to promote health, education, development and peace. National Committees for the Year had been set up in many countries. Many sports projects had been started in developing countries, run by the United Nations, NGOs and Governments, as well as sports organizations. The Swiss Sports Development Project had already run over 40 projects alone. Conferences on sport and peace in Russia, sport and women’s leadership in the United States, and other conferences would be held.

The tsunami had been a terrible disaster, with over 250,000 people killed, but the sports world had mobilised to help the survivors, with money collected thanks to sports events, and athletes travelling to the area and bringing survivors hope and joy. A roundtable had been organized at the United Nations after the tsunami which included over 20 sports federations, and they had all discussed how sport could help in the case of such disastrous events and had agreed to work more closely and to be better prepared for the future.

Last week in New York, at the World Summit, a document on the state of the world had been agreed upon. Besides all the important issues contained therein, paragraph 145 said that sport played an important role for world development and peace, showing that the goal of the Year was being achieved. A Sport and Development Plan of Action, to be discussed in the General Assembly, was also a feature of the paragraph, and this would contribute to achieving the Millennium Development Goals better and faster, and would ensure that a lasting legacy of the Year would be left behind. Everybody should understand that sport was an important instrument for a better world. Roger Federer was helping to raise the profile of development through sport, and was a perfect example for the positive values and advantages of sport, the best school of life. There could be no one better in this respect than Roger Federer.

Roger Federer, Spokesman for the International year of Sport and Physical Education and the world’s top-ranked tennis player, said it was a great honour to be the Spokesman for the Year, and he hoped he would be able to help further. He had been following the developments of the Year closely. It had been a very busy year for him personally, and he was very happy to see what was happening. Sport had always been the most important thing in his life, and he had been able to meet many people, including children, and inspire them. He would always be there when needed, despite his busy schedule. He had gone South Africa to visit his own Foundation in Port Elizabeth, which contributed towards providing education and food to poor children, and he hoped to build that up in the future.

M. Roger Federer a affirmé que c'était un grand honneur pour lui d'être ici avec M. Ogi pour aider au développement du sport et de l'éducation physique. Il a fait part du plaisir qu'il éprouve à partager avec d'autres personnes ce qu'il a vécu dans sa carrière en tant que sportif. Il a indiqué qu'au cours de sa carrière, il a pu rencontrer beaucoup de gens, surtout des jeunes à qui il a pu donner des conseils. M. Federer a souligné qu'il ne voit toujours que le côté positif des choses, qu'il gagne ou qu'il perde. Si je perds, j'ai plus de temps pour ma famille et si je gagne, alors tout va bien, a-t-il dit. Il a en outre indiqué avoir toujours beaucoup de respect pour ses adversaires. Le champion mondial a rappelé qu'il avait créé une fondation en Afrique du Sud pour aider à l'éducation des jeunes et leur offrir des repas.

In response to a question on whether he would contemplate a trip to the Middle East to help Iraqi or Palestinian children or whether he would wait for peace, and whether he was ready for the Davis Cup, Mr. Federer said he was currently trying to focus on South Africa, as his mother was from there. He was working on the extent of his commitment, and as he was still very young, he had time on his side in that respect, as he could continue to extend his commitment in the future. He could always consider a trip to the areas mentioned, and he liked the Arab World. Regarding the Davis Cup, he said yes he was ready. :yeah:

On a question as to what he was doing over the next year and whether he had projects elsewhere in Africa, Mr. Federer said that he only had projects in South Africa. What he would like in the future would be for the Year to fit him in wherever he could help, and then he would try and fit it into his schedule. He would be looking into what was possible in the next year and would go from there.

Un correspondant lui ayant demandé en quoi consistait le travail de sa fondation, M. Federer a expliqué que les personnes associées à sa fondation à Port Elizabeth, à savoir l'organisation partenaire locale IMBEWU, s'occupent notamment du sida et de bien d'autres choses. M. Federer a précisé qu'en ce qui le concerne, il s'occupe plus spécifiquement d'éducation, l'action dans ce domaine se concentrant en particulier sur la promotion de la scolarisation des enfants des rues.

On a question regarding his contact with IMG, a sports management and marketing agency, and whether this would have impact on his philanthropic activities, Mr. Federer said this contact had just taken place, and the owner of IMG was very much into charity, especially in Africa and South Africa, and therefore Mr. Federer intended to increase his contribution, and it was clear that things would change. Maybe a tennis tournament would be arranged in Africa, maybe in the South, and things would be examined further in the years to come.

