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Roger news and articles

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ytben
06-28-2005, 05:02 PM
:awww:

Yeah the expectation and pressure on Rogi is just too enormous now... :awww:

RogiFan88
06-28-2005, 05:33 PM
I've not been here to see him win either of his titles because someone had to stay home and feed Ginger. But it's OK, Ginger is alive and well and my daughter Diana is looking after him this year
Roger Federer's dad, Robert, finally makes it to Wimbledon after using the old cat-sitting excuse for the past two years.

Occasionally I'm amazed by the shots I play
Federer junior - good and modest with it.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/funny_old_game/quotes_of_week/4629913.stm

ytben
06-28-2005, 05:48 PM
Thanks for the quotes RogiFan! Like father like son, both are funny :lol:

Minnie
06-28-2005, 06:17 PM
Either that or she just gets bored sometimes. I mean how many matches does Roger play every year? And Mirka's sitting through every one of them. I think Roger said she sees like 100 matches of his every year or something. I imagine that could get boring sometimes. But I don't know if I'd be leafing through a magazine during Wimbledon where people could see me. :scratch:

Yeah, don't know that I would either. Doesn't look good. Has following article been

Roger Federer is never going to scream and shout like Andy Murray.

But who needs passion and fire when you possess a tennis game as precise and powerful as that of the two-times Wimbledon champion who brushed aside Spain's Juan Carlos Ferrero 6-3 6-4 7-6 on Monday evening?

The match might have finished in the gathering gloom but Federer's game was as bright as anything seen at this tournament so far.

Not vintage yet perhaps, but then it was only the fourth round and better to save your most imperious form for the business end of the tournament.

Ferrero was a tricky opponent. He is a former French Open champion. He has been a US Open finalist. He was a genuine threat.

He was also determined to prove his rehabilitation was complete after emerging from 18 months of injury and health problems, which included a debilitating bout of chicken pox.

Federer needed to be a man on top of his game and he was for the most part as he completed the 33rd consecutive grass-court triumph of his career.

That is a record eclipsed only by the great Bjorn Borg with 41 victories and that is a measure of the tennis company Federer now keeps.

Ominously for the rest, after his victory Federer also marked the various parts of his game and supplied a tick in all the appropriate boxes.

"I'm serving really consistent," said Federer. "My movement is pretty good as well. I wish I could serve and volley more.

"Last year I played better than expected but my goal this year is Wimbledon and being number one in the world. I have lots of dreams left to chase.

"I always try to show the people I can do it over and over again. I'm really happy how I've handled the pressure over the last few years and today I played a really solid match."

So he did and if there was one belated cry from the crowd of 'C'mon Henman' as Federer surged to victory then it was merely an attempt to inject a little humour into a match of relentless baseline hitting.

The difference with Federer, however, is that he can mix it up. He can introduce serve and volley with devastating effect at the appropriate time and that proved crucial.

"He played so good," was Ferrero's verdict. "He's playing with lots of confidence and no mistakes and holds his concentration all the time."

Indeed, on this form it appears inevitable the world number one, who faces another Spaniard Fernando Gonzalez in the quarter-final, is nearing a hat-trick of men's singles titles.

He has lost just one set this tournament, against Nicolas Kiefer in the third round, and apart from tonight's third set tie-breaker the Spaniard rarely looked like troubling him.

True, Federer did have to save a break point in the ninth game of the first set but he produced a powerful smash before serving out the set.

It was always going to be a struggle for Ferrero from that point, especially for a man who had lost his last three matches against Federer.

Ferrero, however, used the pace of Federer's serve to manufacture some spectacular returns in the second set, but as well as he was playing the champion continued to conjure up something better.

He broke the Ferrero serve this time in the fifth game with the aid of a blistering forehand which landed on the line and again it proved crucial, Federer serving out comfortably to take the set.

With Federer producing huge backhands and mixing up his baseline play with penetrating volleys many might have collapsed at that point but Ferrero suddenly began to play some of the best tennis of the match, prolonging the rallies and matching Federer for hitting power from the baseline.

Errors eventually began to seep from the Federer racket and while Ferrero saved four break points on his serve in the third game, he also had a break point on the Federer delivery in the eighth.

He could not take it and Federer eventually forced the break in the 11th game with a spectacular backhand.

It looked all over but the champion promptly experienced an inexplicable blip, netting an easy volley and his first double fault of the match to allow Ferrero to take the set to a tie-break.

With the light fading there was a possibility the match would not have finished tonight if Ferrero could have taken the match into a fourth set.

That was not part of the champion's plan and while he continued to make the odd error, Federer eventually reimposed his superiority to take a hard-fought breaker 8-6 and the match.

Not quite perfection, but champion stuff all the same." :worship:

I have tickets for Court 1 tomorrow and was almost sure that Roger would be on Centre. However, have just found out that the first match on is Roger's! Hooray - have everything x'd that it won't rain! :wavey:

Minnie
06-28-2005, 10:00 PM
Articles

Day 9 Preview from Wimbledon site.


Tuesday, 28 June, 2005


"We're down to the last eight in the men's singles, with eight different nations represented. It's the third year in succession that this has happened at The Championships; what a testimony to the world-wide appeal and quality of the game.

Tim Henman's early departure means that the home nation is not represented in the colourful gathering of talent, from Roger Federer, the two-time champion, to a Swede, a Spaniard and a Chilean - Thomas Johansson, Feliciano Lopez and Fernando Gonzalez - who have never before marched as far as the quarter-finals of this greatest of the Grand Slams.

While it is still very much on the cards that Sunday will bring a repeat of last year's final between the number one and two seeds, Federer and Andy Roddick, Hispanophiles will be hoping for Lopez versus David Nalbandian, Francophiles will be hoping to see the consistent Sebastien Grosjean improving on his two previous semi-finals, and whatever it is you call Australian supporters (Ozzophiles?) will be hoping to see Lleyton Hewitt's back-to-front cap hot in pursuit of the treasured trophy. Should it be a Hewtt-Grosjean final we would have the first occasion on which both finalists wore their caps the wrong way round. A pub quiz gem, this.

Let us begin by assessing the prospects of the man who currently bestrides these Championships, the 23-year-old boy from Basle who means more to Swiss sport than quartz watches do to that country's economy. Federer is doubly a champion of tennis - in merit and comportment -and nothing would give your correspondent more pleasure than to see him join that select group of geniuses who have won this tournament three times in a row, apart from reporting a Henman or and Murray triumph.

Federer is tilting for his 34th successive grass court victory when he takes on the Chilean thunderball Gonzalez, who is peering towards what would be, for him, the promised land of his first Grand Slam semi-final. He is entitled to think he has a chance, not having dropped a set in four rounds so far, bombarding the opposition with 69 aces along the way. The Gonzalez serve and, what's even bigger, the Chilean's forehand, have inflicted much damage on the professional tour but they don't appear to have had effect on the Amiable Alp. Federer has won all four of their previous encounters, dropping only one set.

That grass streak of Federer's is inching him towards Bjorn Borg's mark of 41 consecutive victories. All of Borg's were marked up at Wimbledon, of course, in that incredible run between 1976 and 1981 in which he won five successive Championships and lost in the final of the sixth. Federer's 33 so far have been gained in two Wimbledons and three years of dominance at Halle. In those 33 matches Federer has lost only eight of the 92 sets he has contested. Against this sort of stuff, Gonzalez's biggest weapons in the opening match on Court One this afternoon may be reduced to popguns.

Hewitt will start the Centre Court programme against another Spanish speaker, a Spanish citizen in fact, in Lopez. Hewitt is the only men's survivor besides Federer to have tasted total triumph at The Championships, winning in 2002 before Federer moved into the driver's seat. Lopez is Rafael Nadal's chum and doubles partner and he joins distinguished company in being the first quarter-finalist from his country since Manuel Orantes in 1972.

Hewitt is not the sort to take undue note of such statistics. What is put in front of him is what he is interested in. He is therefore interested only in halting the attractive gallop of Feliciano, the only left-hander remaining form the 17 who kicked off the tournament.

For Hewitt, the all-purpose Aussie, a repeat of 2002 is what he's looking towards, mate.

Centre Court will also host the Andy Roddick battle with Grosjean which, no pun intended, is an engrossing prospect. As Roddick has been revealing in his TV commercials for a credit card company, he expects to be filling the spare seat he has purchased for the flight home from London with the Wimbledon trophy - or its half-size replica that the All England Club permit the winner to cart off into the night.

Since both men are residents of Florida, that dormitory of tennis talent, this could qualify as a "derby" match, except that all France will erupt in celebration should Grosjean sock it to Andy. Roddick has won six of their previous seven, three of them on the grass of London's Queen's Club, and is not in any mood to stop short of another shot at Federer on Sunday.

Also aiming for a repeat of 2002 is David Nalbandian, who lost to Hewitt in that year's final. The (then) unfancied Argentinian, who learned his grass court tennis on a converted cricket field in Buenos Aires, has gone on to success on all surfaces, having reached at least the quarter-finals of all four Grand Slams. His No.1 Court opponent, Johansson, is treading new ground in the last eight on his ninth appearance at Wimbledon and bidding to become the first Swedish semi-finalist since Stefan Edberg in 1993. At 30, he is the oldest man left in the draw, which goes to support Henman's argument that 30 is not too old to be winning this tournament."

Seems everyone is rooting for Roger!

lunahielo
06-28-2005, 11:54 PM
Gonzalez's biggest weapons in the opening match on Court One this afternoon may be reduced to popguns.

Oh I hope so!
C'mon out on fire, Rogi!~~ :yeah:

Thanks, Minnie. Enjoy the match!

Fedex
06-29-2005, 05:11 AM
Thanks for the great articles. :)

Fedex
06-29-2005, 07:34 AM
Words of wisdom from the great Pat Cash
(on Hewitt)
"Being defeated six matches in a row by a player you previously had dominated is reason enough to take drastic measures.

"True, that run did extend to seven in the final of the Masters Series event at Indian Wells in March, but that result should not be taken too seriously.
"Hewitt played with an injured toe that required surgery and kept him off court for a couple of months until he ruled himself out of the French Open by falling down stairs and damaging some ribs."


"He has the power to emulate the sort of attack mounted by Safin in Melbourne, Nadal in Paris and, to an extent, Andy Roddick in last year's Wimbledon final.

These comments are laughable. LMAO, Hewitt can hit with the same power as Safin and Roddick? :rolls: :lol: :haha: And the only reason Hewitt lost to Federer at the Pacific life was clearly because Lleyton was injured. :) Of course that match shoulden't be taken too seriously. :)

babsi
06-29-2005, 03:26 PM
What an expert - Cash should report for FOX news,they are looking for "experts" like him!

Thanks for posting everybody :)

nobama
06-29-2005, 03:27 PM
Well Roger doesn't really count the Indian Wells final either. But last year excluding TMC Roger bagled Hewitt at least once every time they played. Pat Cash is a funny guy. Wasn't he the one that bitched about seeding Hewitt 3rd instead of 2nd? Why else would he care except that Lleyton has to play Roger in the semis instead of the finals? Obviously he doesn't have confidence that Lleyton can beat Roger.

nobama
06-29-2005, 03:37 PM
Well Roger doesn't really count the Indian Wells final either. But last year excluding TMC Roger bagled Hewitt at least once every time they played. Pat Cash is a funny guy. Wasn't he the one that bitched about seeding Hewitt 3rd instead of 2nd? Why else would he care except that Lleyton has to play Roger in the semis instead of the finals? Obviously he doesn't have confidence that Lleyton can beat Roger.

ytben
06-29-2005, 03:39 PM
Words of wisdom from the great Pat Cash
(on Hewitt)
"Being defeated six matches in a row by a player you previously had dominated is reason enough to take drastic measures.

"True, that run did extend to seven in the final of the Masters Series event at Indian Wells in March, but that result should not be taken too seriously.
"Hewitt played with an injured toe that required surgery and kept him off court for a couple of months until he ruled himself out of the French Open by falling down stairs and damaging some ribs."


"He has the power to emulate the sort of attack mounted by Safin in Melbourne, Nadal in Paris and, to an extent, Andy Roddick in last year's Wimbledon final.

These comments are laughable. LMAO, Hewitt can hit with the same power as Safin and Roddick? :rolls: :lol: :haha: And the only reason Hewitt lost to Federer at the Pacific life was clearly because Lleyton was injured. :) Of course that match shoulden't be taken too seriously. :)

LMAO!!!! :haha: :haha: :haha:

Thanks for the quote Fedex! What a wisdom of gem!!!! I can't stop laughing now!!! Gosh so hewitt can emulate Marat's power game, Nadal's lefty game, and Roddick's serves......
I should write a thank you letter to Pat Trash for opening my eyes.... :rolls:

PaulieM
06-29-2005, 03:40 PM
Pat Cash is an idiot, nothing new :shrug:

nobama
06-29-2005, 03:43 PM
Remeber at the beginning of 2004 he went after Mirka because Roger split with Lundgren and was coachless. Of course we all know what happened in 2004 without a coach. ;) Hasn't Cash realized by now that he's a complete moron?

PaulieM
06-29-2005, 04:15 PM
Perhaps Cash remembers what happened in New York, if i remember lleyton was perfectly fit at that time :unsure:

yanchr
06-29-2005, 04:59 PM
Perhaps Cash remembers what happened in New York, if i remember lleyton was perfectly fit at that time :unsure:
Ya, and he still got...:scared::bolt:

kept on dreaming your Aussie... :wavey:

ToanNguyen
06-29-2005, 05:07 PM
Post match interview today with Roger
He sounds confident. Good thing. Two more to go and it's yours, Roger :worship: :worship: :worship:

R. Federer - Day 9
Wednesday, June 29, 2005


Q. How much fun was that? How much fun is it to play a player like Fernando who hits the ball so hard?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, it's always interesting to play against him because sort of have to always weather the storm against him. He hits the ball with so much pace. Not much you can actually control in a match like this because he always takes the first swing at the ball.

But I still enjoy it because, you know, you get good rallies. I have to really work hard on my defense. Sometimes things I don't do so often.

Q. Is he completely unlike any other player out there?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, he's different, you know, because he dominates from the baseline where he can play against a big server. You're just trying to get the serve back. But with him, I always have the feeling I can get the serve back. But then right away he covers his serve very well with incredible forehands. And also backhand, he takes big swings at the ball.

He's quite unique, I would say.

