Roger news and articles [Archive] - Page 13 - MensTennisForums.com

Roger news and articles

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Nocko
07-22-2005, 11:05 AM
Rogi need to treat his feet and whole body enough. Then he 'll show us incredably beautiful tennis again! But I miss Rogi! :hug: :hug: I already rewatch Wimby final 3 times :o and SF twice, and 04 wimby,too. :p

soonha
07-22-2005, 11:08 AM
I suspect that's why he got it, as it could cause the plantar fascii to be overtaxed as his body had to stop so suddenly.

Surgery can take care of it - it did for LDav, if the shoes don't continually aggravate it. Racquets from heaven, shoes from hell!!

If he wasn't advised to do more than take an extra week off then, it sounds like it's getting worse, which I expected/feared. Probably have to figure out now if rest will take care of it, or if surgery is necessary.
Surgery for plantar fasciitis is the last option. I suspect he's now in the early stage of inflammation. In that case, resting is the treatment of choice and he has no choice but prevention from the aggravation of inflammation. If his feet would need surgery, there should be a HUGE problem.

It seems to me that he made a wise decision to be pre-cautious rather than to take unnecessary risks, which I appreciate. We fans should be also grateful for his condition is not so severe that he can be expected to get well soon just by resting.

Nathy
07-22-2005, 11:31 AM
Get well soon Roger :hug:

SUKTUEN
07-22-2005, 02:40 PM
Roger I will pray for you~~

Take a good rest~! Get well soon~!

TenHound
07-23-2005, 04:19 AM
Soonha, could you elaborate? Isn't it a chronic & degenerative condition? Or is the game now trying to figure out how frequently he can practice & play now w/out inflammation?

soonha
07-23-2005, 06:09 AM
Soonha, could you elaborate? Isn't it a chronic & degenerative condition? Or is the game now trying to figure out how frequently he can practice & play now w/out inflammation?
Sorry, I don't quite understand what's the point of your question.

Yes, it is a chronic problem. But right now he's suffering from the acute aggravation of inflammation, a rest is the treatment of choice.

It will wax and wane depending on how much he uses his feet, which is a common characteristic of chronic inflammatory problems in joints, fasciae or tendons. When this acute episode subsides, he can feel pain-free and play tennis.

But as far as he keeps walking, running or playing(esp. on hard court), it has a chance to be aggravated at any time. The problem is that as it repeats to be aggravated, his feet get deteriorated. When it goes to the chronic and final stage, bony spurs get growing and chronic inflammatory tissues are accumulated. Those spurs and tissue deposits cause pain and discomfort on weight-bearing which are so severe that surgery can be necessary.

I meant that surgery is the last option because surgery can make just a physical correction, e.g. the removal of inflammatory deposits and bony spurs or the correction of tissue deformities, not a treatment of inflammation itself.

Thus the best is to minimize the number of acute episodes, i.e. to prevent from aggravating inflammation, which means a rest now and a cutdown of the # of the tournaments from now on.

I hope this can be a right answer to your question.

avocadoe
07-23-2005, 01:40 PM
I, too, have confidance in Roger's decision making. He'll play all out again this summer, and will not jeapardize his feet. It is too bad he has to deal with the painful issue but most players have something of a physical nature to contend with in sport. Happily, Roger does not have a mental issue. In that sphere he is rock solid :)

SUKTUEN
07-23-2005, 01:56 PM
Are there only can post english article?

Minnie
07-24-2005, 12:34 AM
Has anyone found any media article about his pulling out?? I feel it's weird because other media sources reported immediately when he'd pulled out of Rome this year due to the feet problem. I don't know why they are quiet this time... (Even Swiss media hasn't reported yet...) He hasn't told any media about it but only the fans through his website, and the media hasn't noticed yet?? :confused:

There has been a piece on the BBC tennis website which just more or less requoted what was said on Roger's website - and I think I saw a small piece in one of the English newspapers (can't remember which one).

TenHound
07-24-2005, 01:43 AM
Soonha, Beautiful answer. Thanks Very Much.

Did people see the interesting piece on tennisweek(.com) about Babolat coming out w/sneakers - teaming up w/Michelin which will handle the soles? Sounds interesting. Pandy just signed on w/them. I wonder if that's an acknowledgement of the problems w/Nike etc. right now. Also, just announced that Hewitt is leaving Nike. Someone speculated it was the standard issue of money. I'm starting to wonder if it's wanting to get out of Nike shoes - remember he had foot surgery this year. So did AA, another Nike guy - that's 3 top 10 Nike guys w/foot problems in 1 season.

TenHound
07-24-2005, 01:51 AM
(Clarification, Pandy was Not a Nike kid - he was Reebok; but my understanding was that's it's not just Nike shoes that have that very problematical overly grippy bottom. I wonder if Babolat isn't jumping in 'cuz the others have gone down a blind alley & a new perspective is needed on soles.)

Fedex
07-24-2005, 03:56 AM
This injury is unfortunate. I was looking forward to seeing Federer play in Montreal again, after the dissapointing performance there in 03.

SUKTUEN
07-24-2005, 03:44 PM
Hope Roger get well soon~

TenHound
07-25-2005, 06:26 AM
Andre is playing the last few tournaments of his career most likeley, yet tennis-x reports that it looks like he's just switched from Nike to Adidas. So, now how bad are Nike shoes!!

Minnie
07-25-2005, 08:18 AM
Andre is playing the last few tournaments of his career most likeley, yet tennis-x reports that it looks like he's just switched from Nike to Adidas. So, now how bad are Nike shoes!!

I've always wondered if the problem was to do with the shoes because incorrect footwear is one of the causes of plantar fasciitis. Do the players have to wear the shoes given to them, or are they speciallly made for the top players? I've no idea how contracts with sports companies work. From what you say, it sounds as if some of the top players are "jumping ship". I can't remember now what problem Martina Hingis had with her feet and who supplied her shoes.

Stevens Point
07-25-2005, 09:36 AM
I've always wondered if the problem was to do with the shoes because incorrect footwear is one of the causes of plantar fasciitis. Do the players have to wear the shoes given to them, or are they speciallly made for the top players? I've no idea how contracts with sports companies work. From what you say, it sounds as if some of the top players are "jumping ship". I can't remember now what problem Martina Hingis had with her feet and who supplied her shoes.
Hingis was suffering from some kind of foot sores (I doubt there was a mention of plantar fascilitis.) Her sportwear supplier was Sergio Tacchini of Italy. she claimed that her shoes caused the problem..., this case went on to the court (not tennis court), I can't remember if she won the case and got some money...

Black Adam
07-25-2005, 11:25 AM
I have always accused Nike, they ar the responsible ones.
Remember at TMS Rome, Fed and Hewitt were both out with injured feet and their shoes are...Nike :p
At TMS Indian Wells, Ageless One also had feet problems and his shoes are....Nike :p
I think that it would be better for Federer to change his shoe sponsors, for his own good and future ;)

nobama
07-25-2005, 12:02 PM
I haven't heard Nadal complain about his feet. He wears Nike and has played a lot of tennis this year. Seriously I don't think Nike is the problem. Hewitt probably left Nike so he could get more $ elsewhere. Same reason Roddick left Reebok, isn't it? Of course I don't think that's the main consideration for Roger. If it was he wouldn't be doing things in-house, he'd be working with a big time agency.

nobama
07-25-2005, 12:08 PM
Andre is playing the last few tournaments of his career most likeley, yet tennis-x reports that it looks like he's just switched from Nike to Adidas. So, now how bad are Nike shoes!!
If Roger really thought the problem was Nike he wouldn't be wearing them would he? Unless he's under contract where he has no choice? Even Hewitt, who supposedly is no longer with Nike, was wearing Nike shoes during his recent DC matches. And I've seen other players (Ginepri comes to mind) who don't wear Nike clothes wearing their shoes. During Wimbledon ESPN was talking about the "gold" shoes Roger and Maria were wearing and Brad Glibert said Nike makes the best grass court shoes out there.

SUKTUEN
07-25-2005, 01:47 PM
thanks~!!!

Dirk
07-25-2005, 02:59 PM
It is overplaying not his shoes if anything. Don't overreact to this problem. Roger knows what is best and is doing his best. Trust him.

SUKTUEN
07-25-2005, 03:02 PM
I trust Roger~

Minnie
07-25-2005, 04:24 PM
I note what you all say - I remain to be convinced re Nike shoes - I never got on with them when I did a lot of running. But my husband swears by them. Different shoes suit different folks! As for Roger overplaying ... the one person who springs to my mind when you mention overplaying is .... Nadal! Anyway, no doubt when we see Roger speeding around the tennis court again, all our worries will be over!

Tennis_Mad
07-25-2005, 06:31 PM
Sorry if this article has been posted already but this is an interview from 2003 where Roger talks about why Mirka and his parents run the PR side if his career rather than a top agency:

http://www.sportsmediainc.net/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=9211&bannerregion=



Alone At The Top

When Roger Federer received a 1700-pound heifer from tournament organizers at the Swiss Open the week after winning Wimbledon, no doubt agents far and wide were grumbling, "See what you get without proper representation?" To be fair, the cow, which Federer named Juliette, was a gift — not the fruits of hard-fought negotiations with the farming community in Gstaad.

The bovine bounty aside, Federer has taken an unusual step in his business career. The young Swiss star is going it alone in the complex world of professional management, marketing and sponsorship. In short, he’s without an agent.

After several years with IMG, the 21-year-old split from the Cleveland-based mega-firm in mid June — just prior to his Wimbledon victory. Instead, Federer is being represented by his father, Robert, a chemical technician; his mother, Lynette, a homemaker; his girlfriend and (currently injured) tennis pro, Mirka Vavrinec; and an assemblage of outside lawyers, accountants and advisors. Team Federer is even incorporated.

The decision to circumvent traditional agencies is hardly unprecedented in tennis. John McEnroe Sr. handled son John’s business dealings for a number of years. Mario Widmer, the boyfriend of Martina Hingis’s mother, took on much of the former No. 1’s deal-making responsibilities. And Andre Agassi, after years with IMG, chose to turn over the bulk of his business dealings to childhood friend Perry Rogers.

Not everyone thinks Federer’s decision is one worthy of a Wimbledon champion — not least of all, other agents. "I think it’s a relatively myopic approach," says Ken Meyerson, a vice president with SFX Sports Group’s tennis division, adding that navigating the crowded and competitive global marketplace is not for amateurs. Meyerson, whose firm represents the likes of Paradorn Srichaphan and Fernando Gonzalez, is equally blunt when he says that Federer could potentially lose "tens of millions of dollars over the course of his career" by foregoing more professional management.

Octagon’s Tom Ross, who represents Lleyton Hewitt, among others, agrees. "Based seemingly on a less-than-productive experience in the past, the Federers may not fully understand or appreciate the benefits of full-service management and expertise," says Ross.

Agents also point out that Federer’s marketability poses particular challenges because of his nationality. Switzerland has a small population, is home to many languages and has distinct cultural differences.

But Federer has a better chance than most in making his new arrangement work. "Everyone in tennis has been waiting for Roger to go the distance at a Grand Slam; so he’s not a flash in the pan," says Ross. "He’s got a lot of upside."

Only time will tell if the move is a good one. "Our game desperately needs stars," says Meyerson. "I hope the decision of Federer to isolate himself will not hurt the game."

What does Team Federer have to say about it all? Tennis Week caught up with Federer and his girlfriend Vavrinec, once ranked as high as No. 76, at their home in Bottmingen at the end of July. Here’s their take:

TW: Roger, you don’t have an agent. Is this why you got a cow after Wimbledon and not a Ferrari?

RF: (Laughs) No, it was a present from the tournament in Gstaad. It wasn’t something I bought. I hope it’s going to be there when I go back.

TW: Why don’t you have an agent?

RF: Well, it’s a long story. I had a manager, Bill Ryan, through IMG. It’s complicated. Somehow I wasn’t allowed to work with him anymore. So I said, “If I can’t work with my manager, I don’t want to be with the company any longer.” I don’t want to say that I lost trust, but I just wasn’t happy with the way things went. I just decided that the best thing right now is to work with people I trust. These are my parents and my girlfriend and my friends. This is the situation. I just want to give it a try. Hopefully, it’s going to work out.

MV: (Roger and IMG) were long enough together and I think Roger just wanted to try something else. IMG is very big. You are just one of many. Roger is a very sensitive person and it was not always the way he wanted; so now he is trying something new. He is getting older and he is making his own decisions.

TW: How long were you with IMG?

RF: Since around 16 (years old). Since I was a teenager.

TW: Mirka, how did you become part of Roger’s management team?

MV: It started as a hobby. It was around the time of my foot operation last year (in May). I began with booking flights and hotels. Roger is not alone; so I did it for his whole team. They were always late, you know, in booking. I loved to do it because I was playing tennis myself before and I never had an agent. I did everything myself from the beginning. The thing is, Peter (Lundgren, Federer’s coach) lives in Sweden; Roger lives in Switzerland. You need a combination of teamwork and lots of communication. You don’t have a business plan like a businessman. They need somebody flexible and I am very flexible and Roger can call me anytime.

TW: How do you juggle it all: the media demands, the product endorsement opportunities, contract negotiations, etc.?

MV: We talk and we put the heads together. The parents do the contract negotiations when it comes to (specific) points. I do the press, the e-mail, the fan posts, the perfume (the new Roger Federer Line), the hotels, the flights. Really, my days are sometimes too short (laughs).

TW: Do you get a percentage of the deals?

MV: No. For sure, later, maybe I’ll get a salary or something. It’s a company. Everybody is working for Roger but we don’t get a bonus or a percentage from deals.

TW: So you’re doing everything for free?

MV: Well, at the moment, yes. Of course, it is not a long time ago that Roger split from IMG. We had to wait until the contract was finished and then we had to form a new company, which was not very easy.

TW: You are now a company?

MV: Yes, it’s called Hippo In-house Management.

TW: Why Hippo?

MV: It’s just a name.

TW: Roger, how is it working so far?

RF: It’s quite fresh, quite new. Of course the Wimbledon victory didn’t help the cause because right now (his parents and Mirka) have more pressure on them. Everybody wants to know everything. That’s why I’m trying to keep it quiet around the management because we’re trying to settle a few things. Not everything is in place yet. My dad is already in negotiation with tournaments, with companies; so we just need a little more time to settle everything.

TW: What’s your mom’s role?

RF: She’s kind of like a secretary, giving an overview, a little bit of everything. She’s writing letters because her English is much better than my dad’s.

TW: How does Team Federer work?

MV: Everyone has his role and his job. We have a lawyer and a tax person who is watching everything and making sure everything goes well like we had at IMG. But this is more private. We know who the people are. We choose them. And they are not far away.

RF: We haven’t had time yet (to figure it all out). We have had a few offers on the table. We talk about it. When I’m home we have to do a lot of meetings, which is OK. Then we decide what to do. Also they speak between themselves, especially my mom and dad, and they decide what’s best for me and also ask for some advice once in a while.

TW: Is this a “between agents” strategy?

RF: No, this is something for long-term.

TW: Do you feel qualified?

MV: Well, I think to deal with the press, and especially now, this was really a big test for me because if somebody wins Wimbledon — I think you know what it means. I had such a tough time for one week (after Wimbledon). It was not hell, but terribly busy. (The phone) was ringing non-stop. All the press, everyone was calling me, everybody needed an interview and appointments and offers and TV and everything.

TW: Have you negotiated any deals yet?

MV: Not really, no.

TW: How did you decide to do it this way?

RF: Before, we had nothing to decide. IMG made all the calls. I trusted in my manager with all the deals he made. Of course in the end, I always decided which tournaments I’m going to play and which sponsors I work for or present myself with. I always could do it. I will get much more inside now, see how everything works. It’s very interesting. Maybe I’ll be a little more involved in the beginning to help out both of my parents. Then I want both of them to take more initiative themselves. And I trust them also.

TW: Is it working so far?

RF: Obviously things have changed if you become a Grand Slam champion, especially Wimbledon. Your market value goes up, you’re more famous in the world. I showed signs before my Wimbledon title, but now I made a really big step ahead by winning at my age. Now we’ll see how many people will want to sponsor me (laughs). I hope it will be a lot. I hope international people will want to sponsor me, not only Swiss enterprises.

TW: Have other players asked you how you do it without a management company or agent?

RF: Not really. Some have asked more for advice, what they think they should do.

TW: Do you know any other top players without agents?

RF: Well, Martina Hingis didn’t have a manager for some time. She had the husband of her mom that was doing a lot of her stuff. Otherwise, I don’t know too many. Some just don’t have the management system because they don’t need one because they’re not well ranked.

TW: Maybe it’s a Swiss thing?

RF: Who knows (laughs)?

TW: Would you recommend other players do this?

RF: Yes and no. It depends on how much they want to be involved in their career. In the beginning I was never interested in anything that happened around me. Now I really want to know. You ought to do it with people you know and trust. IMG and other such big companies, with them you don’t have the control anymore. You sign the paper and you give them control. You just have to stand behind it.

TW: What are the advantages?

RF: I feel good about what I’m doing. That’s most important so I can mentally relax when I go on court. It’s just interesting to see and it’s important that I know a little bit about what’s going on.

TW: What are the disadvantages?

RF: I don’t know how IMG really worked sometimes, how they made their deals. I wasn’t sitting at the table. It’s tough to say what is the disadvantage. They have a lot of power being such a big company, which maybe we don’t have.

TW: Mirka, have you given up your career to do this?

MV: I wouldn’t say I gave up my career. After the operation (for chronic inflammation), I did everything first for myself to get back and to come back on the tour.

TW: Then you’re not retired?

MV: No, I’m not retired yet. I still have a protected ranking for one more year. But I’ll see. The perfume is coming out (at the end of September) and Roger is playing very well. At the moment I am really happy with my life and I’m enjoying what I do.

TW: What happens if you break up?

MV: I guess he has to find another secretary or something or a lady (laughs). I don’t know. We said if this ever affected our relationship he would find another person to do it because our relationship is just too important.

TW: How long have you been together?

MV: Three years, almost.

TW: Would you do the same for Mirka?

RF: I think I would, if I were injured.

TW: In sum, it’s like a new family business venture, isn’t it?

MV: Yes, he is like a company. For Roger, I think I’m a big help, and with the parents, too. They are very involved in Roger’s life. I live with him. We are under one roof. We are a great team!

TW: Anything else you want to add?

RF: It’s new and we have to wait and see a little bit. In (six months) or a year’s time it’s going to be totally different, better organized. Ask me then and I can tell you more details maybe about the situation

TenHound
07-26-2005, 06:10 AM
Dirk, ordering people around is entirely inappropriate.

Hingis' problems w/Tacchini were awful. Even after she told them, proved to them that their shoes were hurting her feet, they refused to do anything about it. I don't know why she didn't just trot down to her local shoe store & buy something that worked for her, cancel the contract, anything to save her feet.

Personally, I wish Roger would sign a clothing deal w/LaCoste or Tacchini & find shoes that work for his feet. They make the Best looking clothes. And LaCoste have collars & real designers. (Anyone remember that outfit my fave Moroccan w/too many vowels in his name, wore @NYC the yr.of the endless rain - he was playing Moya, and he looked Gorgeous. Definitely a French designer.) Nike's clothes are just junk - apparently like their shoes - mere fabric to stamp their goddamn brand on. Wearing the shoes from the company that pays you the most has always struck me as Absolutely Insane. Some companies make shoes that fit my feet; others don't.

kjo
07-26-2005, 07:00 PM
I was in my car and a radio commercial came on for Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy as a treatment for plantar fasciitis. There's info on this at heelspurs.com/eswt/index.html.
Soonha, have you heard of this treatment? Maybe it's sth he could try if the problem doesn't go away?

RogiFan88
07-26-2005, 10:00 PM
Reminder to anyone who w like to PM me a message for ROGI! I am gathering them and sending them to him next Monday! ;)

nobama
07-27-2005, 05:32 AM
This is an old interview....from the Charlie Rose show after Roger won the US Open. Roger sounds like he has a bad cold, but it's still a great interview. I love how Roger is so open and honest in interviews and isn't afraid to discuss anything.

http://media5.bloomberg.com:443/cgi-bin/getavfile.cgi?A=17151465

babsi
07-27-2005, 09:40 AM
So many new articles - thanks for posting :) :) - will read one at a time,while waiting for Roger to play again - it´s been ages!

lunahielo
07-27-2005, 03:32 PM
Thanks to all of you for the articles/interviews, etc.~~
I watched 4 of his matches from last year's Toronto tournament ~yesterday.

Hope he is healing well and ehjoying his time away from the court. :)

SUKTUEN
07-27-2005, 04:07 PM
Thankyou so much~!!

I love it~!!

nobama
07-27-2005, 06:03 PM
I just read on CNN that the Swiss Davis Cup captin was sacked....and Roger was the one who had to tell him. Poor guy. :(

SUKTUEN
07-27-2005, 06:22 PM
what?

nobama
07-27-2005, 06:28 PM
From CNN:

Rosset axed as Swiss Davis captain

Wednesday, July 27, 2005; Posted: 1:19 p.m. EDT (17:19 GMT)

GENEVA, Switzerland -- Marc Rosset has been sacked as Switzerland's Davis Cup captain.

The team no longer had the "indispensable" confidence in their 34-year-old captain, Swiss Tennis said in a statement just two months before the play-off against Britain.

Three times Wimbledon champion Roger Federer broke the news to Rosset.

"The decision was taken unanimously and I explained it to Marc," Federer said.

"It was motivated by internal reasons. We all have a lot of respect for Marc as a person and a top level athlete with huge achievements. He is and will remain a great personality in Swiss tennis."

Switzerland and Britain face-off on September 23 in Geneva to try to stay in the top flight of the Davis Cup.

A successor for Rosset, who was captain since 2002, has not been named. Coaches Ivo Werner and Pierre Paganini will act as technical directors in the interim.

Switzerland, without Federer, lost their first round Davis Cup tie against the Netherlands in March.

Stevens Point
07-27-2005, 08:44 PM
I read an article from SFDRS about Rosset, it said that the "predecision" against Rosset was already fallen in April after the team lost to Holland by the players who were in the team against Schalken and co. So, it was more or less players' wish not to have him as the captain of Swiss tennis...

According to the article, Rosset is extremely disappointed but not surprised,,, so was he kind of expecting that he would be really....

Oh well, Marc....

http://www.mytennis.ch/daviscup/pages/img/main_img.jpg
We won't be able to see this kind of scenes like old days....

RogiFan88
07-27-2005, 09:48 PM
Sad news, isn't it... Marc really loved Rogi...

SUKTUEN
07-28-2005, 03:06 PM
Roger love His country, I think Swiss team will understand him

1sun
07-28-2005, 05:04 PM
as long as the swiss hav roger, it dont matter.

SUKTUEN
07-28-2005, 05:09 PM
what fire the leader?

1sun
07-28-2005, 05:19 PM
what fire the leader?
the hole team came to the conclusion that it was best that marc left. roger broke the news to marc, but it doesnt mean that he was the one who had the final say wether rosset left or not, he just did the dirty work basicaly.But i reckon roger wanted to tell him personally instead of sum twat just sayin fuck off we dont want you any more. Because roger and marc are good friends roger would have wanted him to fully understand why and the reasons and that theres no hard feelings.

*M*
07-28-2005, 08:08 PM
Everyone here probably already has a copy, but this promo may help bring Roger to a larger audience.

http://www.sportsmediainc.com/tennisweek/index.cfm?func=showarticle&newsid=13467&bannerregion=

Penn Provides Facing Federer Promotion

http://www.sportsmediainc.net/tennisweek/FedererWimbledonTrophy05SMullane.jpg
Photo By Susan Mullane By Tennis Week
07/27/2005


Roger Federer comes in a can next month. In a joint promotion with the ATP and Sports Authority, HEAD/Penn Racquet Sports will include a copy of Tennis Masters Cup Uncovered II: Facing Federer, the ATP’s behind-the-scenes documentary of the most recent Tennis Masters Cup, with purchase of a three-pack of Penn ATP tennis balls.


Priced at $7.99, the three-pack of Penn ATP Tennis Balls will remain on sale through November. It is the first time that ATP partner Penn has featured a three-pack promotion with its ATP ball.

"We’re certain recreational players using Penn balls also will enjoy getting an up-close look at the best professional players in the game through this beautiful and fun documentary," said Kevin Kempin, Vice President of Penn Racquet Sports Worldwide.

Additionally, holiday packs — comprising an eight-pack of balls and complimentary copy of the DVD — will be sold at Sports Authority stores beginning in October. Costing $19.99, the Penn eight-packs will be on sale through December, though Kempin says "we’re traditionally sold out by mid-December."

The DVD includes the one-hour documentary and bonus footage featuring Roger Federer, Marat Safin, Andy Roddick, Lleyton Hewitt, Tim Henman, Guillermo Coria, Carlos Moya and Gaston Gaudio. It continues to be sold online at ATPtennis.com (http://www.atptennis.com/) via ATP partner Tennis Warehouse.

"We’re delighted at the response from fans and broadcasters to the documentary this year, and pleased that Penn wanted to provide it free to so many recreational players," said David Higdon, ATP Senior VP, Communications and the film’s Executive Producer.

Presented by ATP premium partner Mercedes-Benz, the documentary has aired across the world on an extensive broadcasters’ list that includes ESPN International (Latin America and New Zealand), ESPN Classic (USA), The Tennis Channel (USA), TSN (Canada), FoxSports (Australia), SkySports (Great Britain) and SportTV (Brazil). It has also been showcased via in-flight entertainment programming on four airlines: British Airways, SAS, Cathay Pacific and Qatar Airways.

This year’s Tennis Masters Cup, the culminating event of the men’s professional tennis circuit, will be held November 13-20th in Shanghai, China.

SUKTUEN
07-30-2005, 04:17 AM
thanks for the information , 1sun

1sun
07-30-2005, 03:24 PM
thanks for the information , 1sun
no worries ;)

SUKTUEN
07-30-2005, 04:16 PM
no worries ;)

:confused: :confused: :confused:

1sun
07-30-2005, 04:40 PM
:confused: :confused: :confused:
your welcome. no worries is just another way to say it. english slang.

SUKTUEN
07-30-2005, 04:56 PM
oh, I understand now, thanks

1sun
07-30-2005, 05:04 PM
oh, I understand now, thanks
no worries :p

SUKTUEN
07-30-2005, 05:21 PM
no worries :p

to you~~ :D

1sun
07-30-2005, 06:52 PM
to you~~ :D
thank u very much. i just had dinner as well. ;)

SUKTUEN
07-31-2005, 11:11 AM
I have dinner now

TenHound
08-01-2005, 01:27 AM
Bad, sad summer...peak tennis season here in the Northern Hemisphere & no Roger... But for his feet he'd probably be on track to win the Grand Slam,...I'm doing my part to keeep ratings down in his absence, as I hope others are. It's hardly self-sacrifice as there isn't any one else of interest, at least on the guy's tour...Top 10 much more interesting last yr...now AA, Henman & Moya disintegrating...god knows what's going on w/Coria, Roger & Marat hurt...not even Canada worth watching this yr...will anyone still care by the time NYC rolls around...