Une correspondante lui ayant demandé si cela faisait longtemps qu'il avait envie de soutenir des œuvres caritatives, M. Federer a indiqué que cela faisait environ deux ou trois ans que cette idée lui était venue. Certains athlètes, notamment André Agassi, se sont déjà beaucoup investis dans ce domaine, a-t-il fait observer. Il a précisé que sa mère étant sud-africaine, il connaît bien l'Afrique du Sud. Il a indiqué qu'il voulait faire quelque chose assez tôt, mais pas trop tôt non plus. «Alors ça a commencé gentiment et maintenant l'ONU m'offre une autre possibilité de faire des bonnes choses pour une bonne cause», a déclaré M. Federer. Il a souligné qu'il s'efforçait de veiller à ne pas investir toute son énergie uniquement dans le tennis, les entraînements et les médias. «J'essaie aussi de faire davantage pour l'image de la Suisse, pour aider, car quelquefois, avec peu de temps - moi - je peux vraiment faire beaucoup de choses - je crois que je n'en suis même pas conscient moi-même».

On a question on how Mr. Federer, a player in a sport seen as elitist, thought that tennis could be popularised in more countries, in particular in Africa, and what could be done to change tennis from being seen as an elitist game, Mr. Federer said he did not agree with this perception. Tennis was played all around the world, which gave him personally a great opportunity to visit everywhere, including Africa. However, he wished that players would unite further, rather than doing individual things. After the tsunami he had organised an exhibition match with the top 10 players in order to raise some money. This had taken place and he had won the tournament, and it had been a great success, and had given him great hope for the future of tennis.

Answering a question on how much was raised from this event and whether he contemplated doing anything for Katrina and the poor of New Orleans, Mr. Federer said he was not one hundred percent sure, but he thought about $ 50,000. With regards to Katrina, he had not had time yet to plan anything, as it had taken place just before the US Open, but he was ready to invest time and money to help, as it was definitely a disaster.

Responding to a question on whether he and Mr. Ogi could discuss the use of sport in the development of peace, Mr. Federer said that Mr. Ogi has visited many places to try and make people play football and be happy, and to show that sports could bring peace.

Mr. Ogi said that in his experience, there was a potential for the use of sport in the development of peace. The cricket team from India last year had gone to play in Pakistan, with about 10,000 Indian supporters. In January this year, Pakistan's team had gone to India, also with about 10,000 supporters. Three years ago, the two countries had threatened to go to war. When the Pakistani team went to India, President Musharraf also went to India, and met the Prime Minister of India, and he had said that cricket diplomacy worked well - and the relationship between the two countries was much better now. In 1971, the first diplomatic contact between the United States and China had been through ping-pong. Sport could test what was possible for politicians, and the power of sport should be better recognised by society. At the Olympic Village in Athens, the representatives of over 200 countries had lived together in peace and freedom, due to the various rules. If rules were respected, then there would not be so many conflicts. It was time to create a better world, and there was a need for a new instrument, which would not change the world today but could help to create a better world over the next 30 years. Criticism should not continue, rather work should continue to make a better world for the next generations.

On a question on what Mr. Federer thought with regards to the importance of sports and exercise in terms of keeping down obesity and improving the health and well-being of ordinary people, Mr. Federer said that sports gave a great feeling. When one was doing sports, one thought about completely different things than when just sitting in a chair. It was very important for people to do sports, and to stay healthy. There was a small chance of injury, but then anything could happen any time, even walking down the street. Sports were very important for him, not just to stay fit but also to think.

Responding to a question on what kind of experience he could bring to children living in Africa on under $ 1 a day and who could not play tennis, Mr. Federer said that he did not go there to teach tennis, but to teach what sport had given him, such as the opportunity to learn about other cultures and to gain happiness. He was trying to give out the message to remind people what sports could do in the field of happiness. He had his own career, and when that was over he would give more time, and would be able to touch more people. At the moment he could only contribute to a certain extent, but the people in the organization of the Year were trying to do more.

On a question as to whether there was an intent to make the Year a permanent institution and for it to go on after the end of next year, Mr. Ogi said the year would go on, and the first bridge had been built. A platform had been offered to all 191 Member States, and it should not come to an end. Roger Federer would continue as Spokesman. There was a need to climb up one step after another. The goal to create a better world could be achieved, as this was in the interest of all, and Roger Federer was the best in this respect.

Responding to a question on whether there would be a continuing structure for this effort and whether the name of the Year would be changed to make it sound more like permanent body, Mr. Ogi said the Year’s structure would end, but there was an Office in Geneva and another in New York, and the idea would go on, as at the United Nations, it was known that if one wanted to touch the young generations, sport had to be included in all activities, and so the organization set up for the Year would go on and be more successful in the future.

lunahielo
09-22-2005, 02:52 AM
What a terrific article.
What terrific guys~~Roger and you, Stefan! :)
Thanks.