Q. What did you think of the shot he put at you at 4‑All in the first set, huge wind‑up and slice? Do you know the one I'm talking about?

ROGER FEDERER: (Looking quizzical.)

Q. You got it back.

ROGER FEDERER: Hit a reflex volley?

Q. Yes.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, the ball was very low. Of course, to take a swing at such a ball is a little weird. But, you know, it comes back with a lot of spin, so you have to watch out because you know the ball's going to bounce different.

He hit a good reflex volley, because I went sort of at the body, but with a lot of spin. He hit it well to win that point. But I think we had some other good ones, as well.

I lost them all, so... (smiling).

Q. Considering Gonzalez would probably climb into the stands to hit an inside‑out shot, you did a good job of getting on his backhand and staying there today, didn't you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think I especially also returned pretty good. Which gave me quite a few chances always to break. I thought in the third I was playing really good. Then I lost those two points which would have given me breakpoint, which would have given me a chance.

But all in all, I'm really pleased. I really got to his backhand well and thought, you know, it was a really ‑‑ a match like I wanted to, you know, to play against him.

I know he can't play through the entire five‑setter, you know, hitting just incredible forehands. He's going to have his lapses. That's when I had to take advantage of it.

Q. How did you find playing on No. 1 court as opposed to Centre Court?

ROGER FEDERER: I made against Minar on 1, I found it was very similar. So today, I had the same feeling again.

Q. Have you watched any videos of Hewitt's games here or anyone telling you how he's playing or is he a known quantity and also you've beaten him in the past?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, I don't need to watch his match on a tape, you know. I've seen him enough live this week because we're in the same section of the draw, if you like. So you always wait around, or if you're already at home and he's going to play, you're going to watch him play.

We've played on so many occasions now that I think we know each other's game so well. We don't need to have more spies around because we're not going to change our games very much. So I think we're both looking forward to that.

I mean, I'm very happy to be through my third consecutive semis, you know, to be honest. Now against Lleyton, I'm really looking forward because this time he's fit, not like in Indian Wells, you know, where I don't really count that match. It's going to be interesting to see.

Q. The last time he beat you was in that fairly famous Davis Cup match.

ROGER FEDERER: I don't remember (smiling).

Q. I was wondering if that match and what happened in that match has been a factor in the way you've played against Lleyton ever since? Does it fire you up to not let that happen again?

ROGER FEDERER: I think what really ‑‑ that match in a way gave me a lot of confidence because he beat me on many, many occasions before that. I really had the feeling I could dominate almost for three entire sets against him. And that feeling I never had before against him. I was up two sets to love, a break, serving for the match, you know, and I was really playing incredibly well. Then he fought back and we all know what happened.

But I think that match in a way, you know, of course it was a killer for me, but in that moment it gave me a lot of confidence knowing that against Lleyton I can actually get my act together for three or even more sets, you know, in a row. I think that's why I could turn around the series for me.

Q. Your defensive game now looks as good as your offensive game. Maybe that's your biggest improvement in the last months, maybe not a good news for your opponents if you're still improving.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I think today I've been pushed very much into the corners. I have to come up with something. I thought I really did well. My slice is working well, you know, like I want it to.

But I've always been relying on my defensive game as well because, like this, don't only have to attack all the time. It gives me sort of two options. I always thought I'm good at it. You know, today I just have to prove it once again.

Q. Your streak against Hewitt is now seven matches in a row. Can you remember ever being on the wrong end of that kind of a streak against a player and what it's like walking out on court that you've tried so many times and haven't been able to beat this guy?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I never lost seven consecutive matches I think against a player. Very few bad records against players, you know. Maybe the most, maybe four, max maybe five I would reckon. I don't know how it is.

He's beaten me enough to believe in his chance. He knows. He hasn't been playing any tournaments. We don't know how hard he worked, how much he's changed really his game, and what he's got. And on grass I think anything can happen against him. He knows how to win the title here.

I'll just take it a match at a time. I think it's a tough match ahead of me.

Q. Tony has obviously worked a lot with Lleyton previously early on in Davis Cup. Does that help? Does he give you much in regard to Lleyton?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not at all. We have hardly spoken about Lleyton's game, to be honest, with Tony. It's more concentrating on my own game and actually preparing for how the other opponent's going to play.

You take that in consideration, of course. But most important is how I play. Because at the level I'm playing, you know, over the last few years and the confidence I have, I can allow myself to think this way, you know. But I don't think we'll go into this match any different just because he worked with Lleyton. I didn't even know that he did sort of. So I don't think that's going to play any role.

Q. If form holds and you beat Hewitt, you would face Andy Roddick. What do you respect most about Roddick's game?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, we're not there yet. But Andy, I think on the grass with his serve, you know, he's so dangerous. I like his humor on/off court. We get along well. We've had some good match over the years. I've got a great record against him. No matter what, I always enjoy playing against him. He's always fair. Especially in the States, he's very, very well‑liked. It's good to have a great American now that Andre, Pete, Chang, Courier, they all sort of ‑‑ some are leaving and some are gone.

It's great to have Andy.

Q. We've seen a lot of Andy's American style humor this week. How would you describe it?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I saw him today in the locker room. He was nice, so... I don't know what else.

Q. There's been a bit of controversy about the seedings. Who do you think you should be seeded to play in the final?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, it's a tough call, you know. The rules are the way they are. It's the only tournament in the world where it is like this. But I think it's understandable. We're at Wimbledon. I understand everything what Wimbledon decides really because this is where it all started.

Now that Lleyton is through to the semis and maybe Andy is also going to be there, of course these questions are going to come up again. But I think the way Andy played the last two years, I think he deserves to be No. 2. But also Lleyton deserves to be No. 2 because he's No. 2 in the world.

It's a tough call. You know, I hope that neither of those two guys is angry about it. Maybe, of course, Lleyton is more. I don't think it's going to play a role in our match.

Daniel
06-29-2005, 10:18 PM
Thankjs :)

Stevens Point
06-29-2005, 10:21 PM
Updated: June 29, 2005, 3:10 PM ET
Up next for Hewitt: Federer
By Wayne Drehs
ESPN.com
Archive

WIMBLEDON, England – Feliciano Lopez looked like a man whose ego was bruised and whose body was weakened. He hadn't lost a set in his previous three matches and yet Lleyton Hewitt disposed of him Wednesday in the men's quarterfinals as if it were as simple as flushing the handle on a brand new toilet.

After the match, Lopez's words were soft, his shoulders slumped and he openly admitted he had no idea Hewitt had that sort of game. But he also sent a warning to anyone drawing the conclusion that Hewitt might be the favorite to knock off world No. 1 Roger Federer and end his 33-match winning streak on grass in Friday's semifinals.

"He has a chance," Lopez said. "But Roger is another level. It's not me."

Hewitt knows that. That's why after his 7-5, 6-4, 7-6 (2) victory over Lopez, there was little celebration. No running around the court in delight or proudly waving to the Wimbledon faithful. Just a simple pump of the fist in the most confident, Jordan-like fashion, followed by Hewitt's trademark yell.

"Come on!'"

Perhaps it was a message to Federer, the man who has the title that Hewitt craves, world's greatest tennis player. At the age of 20, Hewitt was the youngest year-end No. 1 in the sport's history, but his star has since been eclipsed by Federer. The man Hewitt dominated earlier in his career, beating him in seven of their first nine meetings, is now the world's No. 1 and has won seven consecutive matches between the two. That includes three finals, a semifinal and last year's Wimbledon quarterfinal.

"He's obviously the best player in the world for a reason," Hewitt said. "When he plays some of his best tennis, he's nearly unbeatable in certain matches. I'm going to have to try and find something in the next couple days."

Wednesday's victory was a good start. Hewitt was in control against Lopez, revealing a pinpoint serve that Lopez wasn't prepared for. Not only did Hewitt rack up 15 aces, but he won points on 89 percent of his first serves.

"I know he's quite a good serve," Lopez said. "But not like today. After that first set, he started serving unbelievable. He didn't give me a chance."

Hewitt has said all week that although his serve has been rather inconsistent, when it's on, it's better now than when he last won Wimbledon in 2002.

"I've got more variety," he said. "Those two weeks I served really when I needed to. I'm a good enough returner that I'm going to get opportunities to break if I can clean up my service games."

But will it be enough to beat Federer? Former Wimbledon champion John McEnroe, commentating during the Hewitt-Lopez match for the BBC, isn't so sure.

"This is the best I've seen Hewitt play – that's the good news," McEnroe said. "The bad news is that he's going to have to beat Federer."

The distance between Federer and the rest of the tennis world is just that great. But it doesn't mean that Hewitt, known for his long blonde hair, backwards hat and high-strung emotions, won't be confident.

His body is fresh, after he missed the clay court season because of a pair of cracked ribs he suffered while falling down the stairs at his Sydney, Australia, home.

"I was wearing socks," Hewitt said. "I slipped on my shoes at the bottom of the stairs. It was pretty painful at the time."

And his mind is right, too. This is the chance he's waited for. This is the shot at Federer he wanted. And, believe it or not, Hewitt quietly thinks there are areas of his game where he has an advantage over Federer.

"But I won't be telling you," he said.

The last time Hewitt defeated Federer was in a Davis Cup match in 2003, after Hewitt dropped the first two sets, but came back to win the next three to take the match.

After dropping six of his previous nine matches against Hewitt, Federer said that match turned around his confidence, even though he lost.

"I had the feeling I could dominate for three entire sets against him," Federer said. "And I had never had that feeling before against him. That's when I learned I could turn around this series for me."

This marquee matchup, bringing together the world's top two players, should be taking place in a Grand Slam Final. But Wimbledon is the only Grand Slam not to follow ATP rankings when putting together its draw. This year, the committee awarded fourth-ranked Andy Roddick, who lost to Federer in last year's final, the No. 2 seed. Hewitt slipped to the third seed.

That move didn't sit well with Hewitt, who said in May, "Realistically, [Wimbledon] probably comes down to Roger and myself." He echoed those feelings Wednesday.

"It's a strange situation," Hewitt said. "I don't know how many times it would have happened that the top two ranked players in the world would be playing in a semifinal in a Slam. But if you knock the best player off out there, then you've got to be pretty confident going into Sunday."

And at this point, that's all he can hope for.

"He's beaten me enough to believe in his chances," Federer said. "He knows how to win."

Now the question becomes: Can he?

Wayne Drehs is a staff writer for ESPN.com. He can be reached at Wayne.Drehs@espn3.com.

Daniel
06-30-2005, 01:17 AM
World No.1 wins 34th-straight match on grass

By HOWARD FENDRICH



Defending champion Roger Federer serves to Chile's Fernando Gonzalez during their Men's Singles quarter-final match on the Number One Court at Wimbledon, Wednesday June 29, 2005.(AP Photo/Alastair Grant)
LONDON (AP) - Andy Roddick knows he's a work in progress, a young player with a record-setting serve, a fearsome forehand, a Grand Slam title - and key parts of his game that occasionally let him down.

That's why the American he was so pleased that excellence in two troublesome areas, volleying and returning, played such a large part in a 3-6, 6-2, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3 victory over No. 9-seeded Sebastien Grosjean of France on Wednesday that put Roddick in the Wimbledon semifinals for a third straight year.

Roddick has accomplished plenty, but he seems to be carrying a slightly manufactured chip on his shoulder now that it's been 21 months since he won the U.S. Open and his ranking has dropped from No. 1 to No. 4. A long drought and big drop? Not in the least. But add in a five-match losing streak in five-setters coming to the All England Club, and even Roddick might have been excused for harbouring doubts.

By outlasting Grosjean to join Swiss star Roger Federer, Australian Lleyton Hewitt and Swede Thomas Johansson in the final four - the first time since 1993 all of Wimbledon men's semifinalists owned major titles - Roddick maintained he took a step toward re-establishing himself.

"I feel freer. A lot freer. There was a lot of heat on me coming into this tournament. I wanted to prove that I'm still a pretty good tennis player. I'm not gone. I'm 22 years old," said Roddick, who lost in the second round at the French Open.


"I'm still up in the world, still competing for Slams, basically three out of four of them, throughout the year. I felt like I still deserved a little bit of respect. But that being said, I'd love to take it further. I'm not satisfied yet."

He certainly wouldn't be all that pleased with a loss Friday to the 12th-seeded Johansson, who beat No. 18 David Nalbandian of Argentina 7-6 (5), 6-2, 6-2 to reach the second major semifinal of his 11-year pro career. The other? When Johansson won the 2002 Australian Open; his progress was stymied when left knee surgery wiped out his entire 2003 season.

Upon returning to practice, the Swede worried his playing days might be over. He stuck with it, though, and qualifies as a bit of an interloper in the closing quartet, the first time since 1995 the three top-seeded men lasted this long at the All England Club. Don't tell Johansson that, though.

"I know that when I play my best tennis," he said, "I can compete with the big boys."

Two-time defending champion Federer will meet 2002 Wimbledon winner Hewitt in the more glamorous semifinal. Federer is ranked No. 1 and Hewitt No. 2, although the Australian was seeded third, behind Roddick.

In Thursday's women's semifinals, defending champion Maria Sharapova faces 2000-01 winner Venus Williams, while No. 1 Lindsay Davenport faces No. 3 Amelie Mauresmo.

In junior singles Wednesday, sixth-seeded Aleksandra Wozniak of Blainville, Que., defeated Nikola Frankova of the Czech Republic, 5-7, 6-4, 6-2 to advance to the quarter-finals.

Federer played superb defence against No. 21 Chilean Fernando Gonzalez's swing-for-the-fences style, winning 7-5, 6-2, 7-6 (2) to extend his unbeaten streak on grass to 34 matches. In a remarkably similar match, Hewitt ended the run of No. 26 Feliciano Lopez of Spain 7-5, 6-4, 7-6 (2).

Hewitt and Federer both broke their opponents in the final game of each of the first two sets, then both dominated third-set tiebreakers. And in both cases, it was a combination of better players taking control on key points, and less-experienced players failing to come through when they had to.

Or, as John McEnroe so delicately put it on the BBC: "They call it 'choking."'

Neither Federer nor Hewitt is often accused of committing that sin. But Hewitt can't seem to solve Federer of late, going 0-7 head-to-head over the last two seasons.

"I'm not sure what the key is. Have to try and find something in the next couple of days," Hewitt said. "He's obviously the best player in the world for a reason. He's really taken his game to another level in the last couple of years."