PaulieM
08-01-2005, 01:34 AM
Bad, sad summer...peak tennis season here in the Northern Hemisphere & no Roger... But for his feet he'd probably be on track to win the Grand Slam,...I'm doing my part to keeep ratings down in his absence, as I hope others are. It's hardly self-sacrifice as there isn't any one else of interest, at least on the guy's tour...Top 10 much more interesting last yr...now AA, Henman & Moya disintegrating...god knows what's going on w/Coria, Roger & Marat hurt...not even Canada worth watching this yr...will anyone still care by the time NYC rolls around...
i miss roger too, and all this increased tv coverage is worthless without him. although i'm still "watching," doing my part to increase ratings so tennis will at least be on tv. espn had more hours coverage of eating contests in the last few days than tennis :rolleyes: surely even lame tennis matches are more interesting than watching people stuff their faces till they want to barf :confused: i'm anxiously waiting for henman and moya or somebody i really like to play well or even play at all, it would help if that good play came in usopen series so i could see them on tv. :(

RogiFan88
08-01-2005, 01:56 AM
Coria's hurt??? He just won Umag today over Moya...

Daniel
08-01-2005, 08:35 AM
Coria gets easily hurt becauase hos body is so fragile like a porcelane doll.

1sun
08-01-2005, 02:55 PM
Bad, sad summer...peak tennis season here in the Northern Hemisphere & no Roger... But for his feet he'd probably be on track to win the Grand Slam,...I'm doing my part to keeep ratings down in his absence, as I hope others are. It's hardly self-sacrifice as there isn't any one else of interest, at least on the guy's tour...Top 10 much more interesting last yr...now AA, Henman & Moya disintegrating...god knows what's going on w/Coria, Roger & Marat hurt...not even Canada worth watching this yr...will anyone still care by the time NYC rolls around...
yeah i know what you. the last few weeks have bin pretty boring and the clay tounrys just kill it some more. thank god there over now. but i can assure you as soon as roger gets back on a court, im all eyes and ears again. i can never get bored of him. :angel:

1sun
08-01-2005, 02:56 PM
Coria gets easily hurt becauase hos body is so fragile like a porcelane doll.

:lol: sooo true.

SUKTUEN
08-01-2005, 03:00 PM
Coria what problem?

oneandonlyhsn
08-01-2005, 07:43 PM
Anyone have anything new about Rogi, is he getting better, training? Rogi where are you tennis sucks right now?

SUKTUEN
08-02-2005, 03:31 AM
I think he is take rest also~

babsi
08-02-2005, 07:36 AM
Tennis is a wasteland right now :(

Thanks for the up dates :)

Have the swiss choosen a new leader for there davis cup team,yet? - one would think,they are running out of men power - maybe Martina can take over :)

Stevens Point
08-02-2005, 01:28 PM
Anyone have anything new about Rogi, is he getting better, training? Rogi where are you tennis sucks right now?
Here is the latest info.

Roger says he has no longer problem with his feet and is playing in Cincy. Currently he is still having a vacation and taking care of his "used to be troubled" feet. He assures that the inflamation is completely gone, and he doesn't feel any problem. :D He is playing in Cincinnati and then US Open, Davis Cup, Bangkok, Madrid, Basel Indoors, Paris-Bercy, then Shanghai, as scheduled.

He will be preparing for US Open with Roche, but the coach is not going to be present at Flushing Meadow.

from www.sfdrs.ch

http://www2.sfdrs.ch/webtool/data/pics/sporttennisartikel/te_rogerinti_sz.jpg

Roger Federer beschwerdefrei in die zweite Saisonhälfte
02.08.2005 13:12

TENNIS - Roger Federer hat in einem Interview alle Spekulationen über seinen Gesundheitszustand beendet. Der Baselbieter sagte, dass er keinerlei Beschwerden mehr habe. Federer wird übernächste Woche in Cincinnati (USA) in den Turnierbetrieb zurückkehren.

Zurzeit macht Federer noch Ferien und schont seine lädiert gewesenen Füsse. Nachher aber nimmt er ein umfangreiches Programm auf, das am 15. August mit dem Masters-Series-Turnier in Cincinnati beginnt. Danach bestreitet er der Reihe nach das US Open in New York, das Davis-Cup-Abstiegsspiel zwischen der Schweiz und Grossbritannien in Genf, die Turniere in Bangkok und Madrid, das Swiss Indoors in Basel, dann das Hallenturnier in Paris-Bercy und schliesslich das Masters in Schanghai, wo er den Cup verteidigen will.

Den beiden Ereignissen in der Schweiz, also dem Davis Cup und dem Heimturnier in Basel, misst Federer grosse Bedeutung bei. Der australische Coach Tony Roche wird Federer auf das US Open vorbereiten, ihn aber in New York selber nicht betreuen. Im Weiteren versicherte Federer, dass die Entzündungen in den Füssen vollständig abgeklungen seien und er keinerlei Beschwerden mehr verspüre.

Mrs. B
08-02-2005, 01:56 PM
Merci, Steve! :wavey:

Stevens Point
08-02-2005, 02:08 PM
Merci, Steve! :wavey:
Ha-llo, Eva! :wavey: Where is Bebop?

Mrs. B
08-02-2005, 02:26 PM
Ha-llo, Eva! :wavey: Where is Bebop?

bebop jazzed went for a walk...;)

That's a freaky hairdo Roger is sporting there. :tape:

1sun
08-02-2005, 02:57 PM
Here is the latest info.

Roger says he has no longer problem with his feet and is playing in Cincy. Currently he is still having a vacation and taking care of his "used to be troubled" feet. He assures that the inflamation is completely gone, and he doesn't feel any problem. :D He is playing in Cinccinati and then US Open, Davis Cup, Bangkok, Madrid, Basel Indoors, Paris-Bercy, then Shanghai, as scheduled.

He will be preparing for US Open with Roche, but the coach is not going to be present at Flushing Meadow.

from www.sfdrs.ch

http://www2.sfdrs.ch/webtool/data/pics/sporttennisartikel/te_rogerinti_sz.jpg

Roger Federer beschwerdefrei in die zweite Saisonhälfte
02.08.2005 13:12

TENNIS - Roger Federer hat in einem Interview alle Spekulationen über seinen Gesundheitszustand beendet. Der Baselbieter sagte, dass er keinerlei Beschwerden mehr habe. Federer wird übernächste Woche in Cincinnati (USA) in den Turnierbetrieb zurückkehren.

Zurzeit macht Federer noch Ferien und schont seine lädiert gewesenen Füsse. Nachher aber nimmt er ein umfangreiches Programm auf, das am 15. August mit dem Masters-Series-Turnier in Cincinnati beginnt. Danach bestreitet er der Reihe nach das US Open in New York, das Davis-Cup-Abstiegsspiel zwischen der Schweiz und Grossbritannien in Genf, die Turniere in Bangkok und Madrid, das Swiss Indoors in Basel, dann das Hallenturnier in Paris-Bercy und schliesslich das Masters in Schanghai, wo er den Cup verteidigen will.

Den beiden Ereignissen in der Schweiz, also dem Davis Cup und dem Heimturnier in Basel, misst Federer grosse Bedeutung bei. Der australische Coach Tony Roche wird Federer auf das US Open vorbereiten, ihn aber in New York selber nicht betreuen. Im Weiteren versicherte Federer, dass die Entzündungen in den Füssen vollständig abgeklungen seien und er keinerlei Beschwerden mehr verspüre.
thanks so much stevens point, ive been a bit worried lately. ands it great to hear hes totaly healed, feel alot better now. cheers mate :yeah:

nobama
08-02-2005, 06:15 PM
bebop jazzed went for a walk...;)

That's a freaky hairdo Roger is sporting there. :tape:

Is that a recent photo? I hope not. :eek:

babsi
08-02-2005, 07:15 PM
Is that a recent photo? I hope not. :eek:

I would fire,that picture editor!

But it´s funny anyway - he looks like he just got out from under one of those "stick to the wall" hair dryers you find at public swimming pools -lol

Minnie
08-02-2005, 08:20 PM
I read this news on our teletext here when I came home from work this evening - it said there had been a lot of press speculation about the state of his feet and he had spoken out to stop it. Anyway, its a relief to see the same good news from our Swiss friends. It sure is a relief! Thanks. Only another couple of weeks to go before Cini!

oneandonlyhsn
08-02-2005, 08:31 PM
This is such good news I cant wait to see Rogi back on my screen. Rogi the hair is :eek: It doesnt matter coz I am so happy:yippee: :yippee: :yippee:

MissMoJo
08-02-2005, 08:51 PM
What a relief........i hope everything's good with his feet from now on :D and so excited to see him on court again :bounce:

and yeah, the scruffy look really doesn't suit him:o

1sun
08-02-2005, 09:11 PM
I read this news on our teletext here when I came home from work this evening - it said there had been a lot of press speculation about the state of his feet and he had spoken out to stop it. Anyway, its a relief to see the same good news from our Swiss friends. It sure is a relief! Thanks. Only another couple of weeks to go before Cini!
and remember, not too long after he will be beating the crap outa GB :yeah:

Minnie
08-02-2005, 10:35 PM
and remember, not too long after he will be beating the crap outa GB :yeah:

Hmm, I don't think Roger would have put it quite like that. Though I did read in one of the articles that the Davis Cup tie with UK is one of his main goals for this year. But I shall still be cheering for our team, even though I know they haven't got a hope in hell! :D

1sun
08-02-2005, 11:10 PM
Hmm, I don't think Roger would have put it quite like that. Though I did read in one of the articles that the Davis Cup tie with UK is one of his main goals for this year. But I shall still be cheering for our team, even though I know they haven't got a hope in hell! :D
nope. we certainly dont,n i dont really care to be honest. i cant wait to see roger crush that scottish twat, he needs to learn sum manners. i will also enjoy watching roger give the old man a beating as well. cant wait :p

Whistleway
08-03-2005, 02:43 PM
i cant wait to see roger crush that scottish twat, he needs to learn sum manners.

Those are wise words, 1sun. Indeed.

1sun
08-03-2005, 03:02 PM
Those are wise words, 1sun. Indeed.
;)

avocadoe
08-03-2005, 03:34 PM
that is good news and thanks, glad to hear Roger's feet feeling well again. The mop of hair, well, he needs a trim, lol...Bet he'll get it before Cincy!

nobama
08-03-2005, 06:02 PM
I see there's a message on Roger's website that a new and improved website will be launched in 5 days. Cool! :cool:

RogiFan88
08-03-2005, 06:04 PM
yes, on his 24th birthday! [too bad I won't be around to check it out... unless I find a cybercafe... or maybe a PC at the tournament]

RogiFan88
08-03-2005, 06:56 PM
Tennis: "Tout ce qui arrivera sera du bonus" pour Federer

GENÈVE - Roger Federer reprendra la compétition dans deux semaines, à l'occasion du Masters Series de Cincinnati. Le Bâlois, qui n'a plus joué depuis la conquête de son troisième titre à Wimbledon, a repris l'entraînement physique il y a quelques jours.
11:02 02.08.05

"Même si je ne jouais pas bien jusqu'à la fin de l'année, ma saison sera réussie: j'ai déjà gagné huit titres, dont une épreuve du Grand Chelem et trois Masters Series. Tout ce qui arrivera sera du bonus", a confié le numéro un mondial.

Sa motivation est toutefois intacte: "J'ai encore beaucoup d'objectifs d'ici la fin de la saison, et j'ai très envie de reprendre la compétition. La place de numéro un mondial en fin d'année, la défense de mon titre de l'US Open, le maintien dans le groupe mondial de Coupe Davis, le tournoi de Bâle et la Masters Cup sont mes buts principaux."

Federer, qui a décidé de faire l'impasse sur le Masters Series de Montréal (8-14 août) afin de ménager ses pieds douloureux, vient d'effectuer cinq jours d'entraînement physique avec Pierre Paganini. Sa préparation tennistique débutera dans quelques jours, son coach Tony Roche le rejoignant sur son lieu de villégiature.

Le triple vainqueur de Wimbledon ne craint pas de manquer de compétition avant l'US Open, où il défendra son titre dès le 29 août. "Je pense que le seul tournoi de Cincinnati suffira à ma préparation. En raison de mes problèmes aux pieds, j'avais envisagé dès le tournoi de Miami (début avril) de ne pas jouer à Montréal."

Après l'US Open, Federer prendra encore part à six autres événements en 2005, à Genève pour le barrage de Coupe Davis face à la Grande-Bretagne (23-25 septembre), à Bangkok, à Madrid, à Bâle, à Paris-Bercy puis à Shanghaï (7-13 novembre). "Il me reste beaucoup de tournois à jouer, mais mes batteries seront complètement rechargées après ma pause. J'ai déjà totalement récupéré mentalement."

http://www.lematin.ch/nwmatinhome/nwmatinheadsport.html

...interesting: Rogi says everything now is gravy even if he doesn't do that well fr now til the end of the season. His goals are: #1, defence of USO, DC, Basel and TMC. He has been training for 5 days and Rochey will join him soon. He feels Cincy will be enough prep for USO. Rogi also said that due to his feet, he had been thinking about not playing Montreal since the Miami tournament! :( He says he's completely recuperated physically and mentally and altho he has a lot of tourneys to play, he is ready. ;)

that pic has changed fr the original... check the actual article for the pic!! :p

RogiNie
08-03-2005, 07:05 PM
thanks for the article :) although the pic is horrible :scared:

Minnie
08-03-2005, 09:45 PM
Those are wise words, 1sun. Indeed.


You and 1sun are enough to put me off being a Federer fan .... I would NEVER bad mouth another player.

lunahielo
08-03-2005, 09:47 PM
I kinda like the pic. :)

Minnie
08-03-2005, 09:48 PM
nope. we certainly dont,n i dont really care to be honest. i cant wait to see roger crush that scottish twat, he needs to learn sum manners. i will also enjoy watching roger give the old man a beating as well. cant wait :p

Or should I say - this forum - though I know there are a lot more generous folk here. I left another Forum because too many bods were bad mouthing Roger and I couldn't see the point.

lunahielo
08-03-2005, 09:57 PM
Originally posted byMinnie
I left another Forum because too many bods were bad mouthing Roger and I couldn't see the point

I like your style, Minnie~~~ :hug:
What's the need for negativity? All it does is breed more negativity~~
(Just the way I see things, I guess)
And, I do think Rogi has terrific hair~~no matter what the length...My 2¢
:)

Minnie
08-03-2005, 10:09 PM
I like your style, Minnie~~~ :hug:
What's the need for negativity? All it does is breed more negativity~~
(Just the way I see things, I guess)
And, I do think Rogi has terrific hair~~no matter what the length...My 2¢
:)

Hey thanks lunhielo - I knew there were some nice folk out there! :wavey: Is that a recent pix of Roger? I didn't like his hair when I first saw it cut short - but I prefer it now - he looks v cute!

nobama
08-04-2005, 12:27 AM
Hey thanks lunhielo - I knew there were some nice folk out there! :wavey: Is that a recent pix of Roger? I didn't like his hair when I first saw it cut short - but I prefer it now - he looks v cute!
God I hope it's not recent. Although it seems like his hair does grow quite fast. Hopefully he'll have it trimmed nicely by the time he arrives in the States.

Brianna
08-04-2005, 02:43 AM
I can't wait to see Roger back in action again.

yanchr
08-04-2005, 03:55 AM
Thanks for the great news. * sigh of relief * Can't wait to see him play again since just several days after Wimbledon. And still one more week to go :( :p

Is that a recent pix of Roger? I didn't like his hair when I first saw it cut short - but I prefer it now - he looks v cute!
The pic was taken a few days after he won Wimbledon, that's when I first saw it. And I kinda like the way he turned out. Hey, he was all messy, but that reminds us that he is an ordinary human being, not necessary to come out like he is going to parties every day :D

SUKTUEN
08-04-2005, 05:07 AM
This photo in the article~
Roger looks so relax~!

nobama
08-04-2005, 11:35 AM
Thanks for the great news. * sigh of relief * Can't wait to see him play again since just several days after Wimbledon. And still one more week to go :( :p


The pic was taken a few days after he won Wimbledon, that's when I first saw it. And I kinda like the way he turned out. Hey, he was all messy, but that reminds us that he is an ordinary human being, not necessary to come out like he is going to parties every day :D
Yeah, someone who doesn't know what a comb looks like sometimes? :lol: Thank goodness this is a rare occurance.

Dirk
08-04-2005, 12:07 PM
Roger should grow it long. He looks more like tennis ninja that way. :) I knew his feet weren't that bad. He is playing it cool and I hope he keeps his USO and Cup titles.

1sun
08-04-2005, 12:57 PM
Or should I say - this forum - though I know there are a lot more generous folk here. I left another Forum because too many bods were bad mouthing Roger and I couldn't see the point.
am i insulting roger? no, take a chill pill honey :yeah:

1sun
08-04-2005, 12:58 PM
Roger should grow it long. He looks more like tennis ninja that way. :) I knew his feet weren't that bad. He is playing it cool and I hope he keeps his USO and Cup titles.
lol. for sum reason i would like if roger just one day, shaved his head, a nice skin head. be jokes ;)

1sun
08-04-2005, 01:01 PM
You and 1sun are enough to put me off being a Federer fan .... I would NEVER bad mouth another player.
well you must be an angel then :angel:, and if another fans would put u off being a roger fan, then u aint a true fan.

Whistleway
08-04-2005, 01:29 PM
Minnie, I am not playing an apologist but, hmm.. When did i ever bad mouth Roger?

oneandonlyhsn
08-04-2005, 02:40 PM
Minnie, I am not playing an apologist but, hmm.. When did i ever bad mouth Roger?

I think she meant bad mouthing other players, Minnie I hope you stay here I really lawv you :inlove:

SUKTUEN
08-04-2005, 02:43 PM
Roger should grow it long. He looks more like tennis ninja that way. :) I knew his feet weren't that bad. He is playing it cool and I hope he keeps his USO and Cup titles.

Yes Dirk, if Roger be a ninja one more time in USO ~
Please write the Roger mission again~! :devil:

RogiFan88
08-04-2005, 03:25 PM
Rogi is in the August Tennis Life mag and on the cover! Article about his Mom "Mom's the word"!

SUKTUEN
08-04-2005, 03:28 PM
Rogi is in the August Tennis Life mag and on the cover! Article about his Mom "Mom's the word"!

CAN YOU please post the scann? :worship: :worship: :worship:
Roger also is the cover of Chinese Tennis magazine~! :D :D

What is the meaning of Mom? :confused:

RogiFan88
08-04-2005, 04:36 PM
sorry, no time but check out the site [it's a bit behind though]

http://www.tennislifemagazine.com/

SUKTUEN
08-04-2005, 04:46 PM
THANKS 88

1sun
08-04-2005, 06:06 PM
CAN YOU please post the scann? :worship: :worship: :worship:
Roger also is the cover of Chinese Tennis magazine~! :D :D

What is the meaning of Mom? :confused:
mom= mum, mother.female parent, the woman who gave birth to roger.
thank god she did :worship:

kjo
08-04-2005, 07:25 PM
Hi guys,
Yeah I saw the tennislife thing too, but don't know how to scan. I copied out the begining part of the interview, which i think is the more interesting. Hope you enjoy it:

Q:You have 2 children?
A:Yes, Roger and Diana is the older, she'll be 26.

Q: How old was Roger when he started playing?
A: He picked up a racket when he was 3 or 4. My husband and I enjoyed going to the club on weekends. It was a lovely club with a football field, table tennis, playground for kids and tennis courts. The children could play hide and seek or football, and occasionally, he would grab a racket and enjoy tennis. He loved any ball sport. Diana played with some girls. It was a nice place to start tennis.

Q: How did he progress?
A: He started with lessons about 8. Before that it was for fun. He would occupy himself for hours against a wall or cupboard. I'd play competative tennis and my husband would play; Roger would hit to the wall for hours and only come back when he was thirsty of hungry.

Q: I had read that he played with ball in the house.
A: Yes, he would play with a racket against a cupboard. I would wonder: Where are all my tennis balls? One day I looked on top of the cupboard and there were about 100 tennis balls because the cupboard was too high and he was too small. :)

Q: How was your family time?
A: We didn't just play tennis. Roger liked ball sports and Diana was more into dolls. They were so different. We liked to go for barbecues and biking. We didn't just concentrate on tennis when they were young. Dinner was something we always tried to fit in. They had music lessons, Diana had horse lessons and Roger had tennis lessons, sometimes it was difficult to find the time.

The interview goes on to discuss the Swiss of the Year Award, the Foundation and all the usual stuff. There's a pic of Roger as a kid and another of him and his sister which looks a few years old.

nobama
08-05-2005, 01:35 AM
This mag is certainly not worth buying. The intervew with Roger's mom was short and there was just a page on Wimbledon, but nothing new there. I would like to hear from his mom (or dad) more often, just to get more of an insight as to what Roger was like as a kid. I remember reading one article where when he was younger after a match on the way home his dad pushed his face into a snowbank. :eek: I'm guessing he either behaved badly on court or on the way home. Maybe he was mouthing off in the car or something. :lol:

SUKTUEN
08-05-2005, 03:37 PM
Thanks for the interview and 1sun~!!! :devil: :worship: :worship:

1sun
08-05-2005, 04:16 PM
Thanks for the interview and 1sun~!!! :devil: :worship: :worship:
no worries ;)

SUKTUEN
08-05-2005, 04:42 PM
what time is in your country 1sun?

1sun
08-05-2005, 09:23 PM
what time is in your country 1sun?
10.22 pm now. y?

nobama
08-06-2005, 01:50 AM
This interview is from last year, but I'd never seen it before.

World's Tennis Champion Roger Federer's TalkAsia Interview Transcript

October, 9th 2004

LH: Lorraine
RF: Roger Federer

Lorraine: This week on TalkAsia the world's number one tennis star who's been described as one of sports most complete players in recent times. This is TalkAsia.

Welcome to TalkAsia I'm Lorraine Hahn. Swiss tennis sensation Roger Federer is our guest this week. What a year 2004 has been for the 23 year old phenomenon. He grabbed the Australian open in January, secured his second Wimbledon Grand Slam title in June, and was recently crown US Open champion -- not to mention capturing multiple ATP master series titles along the way. A sports analyst has said watching Federer is "like watching classical music, watching jazz he's a combination of athlete and artist." While his main competition Andy Roddick has commented "Federer I so strong, he's got an aura about him in the locker room, mentally. He's so confident right now, a lot of his success right now- is between the ears."

LH: Well let's find out from the man himself what he thinks about that and much more, Roger Federer is right here with me now in the studio. Welcome to Hong Kong, thank you so much.

RF: Thank you very much.

LH: Is that true that it's all between the ears?

RF: Well, it's a lot going on in your head when you feel good it helps and you're sure that the shot will come at the right moment. It's important.

LH: Now the US open, you just clinched that, I mean his has been an amazing season for you, hasn't it?

RF: Yes it has been beyond expectations: this was not something I was aiming for -- to win three grand slams in a year and now that it happened I'm obviously really really happy. It's a fantastic year I've been having and hopefully I can finish it off in style.

LH: How did you do it?

RF: Its tough to say, it is really tough. I had a great year last year, I finished number two and I won my first Grand Slam. And I was hoping if I could repeat that, and if I am really lucky I could become number one in the world, so that was I was aiming for. Suddenly I win the Australian Open and I'm number one in the world, then I defend my crown at Wimbledon, and won so many titles this year, its been fantastic, I don't know the secret really.

LH: Recently, I mean earlier on, you didn't have that great a time at the Olympics, correct? I mean, what happened there?

RF: It was one of my big big goals for the season to do well at the Olympics. I lost in the second round to a young Czech player. Obviously, I was very disappointed -- because I finished fourth at the Olympics in Sydney so I wanted to do a step better and win a medal, but I failed. But I have nice memories of the Olympics -- I carried the flag for Switzerland so that was a great moment for me.

LH: What was it was it the pressure of representing your country, was it pressure on you individually, what was it?

RF: I don't know, maybe I was a little exhausted from the previous tournaments from the whole year. Obviously I tried to figure out what happened, why did I lose, what went wrong, and I put it down to the fact that my opponent played a good match, and I never really felt comfortable in the tournament, and obviously it's a big pity because I have to wait another four years for my next chance.

LH: No problem you're only 23! You've got plenty of time. I wanted to ask about your tennis, about your game -- how do you prepare, what goes through your mind mentally, just before a match?

RF: Well, you know every match has a similar preparation. You should keep it the same way, I think to keep it simple. Obviously before big matches you're a little bit more nervous than others. You warm up for half an hour before, you make sure you eat early enough, I don't know you might have to tape your feet because you're preventing injuries and so on, you warm up, and you prepare mentally for the match you know -- prepare the tactics you want to use. Then you are ready to go!

LH: Right, now some people have said that you can see the game, you can see the ball coming, even before its shot. How do you predict something like that? Psychic?!

RF: Well, you play a lot of tennis all the time, during the match or in practice and you get a feel for it -- where you will hit a ball, from this position and then your opponent can only do so much. And then obviously you have tougher opponents who can do much more from certain situations and you have to know your opponents well to feel that. But I think I have a natural talent for reading the game very well and the importance is to use it. I've worked very hard in my condition to be faster, stronger, and now everything's coming together. So it's perfect.

LH: Roger you've done pretty well after splitting up with your coach, why end that winning formula?

RF: It's hard you know not hard to explain, we've been working for, maybe three or four years together and we had a great time, that's for sure. And we're still very good friends. I spoke to him during the year and said look "I think there's a few things we should change" and at the end of the year I just thought -- it doesn't seem like we can adjust, because we're too good of friends. And I think professionally, its better for us to stop. I definitely want to look for a coach right away, but then it went so good without a coach that I just kept it that way, and it worked out you know. It's also very strange for me.

LH: So now that it's working out and you've won, do you really need a coach is there something you are looking for? Or, if the right person comes along, then fine.

RF: I think a coach could be help now again. Just relying on my self all the time would be wrong because a person who sees the match from the outside, sees many different things, I think it important to have a coach, but I'm no pressurizing myself by saying "okay I want to have one in the next few weeks, or the next few months, or the next few years..." but I hope so.

LH: Now that you've reached the so-called peak of this tennis mountain, what does it look like from up there?

RF: Its nice, if feels great. Actually, I've experienced it a little bit in the Juniors: I was number one junior in the world in 1998 and I remember when I became number one in the Juniors I felt like I was on top of the world, I'm the best of all and it's a totally different view of the world from up there. Actually, the impact of being number 1 in the world and just winning a grand slam was actually very different: I feel like I have much respect from the people when they say "oh this is the number one player in the world". It's actually very interesting.

LH: Wow, that is really something. Roger, we're going to take a quick break. Up next on TalkAsia, the bumpy road to becoming number one for Roger Federer.

BLOCK B

LH: You're back with TalkAsia and our conversation with Swiss tennis champion Roger Federer. Roger, I know you've seen that clip many many times, but tell us what that moment felt like.