Mrs. B
09-22-2005, 08:53 AM
Merci, yukio-san! :wavey:

babsi
09-22-2005, 03:16 PM
A big - THANK YOU - from a very laszy person to all the busy ones :)

What is it Eva? - are you going under cover - I won´t tell,I prommis :)

Stevens Point
09-22-2005, 04:23 PM
an article about this weekend.

Federer returns to play for Swiss in Davis Cup

Associated Press
09.22.2005

GENEVA (AP) - Britain has a perfect 3-0 record against Switzerland in Davis Cup play. It's been 20 years since they last met, though, and that was long before Roger Federer came along.

Federer, the world's No. 1 player, skipped Switzerland's first-round Davis Cup match early this year and the team lost 3-2 to the Netherlands.

Now he's back in Davis Cup action for the first time in 17 months to lead the Swiss in a playoff match against Britain on an indoor clay court at the Palexpo arena. Play in the best-of-five series begins Friday.

The winning team will secure a place in the 2006 World Group, the elite 16-nation division. The loser drops into Zonal Group I play in 2006.

"I decided not to play the first tie this year because I wanted to focus on the tour," Federer, a six-time Grand Slam champion, told The Associated Press. "The big focus of the year was holding onto the No. 1 position. The team understood completely.

"But now I want to help the team not to go down. It's really important to go back to the World Group. It's special to be back playing for Switzerland after a year and a half."

Federer has had another remarkable year, compiling a 71-3 record with 10 tournament titles so far. He won Wimbledon for the third straight year and is coming off the successful defense of his U.S. Open title.

"We are the favorites," he said. "My Davis Cup record and my record on the ATP circuit are strong. We're playing at home. We are playing on clay, which isn't usually the best surface for British players.

"My goal is to win both my (singles) matches and give Switzerland two points. I strongly believe that I can do that."

Federer opens singles play Friday against Britain's Alan Mackin. In the second singles, Stanislas Wawrinka goes against 18-year-old Scottish star Andy Murray, who reached the third round at Wimbledon, the second round of the U.S. Open and has improved his world ranking from 418 to 111 in just a few months.

British captain Jeremy Bates took a gamble by leaving veteran Greg Rusedski out Friday's singles.

Federer is due to team up with Yves Allegro in Saturday's doubles against Murray and Rusedski. In Sunday's reverse singles, it would be Federer vs. Murray and Wawrinka vs. Mackin.

Switzerland is facing relegation in large part because Federer skipped the first-round match in March, marking the first time in six years he missed Davis Cup duty. In Federer's last Davis Cup appearance, the Swiss lost 3-2 to France in April 2004 on a hard court in Lausanne.

This time the Swiss chose clay - the sport's slowest surface - to favor Wawrinka. However, clay is Federer's least favorite surface. While he has 35 consecutive hard court victories to his name, two of his three losses this season have come on clay.

"It's never easy switching surfaces and it's particularly tough changing from a fast hard court to clay," Federer said. "But I think it will be even more difficult for the British."

Mrs. B
09-22-2005, 09:06 PM
A big - THANK YOU - from a very laszy person to all the busy ones :)

What is it Eva? - are you going under cover - I won´t tell,I prommis :)

lol, i just felt like changing. :lol: but my sig gives me away. ;)
but it's temporary. :devil:

SUKTUEN
09-23-2005, 05:50 AM
GO

Stevens Point
09-23-2005, 06:19 AM
One more article

Updated: Sep. 22, 2005, 3:14 PM ET
Federer draws world No. 262 in Davis Cup playoff
Reuters

GENEVA -- Runaway world No. 1 Roger Federer drew a little-known Scot on Thursday as Britain's Davis Cup captain Jeremy Bates took a surprise approach to this weekend's World Group playoff against Switzerland.

Living up to his promise of playing the tie tactically, Bates nominated world No. 262 Alan Mackin to face Federer in Friday's opening singles rubber, in place of the British team's top player Greg Rusedski.

Rusedski is expected to be brought in for Sunday's reverse singles, allowing Britain to concentrate their firepower on the matches against Swiss No. 2 Stanislas Wawrinka as well as on Saturday's doubles rubber.

British No. 3 Andy Murray will be the first to take on Wawrinka when the two meet in Friday's second singles rubber.

Rusedski and Murray will then pair up against Federer and Swiss doubles specialist Yves Allegro in the doubles.