To truly appreciate how much Roddick has developed since losing to Federer in the 2003 Wimbledon semifinals, one needed to look no further than the second game of the fifth set against Grosjean.

It was there that Roddick earned the lone break of the decisive set, his second victory of the tournament in a match that long.

Roddick earned one point with a hard volley to a corner that Grosjean could only chop at, sending the ball flying into the stands. Another came courtesy of a backhand passing shot that Grosjean got his racket to but couldn't control. And the last came when Grosjean - a Wimbledon semifinalist the past two years - hit a crafty slice serve, and Roddick delivered a sharp return that the Frenchman meekly slapped into the net.

The latest, most vital, addition for Roddick is the volley, and he won the point on 47 of 59 trips to the net Wednesday.

"You know what it is? I don't feel like it's forced right now, whereas other times, I'd go to the net and I'd hit a shot and hope that something good would happen," said Roddick, who lost to Federer in four sets in last year's final.

Roddick split with coach Brad Gilbert in December, switching to Dean Goldfine, an assistant for the U.S. Davis Cup and Olympic teams. Goldfine has worked with Roddick on being confident enough in his volleying and other new-improved skills to use them when a match is on the line.

"It's obviously tough when you go through a period of time where you're not doing as well as you have in the past," Goldfine said.

"Looking at the close matches he's lost, it's relatively easy to do new things at 2-all, 3-all in the first set, but at 4-all in the fifth set, that's a different story. And I think now he's finally starting to believe he has the ability to do some of these things and be successful doing it."

Daniel
06-30-2005, 01:17 AM
LONDON (AFP) - Roger Federer and Lleyton Hewitt, who have monopolized the Wimbledon title in the last three years, will clash in a potentially epic semi-final showdown.


The match-up will be the latest in a long-running series of bruising encounters stretching back to 1999 and featuring 16 clashes with double defending champion Federer ahead 9-7.

Federer, the winner here in 2003 and 2004, reached the semi-finals by racking up a 34th successive grasscourt win courtesy of a 7-5, 6-2, 7-6 (7/2) win against Chile's Fernando Gonzalez.

Hewitt, the 2002 champion, booked his place in his second career Wimbledon semi-final seeing off Spain's Feliciano Lopez 7-5, 6-4, 7-6 (7/2).

Daniel
06-30-2005, 01:18 AM
LONDON (AFP) - Roger Federer moved to within two games of a third straight Wimbledon title when he defused the big guns of Chilean Fernando Gonzalez to win their quarter-final tie 7-5, 6-2, 7-6 (7/2).

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The top seeded Swiss player was left flat-footed at times by the power of the Gonzalez forehand, but in all other aspects of the game he was on top and the result looked in little doubt after Federer won a tight first set.

It was his 34th win in a row on grass and next up in the semi-finals will be old rival Leyton Hewitt of Australia who defeated Felciano Lopez of Spain in straight sets.

"I played a great match today. He was dangerous. It's my third semi-final in a row and Wimbledon has been good to me so far," he said Wednesday.

"The whole match I was tense and he was a dangerous oppoonent. I am happy with the way I played."

The 24-year-old Gonzalez came into his third appearance in a Grand Slam quarter-final as the only player in the tournament not to have dropped a set in the four previous rounds.

But he was quickly in trouble against Federer, dropping his serve in the fourth game after badly mistiming a straightforward forehand.

Federer was comfortably holding on to his serve and he underlined the break to smoothly move 4-1 up.

But two games later three identical forehand crosscourt howitzers from Gonzalez left Federer gasping and the Chilean levelled at 4-4.

The set looked like heading for a tie-break until Federer produced two great defensive efforts as Gonzalez let fly to break the Chilean for a second time and take the set in 33 minutes.

That established Federer's grip on the game and there is no finer front-runner in the sport.

He raced into a 3-0 second set lead with another break of serve and looked comfortable holding on to that advantage forcing the explosive Gonzalez to take all the initiatives.

But brute force apart, the Chilean had little idea of how to unsettle the Federer calm and the second set slipped away 6-2 to the defending champion with the unforced errors mounting from Gonzalez.

It was more of the same in the third set although Gonzalez had a rare break point at 4-4 which he squandered going for a big inside-out forehand winner off a second serve.

He did manage to force a second tie-break, but Federer majestically pulled away from 1-2 to rattle off six points in a row finishing it off with an ace down the middle.

Daniel
06-30-2005, 01:18 AM
WIMBLEDON, England -- Roger Federer's bid for a Wimbledon hat-trick gathered momentum after a sound performance against Fernando Gonzalez earned him a place in the semifinals.

The Swiss ace completed an emphatic win in one hour and 50 minutes, sweeping aside the Chilean 7-5 6-2 7-6.

Federer, unbeaten in 34 matches on grass, will now face Australian Lleyton Hewitt who cruised past Feliciano Lopez of Spain 7-5 6-4 7-6.

"I'm very satisfied with my game today," said Federer. "If I can continue at this level I can beat any player."

The 24-year-old Gonzalez, with his big forehand and useful serve, was the only man to reach the last eight without dropping a set.

But every time he looked like getting a foothold in the match, Federer simply selected another weapon from his armoury.

"You sort of always have to weather the storm against him," Federer, who has played and beaten Gonzalez five times now, said. "He hits the ball with so much pace."

Federer broke the Chilean's serve early in the first set to make it 3-1 but Gonzalez took the break back immediately to make it 4-4.

The defending champion finally took the first set after a series of errors by Gonzalez handed him a break in the 12th game.

He then cruised through the second set allowing the Chilean to take only two games.

Gonzalez upped his game significantly to force a tiebreak in the third set but Federer made no mistakes clinching the tiebreak and the match 7-2.

SUKTUEN
06-30-2005, 03:06 AM
thanks

TenHound
06-30-2005, 04:49 AM
Who needs Champagne for celebration when you've got the British press...Everyone must go indulge themselves...I recommend this order...Guardian, Independent & finally Simon Barnes in the Times. (He doesn't know that Roger works to make his game beautiful, but other than that.) His article ends w/this"It was beautiful, but it just wasn’t fair. Poor González: beaten up in three rounds by the Mona Lisa." Enjoy...we earned this after suffering through the brutal ugliness of Thuggy does Clay, which seemed to never end.

Whistleway
06-30-2005, 03:38 PM
Good point, TenHound.

SUKTUEN
06-30-2005, 04:57 PM
thanks TenHound

Minnie
06-30-2005, 06:43 PM
Who needs Champagne for celebration when you've got the British press...Everyone must go indulge themselves...I recommend this order...Guardian, Independent & finally Simon Barnes in the Times. (He doesn't know that Roger works to make his game beautiful, but other than that.) His article ends w/this"It was beautiful, but it just wasn’t fair. Poor González: beaten up in three rounds by the Mona Lisa." Enjoy...we earned this after suffering through the brutal ugliness of Thuggy does Clay, which seemed to never end.


I've read this article (has it been posted?) and it just continues what is the British press's love affair with Roger Federer. Wimbledon has a love affair with him as well ... there is so much warmth towards him when he walks on the court, you can almost touch it! I was there yesterday and it was like the crowd were giving him one big warm smile! There was a very nice interview with him this afternoon with Sue Barker on BBC - seems Sue is also smitten judging by the looks she gave him!! :devil:

RogiNie
06-30-2005, 07:15 PM
Roger and Juliette: a Fairy Tale


©Getty/ C.Brunskill

Thursday, 30 June, 2005


In 2004 Roger Federer enjoyed one of the best seasons of any player in nearly two decades, winning 11 ATP titles as well as the Australian Open, Wimbledon and US Open - the first man since Mats Wilander in 1988 to win three Slams in a year. Along the way he became the first player in the Open era to win 13 consecutive finals, overtaking the record of 12 held by Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe.

At this year's Championships he is aiming for a rare hat-trick of Mens' Singles titles. In the post Second World War period, only Pete Sampras (1997-2000 and 1993-1995) and Bjorn Borg (1976-1980) have achieved this feat in consecutive years.

Since he won his first Wimbledon title in 2003, Federer has also gathered a plethora of awards to place on the mantelpiece alongside his tennis cups.

First there was the cow ...

The organisers of the Swiss Open presented Federer with a cow to celebrate his 2003 Wimbledon title when he turned up in Gstaad shortly after leaving Wimbledon. This win had made Federer the first Swiss man to win a Grand Slam title.

He named his new four-legged friend Juliette and early in 2004 she had a calf.

After Federer's successful defence of his Wimbledon crown in 2004, the bovine gift was not repeated at Gstaad. A spokesperson said at the time: "Juliette now has a calf and I don't think Roger will need another cow for the moment."

And then there were the other awards…

Now 23, Federer has recently been awarded the 2005 Laureus World Sports Award as sportsman of the year, beating Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong and Formula One world champion Michael Schumacher into top spot. Also this year he is an Ambassador for the United Nations' Year of Sport and Physical Education.

Federer was awarded the BBC Sports Personality Overseas Personality of the Year 2004, the International Tennis Writers Association (ITWA) Player of the Year and their Ambassador for Tennis award for his efforts to promote the sport. He was Reuters International Sportsman of the Year, a title awarded by 33 sports editors and journalists in over 20 countries.

The list goes on: Swiss Sportsman of the Year, ATP Player of the Year, ITF World Champion, European Sportsman of the Year, Sports Illustrated Tennis Player of the Year. He also carried the Swiss flag at the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games in Athens. Back in the mists of his first Wimbledon title 2003, Federer was named "Swiss of the Year" and Swiss Sportsman of the Year.

Now, Federer says his main ambition is to win the French Open, the sole Grand Slam title to elude him.

Far from sitting back and accepting the laurels, Federer is determined to 'give something back'. In 2003 he established the Roger Federer Foundation, which supports underprivileged youngsters in South Africa via its partnership with the South African/Swiss aid agency IMBEWU.

Federer's links with South Africa are strong, as the country is the birthplace of his mother Lynette - one reason why his English is so good. Earlier this year he visited children in the township of New Brighton, near Port Elizabeth. "My objective is to share the luck I have experienced and make my own contribution towards a better world," he said.

No wonder BBC host Sue Barker gushed after an interview this morning: "What a nice guy!"

Fedex
07-01-2005, 02:09 AM
What an expert - Cash should report for FOX news,they are looking for "experts" like him!


LMAO @ FOX News :lol: :haha:

TenHound
07-01-2005, 04:23 AM
Minnie, I didn't post any articles in toto 'cuz so many poured forth yesterday. Can you compare Roger's reception to that of past Champions? I was uncertain since they didn't even put him on Center Court yesterday.

Did everyone hear the wonderful Billie Jean King story? Roger went to a Charity Fundraiser last week - Elton John's perhaps. Billie Jean, w/her 20 Wimbledon titles, went up to him & said "Roger, I've never asked anyone this before, but could I please have my picture taken w/you?" She LOVES him. Is that too sweet!

By way of comparison to the American sports press, I higly recommend the San Francisco, Ca. paper - sfgate.com -> sports. Search on "Bruce Jenkins" to get the list of his articles from Wimby. You'll see how completely swept up in The Spectacle they are - power/violence & sex. The role of sports is to get that ole testosterone flowing in males. Beauty?? Serenity?? Huh, what's that? When does the Real Show begin. You don't even need to read the words in his columns - just as well, since they make little sense.

Ok, here are 2 paragraphs from yesterday to compare to the British press' treatment of the 1/4's:

<I>For pure shot making, Roddick will never be the equal of Federer -- nor will anyone else on the scene today. Federer was up against a mad, creative genius in Gonzalez, who had the crowd gasping over the breadth of his imagination.
...
Federer said later, "To take a swing at such a ball was a little weird. He just hits incredible shots all the time. He's different. Quite unique, I would say."

So you want unique? Federer is your man. On the match's signature shot, Federer came charging to the net on an apparently hopeless attempt to retrieve a Gonzalez drop shot. He not only got to the ball, just short of crashing into the net, he flicked an astounding cross-court winner with the forehand. Nobody else in tennis does it quite like that.</I>

Need I say more??

Mrs. B
07-01-2005, 10:28 AM
from timesonline.uk.co

Why I'm backing Federer to meet Roddick in the final reckoning
By Boris Becker

THERE is no game plan to beat Roger Federer — such a thing doesn’t exist. All Lleyton Hewitt can do today is have a plan for himself, for the way he wants to play, a clear and decisive approach and the desire to match it. He has never been found wanting in that direction.
Federer has not lost on a grass court for three years; when he loses a set there is an investigation, as if something has to be terribly wrong. Fernando González played as well as he could in the quarter-finals, he probably exceeded any expectation of how he would play, and he lost in straight sets. Why? Because Federer came up with shots the like of which I have not seen before (and I’ve seen a few) — shots you cannot practise. He made drop-shots from impossible positions, winners from nowhere, he made more “gets” that I have seen in my life.

When the players shook hands at the end, the look on González’s face spoke of sheer admiration. I can share in that. I spent time with Federer yesterday and to say he is the essence of calm and relaxation understates the mood of serenity in which he lives his life. He had enough time for everyone, a word for everyone; he not only has the potential to be the greatest player the sport has seen but he is its finest salesman as well. What more could tennis want? How much more will tennis get?

He knows he is the man to beat but he has to drop a level today and Hewitt has to be at his very best for the match to be competitive. For the sake of making it a match, I feel Hewitt has to strike first, if he loses the first set he may be made to run faster than ever to try to catch up.

I love his attitude, though. In his past two matches, he has been very aggressive, he has been speaking his mind on many things, he has a bee in his bonnet about the seeding at Wimbledon that moved him from a ranking of No 2 to a seeding of No 3 and exposed him to the prospect of playing Federer in the semis. He has a point, and when he is in his me-against-the-world mood, he can be frighteningly driven.

In the quarter-finals, Federer and Hewitt played people inexperienced at this level, who did not really believe in themselves, who made poor shot selections and when they had the chance, they failed to produce anything of conviction. Hewitt knows when the big moments are there, he has a knack of producing his best the tougher the circumstances; the question today is how he can respond if he gets an opportunity against Federer.

He has a better chance than last year, he believes in himself again, he is a better player than when he was No 1 in 2001. He is going to thrive on the challenge of taking on the No 1 of today and I expect a classic. Hewitt is not that tall, he doesn’t have the broadest of shoulders or the biggest serve, he does not have the most power off the ground, but when it comes to guts and heart, few have more.