RF: Oh it was very a strong emotional moment for me, probably the most that's clear. You know after wins or losses you can hide out in the locker room, but here I'm out on the center court, and the ceremony is taking place and I have so many emotions taking place inside of me and the person who was on court with center court asked me -- how does it feel -- and I said I cannot describe it, I was crying so much, the feeling was so nice.

LH: Your first grand slam amazing. Let me take you back to when you were much younger, when you really fell in love with tennis. What was it about the game that really drew your interest at what, the age of four?

RF: I don't remember I must have been 2, 3, 4 years old. I used to go to the tennis courts with my parents because they would go there on weekends and play their mixed doubles. Meantime, I would just play against a wall. I was into sports in general, I loved soccer, I loved tennis -- any ball sport I loved actually, but particularly tennis and soccer.

LH: Was it your intention to be the world number one?

RF: No not really -- that was beyond my dreams. My dreams were to just to take part, maybe in Wimbledon, maybe to meet my idols like Boris Becker or Stefan Edberg or just kind of look up to them, for me that was already very nice. And suddenly when I started to feel like -- okay I'm not too bad in Juniors, and I'm not too far away from the tour itself, things is when you start dreaming -- I would like to be top 100 one day, top 10 one day. You always set yourself new goals and new dreams.

LH: But you were also quite a footballer? Why not pick football over tennis?

RF: I think I was about twelve years old, I was playing tennis and soccer very much maybe 4-5 times a week. And my coach said to me -- if you don't come to all the practice sessions during the week, you can't play the matches on the weekend. And for me it was all about he matches, and I had to make a decision and I told him and I think it has to be tennis then, because I like being in control of winning and losing, and in soccer, I would always think -- oh no if my goalie makes a mistake, I don't know I'm not happy about it. So, I guess this is why I chose tennis and I guess tennis was always my first love.

LH: You know, I read that you were famous or should I say infamous for your temper tantrums when you were younger. Did that ever get in the way of your training?

RF: Yeah for a while, I couldn't practice for more than an hour in a row or one hour 15 because I would lose my mind, throw my racket, swear, scream, whatever bad there was in tennis. My coaches told me well you're just going to practice for as long until you freak out really. So it took me quite a long time to even get me to practice for 2 hours in a row.

LH: What was it, was it failure that made you angry or...?

RF: It was a very irritating and angry on the court itself, and after I especially lost matches I was very sad, I would cry a lot, even after I especially lost matches I would cry a lot. I would cry even during matches, when I was 10, 12, 14 I would cry saying -- "Oh I can't play tennis anymore", you know how kids are. It took me a really long time, up until I was really 20 years old before I could say -- "okay Roger, some things have to change now you can't always act bad on the court". And obviously it came along, because for you play on the bigger centre courts on the world, you don't want to act kind of strange, so I started to change a little bit.

LH: Right, and how did you overcome that? And become so...

RF: It was really up to myself to say now "enough is enough, now behave" you know? And I learned that saving that energy was good for me, putting it into the match itself. It made a huge difference for me.

LH: Roger do you think after winning the Juniors at 1998, turning pro, it took a while for things to get going, get cooking. Why?

RF: There's always been very high expectations for me. Because I became Junior World Champion when I was 17 years old. When you are 18 they expect you to become top 50 or to win your first tournament. But its not that simple. Even though I thought the transition for me, going from juniors to pro, went quite quick, but I also had my times for about half a year, or three quarters of a year, where I was losing a lot of matches and losing confidence and losing belief that I could do it, because I was mentally and physically not strong enough. Suddenly I was not facing people with the same age, suddenly you're facing 30 year olds, people who have all the experience, who are stronger than you bigger than you, for your mental to change that, it takes some time you know. Even though I thought my career has a good way of going, everything didn't come right away, I had to work for some things, so for me looking the Wimbledon victory came at the right time and now obviously I enjoy this ride.

LH: Roger, we're going to take another very short break. Just ahead on TalkAsia, who is Juliette? And how does Roger plan to keep his number one spot? We'll be right back.

BLOCK C

Lorraine: Welcome back to TalkAsia. Observers are saying that professional tennis is in desperate need of some new blood. Swiss tennis champion Roger Federer, is just that.

LH: Do you think so Roger -- you and Andy Roddick are part of this new generation?

RF: Yeah...I think definitely we are yeah, because we've had some great matches in the past. We're totally different characters, different games, and I think that is exactly what the game needs. I'm looking forward to many more battles with him.

LH: Now how do you feel now that you're so popular obviously. You've got to balance the sort of commercial aspect of your business -- you know, catering to sponsors and as well playing your game.

RF: Yeah, many things come your way when you're getting rich and famous, I would say and especially it goes by very quick in sports, from one day to another you can be a star. And so for me, everything since my Wimbledon win in 2003 everything has happened so fast. Then you make money - then what do you do with the money, so know its very interesting and definitely. You know, checking out what is there is to do. And then you have many more sponsors coming also, you have to find time to do that because it's also good for image. And if you have good sponsors who present you well, but you have to feel comfortable with your sponsors so that's also a very important thing.

LH: It's quite a balancing act isn't it?

RF: Especially to co-ordinate the time with the tennis life, because most important is your tennis -- because I can only do it for another ten years I would say, after that my body is broken you know? (LH: I don't know about that!) It's about coordinating the sponsors, your life, your private life, and your free time.

LH: Roger is it important for you to break in or really make a name for yourself here in Asia for example, or even in America. Obviously in Europe you're a sensation, but this part of the world?

RF: Actually I like Asia very much, and it's for me very important to come and play here more in Asia, because I really like the culture, the people and I hope coming here to these shows and playing more I can gain fans all around the world.

LH: How is it working with your girlfriend? You know, mixing personal and professional?

RF: It is interesting, because she used to play, she had surgery on her foot and never recovered of it, and now she's supporting my career by coordinating the media. She books the flights, books the hotels, makes sure everything is organized for me. It's like her second career I would say, so she's really helping me as much as she can and she's great, she's fantastic. :) :yeah:

LH: Yes, you're very lucky. There is also another woman in your life, and I also made reference to her, Juliet... who is she?

RF: She is...oh this is a funny story. She is a cow I won (LH: Cow right?) ... yeah it's a cow, a real cow, a big one.. a fat one. I won it after Wimbledon, not I won it, they gave me a cow as a present. Actually she had a baby so now I have two cows. But that actually is an older story, that actually is the story from last year, which I'm actually a little happy that it's not. I'm not speaking about it too much anymore because I had a feeling I was looking like a farmer for a while, but now again, it's a little bit over and I'm happy.

LH: I've read recently McEnroe saying that you are the most gifted player he has ever seen. Now that is something coming from a person like McEnroe.

RF: Yeah, many many praises from many different players, and experts and fans. You know it's amazing the compliments that I get. Obviously sometimes I'm over whelmed, because it's too much, they say too many nice things about me, especially difficult in the beginning of my career -- oh this guy has so much talent he can be the best ever -- and I hadn't even won anything yet. Now that I've won four grand slam titles and am number one in the world, feel much more secure and I feel better.

LH: Confident?

RF: Yeah more confident and all... I deserve ... some of the compliments and I hope I can fulfill some of it and everything is all possible, so we'll see.

LH: Right what is the best tip you could give a junior player. I mean it's tough right? When you're young you've got to balance school and...

RF: Yes, there are many factors that have got to be right. You've definitely got to have parents who understand you, what you love doing is sports, you know? And sometimes sports is difficult to combine with school you know, but I've always thought it was important to play any kind of sport in general. Of course, if the person plays tennis I'm happy about it because I'm also here to promote tennis a little bit, and important is to have fun out on the court. It won't always be easy, there's always going to be bad results and they're going to throw you back and you're going to be down sitting in your corner and saying, oh I'm never going to make it in tennis. But when you're young, you're not aiming to be number one in the world - you're dreaming of it, you're dreaming to see the best in the world. But then once you're actually close to them, maybe you get a chance to say hello to a few, and maybe you have a chance to play with them and then suddenly you're playing against them and they're your rival. So it goes very quickly, before you know it, you're up there... it's really really funny.

LH: What will be your focus? In the year?

RF: I really hope I can finish this year off in style, that's really what I am aiming for. If I can win one more out of the five, I'm very happy, because then I would have reach ten titles of the year, which would be fantastic. But I heard just good news lately that after the U.S. open, no one can catch me as number one in the world until the end of this year, which for me is already great.

LH: Is there anything about your game that you're going to try and change or improve?

RF: No

LH: You're very happy with everything you've got

RF: I'm very happy with the way it is right now. There's always things I would like to improve but as long as it's not broken don't fix it as they say. But I'm my own coach so Roger Federer the coach says to the player, you're fine right now.

LH: Right, well roger good luck to you (RF: Thanks very much) Thank you very much for coming in. Appreciate it, appreciate it. World number one tennis ace -- Roger Federer. And that is TalkAsia this week. Be sure to check out our website at cnn.com/talkasia for upcoming guests. And you can let us know who you'd like to see on the show. That address, talkasia@cnn.com. Thank you very much for joining us. I'm Lorraine Hahn. Let's talk again next week.

nobama
08-06-2005, 02:09 AM
Another one from last year.

AN INTERVIEW WITH ROGER

Tennis Week: Roger, how did you get involved in the United Nation's International Year of Sport and Physical Education and what appealed to you about it?

Roger Federer: Well, Mr. (Adolf) Ogi (former President of Switzerland and current UN Special Adviser on Sport for Development and Peace) actually contacted me only last week, so this is very spontaneous. Because I've been injured and unable to play I've had some time...

Tennis Week: How is your health? How is your leg?

Roger Federer: My health is better now. I'll travel right away to Houston after this.



Tennis Week: Do you feel good enough that you'll be able to play the Masters Cup?

Roger Federer: I do feel I'm able to play, but I have to start slow. So this was a very spontaneous decision where Mr. Ogi said: "Would you like to come and introduce the Year of Sport and Physical Education 2005?" He said he would love to have me here next to (UN Secretary-General) Kofi Annan. And I said "Yeah, I'd love to do it." So, we are all here.

Tennis Week: Ultimately, what message do you and Mr. Ogi most want to get across to people about the UN's International Year of Sport and Health?

Adolf Ogi: I think it is important for the first time that the United Nations passed a resolution which focused on the value on sport in relation with development of health, education and peace. And I think sport is a new instrument, which should be used throughout the world to create a more peaceful world, a more pleasant world. We have still 70 conflicts. I was President of Switzerland and now I am Kofi Annan's delegate on sport for development on peace. I think politicians have failed. Therefore, I think we need a new instrument. It is actually an old instrument, not used enough so far. Because sport can bridge difficulties, conflict, cultures. Sport can show what is possible to politicians. The ping-pong diplomacy between China and the U.S. in 1973 was the first break through in their relations. Ping-pong helped bring these two nations together. Today, we have 150 projects and I believe, not today or tonight or tomorrow, but in 10 to 20 years we can create a better world for sport. This is what we are hoping to do.

Tennis Week: I've read your web site, RogerFederer.net, which details the Roger Federer Foundation and its initiative to help children in South Africa. How do you balance your tennis career with your desire to help people, charitable and social causes? And how important is it for you to use this platform you have as the world's top player and an internationally-known star to help people and do things like this with the UN to try to make an impact beyond tennis?

Roger Federer: You're right (it is important) and it's also something very new to me because the Foundation was introduced last year only. I've just had my first event recently for the Foundation.

Tennis Week: How did it go?

Roger Federer: It was very good. We had great success, you know about almost $100,000 raised, which was fantastic. I never thought it was going to be so much and now I'm helping a project in South African because, you know, my mom is from there. My first goal was to actually help kids in South Africa so we founded this project in South Africa. I'm helping 30 kids in South Africa and making sure they get to eat twice a day, properly, that the infrastructure is fine. And that the money I can generate, by my presence, can only increase everything for them. And in being here to introduce the Year of Sport, I hope I can encourage them to do more sports.

Tennis Week: What have you learned in traveling the world, experiencing different cultures, meeting different people about the power of sport to educate and inspire people. You know, so many people — from children to adults — do respect you and look up to you. What have you learned about the power of sports to inspire, educate and just connect with people?

Roger Federer: I've been traveling basically since I was 12 years-old, almost, so I've been traveling 10 years. I've really met a lot of people, different cultures and sports has taught me very much, almost everything, if you like. Because I've always been on the road, you have to speak to different people, learn different cultures, you have to adapt, you know, and speak different languages. For me this is a great opportunity because I really agree with this project and what we're doing here. It's just fantastic because this is how I look at sports.

Tennis Week: Sports can unify people.

Roger Federer: It unifies people because let's say we face each other whether if it's in tennis, if it's a fight, if it's a race, if it's a game, you know you push each other hard, you compete to the max, you want to win, but you have to respect your opponent.

Tennis Week: And you shake hands at the end.

Roger Federer: And in the end, your opponent might be your best friend. So you walk away happy and if you lose you lose and your opponent can sometimes come to you and say "no problem, next time you'll beat me" or something like that. This is what sports is all about. Especially now, with the war and everything, I think sports makes people happy and makes them forget that there is more important things going on in the world. So for me, I feel this is a real opportunity.

Tennis Week: Given the sort of instability and violence we see in the world today, the terrorism, the United States invading Iraq and everything else going on, did it give you a greater sense of urgency to get involved? Did recent world events make you want to contribute or was it just a matter of this was something you felt in your heart was the right thing to do?

Roger Federer: Exactly. I think this is how it felt. Because this year is the Year of Rice so I don't know what the link would be for me to be in the Year Of the Rice. But for me to be in the Year Of Sport, it fits perfectly for me, I'm number one in the world right now and if I can help this cause that's fantastic. Plus, Mr. Ogi is Swiss and for me to come here and meet Mr. Kofi Annan is a great opportunity and truly a great honor.

Tennis Week: A few years back, Martina Hingis served as a UNICEF ambassador for the UN. Does Switzerland's stance in the world influence you getting involved?

Roger Federer: I don't exactly what Martina did as ambassador. Like I said earlier, it was something I felt was important. If I didn't get injured as well, I would have been playing in Paris and I wouldn't be here. So this is how it is now.

Tennis Week: Well, it's great that you're taking advantage of that time off to do something like this rather than sitting around watching TV or something..

Roger Federer: Exactly. I had to make sure with my doctors it was OK leaving earlier with my injury because I was supposed to leave on Sunday because of treatment. Now that I was injured and it's getting better they told me it was OK to leave because the treatment is not as necessary anymore. I'm doing fine so to me this was a great opportunity.

Tennis Week: Tennis does have a tradition of prominent players involved in social causes from Arthur Ashe, Andre Agassi, Andrea Jaeger, Chris Evert, Pat Rafter, yourself. What role would you like to see prominent tennis players play in getting involved and contributing to such causes? Can the sport, the players themselves, do more to help?

Roger Federer: Yeah. I think if you look at team players it's not so easy because you have the whole organization behind you and it's not so easy. As a tennis player, you are an individual and you can decide what you want to do. And for me, it was always one goal in my career: to actually have the Roger Federer Foundation and give something back.

Tennis Week: Even before you made it was that the goal?

Roger Federer: Yeah. Obviously, you have to have a name and make a name for yourself in order to do it. But once I got it, you know I said: "I don't want to rush into things, you know, because maybe it's too early to have a foundation." But I thought last year was the right year to do it. Everybody knows how much money I make, everybody knows the great life I am having. Of course, it's tough at times, I am traveling all the time and I would like to be home more. But this is one of the small ways I can give something back.

Tennis Week: And just the fact that you're here talking about it can promote it and inspire someone in any part of the world who follows you or follow to tennis to get involved.

Roger Federer: Correct and I've already gotten a lot of comments and compliments from people that I'm already having a foundation and trying to do things at my age. Some make it at 25, some make it at 30 and some make it at 60. I thought it was important to make it now, to seize the moment. Of course, I need to also spend time for the foundation, which makes it kind of difficult in the beginning now that I'm so busy with playing tennis and trying to defend the number one position. But this is beyond tennis, after my career as well. So I thought if I started early, then I can build something really nice.

Tennis Week: You're coming off one of the greatest years in the history of the Open Era. It's the type of year many might be tempted to cash in on and yet you haven't sold your soul commercially, signed with a big management agency and pursued excessive endorsements. Is that temptation there and how do you sustain the balance between your tennis career and everything else going on in your life: your foundation, commitment to causes like this and dealing with people like me who want to talk to you all the time?

Roger Federer: Tennis, for me, will always stay, for the moment, the most important thing. Not in life, you know, but it is very important to me. I really try to place everything around my schedule, around my preparation, around my holidays. Sometimes, if I'm really in the mood to do something for my foundation, I tell myself these are the days or the hours I have time to do it and then I place them at the right time, the same for interviews and everything. So it's really important to have the right balance because if you do too much for one, then the other one suffers. For me, I don't want to have my career suffering around the stress I'm in. Because in the end if my results are not there, then the demand is not there.

Tennis Week: The results give you the opportunity to do things like this.

Roger Federer: Exactly. Yes. The impact is bigger. I think that is important to understand. We all speak the same language — my management — and that's very important.

Tennis Week: Professionally, what can you do after the type of season you've had this year? What do you do for an encore? I mean, it's really pretty incredible, winning three of the four majors, where do you go from here?

Roger Federer: Next year will be a hard year for me to kind of prove myself again. I thought I had to prove myself this year after a fantastic season last year. And I'm really looking forward to come back to America after the U.S. Open win. I want to play more in Asia. Of course, I would love to defend my number one position — this stands over everything — of course the defense of the Grand Slam titles is very important as well. But for me, staying number one will be the main goal for next year as there's no Olympics and so on I really have this big, big focus of staying number one in the world. And then I want to get more involved in my foundation and make something happen.

Tennis Week: You seem so cool on court and when I've spoken to you off the court you're so calm and relaxed and it seems the stress seldom gets to you. Does any of the pressure ever sort of get to you? Do the demands of being number one ever get to you? Do you ever want to go home and just smash something against the wall?

Roger Federer: (laughs). Well, I also do feel pressure, very often, in my life. If it's on court or off court, I have to make many, many decisions. Sometimes it's good, sometimes it's bad. Like today, I have to make a speech at the UN. Even though it's only a few minutes, still, you want to do well and you have to come up with the right words. For me, this is not something I am doing every day. For him (points to Mr. Ogi seated next to him) these are moments he is much more used to (smiles). Then I get nervous walking out on center court. So I have many, many times throughout the year where I totally become very nervous. So I think by always having to handle these sort of situations gives me much more confidence and routines and kind of helps me for my character — I become stronger — and again, as we were saying earlier, this is why sports have helped me so much. By experiencing such things and then being able to handle them better.

Tennis Week: I respect the fact you seem to be the sort of person who challenges yourself. You're not sitting back content in saying: "Hey, I'm Roger Federer, the top tennis player in the world." It's pretty cool that someone in your position, who could get so self-involved and wrapped up in being number one, is willing to try these things and try to contribute to others.

Roger Federer: This is why I made this spontaneous decision: because this is beyond tennis. This is sport, this is world-wide and I can sit next to Mr. Ogi and Mr. Annan and try to promote this Year of Sport. Otherwise, it's just Roger Federer, the tennis player, and that's it. This is above and beyond.

Tennis Week: What would you say to people who want to get involved in the UN Year of Sport or who want to get involved in your initiative in South Africa? Whether they want to contribute their time or money or just get involved, what can they do?

Roger Federer: They can definitely go on my web site RogerFederer.net to learn more about my Foundation.

Tennis Week: I've been visiting your web site a lot lately to follow your status. Do you go on there yourself a lot?

Roger Federer: I go there also, very much. When it comes to the International Year of Sport, I would recommend that people go to the United Nations web site.

Tennis Week: I know your focus here at the UN today is talking about the Year of Sport, but can I ask you a few tennis questions?

Roger Federer: The easy questions (laughs)? Yes.

Tennis Week: I'm sure you're sick of hearing this all the time, but what is the coaching status? Early in the year, you said you hoped by next year (2005) you'd have a coach in place. There have been some unconfirmed recent reports. How is that search going?

Roger Federer: The situation is still the same. I still don't have a coach. There is no real plans to actually have one in the near future. It's not even a plan, really, I'm just still making up my mind on who is the right person and so on

Tennis Week: Are you waiting for anyone in particular? Or are you just waiting for the right situation?

Roger Federer: Yes, exactly. For the moment, I haven't found the right person yet, let's put it this way.

Tennis Week: Do you play the ball or the opponent? Will you just play your game regardless or devise tactics based on a given opponent?

Roger Federer: Umm...I think it's 50-50. First, I think you have to make sure about your own game and second, throughout the match, you have to adapt to what your opponent is doing, to how he plays, what has worked for him, what has worked for you and then you work it out.

Tennis Week: In the Wimbledon final, some speculated the rain delay would help Roddick because he could go back and talk to his coach whereas you were losing and don't have a coach to consult. Do you ever coach yourself on the court or during changeovers or are you more intuitive and play more on feel?

Roger Federer: I play very much from feel, from the way I see it, and from what has worked for my opponent and what has worked for me. And then, work around it and see how I can make the difference. Rain delays don't happen often, especially during Wimbledon finals, it was very hard for me going into the rain delay being down.

Tennis Week: Particularly since you hadn't been down the entire tournament.

Roger Federer: Exactly. I said to myself: "I think I have to take a chance here." Because if I keep on playing like this, I will probably lose, so I might as well change up things a little bit. It worked out for me. Of course, I decided to serve and volley more, but to break him, you cannot serve and volley (laughs), you know so I first actually had to get back into the set before I could play my game. I had a good start and played a fantastic tiebreak, so it was great.

Tennis Week: What moment — on the court and off the court — has given you the greatest satisfaction and joy this year?

Roger Federer: Off court, definitely my event last Sunday where I really had my first event for the Roger Federer Foundation. And then I think being here today (a the UN) is a very special moment, of course. On court, I think...a ah...I have so many (laughs). I think the three Grand Slams are fantastic and each has a special place for me. Australia, I became number one in the world. Wimbledon, I defended my title. The U.S. Open, I played a fantastic final, so I think these are the three best moments of my career.

Tennis Week: Who has inspired you in your life?

Roger Federer: I was always looking up as a tennis player to Boris Becker, who was so big in Germany and Switzerland. Off court, I'm only getting into these other things now because when you're young, when you're 17, you sometimes only see the sports world. I have had the opportunity to meet many, many great people and this will be much more important to me.

Tennis Week: For a guy who left school early, you're such an articulate, intelligent person, who seems to have a grasp of the world beyond tennis. Do you read a lot?

Roger Federer: (laughs). No, I don't read too much. I think again we come back to traveling the world, meeting people, seeing the cultures I've seen.

Tennis Week: That's a good education.

Roger Federer: I thought so. And by handling the pressure moments I've had, I think it's made me a more stable person. The way my parents raised me and brought me up and also the coaches have been very important because they guide you through the career. And always important to me was respect, to respect people. I just stick to these principles and they seem like they've been working well so far so I hope they will continue to do so.

Tennis Week: What's the most unusual or bizarre experience you've had as a result of your celebrity?

Roger Federer: I've had many of them (laughs). People you look up to come to you and say "I'm your biggest fan!" And you say: "Really? You?" And that happens occasionally and it's funny. And then you have people in the middle of the street who cannot help themselves and come up to you and start shaking as they talk because they cannot believe they are talking to you. It's interesting and funny to see the reactions sometimes.

Tennis Week: What do you make of the talk of player withdrawals, player injuries resulting from a long season and players defending their right to withdraw to protect themselves from aggravating injuries. I saw Roddick's comments in Paris earlier this week..

Roger Federer: What did he say?

Tennis Week: He basically said "In what other sport do you play 11 months of the year? I am going to finish my season on December 5th and start next year on January 5th. I would rather pull out of an event than injure myself. If they can't understand the way an athlete works, it's too bad." Is the schedule too long? Is it too long? Does it need to be shortened to protect the players from injuries? What do you think?

Roger Federer: I think in a way the season is definitely long. But you can adjust your schedule. Scheduling is very important in my career. I have to make sure I don't just chase tournaments. I just play my schedule I really like to play. I don't think that is an excuse for any of the players because that's just how the tour is. We have a great tour. We should not forget that. We have many, many highlights in our year and you have to be ready for them. And sometimes you are tired. Don't play if you are too tired. If you think, "I really should help the sport", you know you should go play even though you are tired, but still make sure you prevent injuries.

Tennis Week: So you have to take care of yourself.

Roger Federer: You have to take care of yourself. You have to be aggressive sometimes, but not all the time. Think about the fans around the world who want to see you. Think about tournament directors who love to have you there. Think about the sponsors who support the game. I think you have to make it up to all of them. Because we are living our dreams basically because of them. We didn't start when we were three years old because we wanted to play on Wimbledon's Centre Court. We started because we loved playing, we loved hitting the ball and suddenly we make it there. We live the tour and let's say we start saying: "Oh, the tour is too long, I'm too tired." I don't agree. :yeah:

Tennis Week: You can't have it both ways.

Roger Federer: No. You have to make some sacrifices for this life we have. You can't play tennis 'till you're 60. The career already stops at 30 or 35 years old because then your body is used, you're tired of traveling and so on, so you might as well enjoy it now while you can. :yeah:

Tennis Week: I often go back and watch that tape of you against Agassi in the first match of last year's Masters Cup in Houston where you hit that tremendous running forehand winner at the end. You tend to produce these eye-opening, jaw-dropping type of shots under pressure more than anyone else. Are there any moments on court — like that running forehand in Houston — where you surprise yourself and sort of say to yourself: "Wow, I can't believe I hit that shot. That's pretty cool."?

Roger Federer: (smiles) Yeah, that match point in Houston, you're right, that was fantastic.

Tennis Week: That was unbelievable because you created such a sharp, short angle from a full sprint.

Roger Federer: I had almost stopped playing that point because I thought the ball was out and I won the match and then the point continued. He had that easy forehand put away volley and I ran and hit it and I could not even see the ball (land) because of the great angle I hit (laughs). It was just fantastic.

Tennis Week: Remember against Andre in Indian Wells, it was almost the same scenario when he had a volley and you hit a very similar shot. I'm sitting there thinking: "Agassi is never going to want to volley deep to your forehand again after those two..." But do you ever hit a shot that surprises you and brings a smile to your face.

Roger Federer: (laughs). Oh yeah, I think every player surprises themselves a little bit. Because you practice hard, you prepare as best you can and then when a shot like this happens during a match situation — a big point, the crowd gets into it and you've maybe only hit that shot three times in your life before that and then you can hit it on the biggest court in the world, you know — that is surprising and yeah, it feels really good of course. (laughs).

Tennis Week: Champions players from Tony Trabert to Rod Laver to John Newcombe to John McEnroe to Stefan Edberg to Pete Sampras have said you are the player they most enjoy watching. Who do you like to watch?

Roger Federer: I just like to watch tennis. If I'm flipping through the channels and see a match I will watch it, really no matter who is playing. I just like the game very much. I really don't watch the senior tour as much, but one player I would really like to watch is Bjorn Borg because I never had the chance to see him when he was at his best and from what I have seen and heard he is a very special player and obviously a great champion.