Britain will hope to still be in contention after Murray's rubber with Federer on Sunday -- allowing Rusedski to come in for a decisive match against Wawrinka.

"I don't think the Swiss will have been expecting [that]," Bates told reporters following the draw. "It also puts a lot of pressure on Wawrinka who will now play his first match against Murray.

"When it comes to choosing someone to play Federer, we have to look at things realistically. I'm not prepared to throw anything away, but we are definitely looking to transfer the pressure back on to them -- and onto Wawrinka in particular."

Mackin was born just three days after Federer but age is about the only thing the two 24-year-olds have in common.

Once ranked No. 1 in Scotland, before the sudden rise of Murray, Mackin has had his best run of results this year at a lower-tier challenger tournament in Nottingham, England, where he won two matches before going out in the quarterfinals.

His only previous Davis Cup experience came in 2003 when he was beaten 6-3, 6-3, 6-3 by Mark Philippousis during Brtain's World Group first-round loss to Australia.

"I'm going to go out and enjoy myself and just see what happens," a relaxed-looking Mackin said on Thursday.

"Playing Federer will obviously be very different from other opponents I've faced but I mustn't think about it too much."

If Bates had wanted to raise a few eyebrows among the Swiss team, it seems that he succeeded.

"Yes, I was surprised," Federer said during the Swiss team's media conference. "You always keep in mind the various options that are there, but I thought it might be Murray that they would leave out. I'm sure they have their reasons though.

"I'm happy not to be playing Murray in my first match though, and I think Stan is pleased not to be playing Rusedski, who he has never beaten.

"The danger for me against Mackin will be in not knowing him at all. I'll have to try and find out today how he plays and what his results have been. Of course my own game should be enough to get me through. But this is Davis Cup, and we are on clay so I still see it as a challenge for me to get the first point for Switzerland."

Assuming Federer has no difficulty in securing that opening point, the second rubber between Murray and Wawrinka could go a long way towards deciding the tie.

The 20-year-old Swiss and 18-year-old Briton are both seen as future stars in their home countries and share a liking for clay -- having both spent time at separate training camps in Barcelona during their youth.

Currently ranked 110th in the world, Murray will have to overcome an opponent ranked fifty places above him -- as well as a partisan Swiss crowd -- if he is to keep the British game-plan alive.

SUKTUEN
09-23-2005, 04:27 PM
thanks~

nobama
09-24-2005, 11:07 AM
Here's the Thailand draw:

MAIN DRAW :

(1)FEDERER, Roger SUI vs DANIEL, Marcos BRA
KARANUSIC, Roko CRO vs Qualifier
MULLER, Gilles LUX vs (WC)PHILIPPOUSSIS, Mark AUS
(8)HORNA, Luis PER vs MINAR, Ivo CZE

(4)HAAS, Tommy GER vs LABADZE, Irakli GEO
KIM, Kevin USA vs WANG, Yeu-Tzuoo TPE
CALATRAVA, Alex ESP vs TURSUNOV, Dmitry RUS
(6)NIEMINEN, Jarkko FIN vs KUCERA, Karol SVK

(5)SODERLING, Robin SWE vs VIK, Robin CZE
BASTL, George SUI vs MURRAY, Andy GBR
NORMAN, Dick BEL vs Qualifier
(3)GINEPRI, Robby USA vs UDOMCHOKE, Danai THA

(4)SRICHAPHAN, Paradorn THA vs Qualifier
GARCIA-LOPEZ, Guillermo ESP vs Qualifier
GIMELSTOB, Justin USA vs LAPENTTI, Nicolas ECU
(2)HEWITT, Lleyton AUS vs DLOUHY, Lukas CZE[/QUOTE]

oneandonlyhsn
09-24-2005, 11:18 AM
:wavey: Thanks Mirkaland

babsi
09-24-2005, 02:29 PM
Thanks,Steven :)
Thanks Mirkaland :)

SUKTUEN
09-24-2005, 03:23 PM
Roger have more and more chinese articles too

Stevens Point
09-24-2005, 03:27 PM
www.daviscup.com

Swiss seal victory over Great Britain
Yves Allegro and Roger Federer secured Switzerland’s place in the World Group of Davis Cup by BNP Paribas next year, beating Andy Murray and Greg Rusedski 75 26 76 62 to give the Swiss an unassailable 3-0 lead over Great Britain in Geneva.

The 6,500-plus crowd in the Palexpo stadium erupted into noisy delight when the final backhand from Rusedski skewed long and wide to give the Swiss the tie and send Great Britain back to Euro African Zone Group I for another season. The British will have to wait until Thursday’s draw to see which team they face next as they begin their quest for promotion all over again.