I think I’d have found it easy to prepare to play Federer, because there are no guessing games, you do not need to have your mind clouded with strategies and tactics. The only thing that worries you is that you are playing a guy who is a natural, who has that 10 per cent extra than anyone else, a God-given difference that is hard to put your finger on. Few sportsmen are blessed the way Federer is blessed. I take him to win in five.

Andy Roddick remembers last year’s final, when he lost by a couple of points to Federer, and he has spent all year waiting for his revenge. It has been his calling. He doesn’t depend only on his big first serve any more, he is a more complete individual and player but I can tell you that in his heart of hearts he cannot forget what happened to him last year. I don’t think he can stop until he is back in the final again.

For that reason I think he will be too strong for Thomas Johansson, but he dare not underestimate the opposition. To win a grand-slam is special and the fact that Johansson has recovered after serious knee injuries, that he is in a semi-final and playing great tennis again, marks him out as special. He has the character to win on the biggest stage. That said, I am taking Roddick to win in four.

babsi
07-01-2005, 11:04 AM
Thank you,Eva :)

Boris can be smart - only not,for a substained period of time - or away from tennis :)

mitalidas
07-01-2005, 05:40 PM
Look at this!!!!

The Dubai-based right-hander is now closing rapidly on Bjorn Borg's record of 41 matches consecutive grasscourt wins

idiots.... :shout:
http://foxsports.news.com.au/story/0,8659,15796741-23216,00.html

Shabazza
07-01-2005, 05:50 PM
Look at this!!!!

The Dubai-based right-hander is now closing rapidly on Bjorn Borg's record of 41 matches consecutive grasscourt wins

idiots.... :shout:
http://foxsports.news.com.au/story/0,8659,15796741-23216,00.html
:rolleyes:

guinevere_79
07-01-2005, 05:58 PM
I've read this article (has it been posted?) and it just continues what is the British press's love affair with Roger Federer. Wimbledon has a love affair with him as well ... there is so much warmth towards him when he walks on the court, you can almost touch it! I was there yesterday and it was like the crowd were giving him one big warm smile! There was a very nice interview with him this afternoon with Sue Barker on BBC - seems Sue is also smitten judging by the looks she gave him!! :devil:

I think no other player on the planet gets more "oohs" and "aahs" from the audience in a match. There's always a point in a match that Roger plays, where you hear an audible gasp of awe, in disbelief at a seemingly impossible shot that Roger just hit.

SUKTUEN
07-01-2005, 06:52 PM
thanks

Skyward
07-01-2005, 07:20 PM
Q. He doesn't shout his usual "c'mons" when he plays against you. Do you think he has too much respect for you?

ROGER FEDERER: I think it's important to respect each other. Didn't have too much to cheer about today, so he's obviously not going to scream around after he holds his own serve, because that's a normal thing in tennis.

I think once if he's up two sets to love, he's going to be screaming enough in the future, so...

Have to enjoy this while he's not.

:lol: :lol:

Oh, Roger, what is normal for you is not normal for other players. Some of them http://www.easysmileys.com/other_lalala.gif on each and every point.

Mrs. B
07-01-2005, 07:49 PM
Look at this!!!!

The Dubai-based right-hander is now closing rapidly on Bjorn Borg's record of 41 matches consecutive grasscourt wins

idiots.... :shout:
http://foxsports.news.com.au/story/0,8659,15796741-23216,00.html

:lol: and another title from the same site:

http://foxsports.news.com.au/story/0,8659,15796745-23216,00.html

Swiss machine the complete player :rolleyes:

ToanNguyen
07-01-2005, 11:02 PM
An interesting article about Roger's play today.

All aboard Fed express Jul 1 2005


QUESTION: You go into a fight with a rifle, while the other guy has an AK47, an Uzi, a Colt 45, a rifle and a bazooka. Who'll come off worst?

Answer: the guy who gets to load his weapon first. But when you're talking about tennis, Roger Federer has the full array of firepower - he's probably got a magnum as well (and I'm not talking about the ice-cream).

He is sublimely gifted at every facet of the grass game - volley, passing shot, serve, ground strokes, forehand, backhand, smash, lob, and any combination of the above.

He's got all the weapons, as the commentators say - unless you're John Barret, in which case you state something more bleedin' obvious.

Federer can slow the game down, speed it up, throw in some unexpected top spin, serve-and-volley or grind out a baseline marathon.

The 23-year-old is entitled to be confident. "You have to be cocky on court, to believe you have a great serve or forehand," he said. "For me, the secret was to put it all together. I could hit all the shots but it was hard to know which one to use, to understand how to play simple, to win matches."

Television does Federer no favours. On screen, it's easy to spot space to plop a passing shot, or where to arc your lob when someone's storming to the net.

But Federer in the flesh is a phenomenon. He is part of a new generation of players whose rackets whistle every time they swipe it. If the balls had a lump of coal inside, it'd be crushed to a diamond by the end of the allotted six games.

So it was a surprise he even lost a set this year, to Nicolas Kiefer in the third round - and then only 7-5 in a tie-break. That won't trouble him, though. Play-ers tend to worry if everything goes smoothly in the early rounds - it gives them nothing to work on. (Maybe that explains why Tim Henman looks so blasé during his annual first week scare. He's got more to work on than most.)

Federer knows exactly which one weapon to use at any given time. Two years ago on Centre Court, I saw him cut Andy Roddick to pieces using every item in his arsenal. "I never had to fear the danger of losing - everything that year went so smoothly," he said.

And of last year's US Open victory over Lleyton Hewitt he said: "That was the best match of my life. He could not return my serve. And as soon as I had a forehand, I knew the point was over."

If he wins this year, he will join a list of only three others who have won three times in a row - Fred Perry, Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras. And he's won his last 20 consecutive finals.

But how does he rank against the only other player with the same on-court artistry? John McEnroe for me was the greater player - I don't mean better; but greater. It's a quality that can't be measured in the "unforced errors" or the "forehand winners" column. McEnroe had the ability to produce something of unimaginable artistry at a time of blandness - a drop-shot to end a baseline rally or a stretch-volley that makes you wonder how it went over the net at all, let alone won the point. He destroyed Jimmy Connors in the 1983 in one of the most faultless performances in tennis history.

Grass requires the greatest range of skills, and McEnroe used them all, even against big servers like Roscoe Tanner and Goran Ivanisevic.

But the thought of McEnroe brings me to Federer's greatest strength - his temperament.

He is never going to lose the plot, fling his racket or question the umpire's parentage.

Sue Barker might have managed to get him to blub after he won last year, but most of the time his inter-views are safe to the point of tedium. Even when he was given a cow by his country to mark his first All England win, he managed to milk it, so as to speak.

Federer is capable of much greater feats on the court than McEnroe, because he would never have said, as the American did: "I was like a compulsive gambler, or an alcoholic. Anger became a powerful habit."

But nor could you imagine him making a joke in his last final - McEnroe's was against his brother, in Chicago, in 1993. At match point a phone rang. "Dad," the New Yorker shouted to his father in the stand. "It's Mum on the phone."

Nor would he even think as McEnroe said once of Cyclops. "I don't want to be paranoid, but that machine knows who I am."

Federer may also not be lucky enough to have an opponent as good, and as different, as five-times winner and iceberg Bjorn Borg was to McEnroe.

Instead, the stuff the Swiss star says is just scary, like: "There are still some improvements to be made. But I have a very good physical base now. And mentally, I have improved a lot. If those aspects come together, things would be not too bad for me."

Federer's greatest enemy now may not be his opponents, but himself. Can he stay as hungry? Only he knows whether he wants to carry on breaking records and adding noughts to his bank balance.

He has had a poor year - that meant three defeats in six months, one in the Australian Open semi and one in the French Open semi, on his worst surface. He has been unbeaten in 34 games on grass.

On Wednesday, he dismantled Fernando Gonzales - the only quarter-finalist not to have dropped a set --7-5, 6-2, 7-6 (7-2) in clinical fashion in a mere one hour and 50 minutes. "I don't want to be called the greatest ever," he said. "My career is not over. With only four Grand Slams, you are in no man's land."

You go into a fight with Federer? Your best weapon is a white flag.

Stevens Point
07-02-2005, 01:57 AM
Thanks for posting articles, people!!

Has anyone posted this whole interview yet??

R. Federer - Day 11
Friday, July 1, 2005

Q. Lleyton just said that you're a pretty bloody good player at the moment, doesn't know what aspects of your game he feels you've got to work on. When you're playing on grass, is there anything you think you can improve on at the moment?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, definitely I think I can come more to the net, but it's not so easy. You try it out sometimes, and every time you get passed, it's not really helping out your confidence very much. And especially against Lleyton, he's one of the greatest returners and passers in the game we have right now.

Yeah, that's something I would like to do more, but it's not easy.

Q. John McEnroe said on commentary you would make the game a lot easier if you did that more. Was that a specific plan today to stay back on your first serve?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I was planning on doing that, yeah, so... Rather come in on the second shot and be aggressive with that. Who knows, maybe next match I'll play a little different.

Q. It was pointed out that you've won 35 matches in a row on grass. You felt whether you felt unbeatable on the surface. Were you serious about that?

ROGER FEDERER: I never feel unbeatable. There's too many players out there. It's a new day. You have to feel great. It starts from zero, like a soccer match basically. You never want to fall behind too much because it's tough to come back.

You know, today I was happy the way I started. The next match obviously is huge for me. I'm very satisfied, very proud to be in my third consecutive Wimbledon final. That really means very much to me. I hope I can seize the opportunity.

Q. You seem calm. Do you get nervous, uptight before the match, during the match?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I was a little tense before the match because I didn't quite know how Lleyton's going to play me this time. I've always got the feeling he's got options to change up his game. Yeah, I didn't serve well in the beginning, and I think that was clear. He took advantage of that. That was definitely because I knew I'm playing another great player.

So I definitely felt the tensions, you know. I'm happy they still do come up, you know, because if they don't, I'm in the wrong sport.

Q. You get so many superlatives thrown at you like you're super human. How do you react to that sort of thing?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I don't hear the commentary, you know, when I'm playing. I don't read the papers either these weeks because I'm in an apartment and usually I only see the papers when I'm in hotels. I haven't heard or seen anything.

But I've gotten many, many nice things said about me and my game and everything. Definitely appreciate that. They're very much easier to handle because of the success I had, whereas in the beginning I thought it was quite difficult to get all the praises. By then I still hadn't achieved nothing. Now it suits me better.

Q. You've won eight in a row now against Hewitt. What is it in your game and his game that gives you such an advantage?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I have the feeling, you know, I can always hang with him. I always have the feeling if I'm good from the baseline, I'll get a chance also to break him. You know, it seems like he's having a hard time to break my own serve, which always keeps me level with him. Eventually I think with the variation in my game, you know, I get the errors out of him, too.

I got the power when I need it. I think that sort of made the difference over the last few matches.

Q. Do you think you have a psychological hold over him now?

ROGER FEDERER: I think it's obvious. It's not so easy to play somebody who you've lost to so many times, especially in a row. That definitely helps me in a way. But I also have to watch out, you know, that I don't be fooled by that either, where I just take it too easy.

Q. Do you think he's intimidated by you?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not really. I think he knew he had a chance today. You know, I'm surprised it's straight sets because I expected four or five. Just hoped it wasn't going to be three for him.

Q. He doesn't shout his usual "c'mons" when he plays against you. Do you think he has too much respect for you?

ROGER FEDERER: I think it's important to respect each other. Didn't have too much to cheer about today, so he's obviously not going to scream around after he holds his own serve, because that's a normal thing in tennis.

I think once if he's up two sets to love, he's going to be screaming enough in the future, so...

Have to enjoy this while he's not.

Q. It's usual that what would be so‑called the big match might be the second match on in the day. Were you a little surprised to be first up today? Given the circumstances, how much of an advantage is that for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Now that it rains, I think it's definitely an advantage. Gives me more time to relax in between, where I thought, what was it, the Ferrero match, I finished late and then I had to back it up with González quite early in the day. I actually didn't have that much time to recuperate.

I was expecting to play first because of Australian time and American time for Roddick ‑ they want him as late as possible. I actually expected 1:00.

Q. When do you remember the last time you broke a racquet because you were nervous?

ROGER FEDERER: Because I was nervous?

Q. Yes.

ROGER FEDERER: When I'm upset I break a racquet, not when I'm nervous. I don't know if the racquet broke in Miami against Nadal. I think it didn't. Good technique on my throwing racquets. I'm also pretty good at that. I still have the touch, which I'm happy about.

Yeah, I don't remember. Been a while.

Q. When you were a junior, you were quite nervous when you were playing. You were screaming a lot. I remember once in Florence I think you broke a racquet. You won the tournament afterwards. When did everything change?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, there's a few moments. I've had many, many people telling me to finally relax and concentrate on the game and not always commentate every point, which I just couldn't do. Because I was ‑‑ I just love the game too much, I guess, and I thought I needed it to get it out. And eventually, you know, there was a moment where I told myself, "Now it's time to change."

Slowly I actually changed my attitude a little bit because I had the feeling I was wasting way too much energy on getting upset. But it didn't happen from the day I decided. It took me about another year or so to actually get the fire back because I was getting too quiet, too calm.

It was tough times in a way because at times I didn't enjoy playing tennis so much. But I'm happy the fire came back in time.

Q. Are the emotions any different getting back to a Wimbledon final for the third time? Is it different from the first or second? Is it just as pleasurable any time you do it?

ROGER FEDERER: I thought the first one was the best one against Andy. There was a big hype before that match. He was sort of the favorite, which I was surprised to hear about because I had a good record against him. But I really thought I played a terrific match against him. Some (indiscernible) shots in that match. When I came through, I was so pleased. Obviously, it was my first Wimbledon finals.

But still I'm still now excited about this one, even though already an hour has passed. So, yeah, this tournament really means a lot to me.

Q. Is there a reason for your breakthrough over Hewitt? He was winning pretty well before, then there was the Davis Cup match, then you've run ever since. Is there a reason mentally or physically that you can put your finger on for why that happened or is just an accumulation of good play?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think I've improved so much physically and mentally in the last, let's say, three years or so, it really started to play off. In the beginning, I couldn't hang with him physically, but also mentally. I think that definitely has changed around for me. Quite simple.