Text by Richard Pagliaro, Tennis Week.

TenHound
08-06-2005, 03:46 AM
Speaking of Asia, Roger & Safin are each getting $400k appearance money for their trip this fall. Should cover the plane fare!

lunahielo
08-06-2005, 07:31 AM
We didn't start when we were three years old because we wanted to play on Wimbledon's Centre Court. We started because we loved playing, we loved hitting the ball and suddenly we make it there. We live the tour and let's say we start saying: "Oh, the tour is too long, I'm too tired." I don't agree.

:) :) :)

1sun
08-06-2005, 02:12 PM
Speaking of Asia, Roger & Safin are each getting $400k appearance money for their trip this fall. Should cover the plane fare!
lovely. might as well rake it in while you can. well at least we know he wont pull out.

SUKTUEN
08-06-2005, 03:33 PM
Thanks for the interveiw ~!

Roger is so conditence~! :worship: :D

Daniel
08-15-2005, 03:05 AM
CINCINNATI (Reuters) - World number one Roger Federer will make his long-awaited return to the ATP tour at the Cincinnati Masters which begins on Monday.

The Swiss, who missed last week's Masters Series event in Montreal, reportedly to rest a foot injury, has not played a competitive match since he beat Andy Roddick to secure his third consecutive Wimbledon triumph six weeks ago.

Beaten in the semi-finals at both the Australian and French Opens, Federer will be looking for form as he builds toward what he hopes will be a successful defense of his U.S. Open title in New York starting later this month.

He has won eight titles already this year and lost just three times, to Marat Safin, Richard Gasquet and Rafael Nadal.

The world number one based himself in Dubai throughout the summer, working hard with his coach, Tony Roche, in the kind of heat that should make even the sometimes oppressive North American conditions a breeze.

His record in Cincinnati, though, is nothing to write home about.

He has won just one match in four appearances, and the draw has not been kind to him either. He faces a tough first-round match against American James Blake, who earlier this month reached his first final for two years in Washington.

German Nicolas Kiefer, who caused him more trouble than anyone at Wimbledon, could be waiting in round two.

Three-time winner and defending champion Andre Agassi will meet another former winner, Spaniard Carlos Moya, in one of the most intriguing first-round clashes.

Daniel
08-15-2005, 03:07 AM
CINCINNATI, United States (AFP) - Rested and refreshed after six weeks away, world number one Roger Federer returns as top seed at the 2.45-million-dollar Cincinnati Masters Series on Monday.


The three-time Wimbledon winner delayed his comeback by a week, missing this week's event in Montreal to let a foot injury fully heal.

But while the Swiss standout has been resting, Spain's Rafael Nadal has been building up a head of steam as the French Open champion effortlessly shifts his game from clay to hardcourt.

With Nadal a title threat this weekend in Montreal, Federer will have to be on his game from the start in Cincinnati, where he'll meet sentimental wild card James Blake.

Blake is ranked 71st in the world, having endured a year of injury in 2004. But he has made steady if slow progress in his comeback, reaching the final a week ago in Washington with a loss to Andy Roddick, who is seeded fifth here.

The methodical Federer arrived in the American Midwest Thursday evening from Europe, having a hit on Friday as he attempts to get over the hump at a venue which has always jinxed him.

The dominator of the game stands a pitiful 1-4 here, his worst record at any tournament.

Nadal, the second seed, will be keen to go one better against Federer than he did at the Masters Series in Miami four months ago, when he gave Federer a fright in the final before succumbing.

Since then he has won the Masters Series claycourt titles in Rome and Monte Carlo as well as the French Open.

"I'm improving a lot this year with some aspects in my game," said the likeable youngster. "I'm playing comfortable with more security in my serve.

"This year I feel little bit more tough, more solid, more tough on court. I don't have lot of mistakes. I've cut down on unforced errors - that's another improvement for me this year."

Those words could mark a challenge for Federer, who will have only Cincinnati and a week of private practise with which to polish his game prior to the August 29 start of the US Open.

SUKTUEN
08-15-2005, 09:41 AM
thanks Daniel

Stevens Point
08-16-2005, 10:08 AM
Updated: Aug. 15, 2005, 11:37 AM ET

Federer still No. 1 in rankings
Associated Press

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. -- Roger Federer extended his time as the top-ranked tennis player to 81 weeks Monday, lifting him to seventh on the men's career list.

Federer became No. 1 on Feb. 2, 2004 after winning the Australian Open. He's surpassed the 80 weeks that Australia's Lleyton Hewitt spent in the top spot for all but two weeks between November 2001 and June 2003.

Federer won his third consecutive Wimbledon title in July. He also won last year's U.S Open.

Ahead of Federer on the list for the longest time spent at No. 1 is Andre Agassi (101 weeks), Bjorn Borg (109 weeks), John McEnroe (170 weeks), Jimmy Connors (268 weeks) and Ivan Lendl (270 weeks). Pete Sampras holds the record for the longest time at No. 1 with 286 weeks.

Federer's lead in the rankings has been cut to 73 points after French Open champion Rafael Nadal won a Masters Series event in Montreal on Sunday.

If Federer holds No. 1 through the U.S. Open, he will notch 85 consecutive weeks at No. 1, the fourth longest unbroken reign. Connors has the record of 160 weeks, set in July 1974, followed by Lendl (157 weeks), Sampras (102 weeks).

Federer is followed in the top 10 in the rankings by Rafael Nadal, Lleyton Hewitt, Marat Safin, Andy Roddick, Andre Agassi, Nikolay Davydenko, Gaston Gaudio, Mariano Puerta and Guillermo Coria.

SUKTUEN
08-16-2005, 05:05 PM
thanks Steven

onm684
08-16-2005, 05:43 PM
Federer rallies to improve dismal record here
By Josh Katzowitz
Post staff reporter

MASON, Ohio - When you have to face Roger Federer in the first round of a tournament, maybe you look for an omen, a sign that something is destined to go right, a notion that you have a chance to upset the top player in the world.

It could be the hope that, since you're the first opponent he's facing after six weeks of inactivity, you'll exploit his rustiness. It could be that, since you're an American playing a native of Switzerland in your home country, the fans will give you enough lift to propel you to victory. It could even be a throwaway prediction at dinner the week before that eerily came true.

Maybe you need to fool yourself into believing that anything is possible, that beating Federer truly can happen.

James Blake is here to let you know that probably isn't the case.

Last week, Blake - who fell 7-6 (3), 7-5 to Federer in the first round of the Western & Southern Masters on Monday - was having dinner with friend and ATP Tour colleague Mardy Fish in Tampa.

Fish asked Blake whom he thought he'd draw in the first round of this event. Blake immediately mentioned Federer. The next day, his fate was sealed - the wild card ranked 70th in the world would, in fact, meet the top-seeded player in this tournament.

"I felt like maybe that was a good sign," Blake said. "Maybe I was going to beat him. But it didn't quite come true."

That's because you don't need to be perfect to beat Federer, but you'd better be pretty darn close. Omens and signs won't come true if you're not.

Federer, who hadn't played since Wimbledon with a foot injury, was too strong for him. Blake could admit that afterward.

"I really don't think Roger was at his best; he hasn't played in a little while," Blake said. "That's not an insult. That's a compliment, because he beat me at less than 100 percent. That's something guys on the top are able to do. They find a way to come up big on break points and in tiebreakers. He really raised his game, and that puts a little pressure on me because I know I have to do something special to break him."

Blake played well enough to allow a nearly full Center Court to fantasize that he'd be the one to continue Federer's miserable record in Cincinnati.

He forced Federer into a first-set tiebreaker, and after breaking his serve early in the second set, Blake grabbed a 3-0 lead. Federer, who was 1-4 lifetime at this tournament, quickly responded.

"I told myself to focus on his serve," said Federer, who will meet Germany's Nicolas Kiefer in the second round. "Don't give him easy points, which I thought I gave him. Maybe the concentration was lacking for a few points, and then he had a few good points. I hope I could hang in there and give myself a chance. Once I broke back, I had a good feeling that I could close it out."

Federer was correct.

With the second set tied at 5-5 and with Blake serving, he jumped to a 40-0 lead. But Federer won nine of the final 11 points in the match to end Blake's hopes for an upset.

"I feel like I should hold every time I'm up 40-0," Blake said. "But I can't fault myself for the way I played those points. He really attacked me on every single one. He played well when it came down to crunch time."

Federer, though, clearly was rusty. Six weeks off will do that.

"It's really what I expected," Federer said. "I lost one break and made two. I won a tiebreaker. It was a tough match. I didn't think he played too badly either. What counts is that I got through it. I was disappointed that I couldn't make all the returns I wanted. I was getting aced quite frequently, which is not normal. It shows the eye is not quite there like it was in Wimbledon. It's a matter of getting used to it."

But once Federer gets acclimated to these conditions and once he gets used to staring at 131 mph serves, Blake said he'll be the Roger Federer of normal. The one that dominates nearly every time out - no matter what omen his opponent strains to see.

"I don't think I saw his best," Blake said. "He'll get better as the tournament goes on. That seems to be the pattern. He gave me a few opportunities, and now that he's gotten through that, he'll be even more of a nightmare for the rest of the players."



Publication date: 08-16-2005
http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050816/SPT09/508160320/1035

Yasmine
08-16-2005, 05:58 PM
Thanks for posting the articles guys :hug:
"I don't think I saw his best," Blake said. "He'll get better as the tournament goes on. That seems to be the pattern. He gave me a few opportunities, and now that he's gotten through that, he'll be even more of a nightmare for the rest of the players."
I think Blake summarised pretty well the situation here. What counts is that he won and he'll get better as the challenges he has to face raise :devil:

SUKTUEN
08-16-2005, 06:00 PM
onm684 thanks

1sun
08-16-2005, 06:01 PM
Updated: Aug. 15, 2005, 11:37 AM ET

Federer still No. 1 in rankings
Associated Press

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. -- Roger Federer extended his time as the top-ranked tennis player to 81 weeks Monday, lifting him to seventh on the men's career list.

Federer became No. 1 on Feb. 2, 2004 after winning the Australian Open. He's surpassed the 80 weeks that Australia's Lleyton Hewitt spent in the top spot for all but two weeks between November 2001 and June 2003.

Federer won his third consecutive Wimbledon title in July. He also won last year's U.S Open.

Ahead of Federer on the list for the longest time spent at No. 1 is Andre Agassi (101 weeks), Bjorn Borg (109 weeks), John McEnroe (170 weeks), Jimmy Connors (268 weeks) and Ivan Lendl (270 weeks). Pete Sampras holds the record for the longest time at No. 1 with 286 weeks.

Federer's lead in the rankings has been cut to 73 points after French Open champion Rafael Nadal won a Masters Series event in Montreal on Sunday.

If Federer holds No. 1 through the U.S. Open, he will notch 85 consecutive weeks at No. 1, the fourth longest unbroken reign. Connors has the record of 160 weeks, set in July 1974, followed by Lendl (157 weeks), Sampras (102 weeks).

Federer is followed in the top 10 in the rankings by Rafael Nadal, Lleyton Hewitt, Marat Safin, Andy Roddick, Andre Agassi, Nikolay Davydenko, Gaston Gaudio, Mariano Puerta and Guillermo Coria.
i dont think this writer knows the difference between the race and entry rankings. stupid twat.

SUKTUEN
08-16-2005, 06:03 PM
Black is a nice guy~ He play well in this match~

Roger~!! Catch Up~!

RogiNie
08-16-2005, 06:14 PM
good article onm, thanks! :)

fightclubber
08-17-2005, 03:54 AM
OK HERE ALL THE CONFERENCES ETC

SO I PUT THIS HERE AND I PLACED IT IN CINCY THREAD TOO.

SILVY


WESTERN AND SOUTHERN FINANCIAL GROUP MASTERS
CINCINNATI, OHIO

August 15, 2005

R. FEDERER/J. Blake
7-6, 7-5

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Ladies and gentlemen, Roger Federer.

Q. Did you find some room for improvement after that, some things to change, work on?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I think I definitely can improve on this tonight. But that's not really what matters for me. I would also be a little disappointed if I would play my best tonight, you know. So it's really what I expected. If you look at the stats, you know, I got one break, I made two, I won a tiebreaker. So it's not too bad, you know, after all. It was a tough match tonight, you know. Night sessions are always a little different than day sessions. You know, I've been practicing a lot in the day. I didn't think he was playing too bad either. So I think it was a tough combination out there tonight. The crowd also, they got into it. And it was really humid. So it was tough conditions. But what counts is that I got through, and that was good tonight.

Q. Did it take a bit of time to get back into the swing of playing matches again?

ROGER FEDERER: I think I was struggling all the way through. I was disappointed at times where I just couldn't make all the returns I wanted to. I was getting aced quite frequently, which is not normal things. It really just shows how the eye is not quite there like it was maybe in Wimbledon, obviously, in the finals, you know. So it's just a matter of getting used to it. For this, I need to keep on winning, you know, to really get that back, or then in practice I have to play a lot of match situations, you know, play a lot of points. Yeah, so, tomorrow's maybe good to also play some doubles.

Q. Were you surprised by Blake's intensity tonight?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you always get, I think, surprised after being away for five, six weeks, you know, from the intensity that is out there. You know, the balls, they come back so quick, you know. It's a different game you're playing than when you're practicing, you know. The practice, you can let maybe one or the other ball go by, but in the match every point really counts. You suddenly have the feeling everything is going much quicker than you're used to. That's definitely the feeling I had a little bit out there tonight.

Q. Would you mind telling us just a few of the things that you've done since Wimbledon?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, came home after Wimbledon for a day. Had a nice reception there, you know, in front of 3,000 people in the main square like what usually the soccer players get, you know. So to get this for an individual sport was really nice, you know. It's hard obviously to set something -- set it up, you know. But the press, you know, they really helped me out to get everybody's attention. And everybody came, so it was really fantastic. I left the following day for vacation. Had about a two-week vacation. Started to work out, you know, mostly upper body and some running, some bike, you know, because I wanted to also give my feet a rest. So after like four weeks, basically I started to hit with Tony for eight days or so, which was good, too. Then I came home, had my birthday there, and was there for three days and came here on Thursday.

Q. How are the feet?

ROGER FEDERER: They're good. I'm happy. No pains, so, which is nice.

Q. Are you still thinking about Wimbledon? You mentioned out there that the points were -- you thought of the points, you had to remember the points aren't as short. From the three titles, is that something you still think about? Has it changed your thoughts in about eight weeks?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you have to really put Wimbledon to the side because anyway the grass court season is so different, you know. So you don't want to have that in mind, you know, going into another tournament. I've had that mistake. Like when I beat Sampras in 2001, every match I played after that I wanted to play like when you beat Pete. But that's not how -- the way it works. I think I learned from that. You know, the hard courts, you know, you can scramble incredibly well. The reaction times, you know, are way quicker, you know. And everybody's a much better athlete on the hard courts than on the grass so you have to -- like Blake tonight, he's really quick so you have to make sure you finish those points and you've got to take some chances. Today, sometimes I did; sometimes I couldn't so...

Q. After he broke you in the second set and he was up 3-Love, what kind of changed for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I just told myself focus on that serve, you know, don't give him any easy points, which I thought I gave him. Maybe just had a concentration lack maybe for just a couple of points, and then he had another few good points. I just hoped I could hang in there in the second and give myself a chance. He definitely didn't play a great game where I broke back. But I just needed also same -- like he broke me, I just needed to play one or two good shots and that was enough. Once I was back in the second set, I had a good feeling that I could close it out in two.

Q. You haven't played doubles since early June in Germany. Why did you choose to play here?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, really to get back in the rhythm. One - how should I say? - one thing I needed to remember was my feet, was it gonna be good for my feet or not. Also not to really double up. In doubles, my expectations are not as high as in singles. As I haven't been playing for also five, six weeks, it's also always good to get back in the rhythm. I usually do that in the beginning of the clay court season, the beginning of the grass court season. So now this time I also decided to do it beginning of the hard court season. It's basically just a match tomorrow. If I win, great. If I lose, at least I got some match play in. I enjoy playing doubles. I used to play a lot before, but now that the singles has been so great, you know, it's tough to back it up with doubles.

Q. Davis Cup in mind?

ROGER FEDERER: Not really. More -- it's more for Yves and myself. I mean, obviously, you know, little bit egoistic, but he's happy, you know, that I'm playing with him obviously. He's always ready to play with me and when I call up on him, he's ready to go, which is great.

Q. Do you feel like one tournament's going to be enough for you to be ready for the Open?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I can't change it now, can I? So I hope, you know. Can't really answer with a yes or no. It's basically like Australian Open, though, for me. I only got basically one tournament, then the preparation week, then the big one comes around. The thing is at the US Open everybody is much more ready than at the Aussie Open. So definitely will be a tough one to win. US Open is always tough, I think - any Grand Slam. So for this, you know, it's for everybody the same. When it comes down to the Grand Slam, you got to be ready. I think I'm ready, you know. That's why I took a rest. Mentally and physically I'm feeling good, and that's just about getting at least the time on my racquet.

Q. Has winning Wimbledon taken the pressure off you for the rest of the year and in a sense altered your mentality?

ROGER FEDERER: What did it do to my mentality?

Q. Has it taken the pressure off you and altered it?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, yeah. Altered it?

Q. Changed.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I definitely feel less pressure, yes. Well, you know you got a Grand Slam in your bag - not just some kind of a Grand Slam, it's Wimbledon. So for me, this is a great season so far. You know, I'm really happy the way I've played. You look at my record, it is fantastic. So I obviously try to keep it up, you know. And, you know, I said I think in one of the interviews that everything that comes from now is a bonus for me. Not quite like that, you know, because I got still some big goals coming, you know. You know, you got this one here, you got US Open, you got the Davis Cup for me, hometown tournament in Basel, you got the other two Masters Series, you got Shanghai. You got really many tournaments still coming which for me is always special, but definitely, you know, if I don't win a match again until the end of the season, obviously it will be a little disappointing end but still it was a great season. To win always a Grand Slam is always great.

Q. What about your No. 1 position, ATP No. 1 position? Last week Nadal won.

ROGER FEDERER: It doesn't help, yeah (smiling).

Q. If he wins this tournament this week and if you don't, then your No. 1 position goes to Nadal?

ROGER FEDERER: Does it?

Q. I don't know.

ROGER FEDERER: Probably not yet, huh? He's not quite that close yet so (smiling)... I'm sure I have a nice cushion, you know (smiling). No, you know, definitely the way he's been playing, he's definitely a great contender, you know. So obviously the next few months, I would say, because now this week it's not possible for him, but it's going to interesting to see. I got many more points to defend with the US Open and the Masters, you know. But, again, I didn't play the indoor season, which is a great season for me, too. So I got maybe some points I can make there. Obviously I think it's going to be an interesting end to the season, fight for No. 1. But I know I so far could keep my No. 1 position without losing it, it's been great. Obviously, I'm going to try to keep it this way. It's really brought me a lot as a person, also as a player. But it's not only him, there's also other great players that always got the chance, so I have to make sure I play well.

Q. James said when he was in the hospital in Rome you sent him a card. Can you talk about what he's been through, what impresses you about how he's playing now, everything he's gone through in the last year, year and a half.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I was really touched, you know, with what happened to him. I was really disappointed. He's a really good guy, you know. Then, you know, also personal problems, you know, came about. Then also, you know, he couldn't really recuperate from, you know, the accident he had. So it's really hard to see that, you know. I think he's a happy guy and he knows that tennis is not everything, you know, especially in those moments. So to see him back, you know, enjoying the game, and also when he loses he's still in a way happy I think. He's happy to live through those great moments on center court, you know, playing against the best. I think this is what it's all about, you got to enjoy the game. And if you don't, you're in the wrong place. I think before it happened and after it happened he's still the same guy, which is great. Yeah, I'm really happy he's back, definitely. I hope his ranking is going to improve and he can play more often.

Q. You mentioned on the court after the match that you knew you were only 1-4 here before tonight. Any thoughts on why it hadn't come together here? Is it tough to come and adjust to these conditions in that first match right away usually?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, there's always sort of a reason why you lost, you know. Last year I was close, you know, to win the first, and who knows what happens. I always had the feeling conditions are quite quick here so I never really could get the rhythm maybe I wanted to have. Two years ago I lost to Nalbandian, which wasn't a great surprise, you know, but it was a close match. Three years ago my former coach, you know, he passed, a good friend passed away just a week before. So mentally I wasn't here. Basically four years ago I was a nobody, you know (smiling). So for me, that was not excuses, but are reasons why I lost, you know. This year, with maybe the better preparation, I hope it's going to go better. So far it's been all right, you know, so I hope I can improve on that.

End of FastScripts….

Mrs. B
08-17-2005, 07:48 AM
thanks for the interview, Silvy. :hug: aww, sweet of Roger to send Jamie a card like that... :hearts:

Shabazza
08-17-2005, 11:00 AM
thx silvy and onm684 - that was a good interview :yeah:

lsy
08-17-2005, 02:05 PM
Q. James said when he was in the hospital in Rome you sent him a card. Can you talk about what he's been through, what impresses you about how he's playing now, everything he's gone through in the last year, year and a half.

[/b]ROGER FEDERER: Well, I was really touched, you know, with what happened to him. I was really disappointed. He's a really good guy, you know. Then, you know, also personal problems, you know, came about. Then also, you know, he couldn't really recuperate from, you know, the accident he had. So it's really hard to see that, you know. I think he's a happy guy and he knows that tennis is not everything, you know, especially in those moments. So to see him back, you know, enjoying the game, and also when he loses he's still in a way happy I think. He's happy to live through those great moments on center court, you know, playing against the best. I think this is what it's all about, you got to enjoy the game. And if you don't, you're in the wrong place. I think before it happened and after it happened he's still the same guy, which is great. Yeah, I'm really happy he's back, definitely. I hope his ranking is going to improve and he can play more often.


Rogi :hug:

Whistleway
08-17-2005, 02:10 PM
Well, I was really touched, you know, with what happened to him. I was really disappointed. He's a really good guy, you know. Then, you know, also personal problems, you know, came about. Then also, you know, he couldn't really recuperate from, you know, the accident he had. So it's really hard to see that, you know. I think he's a happy guy and he knows that tennis is not everything, you know, especially in those moments. So to see him back, you know, enjoying the game, and also when he loses he's still in a way happy I think.

Nice stuff!!! But, does he have to use these many 'you know's ;)

SUKTUEN
08-17-2005, 02:38 PM
thanks for the interview, Silvy.

lunahielo
08-17-2005, 03:15 PM
Q. If he wins this tournament this week and if you don't, then your No. 1 position goes to Nadal?

Not an issue now~~~~ :) :) :)
Originally posted by Whistleway
Nice stuff!!! But, does he have to use these many 'you know's

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Actually, I think he uses *you know* as a verbal pause. I've noticed that he uses this phrase more when he's a bit nervous...

SUKTUEN
08-17-2005, 03:29 PM
Nadal will not be NO.1 still Roger play tennis

Stevens Point
08-17-2005, 10:07 PM
Some excerpts from Cincy site.



Top seeded Roger Federer reached the third round for the first time in five appearances at Cincinnati with a 4-6, 6-4, 6-4 win over Germany's Nicolas Kiefer.

Federer earned three break points to start off the match before Kiefer reeled off five straight for the hold. Federer rallied a break while Kiefer was serving for the set, but the German bounced back with a second break up 5-4 to take the first set off of Federer for the first time since the World No. 1 fell to eventual champion Rafael Nadal in the Roland Garros semifinal.

Federer won three out of three break point chances to open a up a 5-1 lead in the third set. Then Kiefer issued a scare when he broke while Federer was serving for the match at 5-2.

Federer wrapped when serving it out for the second time in two hours, 13 minutes. He next faces former doubles partner Olivier Rochus in the Round of 16.

Federer and Rochus teamed up to win the Wimbledon juniors double championship in 1998, but they have only faced each other once on the ATP circuit. Federer started off his run to the 2005 ATP Masters Series shield in Miami with a 6-3, 6-1 win over Rochus.


Federer (On the challenges of returning to competition after a long break): Hand‑eye coordination. The explosiveness of your legs, you know. The way you read the game; I have the feeling that's missing most, you know. Then doubt suddenly creeps to your mind, you know, where you're not sure, "Should I go for the shot, or should I rather play it safe one more time?" When you're playing well, when you're confident, you don't think about those kind of things.
So occasionally they come back to me, those moments. But that's always the case in the early rounds of a tournament, because conditions are new.

lunahielo
08-18-2005, 01:42 AM
Thanks, SP.

Good luck tomorrow, Rogi

SUKTUEN
08-18-2005, 06:05 AM
Stevens Point thanks

RogiFan88
08-18-2005, 05:26 PM
Nice stuff!!! But, does he have to use these many 'you know's ;)

Rogi's becoming more American... :p

SUKTUEN
08-18-2005, 06:06 PM
Rogi's becoming more American... :p

why ? :devil:

oneandonlyhsn
08-18-2005, 08:51 PM
Rogi's becoming more American... :p

Nah, he has been spending too much time with Clijsters :lol:

Daniel
08-19-2005, 01:20 AM
Thnaks for the interview :)

PamV
08-19-2005, 03:29 AM
Rogi's becoming more American... :p

I thought the "ya knows" might come when he's lost for words in English. It seems to me when they print his answers they could cut out the "ya knows" as they don't add anything to the answer or meaning.

nobama
08-19-2005, 03:45 AM
I thought the "ya knows" might come when he's lost for words in English. It seems to me when they print his answers they could cut out the "ya knows" as they don't add anything to the answer or meaning.You're right. Often times if people use the word "um" or "ah" a lot it will be removed from translation or a transcript. It's quite obvious that even though Roger speaks English very well it's still not perfect and so sometimes he uses extra words like "you know". Or maybe he does more so when he's nervous. Because when you translate his press conferences in German and French he doesn't often use the phrase "you know".

Daniel
08-19-2005, 03:55 AM
MASON, Ohio - Roger Federer, gathering momentum with every match, advanced to the quarterfinals of the $2.45 million Cincinnati Masters by beating Olivier Rochus 6-3, 6-4 Thursday night.

ADVERTISEMENT

Jose Acasuso of Argentina beat Luis Horna of Peru 7-6 (5), 7-5 in the other late match and will face Federer on Friday.

Five of the top six seeds remain.

"He was just too good," Rochus said. "If you are going to beat him, you have to beat him in the first round. He gets better the more matches he plays."

Federer, ranked No. 1 in the world, has won eight titles already this year, including Wimbledon. He is 61-3 — 35-1 on hardcourts.

"I played a good match," Rochus said. "He's just better than me in almost every way."

It wasn't always so. Rochus, who is from Belgium, and Federer, who is from Switzerland, were teenage doubles partners. They won the Wimbledon junior doubles title in 1998.

Before that, Rochus beat him regularly.

"I remember him when we were 13 years old. He was always losing 6-0, 6-1 against everybody in the under-14 tournament," Rochus said.

But that was then. Federer, who just turned 24, has been No.1 in the world for 81 weeks, the seventh-longest period ever.