The singles wins for Federer and Stanislas Wawrinka on day one meant that Great Britain’s team captain Jeremy Bates and his men faced a difficult task even if they had won the doubles, but there was still smiles of relief from Federer and Allegro at stopping any chance of a British fight-back and wrapping up the tie so comfortably.

Murray and Rusedski had chances to keep the tie alive but could not capitalise on the chances they had against the Swiss pairing. Murray’s serve proved vulnerable at the end of the first set to give Switzerland the lead but the British duo hit back to win the second set and quieten the crowd, giving their own small band of supporters reason to cheer for the first time in the tie by breaking Allegro’s serve twice.

With the match delicately poised in the third set, the Swiss went a break up to lead 2-0 only for Federer to display a rare moment of vulnerability when he dropped his serve as the Swiss lead 5-3. He redeemed himself in some style in the tiebreaker, however, as he and Allegro combined to take both points on Murray’s serve and one on Rusedski’s. When Allegro punched away the winning volley to give Switzerland a two-sets-to-one lead, the momentum shifted irrevocably in Switzerland’s direction.

Federer and Allegro broke Murray’s serve at the start of the fourth set to send the volume in the Palexpo stadium up a few notches, then staved off a break point on Allegro’s serve at 2-1. When Murray’s serve buckled again in the face of some aggressive Swiss returning, both the match and the tie were effectively over.

“I thought it was a good doubles. Obviously it was very tight and the third set was crucial,” said Bates afterwards. “After that they got a bit of momentum going into the fourth set but I can’t fault the effort or the performance from Greg and Andy. I don’t think you can criticise the guys when they give that much.”

For 18-year-old Murray it offered an insight into how it feels to face Federer across the net and, despite the pain of defeat, it was an experience the teenager relished. “I don’t know whether he played his best tennis today but he certainly played very well,” said Murray. “He made a few big serves on a few big points. It’s great to get a feel for how he hits the ball and it’s an honour to be on the same court with him.”

SUKTUEN
09-24-2005, 03:33 PM
So Fast????????????????

1sun
09-24-2005, 03:38 PM
i hope roger plays muller, show andy how you beat him

SUKTUEN
09-24-2005, 03:49 PM
i hope roger plays muller, show andy how you beat him
But I like to watvh their match very much :devil:

yanchr
09-25-2005, 03:41 PM
For you to know.

Roger will come to Shanghai to hold a fan meeting on Oct 3 when he is invited to launch the new tennis court for TMC. I'm going there and hope to give another RE to him.

So if anybody wants to say sth to him, pls PM me or Email me to the following address: iluvry@hotmail.com

Deadline is Oct 1 12pm Beijing time.

I've opened a thread in his official site where I also posted our fan equipment. See the thread below.

http://www.rogerfederer.com/en/fanzone/forum/topicview.cfm?uTopicID=11052

SUKTUEN
09-25-2005, 03:47 PM
For you to know.

http://www.rogerfederer.com/en/fanzone/forum/topicview.cfm?uTopicID=11052
MY CHinese Also Go to See Roger~!!!!

Happy~~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :D :D :devil:

Stevens Point
09-25-2005, 11:03 PM
www.daviscup.com

Swiss savour return to World Group
Having played a vital role in securing his nation’s place in the World Group of Davis Cup by BNP Paribas next year, thanks to a play-off victory against Great Britain, Roger Federer hinted that he will do everything he can to help Switzerland mount a challenge for the trophy next season.

Federer has long been a Davis Cup stalwart for Switzerland since making his debut in a first round tie against Italy in 1999 and he is one of the reasons why the nation is currently ranked at nine in the ITF’s Davis Cup Nations Ranking. Federer, along with former Swiss Davis Cup heroes like Marc Rosset and Jakob Hlasek, has helped maintain Switzerland’s 16-year unbroken run in the World Group.

However, the World No. 1 felt compelled to miss his nation’s first round home tie against the Netherlands in Friborg in March in order to give himself a break. Federer admitted that the victory over Great Britain, in which he beat Alan Mackin in singles and then joined forces with Yves Allegro in the doubles, offered a reminder of just what Davis Cup means to him.

“In a way it did remind me but I was very well aware of what I was missing in Friborg at the beginning of the year, because it turned out to be a thriller and I wasn’t there to watch it or to play and to help and that was hard,” said Federer. “I still look back and think it was the right decision though. What about next year? We’ll see. I’ll decide in the next couple of weeks whether I will be available. My wish is definitely to be available and to be there but we will have to see. There are a lot of things you have to manage when you are No. 1 in the world, that’s very important.”