Q. It's been a month now. Your loss against Nadal at the French Open was pretty much mind‑boggling. I was thinking about it one day. Besides the obvious, him getting to all the balls, the lefty spins, did you come up with any answer for that loss, thinking about that match?

ROGER FEDERER: It's not needed, no answer, you know. I haven't played him since. I didn't have to answer his call, you know. I got over it, you know. It was my best showing at the French, so I was happy about that. But wasn't happy with my performance. You know, it was an average performance. That's just not good enough against a player like him.

But still thought I was actually closer than everybody was saying. I wasn't happy to hear that everybody said my forehand broke down. I had a game plan, and I thought it was in place and it was the correct one. I believed in it and I followed it.

I played against the darkness also in the end which was also sort of tough for me mentally, I thought. I was disappointed after. But somehow I was so happy that the grass court season was coming around that, I don't know, it was all right (smiling).

Q. Do you believe this is your best performance, this Wimbledon so far? If so, why?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's hard to say. The matches against Lleyton are always different, you know, because of the tensions, because of No. 1, No. 2 in the world, because of all the matches we've played over the years. It's hard for me to judge, you know. I don't know if I played really great or if I played good. For me, it's hard. I just played I think right and good at the right moments.

Yeah, I'm happy to be through, you know, in three because in the end it was getting tough. I had Love‑30 games a few times. I could have even broke earlier I think in the third set. I'm just really relieved and happy the way I coped with it today because prior to the match, like I said, you know, I definitely was tense.

To say whether it was the best or not, I don't know. This performance is definitely good enough to win Wimbledon, that's for sure.

Q. What do you think of Mr. Johansson's chances and how can he beat you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, he has to win first against Roddick.

Q. Do you have any tactics?

ROGER FEDERER: I have a good record against him. I have to remember what I did well then.

Q. So what was that?

ROGER FEDERER: Play good forehands and serve well. Hit my dropshot every second shot. Chip and charge, serve and volley.

Q. I don't have any information about Juliette.

ROGER FEDERER: Me either.

Q. Why? Is your own animal. You don't have information about her? You deserting her?

ROGER FEDERER: You're the media guy. You have to find out.

Q. I'm not the media guy. I'm a novelist.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I can't give you any updates. I'm really sorry.

Q. You never take her to try with the Wimbledon grass, if she likes?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not really.

Q. What a pity.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah (smiling).

RogiFan88
07-02-2005, 02:58 AM
July 02, 2005
Cool Federer has greatness in his sights
By Neil Harman, Tennis Correspondent

Swiss ease: Federer celebrates his straight-sets victory over Hewitt yesterday to reach a third successive Wimbledon final (ANJA NIEDRINGHAUS/AP)

THE first time it was all a bit overwhelming, the second time he felt stabs of anxiety. But yesterday, on the Centre Court where he is as cosy as any of the greats of grass-court endeavour, Roger Federer reached his third consecutive Wimbledon men’s singles final in the manner of a skip down the street.
That is meant as absolutely no disrespect to Lleyton Hewitt, for the second-best player in the world played as well as the second-best player in the world could be expected to, and yet Federer won 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 and did not appear to have broken sweat. Had Hewitt been able to extend himself, Federer would merely have extended himself that bit more, such is the understated genius of the 23-year-old from Basle.

The gods, the schedulers, all are on his side. More often than not, the match that is considered the more exciting of the two men’s semi-finals is played second, for highly valued BBC teatime consumption — it was also supposed to have happened that way when Maria Sharapova’s match against Venus Williams was originally scheduled second on Thursday, until almost a full day’s rain forced the referee to move the other semi-final to No 1 Court.

Yesterday, Federer against Hewitt was played first so that Australia might see a bit of their boy before they retired to bed. And a bit was what they got.

The match was over in a little more than two hours and Andy Roddick and Thomas Johansson managed to play 11 games in 33 minutes before the drizzle became too hazardous to continue. At 7.17pm, three hours after they had trudged off court, play was abandoned for the day.

Federer does not need any such helping hands. He can do this on his own, without any favours, thanks anyway. Sleep last night will have come to him as easily as it always does, while Roddick, especially, may have spent less time on his computer playing online poker to all hours and rather more time working out how he might shake off Johansson upon today’s resumption.

There were opportunities aplenty in the first set. Johansson’s first service game was a case in point. He sent down four aces and, on the one break point of the match so far, came up with a service winner. In two further games, the No 12 seed from Sweden slapped forehands into the net to trail 30-0, only to find something extra to extricate himself from the trouble he had caused. Roddick led 6-5, on serve, when the groundstaff came hurtling on and the players disappeared.

There was no need for Federer to hurtle at all. A look at his record compared to Hewitt’s and there was not much to choose between them: they are No 1 and No 2 in the Indesit ATP rankings, Federer led in titles 29 to 24, his record at Wimbledon was 23-4 to Hewitt’s 21-5, their grass-court record this year was 10-0 and 8-1 and their entire career match record read Federer 370-122, Hewitt 393-116.

The statistic most devoured, though, was the one that gave Federer a 9-8 head-to-head advantage and, since their meeting in the quarter-finals at Wimbledon last year, the Swiss had not dropped a set to Hewitt in four matches, including the US Open final last year that he won 6-0, 7-6, 6-0.

That was the imposing standard that Hewitt somehow had to confront. And so, when he dropped his first service game, the portents were hardly encouraging. Hewitt, to his credit, broke straight back, so perhaps Federer was churning up a little underneath the flicks of his hair away from his bandanna that suggested a studied nonchalance.

Hewitt, the 2002 champion, knew at the end of the first set, when he had contrived a first-serve percentage of 37, that he had to step it up, that he could not keep offering Federer second-serve dollies on which to feed with his usual frenzy. His consistency improved, but he was having trouble with the basics as five backhand errors in the fifth game gave Federer the chance for a break that he tucked happily into his pocket.

Hewitt’s resolve stiffened in the third set. He was almost falling over himself to stay in the rallies, scurrying for all his worth, and he had a real chance at 6-5 when Federer wobbled seriously for the first time.

At 0-30, Hewitt could not have wished a second serve to bounce more welcomingly into his backhand hitting zone, but he knocked it too deep. Federer, reprieved, served two aces and you could see the blood drain from Hewitt’s face. The tie-break and the match were gone with one tame netted backhand and a double fault that put the Australian 4-1 down.

“The next match is huge for me,” Federer said. “I’m satisfied, very proud, to be in my third consecutive Wimbledon final. That really means very much to me. I hope I can seize the opportunity. Today’s performance was definitely good enough to win Wimbledon, that’s for sure.

“I’ve had many nice things said about my game and I appreciate that. At the start of my career it was difficult to get the praise, now it suits me better.” He deserves every bouquet.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2641-1677941_2,00.html

July 02, 2005
Federer still serving up slices of perfection
By Simon Barnes, Chief Sports Writer

ROGER FEDERER has done one of the most amazing things in sport: he has enlarged the vocabulary of the Centre Court crowd. If you ever wanted proof of his quite extraordinary talent, this is it, for they had to expand their vocabulary to encompass his excellence.
They had plenty of chance to practise these new sounds yesterday as the Swiss moved into the Wimbledon final for the third year in a row, defeating Lleyton Hewitt 6-3, 6-4, 7-6. Hewitt played very well, please understand that. Very well indeed. Now ask what that says about Federer.

The Centre Court is famous for its oooh! and aaah! in the middle of long rallies. Then, apart from the clapping and the “C’mon Tim!”, there is the silly titter when a line judge dodges a hot serve and the groan that greets a double fault. There is the roar that acclaims a great point. There is also the quality of silence, deafening before the serve on championship point.

It doesn’t sound much, I know, but it really does add up to one of the most thrillingly volatile arenas in sport. Now Federer has expanded its range. He has caused Centre Court to add two new sounds to its repertoire.

The first is a gasp of astonishment, an exhalation of complete wonder and disbelief. It means, basically, I am not seeing that. We heard it as Federer made the decisive break in the first set with a skimmed slice shot that hung in the air, heedless of gravity, cleared the net by a micron or two, hit the grass and died. No one else in tennis could have made that shot. No one else in tennis would have thought of trying.

A word on the Federer slice while we are here. For most players — normal players — the slice, undercut and backspinning, is used tactically, for defence, for control, for manoeuvring your opponent or for exasperating him. Young Andy Murray uses it very well in the traditional way. Federer is more or less alone in using the slice, on either wing, as a means of hitting clean winners.

The second Federer-specific Centre Court sound is a sigh of satisfaction, almost of repletion. It is close to being an aesthetic judgment, an acknowledgement of the final, perfect shot that completes the construction of a perfect point and does so with profoundly pleasing inevitability; the sort of sound you make to yourself after a movement of the Goldberg Variations: yes, yes, how perfectly perfect.

And that sound was heard more and more as Federer played his perfect tennis and made Hewitt, a Wimbledon winner, resemble a tyro. “I feel like I’m the second-best player going around right now,” he said as he contemplated defeat. “It’s just that the best player going around is pretty bloody good.”

No error. Hewitt has been grousing all fortnight that he should have been seeded No 2, rather than No 3. Now we know why — he’d sooner lose to Federer in the final than the semi-finals. Those, after all, are the only options available to him. Federer has now beaten him eight times in a row. As for the defending champion, he has no complaints. He is happy to take them in any order they come.

Well, what can you do about an opponent who plays a top-spin drive winner off a full-blooded smash? I was reminded of Butch Cassidy, who says to Sundance: “I coudn’t do that. Could you do that? How can they do that?” A pause. “Who are those guys?”

Who is this guy? No one knows. He resists characterisation, he has a million different ways of playing tennis. Sometimes he will be Smokin’ Joe and do the toe-to-toe, blow-for-blow stuff. Then he will turn into Shane Warne, spin a web and tie you up in it. Then he will suddenly turn into Mephistopheles and lead you, tempt you, inch by inch, into error. It is glorious to watch, glorious to contribute to the Centre Court sounds, for, though clapping is frowned on in press boxes, gasping and sighing are acceptable and, for that matter, unavoidable.

But despite Federer’s habit of the miraculous, the Centre Court have not really taken him to heart. And that’s a good sign, believe me. They never took Pete Sampras to heart until the end, when there were signs of fallibility, and they didn’t care for Martina Navratilova until she was past her own Himalayan peak.

The Centre Court prefers drama to excellence, giant-killers to giants, five-set wobbles to three-set certainty. For Federer, they have admiration rather than affection. It is possible that Centre Court will not warm to Federer for half a dozen years. If so, what a legend we will have been part of.

But let us not get ahead of ourselves. Federer has a final to play tomorrow, so let us try to help his opponent by pointing out his weaknesses. I have watched Federer a great deal in this tournament, lucky me, and I have come up with a conclusion. It’s that ball-bounce before he serves. It’s pretty bloody ordinary, if you ask me.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2641-1677505,00.html

RogiFan88
07-02-2005, 03:00 AM
Friday, July 01, 2005
Boris: why I'm backing Federer
There is no game plan to beat Roger Federer — such a thing doesn’t exist, writes Boris Becker. All Lleyton Hewitt can do today is have a plan for himself, for the way he wants to play, a clear and decisive approach and the desire to match it. He has never been found wanting in that direction.

Federer has not lost on a grass court for three years; when he loses a set there is an investigation, as if something has to be terribly wrong. Fernando González played as well as he could in the quarter-finals, he probably exceeded any expectation of how he would play, and he lost in straight sets. Why? Because Federer came up with shots the like of which I have not seen before (and I’ve seen a few) — shots you cannot practise. He made drop-shots from impossible positions, winners from nowhere, he made more “gets” that I have seen in my life.

When the players shook hands at the end, the look on González’s face spoke of sheer admiration. I can share in that. I spent time with Federer yesterday and to say he is the essence of calm and relaxation understates the mood of serenity in which he lives his life. He had enough time for everyone, a word for everyone; he not only has the potential to be the greatest player the sport has seen but he is its finest salesman as well. What more could tennis want? How much more will tennis get?

He knows he is the man to beat but he has to drop a level today and Hewitt has to be at his very best for the match to be competitive. For the sake of making it a match, I feel Hewitt has to strike first, if he loses the first set he may be made to run faster than ever to try to catch up.

I love his attitude, though. In his past two matches, he has been very aggressive, he has been speaking his mind on many things, he has a bee in his bonnet about the seeding at Wimbledon that moved him from a ranking of No 2 to a seeding of No 3 and exposed him to the prospect of playing Federer in the semis. He has a point, and when he is in his me-against-the-world mood, he can be frighteningly driven.

In the quarter-finals, Federer and Hewitt played people inexperienced at this level, who did not really believe in themselves, who made poor shot selections and when they had the chance, they failed to produce anything of conviction. Hewitt knows when the big moments are there, he has a knack of producing his best the tougher the circumstances; the question today is how he can respond if he gets an opportunity against Federer.

He has a better chance than last year, he believes in himself again, he is a better player than when he was No 1 in 2001. He is going to thrive on the challenge of taking on the No 1 of today and I expect a classic. Hewitt is not that tall, he doesn’t have the broadest of shoulders or the biggest serve, he does not have the most power off the ground, but when it comes to guts and heart, few have more.

I think I’d have found it easy to prepare to play Federer, because there are no guessing games, you do not need to have your mind clouded with strategies and tactics. The only thing that worries you is that you are playing a guy who is a natural, who has that 10 per cent extra than anyone else, a God-given difference that is hard to put your finger on. Few sportsmen are blessed the way Federer is blessed. I take him to win in five.

Andy Roddick remembers last year’s final, when he lost by a couple of points to Federer, and he has spent all year waiting for his revenge. It has been his calling. He doesn’t depend only on his big first serve any more, he is a more complete individual and player but I can tell you that in his heart of hearts he cannot forget what happened to him last year. I don’t think he can stop until he is back in the final again.

For that reason I think he will be too strong for Thomas Johansson, but he dare not underestimate the opposition. To win a grand-slam is special and the fact that Johansson has recovered after serious knee injuries, that he is in a semi-final and playing great tennis again, marks him out as special. He has the character to win on the biggest stage. That said, I am taking Roddick to win in four.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/

Perfect Federer drives Hewitt to distraction
By Sue Mott
(Filed: 02/07/2005)

Perfection comes in only a very few guises. Cold sauvignon on a warm day, warm shiraz on a cold day, Belgian chocolate truffles and now Roger Federer on grass. This is the heyday of the great Swiss master, a tennis player so supreme that he made reaching his third successive Wimbledon final look like a matter for minimum disturbance.