"We were almost laughing at him, and now he's laughing at us," Rochus said. "He's No.1, easy. And really, when he was young, at the beginning, he was really bad."

As professionals, the two have met only twice. Federer beat Rochus 6-3, 6-1 earlier this year at Miami.

"Both times I had to serve well to get the upper hand," Federer said. "I thought I should be aggressive, take my chances, put the pressure on him. He's a good counter-puncher."

Nearly everything Federer did worked. He served 14 aces, traded ground strokes with Rochus and rushed the net repeatedly.

Rochus won a few points with lobs and passing shots when Federer did that, but not nearly enough.

"I definitely had the feeling I was playing more aggressively than I was the first two matches because, maybe, it's just a better feeling I have now from the baseline," Federer said.

Daniel
08-19-2005, 03:55 AM
CINCINNATI, United States (AFP) - Roger Federer put friendship aside as he regained his lethal touch, leading four of the top five seeds into the quarter-finals of the 2.45-million-dollar Cincinnati ATP Masters.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Swiss world number one hammered home a 6-3, 6-4 victory over former junior doubles partner Olivier Rochus of Belgium, a pocket rocket standing just 165cm.

That pair lifted the 1998 Wimbledon boys title together, setting the stage for the Swiss player's current domination of the grass event where he won his third straight singles crown last month.

Despite his fondness for a friend whose game he described as "cute," top seed Federer was all business as he brushed his mate aside in his first and only warm-up event for a US Open title defence that starts a week from Monday.

"I'm really happy with how how I played," said Federer, twice a winner over his former rival this season. "He's tough and plays well from the baseline.

"You have to play well yourself. I played aggressive and kept coming at him. It really worked well."

The severity of the victory was a confidence boost for Federer, who had struggled with his timing in his first two narrow victories this week.

The triumph left him with a 4-4 career mark at Cincinnati, until now the weakest link of his glittering career. His previous best was a modest second-round place.

The Swiss couldn't have asked for a more forgiving draw as he steps back onto court for the first time since Wimbledon.

He improved his season record to 61-3 as he aims for a fourth Masters Series shield of 2005. His first meeting with a seed could come in the semi-finals against number four Marat Safin.

SUKTUEN
08-19-2005, 10:17 AM
thankyou mirkaland and Daniel

Nocko
08-19-2005, 01:01 PM
:worship: Thanks Daniel :worship: and your avatar !! :eek: :drool: :o :p

TheMightyFed
08-19-2005, 01:03 PM
Do you know where we can find Fed last postmatch full interview ?
Thx

SUKTUEN
08-19-2005, 01:14 PM
:worship: Thanks Daniel :worship: and your avatar !! :eek: :drool: :o :p

I love my new avarat make by chiu ~~!!! :D :devil:

RogiFan88
08-19-2005, 02:32 PM
Any messages for ROGI at USO?? Pls PM me before Tue.!!

SUKTUEN
08-19-2005, 02:39 PM
what's wrong Rogifan88?

oneandonlyhsn
08-19-2005, 05:14 PM
Federer may be past point of no return
No. 1 player now into a groove here

By Neil Schmidt
Enquirer staff writer


MASON - The fit of giggles that struck Roger Federer at the start of his news conference Thursday night is a bad omen for the remaining players in the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters.

Federer, usually guarded and unexpressive with the media, couldn't quit laughing. Some humorous conversation he had concerning varieties of salad dressing in America, he said, was stuck in his brain, and he needed a few minutes to compose himself.

In short, Federer was relaxed. And when the world's No. 1 player gets comfortable at a tournament, he's nearly impossible to beat.

"If you have to beat him, you have to beat him first round," said Olivier Rochus, who lost 6-3, 6-4 Thursday to Federer. "Once he plays for a while, 1-2-3 matches, he plays better and better, gets to know the crowd, the conditions."

Federer advances to a quarterfinal matchup this afternoon with Jose Acasuso.

Players often talk about the difficulty in adjusting to conditions from one tournament to another, even when the surfaces are the same. Federer's past confirmed that: He had been 1-4 here, and in that lone victory - in 2003 over qualifier Scott Draper - he had to save seven match points to advance.

Yet when he gets going? Good luck beating him. Federer has set an ATP record with victories in his last 21 finals appearances, dating to July 2003.

This had appeared the week someone might trip up Federer early. He hadn't played since winning Wimbledon, he was resting an achy foot and he was switching surfaces.

Federer's timing was indeed lacking early. He struggled through a 7-6 (3), 7-5 victory over James Blake and a three-set squeaker against Nicolas Kiefer, losing his serve five times in all.

"He will get better as the tournament goes on," Blake said Monday. "Now that he's gotten through (the first round), he'll be even more of a nightmare for the rest of the guys."

Thursday, he was super-smooth. He struck 31 winners and 14 aces.

Federer had played doubles this week to aid in acclimating himself.

"I was playing more aggressive than I was the first few matches," Federer said. "... It's getting through the first (two) matches that's really going to make me comfortable. Sometimes doubles accelerates that feeling."

Federer is 78-3 since the start of the U.S. Open last year. Federer won his only prior meeting with Acasuso; the Argentine retired in the fourth set of a 2003 match.

jtipson
08-19-2005, 05:37 PM
Any messages for ROGI at USO?? Pls PM me before Tue.!!

Are you going RF?

Rommella
08-19-2005, 10:22 PM
How can a draw with Blake and Kifer in the first two rounds and a potential semis with Safin be in any way forgiving?

Oh well, The Russian hydra's self-destructed again and I was looking forward to Roger's semis with him -- notwithstanding its nail-biting consequences.

Ginepri should be some challenge after he beat Roddick two weeks ago, but Roger should prevail.

SUKTUEN
08-20-2005, 06:47 AM
oneandonlyhsn thankyou

oneandonlyhsn
08-20-2005, 06:51 AM
oneandonlyhsn thankyou

You are welcome sweetie :hug: I love your avatar :hearts:

SUKTUEN
08-20-2005, 07:03 AM
You are welcome sweetie :hug: I love your avatar :hearts:
Your avarat is also funny~! :D

TenHound
08-20-2005, 07:04 AM
Speaking of Roger's good friend Ollie, there's a wonderful quote from him in today's Guardian article:

His 6-3, 6-4 win over the world No34 Olivier Rochus contained so many deft touches contrasting with moments of extreme power that the Belgian, a friend for more than a decade, felt after the match that he needed to give a history lesson on the skills of a younger Federer.

"When he was young he was really bad," said Rochus, who won Wimbledon's junior doubles with Federer. "In a few years he came from very bad to the best player in the world ever. And I think he will stay there for a long time, so it is incredible.

"I remember him when we were 13. He was always losing 6-0, 6-1 against everybody. We were almost laughing at him and now he's laughing at us."

SUKTUEN
08-20-2005, 07:11 AM
"I remember him when we were 13. He was always losing 6-0, 6-1 against everybody. We were almost laughing at him and now he's laughing at us."[/I]
:haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:

RogiFan88
08-20-2005, 01:38 PM
I'm not going to USO but I'm helping out Fedsfan in gathering messages of support for ROGI there. Monday deadline!!

kjo
08-20-2005, 02:29 PM
Latest interview:

WESTERN AND SOUTHERN FINANCIAL GROUP MASTERS
CINCINNATI, OHIO

August 19, 2005

R. FEDERER/J. Acasuso
6-4, 6-3

ROGER FEDERER

ROGER FEDERER: I'm okay today. No giggles. You never know, huh, but...

Q. Nothing like a surprise.

ROGER FEDERER: Exactly.

Q. Someone's left a bottle of salad dressing for you.

ROGER FEDERER: Put some there? Oooh, thanks for that (smiling). (Looking at a bottle of salad dressing). Never heard of this one, actually. "Raspberry walnut vinaigrette." We don't have that stuff in Switzerland (smiling).

THE MODERATOR: We're ready for questions.

Q. Roger, you did a good professional job, but the conditions are very different, aren't they?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, they were, but I thought it was not as tough as it was against Kiefer. I thought I had more control from the baseline, you know. Now my serving is also better. I had the feeling I'm more consistent. So I had the feeling it was easier, you know, even though first set was up and down. But had something to do with my game, with his game, you know, the whole start. I could have been up, you know, 5-1 maybe, but I also could have been down 4-3 and a break. So in the end, you know, I got to be happy the way I played. I thought I relaxed a little bit more in the second set. It was all right in the crucial points. I thought it was a really good and tough performance.

Q. Are you still having to think about the feet, or are they moving automatically now?

ROGER FEDERER: No, it's fine now. Also on the serve, you know, I started to read more and more my opponent's serve, which is a great feeling. So I have the feeling I'm back, back in the flow. That's definitely a good sign to have.

Q. So what happens to the balls when you're playing on a hot, humid day, compared with an evening? What sort of difference is that?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's maybe the ball travels a little bit quicker through the air. It's hard to say, but it's more the bounce off the court. You know, the court obviously heats up during the day where at night it cools down and it's sort of more dead, you know. It doesn't take as much spring out of the court. During the day that's why the balls, you have the feeling they shoot all over the place, you know. The slice stays lower, the spin comes up higher, you know. And that makes obviously a big difference. When you play, you got to adjust to that. But for me maybe it was more difficult because I haven't been playing. So if I would have been in the flow, maybe I wouldn't have had the difficulties I've had this beginning of the week.

Q. Can you talk about playing Ginepri. He is coming in on a pretty good hot streak.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, he definitely plays well in the States, you know. Probably if you look at his results he's had most of them here, you know. Obviously, not to underestimate him here in the States. He's beaten Marat, who I think is one of the best players in the world. Yeah, so I definitely have to watch out even though I think it's a good draw, you know, to play against him. He's won, what, Indianapolis, and played well again here. So, you know, I really have to watch out. And I know he can play aggressive, play good. I mean, he played a great match against Marat today. He's definitely hot, and hope I can cool him down (smiling).

Q. Would you have wanted to play Safin, or is it better not to have to worry about it this week?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, I don't know how Marat's knee is, but I guess if he's playing, it's all right. I guess it's better to play Robby than Marat, you know, because with Marat you never know what you can get; he can play an awful match the one day and a great one the next day. With Robby I have the feeling he's a little bit more consistent maybe overall, but not as great, obviously, as when Marat is at his best, you know. Yeah, so, prefer to play Robby in the semis of a Masters Series.

Q. Robby Ginepri talked about how much confidence he's been gaining this summer, especially this week. Every match he wins, he gains more confidence. I'm curious, what do you gain from this week? You're the No. 1 player in the world. I wouldn't think you'd need any more confidence.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, for me, imagine my confidence after all the wins I've had through the last two years, you know. No, I mean, you always take every match from like new because that's where you start doing and you want to give your opponent a hard time to beat you. I'm No. 1 in the world, you know, so I don't want to give away wins just like that, you know, as presents. I want to make sure when I'm playing, I'm on, and when I'm not feeling well, I don't play, you know. Like in Montreal I didn't feel like I was ready yet. So I'm very happy to see that when I come here, I feel like I'm ready. At least then I go the distance, I go far into a tournament. Now I'm in a great situation, a great position where I can do better than semis, you know. And really looking forward to that challenge. Yeah, my confidence is back, you know. You lose it when you don't play, and you got to earn it again. On this I really have the feeling I achieved this week.

Q. You said sometimes when you play Marat you don't know what you're going to get: A great game or just an okay game. With Ginepri, are you playing the No. 58 player in the world, or are you playing a guy that just beat Marat Safin? It would seem that you don't know who you're going to play.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I never have the feeling I'm playing the ranking anyway, especially when it comes down to semis. The guy has won, what, four matches. He is well into the tournament. He is confident, like he says. Then it doesn't come down to ranking anymore. So you play the player; you play the situation. That's what I will be doing tomorrow.

Q. You seem to be using that intriguing squash shot a little bit more than usual. Is that because you're getting to a few more wide balls than you used to?

ROGER FEDERER: Or maybe a little late, I don't know. Could be both (smiling). No, usually I have the feeling if you can play a squash shot, you can play a normal shot, too. It's the first reflex you sometimes get. I don't know where it comes from, you know, the reflex. But I don't like to use it, to be honest, because it really says that you're in an awful position, you know; it's tough to come back from there. Because forehand slice is not really my favorite shot to play, but as long as I don't miss it and sometimes win a few crucial rallies like I did on set point, I think that's great.

Q. You've won so many matches, so many tournaments. You haven't won this one. I think you've won five of the nine in this series. Do you check them off as you win them and say, "Okay, now I've got this one," does that mean anything to you?

ROGER FEDERER: Tick them off? No, not quite (smiling). But it's obviously great, you know, to win many different ones. It's also nice to win Hamburg three times in a row. That's fantastic, you know, if you hear 2002, 2004, 2005, it's great. But it's also nice at the same time, you know, to win different events. This is one I've never been able to do well, not even come close to winning it. So to be in this position now, it's nice. Haven't really given myself chance either in Madrid, Paris; two I haven't won yet. And Rome I was in the finals. Monte-Carlo at least quarters, you know. So this is a break for me here in Cincinnati, and I'm happy about it.

Q. Does that provide any extra motivation, though?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not really. It's more for me looking at getting back in shape, playing well, looking ahead for the Open, staying ahead in the Race, my ranking. Those sort of things.

1sun
08-20-2005, 03:30 PM
Latest interview:

WESTERN AND SOUTHERN FINANCIAL GROUP MASTERS
CINCINNATI, OHIO

August 19, 2005

R. FEDERER/J. Acasuso
6-4, 6-3

ROGER FEDERER

ROGER FEDERER: I'm okay today. No giggles. You never know, huh, but...

Q. Nothing like a surprise.

ROGER FEDERER: Exactly.

Q. Someone's left a bottle of salad dressing for you.

ROGER FEDERER: Put some there? Oooh, thanks for that (smiling). (Looking at a bottle of salad dressing). Never heard of this one, actually. "Raspberry walnut vinaigrette." We don't have that stuff in Switzerland (smiling).

THE MODERATOR: We're ready for questions.

Q. Roger, you did a good professional job, but the conditions are very different, aren't they?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, they were, but I thought it was not as tough as it was against Kiefer. I thought I had more control from the baseline, you know. Now my serving is also better. I had the feeling I'm more consistent. So I had the feeling it was easier, you know, even though first set was up and down. But had something to do with my game, with his game, you know, the whole start. I could have been up, you know, 5-1 maybe, but I also could have been down 4-3 and a break. So in the end, you know, I got to be happy the way I played. I thought I relaxed a little bit more in the second set. It was all right in the crucial points. I thought it was a really good and tough performance.

Q. Are you still having to think about the feet, or are they moving automatically now?

ROGER FEDERER: No, it's fine now. Also on the serve, you know, I started to read more and more my opponent's serve, which is a great feeling. So I have the feeling I'm back, back in the flow. That's definitely a good sign to have.

Q. So what happens to the balls when you're playing on a hot, humid day, compared with an evening? What sort of difference is that?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's maybe the ball travels a little bit quicker through the air. It's hard to say, but it's more the bounce off the court. You know, the court obviously heats up during the day where at night it cools down and it's sort of more dead, you know. It doesn't take as much spring out of the court. During the day that's why the balls, you have the feeling they shoot all over the place, you know. The slice stays lower, the spin comes up higher, you know. And that makes obviously a big difference. When you play, you got to adjust to that. But for me maybe it was more difficult because I haven't been playing. So if I would have been in the flow, maybe I wouldn't have had the difficulties I've had this beginning of the week.

Q. Can you talk about playing Ginepri. He is coming in on a pretty good hot streak.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, he definitely plays well in the States, you know. Probably if you look at his results he's had most of them here, you know. Obviously, not to underestimate him here in the States. He's beaten Marat, who I think is one of the best players in the world. Yeah, so I definitely have to watch out even though I think it's a good draw, you know, to play against him. He's won, what, Indianapolis, and played well again here. So, you know, I really have to watch out. And I know he can play aggressive, play good. I mean, he played a great match against Marat today. He's definitely hot, and hope I can cool him down (smiling).

Q. Would you have wanted to play Safin, or is it better not to have to worry about it this week?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, I don't know how Marat's knee is, but I guess if he's playing, it's all right. I guess it's better to play Robby than Marat, you know, because with Marat you never know what you can get; he can play an awful match the one day and a great one the next day. With Robby I have the feeling he's a little bit more consistent maybe overall, but not as great, obviously, as when Marat is at his best, you know. Yeah, so, prefer to play Robby in the semis of a Masters Series.

Q. Robby Ginepri talked about how much confidence he's been gaining this summer, especially this week. Every match he wins, he gains more confidence. I'm curious, what do you gain from this week? You're the No. 1 player in the world. I wouldn't think you'd need any more confidence.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, for me, imagine my confidence after all the wins I've had through the last two years, you know. No, I mean, you always take every match from like new because that's where you start doing and you want to give your opponent a hard time to beat you. I'm No. 1 in the world, you know, so I don't want to give away wins just like that, you know, as presents. I want to make sure when I'm playing, I'm on, and when I'm not feeling well, I don't play, you know. Like in Montreal I didn't feel like I was ready yet. So I'm very happy to see that when I come here, I feel like I'm ready. At least then I go the distance, I go far into a tournament. Now I'm in a great situation, a great position where I can do better than semis, you know. And really looking forward to that challenge. Yeah, my confidence is back, you know. You lose it when you don't play, and you got to earn it again. On this I really have the feeling I achieved this week.

Q. You said sometimes when you play Marat you don't know what you're going to get: A great game or just an okay game. With Ginepri, are you playing the No. 58 player in the world, or are you playing a guy that just beat Marat Safin? It would seem that you don't know who you're going to play.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I never have the feeling I'm playing the ranking anyway, especially when it comes down to semis. The guy has won, what, four matches. He is well into the tournament. He is confident, like he says. Then it doesn't come down to ranking anymore. So you play the player; you play the situation. That's what I will be doing tomorrow.

Q. You seem to be using that intriguing squash shot a little bit more than usual. Is that because you're getting to a few more wide balls than you used to?

ROGER FEDERER: Or maybe a little late, I don't know. Could be both (smiling). No, usually I have the feeling if you can play a squash shot, you can play a normal shot, too. It's the first reflex you sometimes get. I don't know where it comes from, you know, the reflex. But I don't like to use it, to be honest, because it really says that you're in an awful position, you know; it's tough to come back from there. Because forehand slice is not really my favorite shot to play, but as long as I don't miss it and sometimes win a few crucial rallies like I did on set point, I think that's great.

Q. You've won so many matches, so many tournaments. You haven't won this one. I think you've won five of the nine in this series. Do you check them off as you win them and say, "Okay, now I've got this one," does that mean anything to you?

ROGER FEDERER: Tick them off? No, not quite (smiling). But it's obviously great, you know, to win many different ones. It's also nice to win Hamburg three times in a row. That's fantastic, you know, if you hear 2002, 2004, 2005, it's great. But it's also nice at the same time, you know, to win different events. This is one I've never been able to do well, not even come close to winning it. So to be in this position now, it's nice. Haven't really given myself chance either in Madrid, Paris; two I haven't won yet. And Rome I was in the finals. Monte-Carlo at least quarters, you know. So this is a break for me here in Cincinnati, and I'm happy about it.

Q. Does that provide any extra motivation, though?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not really. It's more for me looking at getting back in shape, playing well, looking ahead for the Open, staying ahead in the Race, my ranking. Those sort of things.
cheers, where did you get it form? i wanna see robbys interview

Stevens Point
08-20-2005, 03:37 PM
Thanks for the interview!

Here is an excerpt from the interview after defeating Rochus. He talks a little bit about Davis Cup, why he decided not to play the first tie and so on. For people who still wonder about his decision to skip DC vs the Neatherlands early this year.

Q. Quick couple of Davis Cup questions. Could you explain why you missed Switzerland's first‑round tie against The Netherlands, and can we expect to see you playing Davis Cup again soon? And are you more optimistic now that Wawrinka is coming up on your team?

ROGER FEDERER: The reason for the first tie not to be played was that I could really focus on my main goal of this season, was to stay No. 1 in the world and defend my Wimbledon title, and for this I had the feeling I need to be fresh. And if I missed the first week, I could really follow my schedule which I plan to play up until Wimbledon because there was only this one match in there. And this is basically three‑quarter almost of the season, you know, three Grand Slams, and it was many, many Masters Series. So I decided to do that.

Then the second question was about if I'm going to play again. I have announced I will play against England. So that is for sure. We're playing in Geneva on clay against the Brits; you know that. I'm ready to play again.

Wawrinka has improved his ranking. For me, it doesn't really change much if I'm going to play or not. I have to make sure it fits into my schedule. And I thought the first week of Davis Cup or the first date of Davis Cup was not good for me, so this is why I decided not to play. And next year I have the feeling it's already better, but I haven't announced that I'm going to play next year yet.

But I'm happy to see that there's a second player in Switzerland making his move and that I'm not the only one so...

kjo
08-20-2005, 03:42 PM
You're welcome. It's from http://www.asapsports.com/ - go to "recent interviews". I noticed they get them a little faster than the cincy site. Robby's is up there too.

lunahielo
08-20-2005, 03:48 PM
Thanks, kjo~~ :)

1sun
08-20-2005, 04:06 PM
You're welcome. It's from http://www.asapsports.com/ - go to "recent interviews". I noticed they get them a little faster than the cincy site. Robby's is up there too.
thanks a load. yeah the cincy site is sooo slow.

Stevens Point
08-21-2005, 12:36 AM
Excerpts from Cincy site

Federer First to Final

CINCINNATI - Top seeded Roger Federer reached his fourth ATP Masters Series final of the year edging Robby Ginepri 4-6, 7-5, 6-4 on center court Saturday in one hour, 48 minutes.

The match was decided in three crucial late-set breaks with Ginepri breaking at 4-4 in the first set, and Federer breaking while up 6-5 and 5-4 in the second and third sets, respectively.

Federer improved to 28-1 in ATP Masters Series events this year with his only loss coming to Frenchman Richard Gasquet in the quarterfinals at Monte-Carlo. He also extended his consecutive win streak to 17 matches.

Federer brings a 37-1 2005 hardcourt record into his first career final in Cincinnati. His last loss on a hardcourt came back in January to Marat Safin at the Australian Open semifinals.

He awaits the winner of tonight's semifinal between Lleyton Hewitt and Andy Roddick who he is a combined 13-0 against since defeating Roddick in the year-ending 2003 Masters Cup semifinals.


WHAT THE PLAYERS SAID:

Federer: Well, I'm not overconfident, very confident. I just know what I have to do. I know my game's in place now. Once I win a certain amount of matches, my level of play, I know what I can do, what I can't do. And so I play the percentages I think extremely well in finals, and on big points usually I'm ‑‑ well, I've been unbeatable, you know, so that's always what I'm looking for.

Somehow, you know, when the nerves are even bigger, you know, somehow it seems like I can even play better because that can also backfire very quickly, you know, and things turn around.

oneandonlyhsn
08-21-2005, 01:39 AM
Thanks Stevens Point :wavey:

SUKTUEN
08-21-2005, 06:27 AM
thanks for the interveiw~!

Stevens Point
08-21-2005, 10:41 AM
Federer, Roddick advance to Cincinnati Masters final
By JOE KAY, AP Sports Writer
August 20, 2005


MASON, Ohio (AP) -- Heat. Wind. Thunder. Drizzle. Roger Federer took everything that the afternoon and Robby Ginepri could throw at him, and found a way to overcome it.

Federer rallied for a 4-6, 7-5, 6-4 semifinal victory Saturday in the $2.45 million Cincinnati Masters, leaving no doubt that the world's No. 1 player is back in form and ready for the U.S. Open's top spot.

Federer will try for his ninth tournament title of the season Sunday against Andy Roddick, who beat third-seeded Lleyton Hewitt 6-4, 7-6 (4) in the other semifinal. History weighs against Roddick, who is 1-9 career against Federer and has lost their last five matches, including the last two Wimbledon finals.

Overall, Federer has won the last 21 times he reached a tournament final.

"I play my best in the finals, in the important matches,'' Federer said. "That's why I'm No. 1.''

He took five weeks off after winning his third consecutive Wimbledon title, getting some rest and letting a sore foot heal. Federer was out of sync when he showed up in Cincinnati, looking to regain his edge and confidence.

A few matches were all he needed.

"I really feel I've got my confidence back,'' said Federer, who is 63-3 this season, including 37-1 on hard courts. "My footwork is back, the eye is back -- watching the ball, reading the game. Definitely I'm feeling really good right now.''

He extended his winning streak to 17 matches under trying conditions, facing an American who was on a summer-long roll and had the crowd behind him. They'd faced each other once before, when Ginepri was an awed 18-year-old at the 2001 U.S. Open. He was overwhelmed by the setting and the opponent, losing a lopsided second-round match in straight sets.

This time, Ginepri knew he belonged and took Federer to the limit.

Playing on a broiling, 94-degree afternoon in wind gusts that toyed with shots, Ginepri used his biggest advantage -- his accurate serve -- to full advantage. Ginepri had lost only one game on his serve all week, and was the only player who hadn't dropped a set heading into the semifinals.

Ginepri broke Federer's serve to go up 5-4 in the first set, setting up the break point by swatting an overhead back at him. He screamed "Yeah!'' when his crosscourt forehand closed out the set.

"I think he was a little uptight in the first few games of the first set,'' said Ginepri, who stayed calm throughout his first ATP Masters semifinal. "It was a little gusty out there -- that could have been a factor as well.''

Not for long. Sensing his predicament, Federer played his best.

"I'm not allowed to make any more mistakes or it's all over,'' Federer summed up. "I was aware of that.''

Federer broke Ginepri's serve to take the second set 7-5. The third set also stayed on serve until the final game, when Ginepri sailed a backhand return wide to lose serve and the match.

Ginepri is having his best summer on the tour, winning his second career ATP title at Indianapolis last month. A first-round loss at Wimbledon inspired him to work harder on his game -- he spends an extra 45 minutes a day in practice and an additional 45 minutes working out.

With a sculpted body and a sharper focus, Ginepri has gone 14-3 on hard courts this year. He never got a toehold against Federer, who allowed him only one break point during the match.

"It's anybody's match out there when you're that close,'' said Ginepri, still brooding about the loss. "I thought I was playing good enough to win.''

Against anyone else, perhaps.

The crowd favored Roddick in the other semifinal, urging him on after he skinned his right elbow and the back of his right hand while taking control of the first set. Afterward, he had two bright red scrapes below the elbow, another on his knuckles and one on his knee.

Roddick slipped while running down a drop shot, tapped it back over the net for a point, then slid hard on the court. He winced in pain when he got up, but kept playing and broke Hewitt two points later for a 4-3 lead that held.

Both players held serve in the second set, sending it to the tiebreaker. Roddick had four aces in the tiebreaker -- and 24 overall -- as he got a breakthrough win. Roddick had been 1-6 career against Hewitt, losing all five times they played on a hard court.

He repeatedly pumped his fist, then buried his face in a towel after finishing it off with a 133 mph ace.

"I felt really good about it,'' Roddick said. "I didn't want to come in here and explain why I lost to Lleyton again, to be honest.''