Switzerland’s captain Severin Luthi, who was captaining his first tie against the British, must have been delighted to have heard Federer sounding so positive about Davis Cup, for he admitted that, despite having an adept doubles player in Allegro and a emerging star in Stanislas Wawrinka in the team, Federer’s presence is vital if Switzerland is to challenge for the trophy in 2006. “For us it’s really important that Roger is available so we are trying everything to get him to stay in the team, but I think everybody would understand also if he wasn’t able to play. I think he wants to play, so if there is a possibility to play then he will do.”

While Switzerland can dream of a run to a historic first Davis Cup trophy next year, Great Britain will be anxiously eyeing the Davis Cup draw on Thursday in Paris to see which team it will face in the opening round of the Euro African Zone Group I.The good news for British team captain Jeremy Bates is that 32-year-old Greg Rusedski has committed himself to the cause for the foreseeable future and in Andrew Murray he has a player whose passion and ability to withstand pressure make him a natural for Davis Cup.

The Scottish teenager said it was an honour to be on the same court as Federer in the doubles in Geneva and he will be anxious to help his team gain promotion to the World Group in the hope of facing the legendary Swiss across the net again in the heat of Davis Cup competition.

Switzerland completed a 5-0 whitewash against Great Britain on Sunday with two wins in the dead rubbers. George Bastl took just 53 minutes to dismantle David Sherwood’s game in the first match; Bastl, who by coincidence will face Murray in the first round of next week’s ATP event in Bangkok, beat Sherwood 63 60. Wawrinka then defeated Alan Mackin 75 76(5).

The Swiss clean sweep marked Great Britain's worst defeat since they lost 0-5 to the Slovak Republic in April 1995.

Daniel
09-26-2005, 04:06 AM
Thanks :)

SUKTUEN
09-26-2005, 03:27 PM
thanks

Stevens Point
09-28-2005, 05:13 PM
www.yahoo.com

Frustrated Federer advances in Bangkok

(writes through with quotes)

BANGKOK, Sept 28 (Reuters) - Tormented by frustration and a tricky opponent, Roger Federer's customary cool slipped for a second on Wednesday as the Swiss hurled his racket during a hard-fought first round victory at the Thailand Open.

The Wimbledon and U.S. Open champion was made to battle all the way before beating Brazilian Marcos Daniel 7-6 6-4 to open his Thai defence and the strain caused the uncharacteristic outburst.

"I was told he likes to get the rhythm and he's pretty slow from the baseline, and I get a guy serve and volleying at me," the world number one said.

"It's not so easy to adjust, plus on top of that I feel a little rusty coming from clay, but in the end I played some good shots when I needed them.

"There was some frustration here and there. It shouldn't have happened, but it did."

Federer's frustration was understandable as 133rd-ranked Daniel refused to be intimidated by the stature of his opponent and rallied well from the baseline.

DIFFICULTY ADJUSTING

At one stage Federer came within two points of allowing Daniel to serve for the opening set, and he had to wait until his eighth break point before a backhand volley error from Daniel at 5-5 gave him the first break of the match.

Even then he dropped his own serve, and just one mini-break -- on the first point of the tiebreak -- decided the set in Federer's favour.

Several break points also went begging in the second set, before Federer finally claimed victory on his third match point.

Lleyton Hewitt also struggled to overcome a dogged opponent before reaching the second round.

Second seed Hewitt, playing his first match since losing to Federer in the semi-finals of the U.S. Open, survived an enterprising challenge from Czech Lukas Dlouhy to win 6-3 3-6 7-5.

The Australian appeared set for a runaway victory as he swept to a 4-1 lead in the opening set, but once Dlouhy settled he offered a real challenge.

"I probably played the tighter points a bit better than he did out there," said Hewitt, who admitted he had difficulty adjusting to playing indoors after the U.S. Open.

"Everything felt very different out there today, and it was just a question of trying to get through that match.

"Throughout the first and seconds sets I actually felt he was playing my service games a lot better than his own. He threw in a lot of double-faults and some cheap second serves for me for me, but he hit the ball really well from the back of the court."

Updated on Wednesday, Sep 28, 2005 11:37 am EDT

Stevens Point
09-28-2005, 05:20 PM
www.uk.yahoo.com

Federer can, and will, get even better: Roche
Wed 28 Sep, 11:37 AM

SYDNEY (AFP) - Roger Federer's part-time coach insisted that the seemingly-untouchable Swiss world No.1 can improve despite being "just about a complete player".

"I think if he served and volleyed more it would certainly help his cause in the long run," Tony Roche said Wednesday. "His second serve, it was pretty impressive at the US Open, but it can get a little bit better."