His opponent, Lleyton Hewitt, in contrast, was disturbed to the maximum. His cross face was all screwed up in concentration, as though eating a mouthful of chillies. This applied to both winning points and losing them. He did the latter a little more. He pumped his fists, bashed his thighs and smacked his shoes but nothing short of a nuclear detonation was going to make much difference to the serenity of the man on the other side of the net.

Hewitt is the second best player in the world. But as he so rightly noticed: "It's just that the best player going around is so b***** good."

Where do you begin to discuss Federer's ethereal superiority? Watching him is almost a religious experience. You have to reorder the universe to accommodate the impossible nature of his talent. Never mind the name Roger, maybe Federer's parents would have been nearer the mark if they had christened him Gabriel. Didn't they notice the wings?

There was that shot in the first set, eighth game, when Hewitt was beginning to crack on his service game and to achieve break point Federer played a cross-court winner, so feather-light, so audacious, it was scarcely a shot at all. It was a brushstroke in pastel, unlike the primary red on poor Hewitt's face.

The Wimbledon champion, unbeaten in 35 games on grass, claims he was a "little tense" walking out for the match. That's it. That is the extent of Federer's sporting panic. After the match, which he won 6-3, 6-4, 7-6, he was asked when he last smashed a racket in fury. He couldn't remember. He knew he had been upset against Rafael Nadal in Miami, when he was extended to five sets by the Spanish teenager, but the racket didn't break. "Good technique on my throwing rackets. I'm also pretty good at that," he said with a sweetly satirical smile.

Occasionally, he gave vent to a cry of frustration. It was like hearing a monk yell dissent during vespers. Not wrong in itself, but shocking in its unexpectedness. As for Hewitt, he was making noises like the squeaky hinge on an oak barn door. A noise that told of unremitting effort, terrible strain and furious resistance. This was the man who broke a rib falling down the stairs at his new house earlier this year. He seemed to risk popping his entire rib cage every time he returned Federer's serve.

The level of the Australian's striving could not be doubted. He even upped his game a notch to make his last stand in the third set. Leading three games to two, Hewitt hauled himself to 0-30 on Federer's serve and the cathedral surroundings of the Centre Court echoed to the hurrahs for the underdog.

He had, as the Americans put it, emptied the bucket. But it hadn't been easy. In fact, just to achieve that mini-milestone he had ridden into the bullets and mortar fire of Federer's groundstrokes like Tom Cruise against the imperial Japanese army in The Last Samurai. Neither was quite mortally wounded. But, put it this way, the other side won.

Dear old Hewitt. "It's definitely a challenge," he said, putting as mildly as he could the scale of the battle he faces every time he meets Federer in combat. It was put to him: "If people lost to Federer eight times in a row, they might be a lot more disconsolate than you are right now." It was intended as a compliment but was not taken as one. "I don't know," growled Hewitt. "That's probably why I'm sitting here and you're sitting there."

The champion, meanwhile, is sitting pretty with a berth in the final while rain prevented Andy Roddick and Thomas Johansson from completing the other semi-final in good time. Perhaps the winner is irrelevant. Perhaps they could agree to share the doubles court against the world No 1. Either way, you feel the trophy engravers are already practising their Fs.

Federer is something else. Something special. Someone to follow in the hallowed footsteps of Fred Perry, Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras by winning Wimbledon three times in a row. Surely British tennis can market this. It is a social tragedy that our youngsters are far more likely to be accruing Asbos than backhands and yet here is tennis offering them violence, cruelty, beauty, rage, range, speed and firepower. This need not be a nice game for all Wimbledon's rambling roses.

And if today's child is interested only in the bottom line, it should surely permeate little brains that Federer has accumulated his £10 million prize money far sooner than it would take selling hot DVDs off the back of a lorry.

Federer is the real deal. Sweet and savage simultaneously. He could lose his crown tomorrow - any beast in a two-horse race can lose - but you still wouldn't want to bet against the man who can unload 125mph aces when rare danger threatens. "This performance is definitely good enough to win Wimbledon, that's for sure," he said. Ominously.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/

Dominant Federer's giant leap
By Mark Hodgkinson
(Filed: 02/07/2005)

Roger Federer reached the Wimbledon final yesterday, so moving to within one victory of winning three successive titles at the All England Club, after producing a near-faultless performance of grace, flair and controlled aggression to defeat Lleyton Hewitt in straight sets.

Federer, the leading talent of his generation and a man apart on the Centre Court grass, could hardly have hoped for a more one-sided semi-final against Hewitt, the Australian third seed and 2002 champion. He will rarely have played a finer match at these Championships, beating Hewitt 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (7-4).

Walking in the air: Roger Federer fires home another winner
The Swiss is attempting to join Sweden's Bjorn Borg and American Pete Sampras as the only men in the Open era to win Wimbledon three years in a row. "The next match is going to be huge for me. I'm very satisfied and very proud to be in my third consecutive final. That really means a lot to me, and I hope that I can take the opportunity," he said.

The strong likelihood is that Federer will play Andy Roddick, the American second seed and last year's beaten finalist, in tomorrow's final. Roddick was leading Sweden's Thomas Johansson 6-5 on serve in the first set of the second semi-final when rain forced its abandonment for the day.

Roddick and Johansson will resume at noon on Centre Court, meaning that Federer will have an extra day of rest before the final (as if he needed any more help). "Now that it is raining it is definitely an advantage for me," said Federer, who is unbeaten on grass in 35 matches and has won his last 20 finals.

Hewitt was noticeably subdued against Federer. He is usually so animated on court, with cries of "C'mon" and wild pumps of the fist after almost every winner, but only rarely did he make much noise, or look like his normal self as he neared his eighth defeat against Federer in succession. Federer can do that to the world's leading players, take away all their edge.

"He obviously didn't have too much to cheer about," Federer said. "He is obviously not going to scream and shout after he holds his own serve, because that's a normal thing in tennis. I think maybe if he is beating me in the future that he will be screaming enough. So for now I will just enjoy it while he is not."

The Swiss believes that he has a psychological hold over Hewitt. "It's not so easy to play somebody who you've lost to so many times, especially in a row. That definitely helps me in a way. But I also have to watch out as I don't want to be fooled by what has gone on before and then take it too easy," he said.

Federer, who had lost in the semi-finals of the previous two grand slam events this season, was broken just once during the match. And Hewitt conceded afterwards that the biggest opportunity he had in the third set was when he had Federer at 0-30 as the Swiss served to take it into a tie-break. But Federer held his serve and then his nerve in the tie-break. "I can't believe that I did it so smoothly and in straight sets," he said.

Roddick won the opening set of last year's final, hitting his serve and forehand with a sustained ferocity that had probably never been seen before at the All England Club, but the match was then interrupted by rain during the second set. Federer regrouped and won in four sets. "I threw the kitchen sink at him and he went to the bathroom and fetched the tub," Roddick so famously remarked afterwards.

If Johansson defeats Roddick, which would register as a major surprise, it would be the first grand slam final that he has reached since winning the Australian Open three years ago. Johansson was making his first appearance in the semi-finals at the All England Club, having never previously gone beyond the fourth round here.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/

RogiFan88
07-02-2005, 03:09 AM
Hewitt still grinding away at a champion made from granite
By Brian Viner at Wimbledon
Published: 02 July 2005
Hewitt still grinding away at a champion made from granite The superlatives rippled around Centre Court like a Mexican Wave. Might Roger Federer be the finest player ever? Was the first point of the fifth game of the third set the greatest of the championships so far? Are people whose mobile phones play Scott Joplin's "The Entertainer" during a Wimbledon semi-final the biggest pains in the backside on earth?

The answers, from where I was sitting, were possibly, probably and definitely. Federer is not himself much of an entertainer, at least in the sense that there are no exciting tantrums, no banter with the crowd, no hilarious press conferences, but by heavens he plays scintillating tennis.

He has now won his last 35 matches on grass, drawing ever closer to the all-comers' record of 41, established by one Bjorn Borg. And he is reminiscent of Borg in other ways, too, having overcome a volatile temperament to exude a Zen-like calm on court. He also has Borg's athleticism, seeming to defy gravity in retrieving several of Lleyton Hewitt's overheads.

But the most important commodity he has is time. Like the greatest batsmen, he appears to make a split-second last longer, an invaluable asset when the ball is travelling towards him at up to 140mph. Not only did he miraculously reach some neatly executed Hewitt drop-shots, he somehow found the time to decide how to return them.

Hewitt did not play badly. He missed too many first serves, but hit some wonderful groundstrokes and covered the court like a panther. Yet nor, in truth, did the champion play quite as well as he can. He too struggled with his first serve, and his forehand went missing for a period in the first set, which was like Michelangelo losing his sense of perspective. He also mistimed a number of backhands, which was like Einstein struggling to find the square root of 16. But both came dramatically good when he needed them.

Indeed, it was a measure of Federer's dominance that when Hewitt led 6-5 and 0-30 in the third set, everyone still knew that it would be easier for the No 3 seed to break into the vaults of the Bank of England than back into the match. It is his misfortune, and Andy Roddick's, to be a wonderful player in the age of Federer. They should meet up with Ernie Els and Phil Mickelson, who have the same problem with Tiger Woods.

"You've just got to bide your time, keep grinding away," said Hewitt in his post-match interview. Neither Sir David Frost nor Michael Parkinson, both of whom were in the royal box yesterday, would have got much more out of him. One hapless hack asked him how he manages to stay positive, having now been beaten by Federer eight times in a row. "I don't know; that's probably why I'm sitting here and you're sitting there," he said, gnomically.

Federer, predictably, was a little more cheerful. "I'm surprised it was straight sets because I thought it would be four or five, he said. He was the only one who did, and if the 23-year-old has not, by tomorrow evening, joined Borg, Fred Perry and Pete Sampras in winning the men's singles title three or more times consecutively here, then it will count, as the time-honoured cliché goes, as the shock of the championships so far.

Hewitt still grinding away at a champion made from granite
The superlatives rippled around Centre Court like a Mexican Wave. Might Roger Federer be the finest player ever? Was the first point of the fifth game of the third set the greatest of the championships so far? Are people whose mobile phones play Scott Joplin's "The Entertainer" during a Wimbledon semi-final the biggest pains in the backside on earth?

The answers, from where I was sitting, were possibly, probably and definitely. Federer is not himself much of an entertainer, at least in the sense that there are no exciting tantrums, no banter with the crowd, no hilarious press conferences, but by heavens he plays scintillating tennis.

He has now won his last 35 matches on grass, drawing ever closer to the all-comers' record of 41, established by one Bjorn Borg. And he is reminiscent of Borg in other ways, too, having overcome a volatile temperament to exude a Zen-like calm on court. He also has Borg's athleticism, seeming to defy gravity in retrieving several of Lleyton Hewitt's overheads.

But the most important commodity he has is time. Like the greatest batsmen, he appears to make a split-second last longer, an invaluable asset when the ball is travelling towards him at up to 140mph. Not only did he miraculously reach some neatly executed Hewitt drop-shots, he somehow found the time to decide how to return them.

Hewitt did not play badly. He missed too many first serves, but hit some wonderful groundstrokes and covered the court like a panther. Yet nor, in truth, did the champion play quite as well as he can. He too struggled with his first serve, and his forehand went missing for a period in the first set, which was like Michelangelo losing his sense of perspective. He also mistimed a number of backhands, which was like Einstein struggling to find the square root of 16. But both came dramatically good when he needed them.

Indeed, it was a measure of Federer's dominance that when Hewitt led 6-5 and 0-30 in the third set, everyone still knew that it would be easier for the No 3 seed to break into the vaults of the Bank of England than back into the match. It is his misfortune, and Andy Roddick's, to be a wonderful player in the age of Federer. They should meet up with Ernie Els and Phil Mickelson, who have the same problem with Tiger Woods.

"You've just got to bide your time, keep grinding away," said Hewitt in his post-match interview. Neither Sir David Frost nor Michael Parkinson, both of whom were in the royal box yesterday, would have got much more out of him. One hapless hack asked him how he manages to stay positive, having now been beaten by Federer eight times in a row. "I don't know; that's probably why I'm sitting here and you're sitting there," he said, gnomically.

Federer, predictably, was a little more cheerful. "I'm surprised it was straight sets because I thought it would be four or five, he said. He was the only one who did, and if the 23-year-old has not, by tomorrow evening, joined Borg, Fred Perry and Pete Sampras in winning the men's singles title three or more times consecutively here, then it will count, as the time-honoured cliché goes, as the shock of the championships so far.
http://sport.independent.co.uk/tennis/

RogiFan88
07-02-2005, 03:09 AM
English summer provides only dark clouds for sublime Federer
by John Roberts at Wimbledon
Published: 02 July 2005
Those assuming that Roger Federer will join the greats tomorrow by winning the men's singles title for the third year in a row may be proved wrong. The Swiss maestro may have to wait until Monday.

Alan Mills's last Wimbledon as the tournament's referee would not be complete without a rain crisis, and the forecast is not good.

It is also possible that Federer will be denied by his opponent, either Andy Roddick or Thomas Johansson, though on the evidence so far that seems less likely.

As Lleyton Hewitt, the 2002 champion and former world No 1, said after losing to Federer for the eighth time in a row yesterday: "I feel like I'm the second best player going around at the moment. It's just that the best player going around is pretty bloody good."

Hewitt also varied his natural game, venturing to the net more than usual in an attempt to break Federer's rhythm. "I felt I hit the ball pretty well," Hewitt said. "I didn't serve as well as I would have liked. But he puts a lot of pressure on your service games, as well. He gives you few points. I think that's been the biggest turnaround in his game over the last couple of years. He used to give you a lot more free points on your service games, and you just don't get those any more.

"That's why he's the best player. He dictated play better than me. That's basically where he got the win."

Some say that Federer has reached the point, like Pete Sampras before, where opponents are treating him with too much respect and are several games down in their mind as soon as they see him on the other side of the net.

Others would argue that Federer's reputation intimidates his opponents simply because he backs it up with almost flawless tennis. After all, only Marat Safin (at the Australian Open), Richard Gasquet (at the Monte Carlo Masters) and Rafael Nadal (at the French Open) have beaten him in his last 77 matches.