Next comes the rematch against a player who has tormented him even more.

"I want a shot at him,'' Roddick said. "Maybe I can turn the momentum in the series with one win. You never know. I want to keep trying.''

yanchr
08-21-2005, 11:22 AM
August 20, 2005

R. FEDERER/R. Ginepri
4-6, 7-5, 6-4

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Ladies and gentlemen, Roger Federer. Questions, please.

Q. Did he surprise you at all in the first set, or was it just a matter of getting used to him?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I thought I got the rhythm pretty quick, you know. Obviously was surprised how far in he was standing, you know, on the returns. But that really didn't mean I was serving bad, you know, was just a different sort of angle to the game. But I really thought, you know, I had my chances early; didn't take it. Then I had problems really putting the return back in to play. I was a little disappointed with that, but I thought I got a little unlucky, you know, the game I got broken. He had one sort of shank pass, you know. He hit the reflex volley and sort of stuff. Suddenly I was down Love-40, so obviously then it's tough. But I thought that was something I could have prevented maybe, or a little bit more luck on my side, things would have changed. But anyway he played -- he hit those shots good and he read them well. So suddenly, well, I was down a set. You know, it goes very quick in tennis especially when you're 4-All, you know. Yeah, it was definitely a hard battle, but I didn't underestimate him. That's why I came back and won.

Q. Do you think the mini rain break helped you a little bit?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I was worried because I knew that if the rain delay is not long, you know, I have to come out and serve right away. That's what happened I think against Blake, it was. It's not so easy, you know. You must have a good start to the game, and that's what I had. So that kind of was more relaxing then. And obviously once the service game was over, he had the pressure on his side, you know, to get his rhythm going again. But I didn't really think that was a big advantage.

Q. Did you always feel sort of in control even though you were a set down? Did you feel like it was in-hand for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, so-so. I'm not allowed to make any more mistakes, huh? Otherwise, it's all over. And I'm aware of that. But I had the feeling I was really winning my own service games very consistently, you know, very sort of easy. That gave me a lot of confidence maybe to also go for a little more on his serve. And really up until the moment where we should have been a tiebreak, he was up 40-15 on the last service game in the second, I didn't really have still that good feeling on the return, you know. It's only in the third where I really started to relax a little bit.

Q. He said by the end of the match he knew he wasn't going to break you. You had 12 aces today. Were you serving particularly well today, or maybe your serve is just underrated by some people?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I out-ace many, many players. It doesn't mean I hit 25 aces, but I hit more than my opponent, and that's what counts, you know. I think my second serve is very reliable. Today I had the feeling I served quite smart, you know, because he was trying to change it up and mix it up and give me different sort of looks on my own serves. When I needed my serves, most of the time they were there, and that is definitely always good to know - especially now heading into the finals, heading into the US Open, that the confidence is back, because I had to work for it; it didn't come by itself.

Q. You have this streak of 21 straight tournaments that you've won when you reached the finals. What is it about your game that has prevented you from losing when you get to the finals?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I had losses in the early part of my career in finals. But, you know, I don't know. Play my best in the finals, in the important matches. That's why I'm No. 1, you know. There's no secret. So I hope I can keep it up.

Q. Is that a mental thing?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, yeah (smiling). You can imagine.

Q. Do you feel like maybe you're a little stronger mentally than most of the guys on tour?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I'm not overconfident, very confident. I just know what I have to do. I know my game's in place now. Once I win a certain amount of matches, my level of play, I know what I can do, what I can't do. And so I play the percentages I think extremely well in finals, and on big points usually I'm -- well, I've been unbeatable, you know, so that's always what I'm looking for. Somehow, you know, when the nerves are even bigger, you know, somehow it seems like I can even play better because that can also backfire very quickly, you know, and things turn around.

Q. How would you assess tomorrow's final? You're 9-1 against Roddick; you've won the last 8 against Hewitt, you've won like 15 straight sets against him.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's great, you know. But what can I say? Tough match no matter what, you know. I have a great record against anybody basically right now. So doesn't really matter who I play in the finals, I'll be in there as the big favorite. But I still have the feeling against these guys, a little bit off the best, you know, and you lose - and they all know that. So I'm aiming for a very good performance to win this tournament.

Q. What about possibly like a home-crowd advantage if it would be Roddick? I mean, you obviously faced Hewitt in the Australian Open. Does that ever affect you, or does that even motivate you more when you've got the fans against you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I had Blake and Ginepri this week, so I got a taste of it. But it's not too bad, you know. We're not like in Spain or I don't know where, where they can be more brutal. So, no, I enjoy it, of course, you know, if Andy will be in the finals. But the same with Lleyton. With Andy there will be obviously more fans cheering for him, against me, for me as well, you know, because people who are maybe more quiet, they get also out of their seats to help me because they see that everybody's behind Andy, you know (smiling). So, no, it's always interesting, you know, when the crowd gets into it. You know, without them, it would be a little different tennis if we wouldn't have the crowd.

Q. Has this tournament taken away any of the effects of taking a month off? Are you feeling any effects of not playing since Wimbledon anymore?

ROGER FEDERER: It's in the past now that I haven't been playing. I feel very fresh mentally especially. Physically, I was struggling in the beginning of the week with some muscle pain in my shoulder and chest because of, yeah, serving. You know, I wasn't quite used to that. So that's going away, luckily, and just right in time, you know. I've got one more match and then some time to rest it again. But I really feel like, you know, I got the confidence back. I got my footwork back. The eye is back, you know, watching the ball, following the ball, reading the game. So definitely I'm feeling really good right now.

End of FastScripts….

RogiNie
08-21-2005, 12:30 PM
thanks for the interview! :)

SUKTUEN
08-21-2005, 06:20 PM
thankyou steven !! Roger is the champion now~!

Stevens Point
08-21-2005, 06:38 PM
One of the first articles about today's victory

Federer beats Roddick in Cincinnati final
August 21, 2005

MASON, Ohio (Ticker) - World No. 1 Roger Federer of Switzerland seemingly is invincible in tournament finals.

The top-seeded Federer won his ATP Tour-record 22nd straight final with a 6-3, 7-5 triumph over fifth-seeded American Andy Roddick on Sunday at the $2.45 million Western & Southern Financial Group Masters, a U.S. Open warmup event.

It was the 18th straight match win for Federer, the reigning U.S. Open champion who tied Rafael Nadal of Spain for the tour lead with his ninth title of 2005. Federer, who also beat Roddick in straight sets in the Wimbledon final last month, has not lost since falling to Nadal in the French Open semifinals in June.

"It's a bit of a surprise because I haven't been playing since Wimbledon," Federer said. "But I really started to play fantastic tennis, especially semis and finals, I thought.

"I'm really, really happy to be back and really looking forward to the Open now."

Federer is an astonishing 64-3 this year, including 38-1 on hard courts. His only loss on the surface came to Marat Safin in the Australian Open semifinals, a match in which he held a match point.

Federer broke Roddick in the fifth game and again in the ninth to easily claim the opening set.

Roddick, the 2003 champion here, broke Federer in the fifth game of the second set but the Swiss star immediately broke back. After Federer held for 6-5, Roddick called for a trainer to work on an injured right foot.

"I only felt something in my foot at 5-all in the second set, so he was already kicking my (behind) before that," Roddick said during the trophy presentation. "I don't really know what to tell you. Right now I'm going to go off and get it looked at, and hopefully I'll be OK come New York City."

Following a seven-minute delay, Roddick fell behind on serve, 15-40. He saved one championship point with an ace but hit a forehand into the net on the next point.

Federer, who claimed his fourth Masters Series event this year, has won six straight matches over Roddick and is 10-1 in their all-time series.

"He's a great champion and he carries himself even better off the court, which is a real credit to our sport, so congratulations," Roddick said.

SUKTUEN
08-21-2005, 06:39 PM
thanks Stevens Point

oneandonlyhsn
08-21-2005, 06:56 PM
thanks Stevens Point

Ditto :yeah:

SUKTUEN
08-21-2005, 07:01 PM
Ditto :yeah:
:confused: :wavey: :D

oneandonlyhsn
08-21-2005, 07:58 PM
:confused: :wavey: :D

:wavey: :wavey: :hug:

PaulieM
08-21-2005, 10:09 PM
Federer beats Roddick to win Cincinnati Masters

By JOE KAY, AP Sports Writer
August 21, 2005

AP - Aug 21, 3:29 pm EDT
More Photos


MASON, Ohio (AP) -- When Roger Federer reaches a tournament final, he doesn't lose. Nobody knows that better than Andy Roddick.

The unflappable Federer won his 22nd straight final on Sunday, beating the exasperated American 6-3, 7-5 for the Cincinnati Masters championship and his ninth overall title this season.

Federer improved to 10-1 against Roddick, who tried every tactic but still came up short. Federer has won the last six times they've met, including the last two Wimbledon finals.

The world's top-ranked player for the last 81 weeks, Federer heads into the U.S. Open fit, relaxed and on a roll. He took time off after winning his third straight Wimbledon, looking to recharge and rest a sore foot.

He needed only one week of matches to get back in form.

``Today I got the feeling occasionally that this is great tennis again,'' Federer said.

Roddick has a new worry with only one week left before the U.S. Open.

ADVERTISEMENT


His right foot started bothering him late in the final set, and he needed a timeout before the last game to get treatment. Roddick winced, groaned and covered his face with a towel while a trainer stretched and rubbed the bottom of the foot.

He returned and moved gingerly, getting only two points while Federer broke his serve to close it out. Federer got $400,000 for the win, Roddick $200,000 for finishing second.

Roddick isn't sure whether the foot will be a lingering problem.

``It's still too early,'' Roddick said. ``I'm probably going to take a couple of days off. The thing that makes me a little optimistic is it didn't happen on one movement. I didn't hear anything click, I didn't hear anything snap.''

Federer's tour dominance is captured by remarkable numbers -- a 54-3 match record this season and 138-9 the last two years with 20 titles; 28 straights wins on hard courts; an 18-match winning streak; the seventh-longest uninterrupted stay atop the ATP list.

Perhaps the most amazing: Those 22 straight wins in title matches, where he's always at his best. He was again Sunday against a player he has bedeviled over the years.

Federer countered Roddick's serve-and-volley strategy by hitting returns at his feet as he came to the net, leaving him in a bad spot. Roddick double-faulted to lose his serve and fall behind 3-2 in the opening set, then uttered a profanity as he left the court.

He knew he was in trouble already.


AP - Aug 21, 3:27 pm EDT
More Photos


Federer kept the pressure on, making few mistakes and pouncing on every opening. He broke Roddick again to finish out the first set, a bad omen for the American. Roddick had lost only two games on his serve all week; now, he'd lost two in one set.

``I haven't had an amazing serving day against him,'' said Roddick, who had 11 aces and made a subpar 56 percent of his first serves. ``I've played well against Roger from the baseline before, but I haven't had that monster serving day. That's what I'm looking for.''

By contrast, Federer won 14 consecutive points off his serve during one stretch. The streak ended when Roddick broke him with a backhand passing shot to go up 3-2 in the second set.

``Then Roger started being Roger again,'' Roddick lamented.

An energized Federer broke him right back. In a telling moment, Roddick hit a 125 mph first serve, and Federer shot it back down the line for a forehand winner that set up the break point and put him in line for the victory.

Federer will be an overwhelming favorite at the U.S. Open, where he'll be challenged by an eclectic field and growing pressure to keep winning tournaments.

``It's constant pressure,'' Federer said. ``When it's over, it's kind of a surprise. You can't expect to win all the time. If it keeps on going, it's incredible.''

Roddick hoped that his revamped game would be good enough to end his misery against Federer. Roddick has spent the year developing his game -- changing pace on his ground strokes, coming to the net more often, building stamina for long rallies. The tactics worked in a semifinal win over Lleyton Hewitt, another player who had dominated him.

Roddick served 24 aces and left some skin on the court during a two-set win over Hewitt. Roddick came away with nasty scrapes galore -- two below the right elbow, another on his right hand, yet another on his knee -- from the rough-and-tumble semifinal.

All that got hurt on Sunday was his foot and his pride.

``He's the one guy that all of us are chasing,'' Roddick said. ``He's the main guy, and then there's probably four or five of us. Maybe we need to do a tag-team effort or something, join forces.''

mitalidas
08-21-2005, 10:13 PM
Today I think is the first time that roddick outaced Roger --hard to believe but true.
I might be mistaken about the match they played right before Wimbledon 2003, but I don't think so.
Well, at the least, this is the first time since Wimbledon 2003 that Roger has been outaced by roddick. Its surprising, because that seems to be the only real strong point of roddick's game, and it has taken 11 matches for him to beat Roger on that one dimension!

Stevens Point
08-21-2005, 10:16 PM
Thanks, Paulie! :D

1sun
08-21-2005, 10:20 PM
I haven't had that monster serving day. That's what I'm looking for.''
here roddick admits that his only chance is to literaly serve roger off the court
not a good sign ay andy?

oneandonlyhsn
08-21-2005, 10:31 PM
Today I think is the first time that roddick outaced Roger --hard to believe but true.
I might be mistaken about the match they played right before Wimbledon 2003, but I don't think so.
Well, at the least, this is the first time since Wimbledon 2003 that Roger has been outaced by roddick. Its surprising, because that seems to be the only real strong point of roddick's game, and it has taken 11 matches for him to beat Roger on that one dimension!

Roger has still not reached his best, and he says that his biggest problem is returning serve when he comes back. Funny how most of the Roddick fans think that Roger played 110%, Rogi played really well, but he is still getting his groove back. Once he does he will be back to returning in his usual ninja way :armed: So I guess I'm not surprised that he was outaced by Roddick

Stevens Point
08-21-2005, 11:59 PM
R. FEDERER /A. Roddick

6‑3, 7‑5

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Ladies and gentlemen, the 2005 winner of the Western & Southern Financial GroupMasters, winning his fifth different ATPMasters Series event, a record‑setting fourth for this season, Roger Federer.

Questions, please.

Q. Congratulations.

ROGER FEDERER: Thank you.

Q. Six weeks away, you come back and you win first up. Pretty impressive.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, it is. Obviously, I am always a little surprised, you know, when I win the big tournaments like this. But more, you know, when I've been away from the game for five, six weeks.

This is a great comeback for me, and obviously the best preparation I could have hoped for before the Open, you know. Even though I don't take this tournament as a real warm‑up event because it's just too important, you know.

But I'm really pleased that I could beat such a quality player like this in the finals, you know. These are the big moments. This is how it's going to be at the US Open basically every match, you know. So I'm ready for the fans and for the pressure and for everything. It's a really good feeling I have.

Q. How do you raise your level? You always seem to be able to raise your level at the important moment.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think I always believed in playing consistent, you know. Believing that I can come up with the good shots at the right time. I read his ‑‑ try to read his game, you know, over the ‑ how do you say? ‑ throughout the match, I try to analyze what he's been doing, what he's doing best, what he's maybe doing less good and try to exploit it on the big points. But it doesn't always work, obviously, with his kind of serve.

But I really had the feeling he gave me some chances on breakpoints where he didn't make his first serve sometimes, and I could take that advantage and break and win the match and the set.

Q. It's worked out very well. But how much of a risk is it just having one buildup tournament?

ROGER FEDERER: It's quite a risk, but what can I do, you know? I also need my rest. I'm playing consistent for the last two years, and this is really the moment where you can basically pick and choose when you're No. 1 in the world and you have all the options, you know. Just because you're No. 1 doesn't mean you've got to race through the same schedule like you've been trying to get there, you know.

But it is very ‑ how should I say? ‑ there's so much you can still do. Everybody wants to have you. The offers are big, you know. You're like, Should I do it, or Should I not do it. But I believe in the long run, I believe that I should follow a smart schedule throughout my career so I can hopefully play injury‑free as long as possible and try to maintain the good level. That's my mindset I have on picking tournaments.

So this is definitely also not only thinking about this US Open, this preparation I have, it's much more long term. This is how I'll keep it for the rest of my life, I guess.

Q. Have you ended the tournament with your feet in good condition?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, feet were good in the beginning and they feel okay now. I have another week only practice. Practice is never as brutal as the match situation because in the match you really push to the limits, where in practice you can still, you know, see how it works. But I have to say I'm pleased the way things have turned out with my feet.

Q. Yesterday against Ginepri you worked real hard. How did you feel during that match about getting in this match? Did you find today easier?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, different. You know, Robby gave me much more time from the baseline. With Andy, he put me much more under pressure. He tried to serve and volley. He tried to, you know, tried to shorten up points sometimes and take chances. And, you know, Robby was more making sure he gets all the balls back, hardly makes any mistakes. Where Andy, you know, obviously, you know, it's going to be unforced errors, same as my game, too; it's much more offensive.

I don't know. It's very different. Obviously, the serves are very different, even though both have a great serve right now. Very different match. Hard to compare.

Q. You dominated him last month at Wimbledon. How did today's match compare to that?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, I really had the feeling he came in thinking he really has a good chance to beat me today. That's really the feeling I got. So for me to save that first breakpoint was huge.

Then coming back and break myself, you know, that was the key I would say. Get a little bit cushion and make him calm down a little bit because he was really all excited, you know, the way he started the match, and serving big. He actually served, I thought, really big all the way, the whole match through. He hardly ever double‑faulted except on the one breakpoint, you know. But he really went big first and second serve. Usually when I play him he goes much more for the spin serve than for the big second serve. I really have the feeling that match against Lleyton yesterday gave him a lot of confidence also on his second serve.

So I really had to watch out. I'm actually happy I saw that match against Lleyton on TV last night so I got an idea of how much chances he's actually taking, because I don't think I would have expected him playing that offensive if I wouldn't have seen the match.

Q. Because of the way you played this week, you played a lot of matches, did you still feel confident coming into this match as well?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, absolutely. I knew that after Rochus, Acasuso and Ginepri matches I was ready for anybody. That feeling obviously before a final is good to have.

No, I've got so many matches in my legs, you know, again, like I said, after the semis, you know, everything comes very automatic now. I don't need to think anymore where I'm going to hit my balls, they just go automatically. That is very important in my game because I need to play with the flow and natural.

Q. What exactly was wrong with your foot when you were off?

ROGER FEDERER: Excuse me?

Q. What exactly was wrong with your foot when you were off?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I've been ‑‑ I had this big foot problem at the Australian Open. I don't know if you remember, but against Marat, I was really struggling with movement. I had inflammation on the bone in the foot. Never really seemed to really heal, even though it never returned as bad as it did that particular match against Safin.

So I'm actually happy about that. It's been improving. But I still thought, you know, I have to rest it sufficiently to really make it go away because I don't want to play in pain all the time. I was doing that from the Australian Open maybe all the way through to Wimbledon occasionally. So now it's better.

I just give myself a chance to rest sometimes as well. Not only my feet and physically, but also mentally I think it's important to rest.

Q. You said at the start of this that you're a little surprised when you win big tournaments like this. Do you mean coming off of an injury, or you're always surprised when you win Wimbledon?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I am. No, because I see the draw and I see how many good players we have right now, how deep men's tennis goes, you know, how tough it is from the first round on.

Already like during a finals like this I feel like, you know, this constant pressure, you know, where I'm just waiting for the moment where everything is over, you know, where I can finally relax again. Because, you know, I eat, I wake up, and I think about the match all the time, you know. So it's only when the match is over, you know, like let's say last night, when I can relax for a few hours, and then before I go to bed it comes back to my mind that I've got a finals to play. Then everything from then on is only about the match all the time. It's constant pressure. When it's finally over, you're so relieved that it's in a way a surprise that you've achieved it once more. Because with the record I have lately, you cannot expect all the time to win. But if it keeps on going, it's just incredible.

Q. How do you account for your success against Roddick? I think he's only won four sets off of you in eleven matches, that highly‑ranked of a player.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I guess my game matches up well with his. That's my only explanation. I guess I know how to play him, I've got the game to play him.

But it's not easy, you know, because if he serves big and takes his chances, let's say like early in the match, he's a great frontrunner. That's what I've been able to do against the best, you know, get the first break usually, and lead from there. Because once I'm in the lead, I'm obviously the best frontrunner.

So that's what I have been doing very well over the last few years. Didn't really allow them to get into the match where maybe in the past, you know, it was different. Especially against the best, you have to start well.

Q. Can we go back to the beginning of this week. How did you feel? Did you feel a little bit under pressure because Nadal had just won in Montreal and he was closing up the gap on you?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, he's so far away in the draw anyway. But, of course, you see he's been winning tournaments. It's nothing I have to be concerned about, it didn't affect my play, you know.

I don't know. You take it like it's a new tournament and you haven't been playing so your only concern is trying to get, you know, your form back, you know, what you've been stopping with in Wimbledon, which was so fantastic.

So you try to get just a little bit of a feel from that again. I know it won't happen in the first round; it's a longer process. Today I got the feeling occasionally, this is great tennis again, you know.

Obviously now I'm relieved, you know, that the gap is bigger again, and I finally played well in Cincinnati especially, because this tournament never really worked for me.

Q. Can you tell us in percentage how do you feel versus when you were in the final of Wimbledon? Are you at the same level?

ROGER FEDERER: It was different, you know. The ball flies much more here. I think Wimbledon you can have nicer points, you know, because everything is in the hitting zone.

But I still felt today I didn't make many easy mistakes. I served consistent. I got back his return very well, especially second serve, the way he was serving. I really had the feeling it was a very good match.

Q. In percentage how do you feel, 100% fit back?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, absolutely. Yeah.

Q. You talk about the pressure. You're pulled every which way from the media, having to do interviews in English, French, German. How do you handle that? Is that something that gets tiring for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. Every day, it's tough (smiling). Once in a while, it's all right, you know. But sometimes you have matches, you know, I don't know, 6‑3, 6‑2, there's not much you can say about it. Then I got to rap through all three languages, it's sort of not the funniest thing, you know.

But I understand, you know. So for this reason sometimes it's nice to get away from everything and sort of come back fresh and maybe with new information, too. It's a little bit more exciting for me, too.

Q. For the Swiss, do you think there will be a celebration of you and Patty Schnyder winning Cincinnati?

ROGER FEDERER: There you go, yeah. Yeah, for the men's, it's little bit bigger tournament, though. No, she's having a great season. I'm really happy for her.

Q. In the long run is it a goal for you to try to win all the Masters?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, people are saying I messed up the AustralianOpen, I'm going to win nine Masters Series because everybody thought I was going to win the Grand Slam. But that' not how it goes.

Obviously it would be nice to win as many Masters Series as possible because they are for me very prestigious. You start to play great players from the start. I had difficult times in the beginning of my career to win back‑to‑back matches at Masters Series because draws were so tough. Now that I can win them, you know, it's a really nice feeling.

I've won, what, five out of nine? Yeah, so, that's great.

Q. Agassi said that it's harder to win a Masters because it's six matches within seven days, versus a Grand Slam. Do you agree with him?

ROGER FEDERER: Hmm (smiling). He's got many more Masters Series than Grand Slams, so that's weird, isn't it?

I understand his point. I think back‑to‑back Masters Series are almost impossible, if you pick like Montreal, Cincinnati. Indian Wells, Miami is different because you have a break of four, five days in between.

What else we have? Oh, yeah, Rome, Hamburg. That's like almost impossible to win I have the feeling back‑to‑back because you have to win 12 matches maybe in 13 days. Imagine that, you know, plus a five‑setter in the finals of the middle week.

But I don't know. For me Grand Slams are harder maybe because of the five‑setters and because if it's over two weeks you've got to make sure you stay healthy, you don't get sick, the preparation is good, you know. All these little things, you know. It's a long time, you know, you're at the same place. Little thing need to go wrong and you lose, you know. Because out of a five‑setter, you don't come semi‑injured or semi‑sick, you'll pay the price there quickly.

Q. What part of his game did you try to pick apart today? Did you sense he was making some errors at the net early on?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, obviously I was trying to get the ball back low, you know, and trying to get it short also. If he was coming in, trying to make him volley up because, you know, he can put away easy volleys no problem, you know. But it's the tough volleys he's not I would say good enough yet, quite like the best volleyers. This is what I had to hope for, that he's going to miss a few of them and give me some chances for passes.

You know, on the second serves, try to get into the rally, work my way into the points, try to take away his confidence from the baseline. That really worked once more, so I'm really pleased.

Q. A few words about the US Open now. Who do you fear, or do you fear nobody?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I fear the two, three weeks ahead of me. It's, like I said, a long time. I'm looking forward to that.

The players, I know them all, I've beaten them all. But it's a tough one, the US Open. I experienced it last year, you know, especially with the Agassi match. And then just the heat can play a big factor, the winds and everything.

So you better be ready mentally.

Q. What did you think about this tournament before this year considering the record you've had here? How much has that view changed now?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I was a little concerned, you know, in the beginning. I really never played a good match here. So I was really hoping to get through the first round. In a way I was happy to play Blake, but then I realized he just also played well, and he likes to play in the States. I was not so sure if that was going to be a good draw either.

It was Kiefer, you know. It was sort of a shaky draw, too, because I was just struggling recently against him in Wimbledon. I know he can take away the rhythm very, very easily by his game.

No, so I was concerned. But once I think I got through those two rounds, I started to get more confidence, started to actually understand the conditions here in Cincinnati, and started to play much better.

But, you know, I have the feeling the conditions are really quick here, and you've got to get used to it. It's tough from the baseline.

Q. You don't seem to have a rival. Would you like to have one? Would that be good for the game if you had someone that might beat you every once in a while? It wouldn't be good for you, but...

ROGER FEDERER: Not really good for me. Good I don't know for who, but...

Q. For the game.

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know if it's good for the game. I think it's also nice to see the guys challenging me. I think it's an interesting time in tennis we're going through with all the guys coming along, you know. You've got nice youngsters coming along, Agassi is still playing, and, you know, the bunch of guys right behind me. So I think it's really interesting.

Nadal has definitely made his move, you know, to No. 2 player in the world. Now it's an interesting end to the season. It's not for sure I'm going to finish No. 1 in the world, you know. I've still got to play well and defend my titles and make sure I play well. So I have a lot to play for next few months.

Q. You played a little bit of doubles here. Are your plans to continue to play doubles throughout the rest of the year?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I'm going to play doubles in Davis Cup most probably. Played Bangkok doubles last year, so I don't know if I'm going to do that again. I'm not going to play at the Open, that's for sure. I hope I'm healthy in the winter this time, I couldn't play there last year. I haven't made up my mind yet, we'll see. But I'm always a fan of doubles, so...

Q. Will you take any salad dressing with you?

ROGER FEDERER: Still here? No, it's gone. I'll take the trophy instead (smiling).

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

guinevere_79
08-22-2005, 06:50 AM
From Bob Larson's tennisnews....

Men's Match of the Day
Cincinnati - Final
Roger Federer (1) def. Andy Roddick (5) 6-3 7-5

There was a brief moment when Andy Roddick appeared to have hope. That was in the second set, when Roger Federer had a brief lapse and went down a break.

It didn't last, of course. Federer, who had won the first on the strength of two breaks -- against Roddick! -- immediately got the break back, and then added one more to polish off the match when Roddick suffered a foot injury late in the second.