Federer beat Andre Agassi in four sets to take the US Open earlier this month, with the US veteran calling his opponent "the best I've played against".

Roche -- Australia's Davis Cup coach and Federer's part-time coach since January -- said the 24-year-old was the perfect competitor.

"The thing with Roger is that he is just about the complete player," Roche told the Australian Associated Press.

"The players that I have worked with before like (Ivan) Lendl and Pat (Rafter), Roger is sort of a blend of all those guys.

"That is the ideal world, to have people play tennis like Roger Federer."

Roche will join Federer at the Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai, China, in November in preparation for the first 2006 Grand Slam, the Australian Open, in January.

Roche, who is also a friend of Australia's former world No.1 Lleyton Hewitt, said that while he felt torn watching Federer play Hewitt he felt comfortable coaching the Swiss player because he had many national attributes.

"He is such a terrific bloke, he's very much an Australian in lots of ways," he said. "He's laid back, he loves his sport, he is easy to get along with, so it's been terrific."

babsi
09-28-2005, 05:26 PM
Thanks,Steven :)

a mix of Lendl and Rafter - not bad for starters :)

SUKTUEN
09-29-2005, 08:58 AM
thankyou

nobama
09-30-2005, 03:46 AM
Video of Roger talking about Shanghi. He will visit there for a day after Thailand.

http://www.atptennis.com/en/common/TrackItA.asp?file=http://wm.atptennis-global.speedera.net/wm.atptennis-global/federer_answers_high.wmv

LCeh
10-01-2005, 12:06 AM
Someone posted this on tennisweek

________________________
Coach: Federer will get better
28/09/2005 12:38 - (SA)
Melbourne - Australian coach Tony Roche says world No 1 Roger Federer can only get better.

Roche, who has been Federer's part-time coach since January, has pinpointed areas of the 24-year-old's game that need improvement.

He'll join Federer at the Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai, China, in November to begin working more closely with him.

"I think his net game, he is obviously a good volleyer but he can get better," Roche said on Wednesday. "I think if he served and volleyed more it would certainly help his cause in the long run.

"His second serve, it was pretty impressive at the US Open (where he beat Andre Agassi in the final), but it can get a little bit better."

Roche said Federer was a model player.

"The thing with Roger is that he is just about the complete player," said Roche.

"The players that I have worked with before like (Ivan) Lendl and Pat (Rafter), Roger is sort of a blend of all those guys. That is the ideal world, to have people play tennis like Roger Federer."

Federer has held the ATP top ranking for 86 weeks.

After Shanghai, Roche and Federer won't meet again until just before January's Australian Open at Melbourne, where Federer will attempt to win his third Grand Slam singles title in a row.

_____________________

I would certainly love to see Roger Serve and volley more if he can do well with it. It's become such a rarity these days to see guys hitting good volleys at the net that it would be a shame if Roger doesn't improve his net game more. Can't wait to see what changes Roger can make during Shanghai. :)

soonha
10-01-2005, 12:37 AM
This is an article from the Times. Not specifically written about Roger or tennis but about the geniuses in sports. I like the part in which the author compared Roger to Sampras cuz I've been thinking of the same since long ago.

A little long but worthy of reading, I think.
================================================== =
The Times September 30, 2005

Illusionists who shade the rest with nothing to declare except their genius
By Simon Barnes

IT HAS been a week for contemplating the nature of genius. Like all others, I suppose, but Martin Scorsese’s documentary on Bob Dylan, No Direction Home, broadcast on Monday and Tuesday, certainly brought the matter to mind. Dylan is the only genius that pop music has produced. He stands as far above the rest as Shakespeare towers above everyone else that wrote a play.

It is not necessary to like Dylan, or for that matter, Shakespeare, to come to such a conclusion. You can, more or less objectively, state that these two created one masterpiece after another, in an immense variety of forms and moods, on a scale that no one else has even thought of challenging.

And so, naturally enough, the mind strays from the love who speaks like silence and William Zanzinger and the night that plays tricks when you’re trying to be so quiet, and turns to genius in other walks of life. Like sport. Most people would agree that genius of a kind exists in sport — and most of us would be careful about the way we use the term.

After England had been scattered by Glenn McGrath in the Lord’s Test, I referred to him as “a genius”. My friend and colleague Michael Henderson disagreed with the term, which got me thinking. I had used it deliberately, and a touch perversely, to make it quite clear that the collapse was as much a matter of McGrath’s brilliance as England’s errors.