Yesterday's semi-final victory against the third-seeded Hewitt, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6, was Federer's 35th win in a row on grass, and he is unbeaten in his last 20 finals on any surface, which is an ATP Tour record.

For all that, Federer is aware that there are blemishes in his game. His backhand is not as good as his forehand, and he does not attack the net as often as some observers would like.

Yesterday, against the swift, counter-punching Hewitt, Federer's first serve was misfiring in the opening set, only 10 of 27 deliveries landing good. Fortunately for the champion, Hewitt was not serving well either, offering Federer the cushion of a break in the second game.

To make matters interesting, Federer made four unforced errors to lose his own serve in the next game. For a time it appeared that Hewitt, probing his opponent's backhand, trying to make him rush, and generally displaying far more confidence than when dazzled by Federer in last year's US Open final, was getting to grips with a difficult task.

That thought was erased in the eighth game, when Federer's wickedly sliced backhand caused Hewitt, break point down, to net the ball, after which Federer served the set out after 36 minutes.

Although the contest was unflagging, and the protagonists engaged in many wonderful rallies and hit some incredible shots, Hewitt did not get another opportunity to break, partly because Federer's serving improved and the Australian's fluctuated.

Federer broke for 3-2 in the second set with a block return off a Hewitt drive, and the third set went to a tie-break after Hewitt repelled Federer's all-out assault on his serve in the fifth game.

Whether or not Hewitt has come to respect Federer's talent too much, there was mutual respect in this match. The players groaned at their own errors, but there was no attempt to undermine the opposition.

Even when the crowd booed the umpire's decision to overrule a call on a far line in Federer's favour, there were no histrionics from Hewitt.

The tie-break was interesting rather than thrilling. Federer seemed ready to run away with it after Hewitt double-faulted to 4-1 - but Federer returned the gift on the next point before going to win the shoot-out, 7-4, wrapping up the match after two hours seven minutes.

Any criticism of Federer's play is nit-picking, of course. The man, in the opinion of everybody from John McEnroe to the local club hacker, is potentially the best player the sport has ever seen. And the more rivals he "owns", the longer his domination is likely to continue, barring injuries.

Federer has done well so far to enjoy the praise without letting it go to his head. "I don't hear the commentary when I'm playing," he said. "I don't read the papers either these two weeks, because I'm in an apartment and usually I only see the papers when I'm in hotels."

Federer has not always dominated Hewitt, who has won eight of their 10 matches. But the Australian has been on the losing end since 2003.

"I have he feeling I can hang with him," Federer explained. "If I'm good from the baseline, I'll get a chance to break him. It seems like he's having a hard time trying to break my serve, which always keeps me level with him. Eventually, with the variation in my game, I get the errors out of him, too."

Speaking about the men's final against either Roddick or Johansson, Federer said: "The next match is huge to me," said Federer. "I'm very proud to be in my third Wimbledon final, it means a lot to me."

http://sport.independent.co.uk/

RogiFan88
07-02-2005, 03:11 AM
Nick Bollettieri: Wimbledon Dossier
Master eyes glory as apprentice goes to work
Published: 02 July 2005
Andy Murray now has the coach he wanted, but for a tennis lesson he need look no further than one Swiss genius

Andy Murray and Roger Federer are at opposite ends of the tennis spectrum right now but both players took important steps in their respective careers yesterday.

Murray confirmed that he had got himself the full-time coach that he wanted, Mark Petchey, which we'll come back to. And Federer moved past Lleyton Hewitt, despite a problem with his serve in the first set, to stay on course for three successive Wimbledon titles. A third championship in a row would elevate Federer closer to Pete Sampras and Bjorn Borg, the American and the Swede respectively being the only other men since the 1930s to have won three consecutive singles titles at The All England Club.

The story of Federer's victory yesterday was simple enough. Too good. Too good for Hewitt for the eighth time in a row. Too good on the big points. Too good at reaching balls that other players struggle to get. Too good hitting wonderful winners that just left Hewitt staring at him, or the ground.

The statistic that underlines the "too good" in all departments was that in the first set Federer hit only 37 per cent of his first serves in - and he still won the set 6-3. Hitting only 37 per cent of your first serves in is not great for anyone. For Federer, he would be looking to be in the 60s and upwards as a percentage. But the fact that his serve was off and yet he still had enough quality in the rest of his game tells us quite how good he is. If one area falters, the Swiss has other weapons to compensate.

Murray's announcement is a positive move. He said that he had a "great deal" of respect for Petchey, and that is crucial in a coach-player relationship. Because if you don't get on, and the player is not going to take on board the advice of the coach, it isn't going to work.

Petchey was quoted as saying that "more than anything it will be about motivating him for the training", and "you can't create a champion overnight and you can't go out and buy them".

I believe he's right on both counts. Murray has the basis of an excellent game. He is still growing. He needs to work on his conditioning and stamina. That is normal enough for players of his age. But the real work - the work that will make the difference in realising his potential - is the hours and days and months and years of training. Having a full-time coach to make sure he is doing it can only help.

I also think it's a positive that the Lawn Tennis Association is backing this partnership, which officially starts when Murray plays in Newport, Rhode Island, next week, in the only professional grass-court tournament in the United States.

It's a long way from there to where Federer is at, but Murray is going in the right direction. It will take time. In a year we will be better placed to see what he's really made of.

Andy Murray now has the coach he wanted, but for a tennis lesson he need look no further than one Swiss genius

Andy Murray and Roger Federer are at opposite ends of the tennis spectrum right now but both players took important steps in their respective careers yesterday.

Murray confirmed that he had got himself the full-time coach that he wanted, Mark Petchey, which we'll come back to. And Federer moved past Lleyton Hewitt, despite a problem with his serve in the first set, to stay on course for three successive Wimbledon titles. A third championship in a row would elevate Federer closer to Pete Sampras and Bjorn Borg, the American and the Swede respectively being the only other men since the 1930s to have won three consecutive singles titles at The All England Club.

The story of Federer's victory yesterday was simple enough. Too good. Too good for Hewitt for the eighth time in a row. Too good on the big points. Too good at reaching balls that other players struggle to get. Too good hitting wonderful winners that just left Hewitt staring at him, or the ground.

The statistic that underlines the "too good" in all departments was that in the first set Federer hit only 37 per cent of his first serves in - and he still won the set 6-3. Hitting only 37 per cent of your first serves in is not great for anyone. For Federer, he would be looking to be in the 60s and upwards as a percentage. But the fact that his serve was off and yet he still had enough quality in the rest of his game tells us quite how good he is. If one area falters, the Swiss has other weapons to compensate.
Murray's announcement is a positive move. He said that he had a "great deal" of respect for Petchey, and that is crucial in a coach-player relationship. Because if you don't get on, and the player is not going to take on board the advice of the coach, it isn't going to work.

Petchey was quoted as saying that "more than anything it will be about motivating him for the training", and "you can't create a champion overnight and you can't go out and buy them".

I believe he's right on both counts. Murray has the basis of an excellent game. He is still growing. He needs to work on his conditioning and stamina. That is normal enough for players of his age. But the real work - the work that will make the difference in realising his potential - is the hours and days and months and years of training. Having a full-time coach to make sure he is doing it can only help.

I also think it's a positive that the Lawn Tennis Association is backing this partnership, which officially starts when Murray plays in Newport, Rhode Island, next week, in the only professional grass-court tournament in the United States.

It's a long way from there to where Federer is at, but Murray is going in the right direction. It will take time. In a year we will be better placed to see what he's really made of.
http://sport.independent.co.uk/

Minnie
07-02-2005, 09:31 AM
Minnie, I didn't post any articles in toto 'cuz so many poured forth yesterday. Can you compare Roger's reception to that of past Champions? I was uncertain since they didn't even put him on Center Court yesterday.

Did everyone hear the wonderful Billie Jean King story? Roger went to a Charity Fundraiser last week - Elton John's perhaps. Billie Jean, w/her 20 Wimbledon titles, went up to him & said "Roger, I've never asked anyone this before, but could I please have my picture taken w/you?" She LOVES him. Is that too sweet!

By way of comparison to the American sports press, I higly recommend the San Francisco, Ca. paper - sfgate.com -> sports. Search on "Bruce Jenkins" to get the list of his articles from Wimby. You'll see how completely swept up in The Spectacle they are - power/violence & sex. The role of sports is to get that ole testosterone flowing in males. Beauty?? Serenity?? Huh, what's that? When does the Real Show begin. You don't even need to read the words in his columns - just as well, since they make little sense.

Ok, here are 2 paragraphs from yesterday to compare to the British press' treatment of the 1/4's:

<I>For pure shot making, Roddick will never be the equal of Federer -- nor will anyone else on the scene today. Federer was up against a mad, creative genius in Gonzalez, who had the crowd gasping over the breadth of his imagination.
...
Federer said later, "To take a swing at such a ball was a little weird. He just hits incredible shots all the time. He's different. Quite unique, I would say."

So you want unique? Federer is your man. On the match's signature shot, Federer came charging to the net on an apparently hopeless attempt to retrieve a Gonzalez drop shot. He not only got to the ball, just short of crashing into the net, he flicked an astounding cross-court winner with the forehand. Nobody else in tennis does it quite like that.</I>

Need I say more??

Hi Tenhound. Sorry for delay in coming back to you - too busy watching Rog on TV (and trying to fit in jobs around the home!). I would say that the Wimbledon crowd has definitely warmed to Roger more than they did (initially anyway) to say, Pete Sampras. I don't agree with the journalist who said in some article that the Centre Court crowd hasn't taken him to their hearts. Did he not see/hear the reception Rog got when he walked out there for his first round match?? Roger even commented himself on it and how friendly everyone is towards him, shouting out "Good luck" whenever they see him. In fact in 2003 after he beat Roddick in the semi, a BBC interviewer told him that the "crowd seem to have really warmed to you" I think Roger thought he meant tennis-wise - but he didn't - he meant as a person. That hasn't changed - in fact I'd say its even more so now. They recognise a legend in the making when they see one - and a really nice guy as well. I guess Andre Agassi was also taken to our hearts - it must be the tears that do it (he cried as well when he won) - and let's face it, Roger is a past master at shedding tears - and why not! Us Brits like to see how much Wimby means to the winner so we're looking forward to seeing more on Sunday!

Personally, I was absolutely delighted they put Roger on Court 1 on Wednesday because I had tickets for that court on Wednesday - and our seats were the row behind Fed's coach + girlfriend - which was nice! Again, when he walked on court, the warmth towards him was almost "touchable" and when he walked off at the end. I don't think alternating players between Centre and One is a bad thing - especially since Court 1 is so superior to what it once was. Anyway, I don't think a thing like that would bother Roger, do you?

Thanks to you and everyone else for posting all the great articles in the British press - I don't buy the newspapers here! And I like your bit about Billie Jean King asking to have her photo taken with him! Wow!

I hope this hasn't been posted before, but I managed to track down the interview that Sue Barker did with Roger on Thursday afternoon. He comes across very well - she's such a flirt! I like her - she does a great programme over here called Question of Sport - I'd love Roger to be on that with her!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sol/ukfs_sport/hi/av/bb_rm_fs.stm?nbram=1&news=1&nbwm=1&bbwm=1&bbram=1&nol_storyid=4638669

I can post more BBC interviews if they haven't been posted already.

babsi
07-02-2005, 10:38 AM
RogiFan,Steven and everybody eles - thanks for the articles :)

Shabazza
07-02-2005, 11:53 AM
Steven, Rogifan and Minnie :) - thx for those great articles and interviews :yeah:

nobama
07-02-2005, 01:29 PM
http://images.icnetwork.co.uk/upl/m2/jul2005/2/8/000CFB9B-56ED-12C6-93770C01AC1BF814.jpg

SUKTUEN
07-02-2005, 05:23 PM
thankyou

RogiNie
07-02-2005, 07:44 PM
Lleyton Blewitt :rolls:
thanks for all the cool articles everyone! :)

babsi
07-02-2005, 07:50 PM
The british Press - a beautiful institution,in it´s own right - lol

violet coley
07-02-2005, 08:58 PM
Roger Federer: A smashing guy
By Brian Viner
Published: 02 July 2005
If the Wimbledon champion and number one seed Roger Federer successfully defends his men's singles title tomorrow to win the coveted prize for the third time in as many years - and there are those who believe that it is as inevitable as the sunrise - the 23-year-old Swiss will move into exalted company.

Since the All-England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club moved to its present site in 1922, only three men have won Wimbledon more than twice consecutively. Fred Perry dominated for three years in the mid 1930s; Bjorn Borg won five times on the trot between 1976 and 1980; and Pete Sampras four times between 1997 and 2000, having also won in 1993, 1994 and 1995.

That Federer is already considered by some shrewd judges of the game to be an even better player than Sampras shows why he is being talked about, a month before his 24th birthday, as destined, more likely than not, to become the greatest tennis player ever.

Of course, different eras, different equipment and different standards of opposition make "greatest ever" labels both invidious and hypothetical. Although Federer beat Sampras at Wimbledon in 2001, ending the American's run of 31 victorious matches on grass, who can say whether he would have beaten the great Rod Laver on level terms?

Actually, Laver himself reckons he can. "I am honoured just to be compared with him," the 66-year-old Australian has said. "A lot of the shots that he produces are just totally uncanny."

While it is true that Federer often seems to weave sheer magic on the court, leaving even the most nimble of opponents flat-footed with the improbably acute angles of his shots, he still has some way to go to match Laver's record. The "Rockhampton Rocket" remains the only man with two Grand Slams, twice winning all four major tennis tournaments - the Australian, French and US Opens, and Wimbledon - in a year.

But that happened in 1962 and 1969. The speed and intensity of modern men's tennis, and the ferocity of competition at the highest level, with different players trained to excel on different surfaces, now make it almost unimaginable that one man could capture all four titles inside 12 months.

And yet last year, Federer came astonishingly close to realising the unimaginable, winning on concrete in Melbourne and New York as well as on the Wimbledon grass. Moreover, in the course of winning the US Open he subjected Lleyton Hewitt, his losing opponent in yesterday's semi-final and a brilliant player in his own right, to a humiliating "double bagel" - 6-0 6-0 - in the final, triumphing 6-0, 7-6, 6-0.

This year has not been such an annus mirabilis for Federer. He lost in the semi-finals of the Australian and French Opens, and hasn't yet won Wimbledon. But everyone knows that when he plays his best tennis, he is unbeatable. And when he plays below his best, he is quite often unbeatable, too.