And this after looking terrible for much of the week. Almost makes you think he's luring his opponents into false confidence. What can you say? It's his ninth title this year, without a loss in a final; he's again tied with Rafael Nadal in that department. 22 straight finals without a loss.

And he just keeps strengthening his grip on the #1 ranking. Rafael Nadal has had one of the best years in recent memory -- but Federer now leads him by over 2600 points, or almost more than 50% of Nadal's total. And he has only three more events to defend in 2005 (all of which he won last year): The U. S. Open, Bangkok, and the Masters Cup. That means that, even if Federer loses first round at the U. S. Open, and Nadal wins it, Federer will be #1 until at least Madrid. In practice, we can't imagine him losing the top spot before the Masters Cup.

And his lead in the Race is back up to 172 points over Nadal, and 443 points over #3 Roddick. With 550 required events points still to be awarded, and Federer having room in his optional five, and Nadal having none. Federer has clinched the year-end #2, and only Nadal has any serious shot at #1 (no one else except Roddick has even a mathematical chance), and even Nadal is going to find it very difficult, even if we assume he can play on carpet the way he plays on clay.

To give this a little perspective: Federer last year at this time had 887 Race points, and people were calling it one of the best years ever. This year, he has 1010 Race points.

Despite the loss, Roddick benefits significantly. He came in at #5, but rises to #4 (passing Marat Safin). That gets him the #4 U. S. Open seed, which is worth a lot -- assuming his foot injury isn't too bad, anyeay.

His Race standing doesn't change; he came in at #3, and remains there. But he now leads #4 Hewitt 547 to 400, and no one else is within 175 points of him. He has almost no chance of ending the year higher than #3 -- but his chances of earning that spot are pretty good. He's clinched his Masters Cup berth. Small consolation, perhaps, but it really is progress.

Mrs. B
08-22-2005, 07:39 AM
loved Roger's interview. Thanks for posting, Yukio. :wavey:

yanchr
08-22-2005, 08:13 AM
Thanks SP for Roger's interview :wavey:

Ummmm......From his interview, his feet still sounds a bit of a problem, though he would call it Ok, but we all know USOpen is coming around...I hope it won't stand out as a problem as it did in AusOpen. I want a fully fit Roger to deliver in full swing.

nobama
08-22-2005, 11:30 AM
When we say Roger wasn't his best, what are we referring to? Wimbledon 2005? US Open 2004? Ok so Roger didn't play like that yesterday, but I still think it was a good performance and was the best he's played all week. We're all so spoiled now we're looking for a flawless performance. But I like when he can work his way through a tournament, playing some scrappy tennis along the way and still win the thing. Just shows how much he does care about every tournament he plays (doesn't just consider this a US Open "tune-up" event). He's out there to win.

SUKTUEN
08-22-2005, 04:18 PM
Roger you are so Funny~! :haha: :haha:

mitalidas
08-22-2005, 04:40 PM
Isn't this one of the nicest things you have ever heard about Roger?

When Blake broke his neck last year while practicing in Rome and was lying in the hospital, a few of his American buddies came by to visit. He only received one get-well note. It was from Federer.

"It said, 'We'll miss you and we really hope you get back here quickly,' " Blake said. "That says a lot about a person that's No. 1 in the world and doesn't need another friend out here. He's really a class act."

SUKTUEN
08-22-2005, 05:04 PM
mitalidas Roger is a very nice and kind Boy~!! :inlove: :hug: :hug:

Thankyou my LORD made Roger to us~!!!! :worship: :worship: :worship:

TenHound
08-23-2005, 03:35 AM
@Mitalidas - Totally Agree. I was so moved, I just went to thread "Why we love Roger" & posted it. That's just too dear- I'll always remember it. And James seems like a real Sweetie, so I was doubly pleased for him. Somehow I can't imagine it even occurring to say AA, Sampras or JMac to do such a thing.

Mrs. B
08-23-2005, 07:38 AM
Roger mentioned that but it's good to know the other details...aww, classy guy all the way. Indeed!

Dirk
08-23-2005, 12:38 PM
Ninja has a heart of gold off the court. :hug:

SUKTUEN
08-23-2005, 03:58 PM
Ninja has a heart of gold off the court. :hug:

:hug: :hug: :yeah: :yeah: :yeah: :yeah:

Brianna
08-23-2005, 08:06 PM
Ninja has a heart of gold off the court. :hug:

Roger is a total class act. :)

PaulieM
08-23-2005, 08:33 PM
Isn't this one of the nicest things you have ever heard about Roger?

When Blake broke his neck last year while practicing in Rome and was lying in the hospital, a few of his American buddies came by to visit. He only received one get-well note. It was from Federer.

"It said, 'We'll miss you and we really hope you get back here quickly,' " Blake said. "That says a lot about a person that's No. 1 in the world and doesn't need another friend out here. He's really a class act."
i didn't know about this, aww that's so sweet. I love roger and i love james, and this story made me really happy :D

Daniel
08-23-2005, 09:07 PM
Federer the clear-cut favorite to win U.S. Open

By JOE KAY, AP Sports Writer
August 22, 2005

AP - Aug 22, 11:54 am EDT
More Photos


MASON, Ohio (AP) -- Roger Federer reckons that it wouldn't take much to prevent him from winning his second straight U.S. Open title.

A virus. An injury. A windy day that makes everything go awry.

``A little thing needs to go wrong and you lose,'' he said.

For everyone else, maybe. It's going to take a whole lot more to keep the Swiss star from extending one of the most dominant runs in ATP history.

Federer won his 22nd consecutive tournament final on Sunday, dispatching Andy Roddick and any thought that he was vulnerable after a long summer layoff. His two-set victory for the Cincinnati Masters title made him the prohibitive favorite for the tournament at Flushing Meadows, which begins next Monday.

``Federer is in a class of his own,'' said Australia's Lleyton Hewitt, who lost the Open final to Federer last year.

And few players have marks like Federer, who turned 24 this month and has only recently come into his prime. He's been No. 1 for 82 consecutive weeks, one of the longest stays in ATP rankings history.

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That's only the beginning.

Federer is 138-9 over the last two years, including 54-3 this season. He has won his last 28 matches on hard courts. He and Rafael Nadal are tied with nine ATP titles this year. The last three Wimbledon titles belong to Federer.

He's playing so well that opponents have no margin for error -- a factor that weighs on their nerves and their shots.

``You have to play pretty close to perfect,'' said James Blake, who lost a first-round match to Federer in Cincinnati.

The rest of the field had a little hope when Federer decided to take off after beating Roddick in July for his latest Wimbledon title. Federer knows he's on the cusp of history, as long as he doesn't burn out or break down.

He went home to Oberwil, Switzerland, for a public celebration of his fifth Grand Slam title, then went on vacation. He celebrated his birthday and practiced, but mostly rested his sore feet. He knew it was a huge risk -- he'd be going into the U.S. Open with only the tournament in Cincinnati to get ready.

By the time he got to the final, it looked like Wimbledon all over.

``Everything comes very automatic now,'' he said. ``I don't need to think anymore where I'm going to hit the balls. They just go automatically. That's very important in my game, because I need to play with the flow.''


AP - Aug 22, 11:54 am EDT
More Photos


That's the best way to describe his game. There's nothing dominant -- no overpowering serve like Roddick, no incredible quickness like Nadal -- but no weakness, either. Plus, the biggest points in a match bring out his best.

Once he gets ahead, it's usually over.

``That's what I have been doing very well over the last few years,'' he said. ``That's what I've been able to do against the best -- get the first break, usually, and lead from there. Because once I'm in the lead, I'm obviously the best front-runner.''

Given the state of the rest of the field, he'll be the undisputed front-runner at the U.S. Open.

Andre Agassi, who lost to Federer in a five-set quarterfinal match at the Open last year, had to withdraw from Cincinnati because his 35-year-old back was acting up. Roddick hurt his right foot during the final on Sunday, leaving his condition in doubt.

Russia's Marat Safin has a slight tear in his left knee, and five weeks of rest after Wimbledon didn't eliminate the pain. Nadal has matched Federer in tournament titles this year, but the 19-year-old Spaniard hasn't demonstrated that he can win consistently on hard courts.

The New York crowds will try to coax an upset out of one of the Americans, but will likely end up applauding a player whose fame hasn't caught up with his accomplishments on this side of the ocean.

``It took a while for the fans to warm to Pete Sampras,'' Blake said. ``I think he's comparable to that because he goes about his business, he doesn't throw temper tantrums, he doesn't do anything like that. He goes about it in a very honorable way, which I really appreciate.

``And I think the fans, as he gets closer and closer to history, will appreciate it more and more.''



Updated on Monday, Aug 22, 2005 12:

lunahielo
08-23-2005, 10:19 PM
Once he gets ahead, it's usually over.
Sweet Words!

Thanks, Daniel ~~:)

Daniel
08-23-2005, 11:49 PM
Federer, Sharapova top seeds at U.S. Open

August 23, 2005
NEW YORK (AP) -- Defending champion Roger Federer and new women's No. 1 Maria Sharapova are the top seeds for next week's U.S. Open.

Tuesday's announcement came as no surprise. Federer is 64-3 this year with nine ATP titles -- including Wimbledon -- and has won 28 straight matches on hard courts. He has won 22 consecutive tournament finals and has been ranked No. 1 for 82 straight weeks.

Sharapova became the first Russian woman to be No. 1 in the overall rankings when she took over the top spot from Lindsay Davenport earlier this week. She has won six titles in the last 12 months in addition to her 2004 Wimbledon crown and season-ending title at the Tour Championships. Sharapova has reached at least the semifinals in eight of her last 11 WTA Tour events and her record is 43-7.

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French Open champion Rafael Nadal was the No. 2 seed on the men's side, followed by Australia's Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick of the United States and reigning Australian Open champion Marat Safin of Russia. Hewitt, Roddick and Safin are all former U.S. Open champs.

Andre Agassi, who has been hampered by a bad back and hasn't played since losing to Nadal in Montreal earlier this month, is seeded seventh.

Sharapova is followed by Davenport, the 1998 US Open champion; France's Amelie Mauresmo of France; Kim Clijsters of Belgium; and No. 5 Svetlana Kuznetsova of Russia, the defending champion.

French Open champion Justine Henin-Hardenne is seventh. Serena Williams is seeded eighth, while sister Venus is 10th.

The tournament's draw will be held Wednesday. The U.S. Open begins Monday.

lunahielo
08-23-2005, 11:59 PM
No. 1 for 82 straight weeks
:woohoo: :woohoo: :woohoo:

Thanks Daniel~ :hug:

TenHound
08-24-2005, 01:27 AM
Dirk commented that Roger has a "Heart of Gold off the Court".

I'd say the same thing another way. He's as emotionally healthy as a human being as he is Brilliant & Magnificent on the tennis court. Can anyone think of anyone who attained the level of arguably the Greatest Ever about whom one can say that - at least among guys? Certainly not in tennis.... I know I needn't elaborate... though I should add, I know Nada about Rod Laver.

(Here's my Roger Federer Creation Myth.
One night the Gods & Goddesses were having their yearly Dionysian Get Together. And suddenly they noticed that a being had been conceived & quickly had to be endowed. So they got into a drunken rivalry to see who could give him the most...one threw in the Right Height - 6'1" is optimal, another offered speed of light hand-eye co-ordination, a third tossed a wrist w/magical powers as her offering, yet another gave him the gift of superb eyesight, a Goddess bestowed him w/wise loving parents who had tennis courts at their disposal & a mother who was a track star...and so it went as all the assembled Deities delighted in trying to outdo each other in their new game... And at the end, one wise Goddess looked at their Creation & exclaimed - Jesus, he'll be an arrogant obnoxious pig w/all those gifts!! I've give him the worst nose since Barbra Streisand right in the middle of his face to keep him humble!!!

And so Roger Federer came to be. The End.)

Daniel
08-24-2005, 01:58 AM
:lol: at the nose comment :haha:


A Look Forward...
Alan Murphy / 1:24am, 24-08-2005
The excitement. The sheer athleticism. The drama. The glamour. It’s almost here. Yes, this Monday, the US Open kicks off in Flushing Meadows, New York, and one thing is for certain – we’re in for a real treat. Sure, it may lack the tradition and prestige of Wimbledon, or the brutal physicality of Roland Garros, but there is just something about the US Open that sets it apart from the other Slams. Maybe it’s the dynamic atmosphere of the night sessions; maybe it’s the big screens, loud music, and even louder fans; or maybe we’re just dying to see what Serena Williams will wear next. Whatever it is, the US Open is probably the most exciting of all tournaments. You’ve just got to love it. The Open personifies New York – it’s loud, brash, edgy and larger than life. There’s never a dull moment that’s for sure! And this year promises to be no different… So now that’s out of the way, it’s on to more important matters – most notably, who’s gonna win it? Well come on, we can hardly look past defending champ Roger Federer now can we? After his phenomenal year – winning a third consecutive Wimbledon, a record 4 Masters, losing just 3 matches all year – all arrows are pointing at him to lift the coveted trophy again this time round. And rightfully so, he’s one of the most dominant players the game has ever seen. A tennis God he’s a been called. The best ever perhaps. So will he win it then? Almost definitely. Let’s just say if I had bet the house on him, I don’t think I’d be losing too much sleep over it. So what of the challengers then? Can anyone take Federer's crown? Well there’s one guy that stands a more than fair chance. You might have heard of him. His name’s Raphael Nadal. Yes the teen prodigy has pretty much matched Federer this year trick for trick. And sure, we all know he’s the clay court whiz kid…the master. But it doesn’t end there, not by a long shot. Nadal is a major force on hard too. He proved this by winning Montreal a couple of weeks back, and he was points away from destroying Federer at Indian Wells in March. If anyone can beat the Swiss maestro, Rafa can. And he did just that on his way to his French Open title. Heck, his ruthless fighting spirit and never-say-die attitude makes even Lleyton Hewitt look like a little pussy cat in comparison. And what of the others then? Well it was only in January that we were all talking about the Big 4 – Roger, Hewitt, Marat Safin and Andy Roddick. How things have so quickly changed. Yes Andy and Lleyton are both former winners at Flushing Meadows, but they have become nothing more than Roger’s whipping boys over the last year or so. Will that change here? It’s seriously doubtful. Both of them better pray hard that someone else takes out Federer – it’s the only chance they’ve got! And then this brings us to Marat Safin. It looked in January that the burly Russian would finally live up to his true potential when he sensationally won the Australian Open. But oh no, Marat has hopped back on that rollercoaster. And who know’s if it’ll be up or down when he gets to New York. If he is in top form though, however unlikely that is looking, then you’d better watch out. Marat at 100% is virtually unbeatable. Just ask Roger! Anyone else have what it takes? Well, Robby Ginepri has been one of the most in-form players in the lead up, but realistically he’s not a serious threat. Gaudio, Nalbandian, Coria perhaps? I can tell you now, there won’t be an Argentinean winner this year, I can bank on it! Tommy Haas has unlimited talent, but the German seems destined to remain a perennial underachiever. Wildcard Mark Philippoussis has done nothing all year, and he’ll continue to do nothing at the Open. Britain’s Greg Rusedski has shown some good form in recent weeks, and could pull off a scalp or too, but that’s about it. And what about his compatriot Tim Henman – what a truly awful year he’s been having. Tim has so much to lose here (semi-final points to defend), and losing is pretty much all he’s done in 2005. So finally, this brings us to the one man that I think we’d all love to see lift the trophy on the second Sunday. Yes can Andre Agassi, at 35 years of age, possibly have one more run left in him? A final swansong? Well, he’s showed renewed vigor this summer winning LA and reaching the final in Montreal, and he’ll definitely be one of the favourites. And if he’s on, then he still has the game to take it to Federer. But in all seriousness, his chances aren’t too good. He’ll need a pretty open draw, a lot of luck, and an easy first week. But even then, can he win a semi-final and final in the space of 24 hours? At his age? A miracle notwithstanding, I don’t think there will be a fairytale finish to Agassi’s career, as much as I’d like to see him win the whole thing. Still, stranger things have been known to happen in the tennis world…Goran winning Wimbledon anyone? But then again, maybe this isn't even the end for Agassi. He's surprised us before - He might have a couple more years in him. Who knows? So that’s the men more or less covered, now what off the women? The question a lot of us are asking is can Kim Clijsters finally make the break-through and win her first Slam? She tore through just about everybody this summer, nabbing 3 titles along the way, but when it really comes down to it, when it’s all on the line, can Kim win the big one? Probably not, I’m afraid. She’s shown in her 4 previous Slam final losses that she can’t step up in the very end. And the longer she doesn’t win that Slam, the harder it’ll be for her to ever win one. Unlike in previous years, this US Open really is wide open. I don’t think anyone can pick a definite winner. But hey, let’s give it a try. No one can ever count out the Williams’ sisters, that’s for sure. Venus showed that she’s well and truly back, after steam rolling through the field to win her third Wimbledon. And despite a quiet summer, she’ll be rearing to go, and very difficult to beat. Venus wants this, trust me. She's a top contender. And what of her sister? It’s funny, just this time last year, we were wondering if Venus would ever recapture her dominating form, now this time round, we’re thinking the same of Serena. It’s hard to believe that when Serena won the Aussie Open in January that the type of year that she’s had would follow. Sure, Serena has struggled with injuries, but it looks majorly like she’s also struggling with motivation. She was not only out of form but out of shape at Wimbledon, and things didn’t look much better last week in Toronto. I really hope that Serena re-dedicates herself in the coming months, but on a more immediate scale, I hope that she at least turns up for the Open. And regardless of her fitness, if she means business, she’ll be tough to beat! Love her or hate her, there is no denying that Serena is so good for the game. Hell, she provides more drama than a whole series of Desperate Housewives. Now, it’s on to the brand new World Number 1, former Wimbledon Champ, and women's sexiest player - the one and only Maria Sharapova. Yes she is indeed top of rankings now, but that was more by default than anything else. While Maria has had a great year, she just seems to fall short to the really top players when they are playing their best – Serena in Australia, Kim at Indian Wells, Venus at Wimbledon. Still, she is only 18 after all. Regardless of her new ranking though, Maria will struggle to be number 1 in this tournament. Then there’s Lindsey Davenport. Boy was she close! That match point in the Wimbledon final’s gotta hurt. She’s been consistently on top all year, but her summer was blighted by injury, and one has now got to question her fitness. There are definitely seeds of doubt being planted. Maybe though the rest will have done her some good. It won't take her too long to get into her stride. Lindsey says she wants one more Slam. Well, if she is fit, then she better go all out to win it here. She won't have too many more chances. No room for nerves. Others like Amelie Mauresmo, Anastasia Msykina, Elena Dementieva, and of course last year’s winner Svetlana Kuznetsova, are all capable of going deep into the second week, but most likely won’t be around on the final Saturday. Mauresmo and Myskina are too mentally frail, and Dementieva’s dire serve will prevent her from going all the way yet again; while Kuznetsova this year seems to have forgotten to use her brain on the court. She’s a powerhouse capable of big things, but someone needs to introduce her to the word “control.” Maybe though she’ll be inspired by memories of her remarkable run 12 short months ago. Now we can’t forget about that gritty little Belgian with the most exquisite backhand in the game. Yes Justine Henin-Hardenne proved she was well and truly back after roaring through the clay court season. And while she did bow out at the first hurdle at SW19, the same won’t happen here. My advice is, don’t overlook Justine one bit. The champion of only 2 years ago could actually be the main contender to win the whole thing. Although she lost quite easily to Clijsters in the Rogers Cup final last week, do you think that result would have been the same if it was a US Open final? I don’t. Regardless of who has the most potential to win in Flushing Meadows, it doesn’t matter if you’re not fit. And nothing has become more synonymous with women’s tennis in the last couple of years than injuries. Serena, Maria, Lindsey, they all have question marks over them. In the women’s game, nobody will know who’s going to turn up to play until they are out on court. Injuries have torn the women’s tour apart in recent years, in what should be the most exciting time the game has ever seen. Never has there been such depth in the game, and never has the outcome of Slams been so unclear. Let’s just hope, everyone turns up on Monday – then there definitely will be fireworks. One person though could benefit from the uncertain fitness of several players, and that is the rejuvenated Mary Pierce. With a bit of luck, Mary could shock us all. She has the game. Sure, she has her flaws, but she wants this. All I’m saying is don’t count her out. So they are the contenders for the forth and final Slam of the year, a strong field on both sides, isn’t it? But no matter who wins, we’re guaranteed all the action we can handle – and more. The US Open is where athleticism, fashion and celebrity collide, which results in an explosion of nail-biting drama, and edge of the seat tension. I can’t wait. Bet you can’t either…

RogiFan88
08-24-2005, 02:45 AM
Hola, Daniel!

lunahielo
08-24-2005, 02:57 AM
TenHound
I love the creation myth!
Super~~~very creative. :)

luna

TenHound
08-24-2005, 03:13 AM
thank you very much, Luna. I hoped you esp. would appreciate it.

nobama
08-24-2005, 01:05 PM
I see on Roger's website that there is a new DVD coming out about him but it's only available in Switzerland. :sad: Anyone know when/if it will be available elsewhere or if there is a way to get a copy of it anyway?

RogiFan88
08-24-2005, 01:13 PM
not yet, too early, keep checking or email the site for info -- only available in PAL format so far

RogiNie
08-24-2005, 01:38 PM
Dirk commented that Roger has a "Heart of Gold off the Court".

I'd say the same thing another way. He's as emotionally healthy as a human being as he is Brilliant & Magnificent on the tennis court. Can anyone think of anyone who attained the level of arguably the Greatest Ever about whom one can say that - at least among guys? Certainly not in tennis.... I know I needn't elaborate... though I should add, I know Nada about Rod Laver.

(Here's my Roger Federer Creation Myth.
One night the Gods & Goddesses were having their yearly Dionysian Get Together. And suddenly they noticed that a being had been conceived & quickly had to be endowed. So they got into a drunken rivalry to see who could give him the most...one threw in the Right Height - 6'1" is optimal, another offered speed of light hand-eye co-ordination, a third tossed a wrist w/magical powers as her offering, yet another gave him the gift of superb eyesight, a Goddess bestowed him w/wise loving parents who had tennis courts at their disposal & a mother who was a track star...and so it went as all the assembled Deities delighted in trying to outdo each other in their new game... And at the end, one wise Goddess looked at their Creation & exclaimed - Jesus, he'll be an arrogant obnoxious pig w/all those gifts!! I've give him the worst nose since Barbra Streisand right in the middle of his face to keep him humble!!!

And so Roger Federer came to be. The End.)

:rolls: very cool TenHound!!

and thanks for the articles all! :)

lunahielo
08-24-2005, 02:44 PM
Originally posted by TenHound
thank you very much, Luna. I hoped you esp. would appreciate it.
:) :) :)

ytben
08-24-2005, 02:51 PM
:lol: @ your creation myth TenHound

Thanks for all the articles guys :kiss:

RogiFan88
08-24-2005, 03:38 PM
FINALLY, some news! I thank Dana who posted this on rfcom! ;)

Monday August 22, 10:07 PM
Clooney on first men's Vogue cover

The Vogue empire will break new ground next month with the latest spin-off of the fashion bible dedicated solely to men.

Men's Vogue oozes high style and success. George Clooney sets the tone, smouldering from the cover of the first issue in a sophisticated long coat.

The magazine is aimed at men over the age of 35 who earn more than £55,000 (100,000 dollars) a year.

It is edited by a target reader, Jay Fielden, 35, who began his career at the New Yorker and was originally hired by Vogue chief Anna Wintour five years ago as an arts editor.

Fielden is keen to draw a careful line between the new magazine and its established fashion stablemate.

The aim is to take the elements that make Vogue "gold standard" and give it a masculine twist.

"It will be like nothing else out there," Vogue spokesman Patrick O'Connell insists.

The first edition, which hits US news stands on September 6, includes profiles of tennis player Roger Federer and painter Walton Ford, articles on wine and the latest gadgets.

There is a photographic portrait of artist John Currin, a feature about the English obsession with weekend shooting parties and a piece on the New York town house designed for Nathaniel Rothschild by architect David Chipperfield.

Subsequent issues will depend entirely on its success.
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/22082005/344/clooney-first-men-s-vogue-cover.html

Mrs. B
08-24-2005, 04:07 PM
I see on Roger's website that there is a new DVD coming out about him but it's only available in Switzerland. :sad: Anyone know when/if it will be available elsewhere or if there is a way to get a copy of it anyway?

i already ordered it. It's available at the ex libris shops starting tomorrow. it's available only in the code 2 format.

Mrs. B
08-24-2005, 04:09 PM
Tenhound: nice myth and :lol: at the nose part!

PaulieM
08-24-2005, 05:52 PM
Tenhound, i LOVE your creation myth! very funny and cute. worst nose since barbara streisand :scared: her nose sure is something :tape:

nobama
08-24-2005, 06:06 PM
i already ordered it. It's available at the ex libris shops starting tomorrow. it's available only in the code 2 format.And I'm guessing narrated in German too? I have a code-free dvd player, but I do not understand one word of German.

SUKTUEN
08-24-2005, 06:06 PM
thanks 88

nobama
08-24-2005, 06:32 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/frank_deford/08/22/federer/
Pretty is as pretty does
Federer exudes grace, skill and pure dominance

The amazing thing about Roger Federer is how many really astute tennis authorities not only speculate that he might become the greatest player ever to pick up a racket, but that he already might be the prettiest. It's almost as if he is so beautiful upon the court that it would be worth paying to see him play even if he didn't win -- which, of course, he does most every time.

There is such an effortless quality to Federer's game. He always seems to be in the right place. He gildes, never scurries, and his strokes are so clean they seem to have been lifted from a manual -- picture-perfect.

Keep in mind that being a champion in any sport doesn't necessarily equate to beauty. The finest players often are, by the very nature of their excellence, sui generis, which means they are impressionists who create a new model rather than improve on the loveliness that precedes them. (Think Babe Ruth.) I never saw Joe DiMaggio play, but from everything I heard about him, he seems to have been the equivalent in center field to what Federer is on the court: all grace and majesty.

The fact that Federer hits an old-fashioned one-handed backhand helps. A two-handed backhand, which most players have used ever since Jimmy Connors and Chris Evert came to glory, never can look so stylish because the two hands never can achieve the lovely arching reach and extension of just the one. The two-hander jerks; the one-hander flows.

Well, it is good that we have Justine Henin-Hardenne, the fabulous little Belgian champion, around because she hits a backhand for the angels. It reminds us that Federer is still just short of perfection. And, of course, although he utterly dominates on hardcourts and grass, he still is vulnerable on clay to the very best dirt specialists. But it will take any opponent playing well beyond his usual finest talents to deny Federer a repeat championship at the U.S. Open -- which would be his sixth Grand Slam title. Pete Sampras set the record just three years ago with 14. He should keep it for, oh, another four or five years.

If anyone can beat Federer, it must be done before the finals. As they say of him: never on Sunday. The last 22 finals Federer has played, he has won. Victory in 22 straight finals -- that's almost beyond comprehension in any sport today.