But Hendo disallowed genius for McGrath: but I don’t think he — or anyone — would disallow the term for Shane Warne. If you accept the concept of sporting genius at all, Warne is self-evidently a genius. But why, then, is McGrath, a man who has taken 500 Test wickets, not a genius? All at once, there is a hint that sporting genius is not quite the same thing as sporting excellence.

When Wisden carried out its search for the five cricketers of the 20th century, not a single fast bowler made the list: the best was Dennis Lillee in sixth place. True, Wisden was not explicitly looking for genius, but the reluctance to give the supreme accolade to a fast bowler — and fast bowlers win more Test matches than any other kind of cricketer — is significant.

Let us turn to football. Genius: well, we have to start with Pelé and Diego Maradona, and then get into beery arguments about Zinedine Zidane and Johan Cruyff and George Best. What we won’t do is talk about centre halves. John Terry, Terry Butcher, Tony Adams, forget it. A centre half is indispensable: a great centre half is the team’s rallying point of sanity and safety and security. A team without a centre half is not a team. But no one looks at Sol Campbell and says: “The man’s a genius.”

In England’s World Cup- winning rugby union side, you might call Jason Robinson a genius, for his thrilling, defence-scattering running. You might even use the term for Jonny Wilkinson. But England won the World Cup because of the driving force of Martin Johnson, and no one has suggested that Jonno is a genius. You can complete the ultimate achievement in your sport and still be free of genius.

Everyone uses the term genius for Roger Federer. As with Warne, the term is self-evident, not a hint of controversy. The greatest tennis player that lived, in terms of grand-slam victories, is Pete Sampras, with 14, as compared with Federer’s six and counting. No one considered Sampras a genius.

For that matter, the greatest achiever in the history of sport has never been called a genius. Sir Steve Redgrave is everybody’s idea of sporting greatness and if five Olympic gold medals do not make you a genius, it is crystal clear that genius is not the same thing as sporting excellence.

Let us go back to tennis. Sampras’s game was based on naked force of will. His chief weapon was usually considered to be his serve. In fact, it was his second serve: not only accurate and safe, but also brutally competitive. That reflected not his skill but his nerve. This is not a prosaic quality. Sampras, like Redgrave, has the world’s respect but from both, the word genius is withheld.

Federer's game is different. It is shockingly various. He is as myriad-minded as ever Shakespeare was. He can play shots that no one else can, he can make the ball do things that you would think impossible. There is an aesthetic beauty to his game, as well as a sense of purpose. There is a kind of magic about it that we find deeply pleasing to watch.

In art, we use the term genius for the highest achievers: Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, Joyce. In sport we frequently use the term for lesser achievers whose skills, for some reason, please us. In snooker, the serial winners Steve Davis and Stephen Hendry were admired all right but only Alex Higgins, Jimmy White and Ronnie O’Sullivan are called genius.

Sporting genius involves something of an illusion. Warne, Federer and Zidane offer the illusion of complicity, the stunning impression that the person who is doing everything possible to stop the genius is in fact co-operating with him. Thus competition assumes the air of a dance, a ritual, something that is both spontaneous and immemorial. There is a real beauty in this, for all that beauty is not the aim of the exercise. The beauty is incidental, and perhaps the more pleasing for that.

And all those who acquire the name of genius are able to supply another illusion, that they have some kind of immunity from the laws that govern the rest of us. We think of a genius as a man apart, a man for whom the normal rules do not apply, Vincent van Gogh being, if you like, the type specimen.

A sporting genius seems to have been let off the laws of physics. Gravity does not pull him down. A ball will behave not as Newton said, but according to some grander and more idiosyncratic world view. Warne makes a cricket ball behave with a new and elusive logic; Federer puts tennis ball and opponent on contrary strings; Zidane leaves defenders and goalkeepers lunging at air.

Those who possess these talents often fall in love with them. All athletes go out to win. Sampras set out to win by means of will, Federer by means of genius :yeah:. All methods of winning have their drawbacks and a sporting genius can fall in love with his own gifts, and find himself seeking to create art and beauty above mere victory.

But to do so, even in the debased sporting use of the term, is to betray both sport and genius. If genius in sport is not used entirely for the purpose of seeking victory, it is an empty thing, a mere decoration: to be a Henri Leconte or a Rodney Marsh. If we accept that sport can bring out a kind of genius, we must also accept that in sport — even though on occasions they coincide gloriously — genius and greatness are not the same thing.

================================================== ==
I think that in Roger's case genius and greatness come together "gloriously". Thank God. :worship:

SUKTUEN
10-01-2005, 06:26 AM
thanks

babsi
10-02-2005, 11:59 AM
Great article,soonha - thank you :)

and a thank you,to anyone else for taking the time to post :)