So, come Sunday, Sept. 11, we should see him jumping the net in victory once again .. no, excuse me, strike that. Tennis champions used to jump over the net. Now the men, anyway, all fall down in triumph. It's bizarre. It started with Bjorn Borg, I believe. He would collapse to his knees.

No, no, guys, that's not the way to win. All other champions, you rise up in victory. You throw your arms up. You shake your fists to the heavens. You exult. Basketball players raise their forefingers on high -- we're No. 1! Football players even find somebody to hoist up on their shoulders. Victory is up. Only modern male tennis players act like losers when they win. Federer's the worst of the lot: He tends to fall flat out.

Come on, Federer: As gorgeous as you are at everything else, why do you have to take victory lying down?

SUKTUEN
08-24-2005, 06:40 PM
thanks mirkaland~!

Mrs. B
08-24-2005, 08:48 PM
i like that last line. ;)

Mrs. B
08-24-2005, 08:51 PM
And I'm guessing narrated in German too? I have a code-free dvd player, but I do not understand one word of German.

i have no idea which language it's narrated but i presume it's in German. i'll find out more tomorrow.

Whistleway
08-24-2005, 09:04 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/frank_deford/08/22/federer/
Pretty is as pretty does
Federer exudes grace, skill and pure dominance

The amazing thing about Roger Federer is how many really astute tennis authorities not only speculate that he might become the greatest player ever to pick up a racket, but that he already might be the prettiest. It's almost as if he is so beautiful upon the court that it would be worth paying to see him play even if he didn't win -- which, of course, he does most every time.

There is such an effortless quality to Federer's game. He always seems to be in the right place. He gildes, never scurries, and his strokes are so clean they seem to have been lifted from a manual -- picture-perfect.

Keep in mind that being a champion in any sport doesn't necessarily equate to beauty. The finest players often are, by the very nature of their excellence, sui generis, which means they are impressionists who create a new model rather than improve on the loveliness that precedes them. (Think Babe Ruth.) I never saw Joe DiMaggio play, but from everything I heard about him, he seems to have been the equivalent in center field to what Federer is on the court: all grace and majesty.

The fact that Federer hits an old-fashioned one-handed backhand helps. A two-handed backhand, which most players have used ever since Jimmy Connors and Chris Evert came to glory, never can look so stylish because the two hands never can achieve the lovely arching reach and extension of just the one. The two-hander jerks; the one-hander flows.

Well, it is good that we have Justine Henin-Hardenne, the fabulous little Belgian champion, around because she hits a backhand for the angels. It reminds us that Federer is still just short of perfection. And, of course, although he utterly dominates on hardcourts and grass, he still is vulnerable on clay to the very best dirt specialists. But it will take any opponent playing well beyond his usual finest talents to deny Federer a repeat championship at the U.S. Open -- which would be his sixth Grand Slam title. Pete Sampras set the record just three years ago with 14. He should keep it for, oh, another four or five years.

If anyone can beat Federer, it must be done before the finals. As they say of him: never on Sunday. The last 22 finals Federer has played, he has won. Victory in 22 straight finals -- that's almost beyond comprehension in any sport today.

So, come Sunday, Sept. 11, we should see him jumping the net in victory once again .. no, excuse me, strike that. Tennis champions used to jump over the net. Now the men, anyway, all fall down in triumph. It's bizarre. It started with Bjorn Borg, I believe. He would collapse to his knees.

No, no, guys, that's not the way to win. All other champions, you rise up in victory. You throw your arms up. You shake your fists to the heavens. You exult. Basketball players raise their forefingers on high -- we're No. 1! Football players even find somebody to hoist up on their shoulders. Victory is up. Only modern male tennis players act like losers when they win. Federer's the worst of the lot: He tends to fall flat out.

Come on, Federer: As gorgeous as you are at everything else, why do you have to take victory lying down?

This article and Frank is so gay !!! Gimme a break.

Stevens Point
08-24-2005, 11:48 PM
i have no idea which language it's narrated but i presume it's in German. i'll find out more tomorrow.
This page says the languages are Dolby Digital English and Dolby Digital German with German and French Subtitles. I let Google translate this page into English.

http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dvd-shop.ch%2Fdetail.php%3Fproducts_id%3D92971&langpair=de%7Cen&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&prev=%2Flanguage_tools

Mrs. B
08-25-2005, 08:21 AM
Domo arigato, Yukio-san. :)

Puschkin
08-25-2005, 08:53 AM
i like that last line. ;)

:yeah:

Stevens Point
08-25-2005, 11:49 AM
Domo arigato, Yukio-san. :)
:yeah: Konnichiwa Eva!

Did you see the DVD? It is quite good. I liked it very much!!

Mrs. B
08-25-2005, 12:49 PM
i just got it now during my lunch break and can hardly wait to get home to watch it. :bounce:

nobama
08-25-2005, 01:14 PM
:yeah: Konnichiwa Eva!

Did you see the DVD? It is quite good. I liked it very much!!Glad to hear! Is there a non-German feature on the DVD or a way for non-Swiss fans to purchase? If not hopefully it will be available in other countries soon.

Shabazza
08-25-2005, 01:46 PM
An Interview with Tony Roche about Federer :)

Federer's a class act: Roche

I will pay to watch Roger Federer practise: Ivan Lendl Australian Tony Roche, specialist coach to Roger Federer, speaks to Rohit Brijnath about the brilliant Swiss

MELBOURNE: Ivan Lendl is apparently not a tennis watcher, is not really moved to switch on the television and measure Roddick's forehand against the memory of his own. Till the flinty Czech-American, all stony stoicism, sees the striking Swiss and his resolve wavers. Hey, he tells Tony Roche, I will pay to watch Roger Federer. I will pay to watch him practice.

Tony Roche, 60, his lined face a map of experience, is telling me this story on Monday. The grand Australian leftie, French champion in 1966, was Lendl's and Patrick Rafter's tutor to greatness. Now he's Federer's part-time specialist coach, a wise presence for the great one to lean on. After all, even Roche believes: "There's no such thing as the perfect tennis player," but hell, Federer occasionally has us fooled.

Roche, who usually travels to the Grand Slams with Federer but is skipping this US Open, lived an unobtrusive life. Then this year the Swiss comes knocking and how exactly do you say no to a man who is redefining tennis. One thing is fundamental to accepting the job: Roche must like Federer. But one thing is evident: Federer is an affable man.

When James Blake injured his neck last year, he got only one note in hospital. It was from Federer and read: "We'll miss you and we really hope you get back here quickly." This week, Andy Roddick expressed bewilderment over why the U.S. public hasn't swooned over Federer: "Roger does his business, he goes home. He's not looking for anything besides winning. Unfortunately, that hasn't been embraced. It's almost like people want more of a story. He's a class act. For some reason, that's not a good story."

`Laidback'

Roche is taken with this Swiss he defines as `laidback', he sees Federer as a sweet echo of old-fashioned values. "He has respect for the game of tennis, he feels he has an obligation to the game because he's No. 1, he cares about the game and that's a throwback to Laver and Rosewall."

The Australian is not a flirter with overstatement, a player who has shared court-space with Rosewall and Hoad is not easily impressed. Yet ask him if Federer has ever done something even he has never seen before and he says yes. "Very much so, at the Wimbledon final (this year) against Roddick. I really hadn't seen anyone play that level."

It's what champions do, he reinforces, `produce their best on the biggest stage.' It's like Laver, he adds. Indeed, often in the conversation, Roche will, almost involuntarily, summon Laver's name. He is too prudent to suffocate a maturing Federer by attempting comparisons in record, but it appears as if in grace and gifts as a competitor Laver is his benchmark.

Perhaps for Roche part of the attraction is that he finds a resemblance between the polished Swiss and the majestic Laver. "Certainly in the way they play, so many different shot selections, able to hold the ball till the last minute. Roger is such a beautiful athlete, he doesn't give the impression that he's very quick, but he's always there. He reads the game very well." And, of course, so did Laver.

Federer astonishes with his consistency and versatility, his winning of 22 consecutive finals on varied surfaces a stunning mastery of opponent and moment. He appears, says Roche, not to `stress on the outside,' and while nervousness is hardly absent it is the collected cool that Federer projects that unhinges rival.

But this confidence Federer wears so comfortably now has been earned. Olivier Rochus last week said that when "Federer was young, he was really bad. I remember him when we were 13 years old. He was always losing 6-0, 6-1 against everybody. We were almost laughing of him, and now he's laughing of us."

If Federer found himself, he is still doing so, and Roche finds him inquisitive, eager to pick up things. It's the key, he states, and calls on the memory of Lendl, saying, "he got up every morning wanting to be a better player and you have got to be like that."

Flawless

Federer's symmetrical game may appear to be without weakness, but he is still harnessing his skills, so many shots immaculately designed, but some perhaps unequal to the other. Roche sees him `improving his volleys,' raising them to the `same standard as the rest of his game.' He also views the second serve as a significant weapon, a shot that found perfection through Pete Sampras, and believes Federer will continue to `work on that.'

God forbid, this is an unfinished masterpiece. With a month's sabbatical to heal his foot, having won his sole warm-up tournament in Cincinnati, Federer heads to New York. Last year he won three Grand Slam titles, this year so far one. Everyone will want his head, but Federer will merely pluck at his, adjusting his hair, and then unveiling his artful mayhem. As Roche, nailing perfectly a collective view of this champion, says: "Roger gives the unique impression that he can go to another level." We know, it's why like Lendl, we watch him.

Mrs. B
08-25-2005, 02:19 PM
lovely article. thanks, shabazza! :)

PaulieM
08-25-2005, 03:03 PM
for those of you that get espn classic, roger is going to be on classic now at 7pm et talking about the upcoming USO

Stevens Point
08-25-2005, 03:29 PM
Glad to hear! Is there a non-German feature on the DVD or a way for non-Swiss fans to purchase? If not hopefully it will be available in other countries soon.
Actually the whole feature is conducted in English. His parents and sister talk also in English. I don't know when it will be available in other countries, but hopefully soon, because it has good stuff. Hmm, there might be online shops which could ship items overseas, but not sure...

Skyward
08-25-2005, 04:06 PM
Thanks Shabazza. I like that Roche sees a room for improvement in Roger's second serve.

Mrs. B
08-25-2005, 06:35 PM
Actually the whole feature is conducted in English. His parents and sister talk also in English. I don't know when it will be available in other countries, but hopefully soon, because it has good stuff. Hmm, there might be online shops which could ship items overseas, but not sure...

Hallo, Yukio-san!

I just finished watching it and it's really well made, definitely a must have to any Roger fan along with your collection of his matches. It shows pics and footages of Roger as a young boy playing tennis (lol at the racket throwing tantrums), John McEnroe, Boris Becker, PMac, Lundgren, Mark Miles and others have great things to say about his game, even his father is speaking in English, his mom also talking affectionately about the late Peter Carter and getting teary eyed, some footages of him training with Paganini (hey guys he does lift weights!), also some funny pics including him & Peter Lundgren with their long hairs over their faces and wearing shades :lol:, you can even see the interior of his flat, and of course footages of his wins...including the one over Sampras. ;)

TenHound
08-25-2005, 07:53 PM
I would think they'd show that DVD on Am. tv as warm-up to USO.

@Shabazza, where is Roche interview? Listening to Tony is always the sine qua non...

SUKTUEN
08-25-2005, 08:04 PM
thanks

ToanNguyen
08-26-2005, 04:06 PM
Good day,
Another article about Roger

After 82 Weeks on Top, Federer Guns for Game's Greats
2005 U.S. Open

By TOM PERROTTA
August 26, 2005

John McEnroe was a maestro, nimble at net and sharp of tongue. Jimmy Connors would sooner mug his opponent than concede defeat. Pete Sampras won more big matches than any player in history, yet he usually looked like someone had just punched him in the gut. Ivan Lendl was an immovable object who frustrated his opponents - and often his audience - until they surrendered.

In tennis, greatness comes in many forms, and for the past 82 weeks, Switzerland's Roger Federer has shown himself to be among the best of the best. Is Federer better than all those who came before him? Should the new greatest be crowned already, only two years after Pistol Pete's retirement?

Despite the fact that the 24-year-old has played at his peak for only two years and won five major titles to Sampras's all-time record of 14, the debate is legitimate, owing to Federer's astonishing versatility. Never before has a no. 1 player flashed so much talent in so many ways. Federer owns the best forehand in the business, his serve is among the best, and his backhand - once less steady - is no longer a weakness. You won't mistake him for Stefan Edberg at the net, but he volleys better than most. Scarcely a skill exists at which Federer does not excel: footwork, speed, stamina, tactics, returning serve.

McEnroe has extolled Federer as the best he's ever seen. And while it's always difficult to compare players past and present in their primes, Federer is certainly on a level with Sampras, whom he defeated in five sets at Wimbledon in 2001 (Sampras was fading by then, but he was still good enough to reach two more U.S. Open finals).

So far this season, Federer is 64-3 with nine titles under his belt, including his third consecutive Wimbledon crown. Last year, he lost six matches. His streak of 82 straight weeks at no. 1, dating back to February 2004, is the fourth longest in history, behind Connors's record of 160, Lendl's 157, and Sampras's 101. (If Federer's reign continues, he would pass Connors at the end of February 2007). In finals, Federer has won 22 consecutive matches, a tour record.

Federer dominates in terms of match-by-match statistics, too. Of the 10 categories the ATP regularly tracks - various measurements for service and return of service performance - Federer is among the top 10 on the tour in eight of them. He has not lost in straight sets since the 2004 French Open.

As impressive as this all is, some observers - and at times even Federer himself - have portrayed this season as a disappointment, since he was thought to have a chance at the single-season Grand Slam. It's a sure sign of greatness when pushing the boundaries of what is humanly possible is not enough.

"When Tiger [Woods] won - what did he win? - I mean, seven out of eight or eight out of nine majors," Andy Roddick said last week, "that made the other guys better. It made them elevate their games. I think that's what Roger is doing right now with tennis. I'm a better player than I was two years ago basically because I have to be."

To tennis aficionados, and seemingly to his rivals, Federer is otherworldly: a player who can do everything, who respects his opponents, who does not act superior no matter how superior he is. No player so regularly turns a thrashing into art. With Federer, a shellacking is stylish: sharp angles, deft touch, and small, rapid-fire steps that would make a ballerina proud. And while the Swiss master is no stranger to conceit - "I amaze myself" he said after Wimbledon - he's not arrogant. He often sounds like the rest of us: truly amazed that he is so good. Federer even loses with grace, invariably paying a compliment to the man who beat him.

It's unlikely he will have any such conversation at the U.S. Open these next two weeks. Fresh off his ninth tournament win of the year - in which he played below average - Federer should find his footing by Round 2 and become near impossible to stop.

Rafael Nadal, the dazzling Spanish teenager who come closest to matching Federer's strokes and outdoes him in pizzazz, has the best shot, and they cannot meet until the final. Beyond that, the rest of the field must pray for a bad day. Roddick is now 1-10 against Federer, though his hard work both on and off court has produced an aggressive net game that will improve his chances down the road. Australian Lleyton Hewitt, ranked no. 3, has lost eight straight. Marat Safin has the talent to repeat his Federer upset from the Australian Open, but he is recovering from knee surgery.

If there is one battle Federer likely will never win, it's with fame, and largely because he chooses not to seek it. Most of the year he travels without a coach; his girlfriend and family act as his agents and handlers. Federer approaches tennis with caution: He places his bets on the tour's most sound events, and happily rests and trains during off weeks (he played just one event this summer, and won it). For Federer, the long term counts most, and he does not try to generate publicity and other short-term monetary gains, nor does he let marketers do it for him.

"He's not a story like [Terrell Owens] where you're going to be all in this drama," Roddick said. "He goes and does his business, he goes home. He's not looking for anything besides winning. Unfortunately, that hasn't been embraced."

The world may not have embraced Federer yet, but there's time. Here's counting the days until February, 2007.

Taking Aim at Federer

Roger Federer has sat atop the men's rankings for 82 weeks, during which he's won 19 tournaments (three of them majors) and lost just nine matches (that's including the 2004 Olympic Games). In finals, Federer has now won 22 straight times; his record this year is 64-3. Hard to believe that before Wimbledon, Federer himself had been disappointed with his season, which many expected would end with him holding championship trophies from all four majors. No one is likely to stop Federer from winning his second straight U.S. Open, but here's a look at the players who have more than a fleeting chance:

THE TOP DOGS

Rafael Nadal
Record vs. Federer: 2-1

The man-child from Majorca, Spain, is the only top player who can boast of a winning record against Federer. It's hardly a large sample, but Nadal has the best chance of beating the Swiss champion. He combines the consistency and speed of Lleyton Hewitt - usually no trouble for Federer - with the strength and incredible passing shots of, well, Federer himself. Add to this the remarkable spin Nadal imparts on the ball, and we find a game that can make the unflappable Federer look out of sorts. Though his serve is a weakness, being left-handed helps his cause. The Spaniard is also fearless. If the two reach the final, they may put on one of the best shows the tournament has seen in some time.

Andy Roddick
Record vs. Federer: 1-10

If given three serves rather than two, Roddick would be in business. Once the ball is in play, however, there's little hope. The American too often finds himself out of position and can't force Federer to miss. His mediocre returns make it easier for Federer to hold serve and put more pressure on his own serve. Despite Federer's lopsided 6-2, 7-6(2), 6-4 win in the Wimbledon final, Roddick's performance there was admirable for its creativity and persistence. To succeed against Federer in Flushing, he'll have to charge the net and connect on his booming first serve close to 70% of the time, if not better.

Andre Agassi
Record vs. Federer: 3-7

When the American legend takes the court, he still moves and swings like a 25-year-old. But the 35-year-old Agassi is having a hard time even getting there. A sciatic nerve in his back continues to flare up, requiring consistent cortisone shots. Luckily for Agassi, he doesn't need to play much before finding his rhythm. A great deal needs to happen for Agassi to make a run here: The weather must cooperate (he's not fond of playing on consecutive days), his back must remain stable, and Federer, who has won their last seven matches, must have a bad day.

Lleyton Hewitt
Record vs. Federer: 7-10

Normally feistier than a terrier, the Australian is a kitten against Federer, having lost eight straight while winning just two sets. Is there a mental block at work? Perhaps, but Hewitt just doesn't match up well with the world no. 1. He does not generate enough of his own pace, and hits clean strokes that bounce just so, making it seem as if Federer is hitting the ball out of his hand. If Federer plays terribly, Hewitt has a chance. But an average Federer wins easily, while Federer at his best beats the Australian senseless - last year's 6-0, 7-5, 6-0 romp in the Open final being a case in point.

Marat Safin
Record vs. Federer: 2-7

The Russian has done what no one else has this year: defeat Federer on a surface other than clay. And Safin is capable of doing it again. He can match Federer blow for blow off the baseline - in Australia, he dictated play and pressured Federer with pace, a rare feat. Considering Safin's recent knee surgery and his flameout in Cincinnati last week, logic suggests he will not have enough to challenge Federer this year. Then again, logic rarely applies to Safin, one of the most talented, inconsistent, and confounding players in the world.

THE DARK HORSES

Robby Ginepri

Now that the 22-year-old American with the bodybuilder's physique no longer goes for broke on every shot, he could find himself in the second week at the Open.

Gael Monfils

The Frenchman, who turns 19 next week, has quietly moved inside the top 50, posting a winning record in his first full year on the tour and winning a title. Monfils's huge serve and forehand are perfect for the hard courts in Flushing.

Chin Fidds

The much-heralded son of a Chinese gymnast and a Finnish hockey player, Fidds makes his Grand Slam debut at the Open after years of self-imposed exile from the tour (he claims he was too shy to play in front of crowds). Andre Agassi once called Fidds the game's greatest talent; Andy Roddick was reportedly left speechless after a recent practice with the 26-year-old in California. Fidds, who stands just 5-feet-8 inches tall, is said to serve upwards of 225 mph, though his control is suspect (he once broke an opponent's sternum with an errant blast). Can Fidds keep it together and threaten Federer, or will the lights, cam eras, and action of Flushing send him running for cover?



Go Roger. Please win this one. :worship: :worship: :worship:

mitalidas
08-26-2005, 04:16 PM
McEnroe said: "But it doesn't mean the game is boring because Roger's winning all the time. I don't know who can beat Roger here. Pete Sampras was saying recently that if Roger keeps it up like this for three or four years he will be the greatest player who ever lived."

Always happy to see that Pete is not insecure.... he has been really very generous with praise for Roger in the last couple years

ExpectedWinner
08-26-2005, 04:32 PM
Always happy to see that Pete is not insecure.... he has been really very generous with praise for Roger in the last couple years

Why should he be worried? He knows that his records are untouchable. He's not stupid and sees the strong young contingent ( Nadal, Gasquet, Monfils, Djocovic) is coming up. One of the hardest thing in sports is to fight off the younger, hungry, fearless rival. On the other hand, Pete himself didn't have the younger rival until Safin/Hewiit/Federer(in that order) arrived. Luckily for him, he was almost done by then. Players, 5-7 years younger than Pete, weren't great. None of them, except for Moya, won a Slam. Moya, Grosjean, Flip, Haas, Kiefer have never played up to their potential and were slowed down by injures. Thus, Pete had been fighting mostly the players of his generation- Agassi, Chang, Becker, Rafter, Courier, Ivanisevic.

jtipson
08-26-2005, 04:39 PM
THE DARK HORSES
...
Chin Fidds

The much-heralded son of a Chinese gymnast and a Finnish hockey player, Fidds makes his Grand Slam debut at the Open after years of self-imposed exile from the tour (he claims he was too shy to play in front of crowds). Andre Agassi once called Fidds the game's greatest talent; Andy Roddick was reportedly left speechless after a recent practice with the 26-year-old in California. Fidds, who stands just 5-feet-8 inches tall, is said to serve upwards of 225 mph, though his control is suspect (he once broke an opponent's sternum with an errant blast). Can Fidds keep it together and threaten Federer, or will the lights, cam eras, and action of Flushing send him running for cover?


Ha ha ha. Strange to have this paragraph in an otherwise serious article!

ytben
08-26-2005, 04:55 PM
Stefan, that Roche interview is a great reading. Thank you for posting :kiss:

Toan, thanks for the article :D

Mrs. B, thanks for the excerpt of the DVD. Now I can't wait to get my hands on it. I hope they will make one in english.

TenHound
08-26-2005, 05:50 PM
It's striking comparing press pre-Wimby & pre-USO. During the former, the press was flooded w/beautiful Roger articles. Yet, despite Roger giving probably the Greatest Performance in a Final Ever last yr, not much has been written. A bit here & there.

1sun
08-26-2005, 06:04 PM
Why should he be worried? He knows that his records are untouchable. He's not stupid and sees the strong young contingent ( Nadal, Gasquet, Monfils, Djocovic) is coming up. One of the hardest thing in sports is to fight off the younger, hungry, fearless rival. On the other hand, Pete himself didn't have the younger rival until Safin/Hewiit/Federer(in that order) arrived. Luckily for him, he was almost done by then. Players, 5-7 years younger than Pete, weren't great. None of them, except for Moya, won a Slam. Moya, Grosjean, Flip, Haas, Kiefer have never played up to their potential and were slowed down by injures. Thus, Pete had been fighting mostly the players of his generation- Agassi, Chang, Becker, Rafter, Courier, Ivanisevic.
ive said it before and i will say it again. sampras' records are touchable.
i dont know where you get the assumption that his records are untouchable

nobama
08-26-2005, 06:15 PM
McEnroe said: "But it doesn't mean the game is boring because Roger's winning all the time. I don't know who can beat Roger here. Pete Sampras was saying recently that if Roger keeps it up like this for three or four years he will be the greatest player who ever lived."

Always happy to see that Pete is not insecure.... he has been really very generous with praise for Roger in the last couple yearsDidn't he once say in an interview there were certain things Roger did as well as or better than him? I remember reading somewhere that Pete said Roger had a better backhand, stayed back better and had just as good of forehand as himself. He gave himself the edge on the serve and volly. I know some of the greats have said that Roger's overall game is better than Pete's was. Tracy Austin, for instance, said that she's never enjoyed watching anyone as much as Roger...that Pete relied so much on his serve whereas Roger has it all. John McEnroe said this Wimbledon that Roger was the greatest natural talent he'd ever seen. I'm sure Pete sees the same thing these greats do. But he also knows that it won't necessarily translate into 64 titles including 14 grand slams. I think Sampras's slam record won't be beat, but I also think Roger is overall a better player than Pete was. And if he works on his second serve and vollys and one day wins the French I think he will be considered better than Sampras.

ExpectedWinner
08-26-2005, 06:34 PM
ive said it before and i will say it again. sampras' records are touchable.
i dont know where you get the assumption that his records are untouchable

The tour is very deep, the game is very physical, the players are stronger and faster than they've ever been. That's what I'm coming from. It's only my opinion, your having a different opinion doesn't bother me at all.

SUKTUEN
08-26-2005, 07:20 PM
thanks Shabazza

TenHound
08-26-2005, 07:37 PM
JMac said during NY final last yr. that "Roger plays the way I only dreamed of playing."

SUKTUEN
08-26-2005, 07:45 PM
JMac said during NY final last yr. that "Roger plays the way I only dreamed of playing."
:yeah: :yeah: :yeah:

1sun
08-26-2005, 09:22 PM
The tour is very deep, the game is very physical, the players are stronger and faster than they've ever been. That's what I'm coming from. It's only my opinion, your having a different opinion doesn't bother me at all.
you shouldnt be bothered.
and i respect your opinion and to be honest i dont think roger will beat samprass' 14 as well but i neither think that, that record is untouchable.
in my eyes, if he gets the fo and 10 slams overall he will be the greatest but obviously i would love him to beat sampras' record.

TenHound
08-27-2005, 03:21 AM
Shabazza still has not shared the secret location of the Tony Roche interview. For those looking for some new articles before Mon., you might google Rohit Brijnath Rog- -.

He seems to be the leading Indian tennis writer. Apparently writes for both Indian/Hindu press & sometimes Aussie. It's interesting seeing things through Indian eyes, and he appreciates Roger!

Googling brings up this art on Roger & Pete:
The Most Divine of Heirs

....
WE are too quick these days to award greatness. Wayne Rooney plays a few matches and talk of another Pele begins. Sehwag swishes a few strokes and he is labelled the next Tendulkar. But Federer, even on reflection, has put forward a persuasive initial argument that if not one day the statistical equal of Sampras, then at least he is the most divine of heirs.
...

google away hungry Roger admirers.

nobama
08-27-2005, 04:05 AM
Look you've got former players - multiple grand slam winners - saying that Roger's playing the best tennis they've ever seen. He may not win as many grand slams as Laver or Sampras, but I think the argument can be made tht he is just as good as anyone who's ever played. Just this week Tracy Austin said Roger has shots that John McEnroe never had. During the Wimbledon final Jimmy Connors marveled at Roger's play saying he "couldn't comprehend it". To me winning RG is more important than breaking Pete's 14 GS titles. Although I'd love to see him break Borg's record of consecutive Wimbledon titles. I think if Roger were ever to win RG and Wimbledon in the same year that would seal the deal on his greatness. He came close this year.