If a mad scientist created a composite of the finest tennis players, it would perform like Federer: he has the extraordinary speed, agility and focus of Borg, the brilliant improvisational skills of John McEnroe, the overwhelming power of Sampras. But he also, almost dispiritingly for his opponents, has the friendly personality of, let's say, John Lloyd. When you cannot find a chink of vulnerability in your opponent on the tennis court, you can sometimes find some personal animus to light your fire. That tactic doesn't work with Federer.

On Thursday evening, the men's number two seed, Andy Roddick, was asked what he respected about the champion. "He's probably the most talented person ever to carry a racket around," Roddick replied. "The shots that he can come up with ... the way he's kind of become a totally complete player. But I think off the court, it [the respect] is huge.

"There have been a lot of good champions, but he's just classy. He is never high and mighty in the locker room or anything like that. He treats people with respect. Even if it's the locker room attendants or the people serving food, he is 'please' and 'thank you'. I think that's why he's so well-liked on tour. There's not a whole lot of animosity towards him, even though he has been that successful."

Much of the credit for this belongs with Federer's parents, who refused to tolerate his boyhood petulance. As in the case of Borg before him, the calm demeanour of the man grew out of the histrionics of the child. During the tournaments he played in his early teens, Federer was prone to racket-smashing tantrums on court. His father, Robert, a salesman for a pharmaceutical company, was horrified. He would yell at him to desist, then drive him home, a journey sometimes lasting several hours, in complete silence. His son eventually got the message. By the time he turned professional, aged 16 in 1998, he had learnt to control his temper.

Federer is a second child (he has an elder sister). His father is Swiss and his mother, Lynette, is South African. They both played tennis socially at a club near Basel, and as a toddler Roger used to watch them. When he was three, he started hitting balls himself and his impressive co-ordination was cheerfully remarked upon by members of the club. Within a few years, Robert and Lynette realised they had a prodigy on their hands. At 12, Federer, whose idol was Boris Becker, acquired a proper coach, an Australian who worked with the Swiss Tennis Federation, called Peter Carter.

Carter refused to be dazzled by the prodigy. He insisted on him playing plenty of doubles, both to develop his game and to avoid burn-out, and advised him never to neglect his social life. In due course, Federer changed his coach, hiring Peter Lundgren, a Swede who had been a decent Tour player. But Carter remained his mentor, and watched proudly as his brilliant protégé moved quickly up the world rankings and into the top 10.

For quite a while, however, Federer could not fulfil his promise in Grand Slam tournaments. It was widely believed that he did not have the cussedness to make it through a two-week competition, that being told since boyhood that he was a genius had somehow sapped the single-mindedness needed to string together win after win. His world ranking began to slip. At Wimbledon in 2002, a year after his five-set, fourth-round victory over Sampras, he was dumped out in the first round. For the first time in his gilded life, he was heading down rather than up.

Then came a tragedy. Shortly before his 21st birthday, during a tournament in Canada, Federer received a phone call from Lundgren relating the appalling news that 37-year-old Carter had died in a car crash. He had been on holiday in South Africa, a holiday that Federer had urged him to take, when the rented jeep in which he was a passenger overturned on a bridge, killing him instantly.

Federer spent his birthday utterly distraught and remained so for months afterwards. "Peter was the person who gave me the most, and I owe him the most," he said. At first, the quality of his tennis plunged even further, and yet he gradually emerged from his grief with a new resolve, his wondrous shot-making now complemented by a sense of purpose and, that most difficult of skills to acquire for sportsmen of an easy-going disposition, a killer instinct.

Eleven months after Carter's death, he won his first Grand Slam event, Wimbledon, the most prestigious title of them all. And afterwards wept copiously, assailed by contrasting emotions of elation and sadness. Since then, without quite as much emotion, he has won three more Grand Slam titles. Tomorrow, he looks likely to add a fifth. He still has the north face of the Eiger to climb if he is to exceed Sampras's record haul of 14, but then he's Swiss; he knows about mountains.

In the meantime, a small but devoted entourage attends his every need. His mother is his agent, and his girlfriend of five years is his public relations manager. She is a former player herself, Mirka Vavrinec, who owed her own career to the kindness of another great champion, Martina Navratilova.

In 1987, when Mirka was nine, her father took her to watch a tournament at Filderstadt in Germany. The event coincided with Navratilova's birthday, and Mirka's father, a huge fan, managed to hand her a present. He had his daughter by his side and Navratilova asked the youngster if she played tennis. No, she'd never tried it. Navratilova said she looked athletic and ought to give it a whirl.

There the exchange might have ended had it not been for Navratilova's immense generosity of spirit. When she discovered that the Vavrinecs - who originally came from Slovakia - lived in Zurich, she phoned a friend there and arranged Mirka's first tennis lesson. Later, she sent one of her rackets from America for Mirka to use. And her instincts proved remarkably astute. By 2000, Mirka was in the top 100 players in the world and in Switzerland's team for the Sydney Olympics. It was there that she met Federer.

A year later, Mirka was forced to retire because of a persistent foot injury, but Federer enjoys the story of her introduction to tennis. He likes the idea that it was Navratilova who, in a way, brought them together.

But he is also inspired by the example of a celebrated tennis champion showing so much kindness to a child. This is partly why he has set up the Roger Federer Foundation, to help underprivileged children in his mother's native South Africa. And while it is true that other leading sports stars, among them Andre Agassi and Tiger Woods, also have charitable foundations, Federer is unusual in having set it up so early in his career and devoting so much energy to it. He flies to South Africa as often as he can to meet the children and see how things are going.

So, this young man would appear to be a paragon of virtue as well as a paragon of ability on the tennis court. There must be some flaws in his make-up, although the only thing anyone seems able to get their teeth into is his passing resemblance to the film director Quentin Tarantino, he of the pronounced jaw. There will doubtless come a time when Tarantino is fêted as a Federer lookalike rather than the other way around. In fact, it has probably arrived already.

A Life in Brief

BORN 8 August, 1981 in Basel, Switzerland

FAMILY Mother, Lynett, South African; father, Robert, Swiss. One sister, Diana

PARTNER: Mirka Vavrinec, whom he met when they represented Switzerland in tennis at the 2000 Olympics

CAREER Wimbledon Junior Singles champion and World no 1 Junior, 1998; reached finals at US Open, the same year and turned professional; won first ATP title in Milan, 2001; his first Wimbledon and Grand Slam title in 2002; Wimbledon, Australian and US Open Grand Slam titles, 2004, during which he gained 11 titles overall.

RECORD SO FAR THIS YEAR: 7 titles including ATP Masters Seriesm Miami, Hamnburg and Indian Wells.and S2.586m.

PRIZE MONEY TO DATE: $16.681m.

THEY SAY: "He's probably the most talented person ever to carry a racket around," Andy Roddick

HE SAYS: Some of my shots are very natural, but there is also a lot of practise and hard work behind my game. I love experimenting shots though.

If the Wimbledon champion and number one seed Roger Federer successfully defends his men's singles title tomorrow to win the coveted prize for the third time in as many years - and there are those who believe that it is as inevitable as the sunrise - the 23-year-old Swiss will move into exalted company.

Since the All-England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club moved to its present site in 1922, only three men have won Wimbledon more than twice consecutively. Fred Perry dominated for three years in the mid 1930s; Bjorn Borg won five times on the trot between 1976 and 1980; and Pete Sampras four times between 1997 and 2000, having also won in 1993, 1994 and 1995.

That Federer is already considered by some shrewd judges of the game to be an even better player than Sampras shows why he is being talked about, a month before his 24th birthday, as destined, more likely than not, to become the greatest tennis player ever.

Of course, different eras, different equipment and different standards of opposition make "greatest ever" labels both invidious and hypothetical. Although Federer beat Sampras at Wimbledon in 2001, ending the American's run of 31 victorious matches on grass, who can say whether he would have beaten the great Rod Laver on level terms?

Actually, Laver himself reckons he can. "I am honoured just to be compared with him," the 66-year-old Australian has said. "A lot of the shots that he produces are just totally uncanny."

While it is true that Federer often seems to weave sheer magic on the court, leaving even the most nimble of opponents flat-footed with the improbably acute angles of his shots, he still has some way to go to match Laver's record. The "Rockhampton Rocket" remains the only man with two Grand Slams, twice winning all four major tennis tournaments - the Australian, French and US Opens, and Wimbledon - in a year.

But that happened in 1962 and 1969. The speed and intensity of modern men's tennis, and the ferocity of competition at the highest level, with different players trained to excel on different surfaces, now make it almost unimaginable that one man could capture all four titles inside 12 months.

And yet last year, Federer came astonishingly close to realising the unimaginable, winning on concrete in Melbourne and New York as well as on the Wimbledon grass. Moreover, in the course of winning the US Open he subjected Lleyton Hewitt, his losing opponent in yesterday's semi-final and a brilliant player in his own right, to a humiliating "double bagel" - 6-0 6-0 - in the final, triumphing 6-0, 7-6, 6-0.

This year has not been such an annus mirabilis for Federer. He lost in the semi-finals of the Australian and French Opens, and hasn't yet won Wimbledon. But everyone knows that when he plays his best tennis, he is unbeatable. And when he plays below his best, he is quite often unbeatable, too.

If a mad scientist created a composite of the finest tennis players, it would perform like Federer: he has the extraordinary speed, agility and focus of Borg, the brilliant improvisational skills of John McEnroe, the overwhelming power of Sampras. But he also, almost dispiritingly for his opponents, has the friendly personality of, let's say, John Lloyd. When you cannot find a chink of vulnerability in your opponent on the tennis court, you can sometimes find some personal animus to light your fire. That tactic doesn't work with Federer.

On Thursday evening, the men's number two seed, Andy Roddick, was asked what he respected about the champion. "He's probably the most talented person ever to carry a racket around," Roddick replied. "The shots that he can come up with ... the way he's kind of become a totally complete player. But I think off the court, it [the respect] is huge.

"There have been a lot of good champions, but he's just classy. He is never high and mighty in the locker room or anything like that. He treats people with respect. Even if it's the locker room attendants or the people serving food, he is 'please' and 'thank you'. I think that's why he's so well-liked on tour. There's not a whole lot of animosity towards him, even though he has been that successful."

Much of the credit for this belongs with Federer's parents, who refused to tolerate his boyhood petulance. As in the case of Borg before him, the calm demeanour of the man grew out of the histrionics of the child. During the tournaments he played in his early teens, Federer was prone to racket-smashing tantrums on court. His father, Robert, a salesman for a pharmaceutical company, was horrified. He would yell at him to desist, then drive him home, a journey sometimes lasting several hours, in complete silence. His son eventually got the message. By the time he turned professional, aged 16 in 1998, he had learnt to control his temper.

Federer is a second child (he has an elder sister). His father is Swiss and his mother, Lynette, is South African. They both played tennis socially at a club near Basel, and as a toddler Roger used to watch them. When he was three, he started hitting balls himself and his impressive co-ordination was cheerfully remarked upon by members of the club. Within a few years, Robert and Lynette realised they had a prodigy on their hands. At 12, Federer, whose idol was Boris Becker, acquired a proper coach, an Australian who worked with the Swiss Tennis Federation, called Peter Carter.

Carter refused to be dazzled by the prodigy. He insisted on him playing plenty of doubles, both to develop his game and to avoid burn-out, and advised him never to neglect his social life. In due course, Federer changed his coach, hiring Peter Lundgren, a Swede who had been a decent Tour player. But Carter remained his mentor, and watched proudly as his brilliant protégé moved quickly up the world rankings and into the top 10.
For quite a while, however, Federer could not fulfil his promise in Grand Slam tournaments. It was widely believed that he did not have the cussedness to make it through a two-week competition, that being told since boyhood that he was a genius had somehow sapped the single-mindedness needed to string together win after win. His world ranking began to slip. At Wimbledon in 2002, a year after his five-set, fourth-round victory over Sampras, he was dumped out in the first round. For the first time in his gilded life, he was heading down rather than up.

Then came a tragedy. Shortly before his 21st birthday, during a tournament in Canada, Federer received a phone call from Lundgren relating the appalling news that 37-year-old Carter had died in a car crash. He had been on holiday in South Africa, a holiday that Federer had urged him to take, when the rented jeep in which he was a passenger overturned on a bridge, killing him instantly.

Federer spent his birthday utterly distraught and remained so for months afterwards. "Peter was the person who gave me the most, and I owe him the most," he said. At first, the quality of his tennis plunged even further, and yet he gradually emerged from his grief with a new resolve, his wondrous shot-making now complemented by a sense of purpose and, that most difficult of skills to acquire for sportsmen of an easy-going disposition, a killer instinct.

Eleven months after Carter's death, he won his first Grand Slam event, Wimbledon, the most prestigious title of them all. And afterwards wept copiously, assailed by contrasting emotions of elation and sadness. Since then, without quite as much emotion, he has won three more Grand Slam titles. Tomorrow, he looks likely to add a fifth. He still has the north face of the Eiger to climb if he is to exceed Sampras's record haul of 14, but then he's Swiss; he knows about mountains.

In the meantime, a small but devoted entourage attends his every need. His mother is his agent, and his girlfriend of five years is his public relations manager. She is a former player herself, Mirka Vavrinec, who owed her own career to the kindness of another great champion, Martina Navratilova.

In 1987, when Mirka was nine, her father took her to watch a tournament at Filderstadt in Germany. The event coincided with Navratilova's birthday, and Mirka's father, a huge fan, managed to hand her a present. He had his daughter by his side and Navratilova asked the youngster if she played tennis. No, she'd never tried it. Navratilova said she looked athletic and ought to give it a whirl.

There the exchange might have ended had it not been for Navratilova's immense generosity of spirit. When she discovered that the Vavrinecs - who originally came from Slovakia - lived in Zurich, she phoned a friend there and arranged Mirka's first tennis lesson. Later, she sent one of her rackets from America for Mirka to use. And her instincts proved remarkably astute. By 2000, Mirka was in the top 100 players in the world and in Switzerland's team for the Sydney Olympics. It was there that she met Federer.

A year later, Mirka was forced to retire because of a persistent foot injury, but Federer enjoys the story of her introduction to tennis. He likes the idea that it was Navratilova who, in a way, brought them together.

But he is also inspired by the example of a celebrated tennis champion showing so much kindness to a child. This is partly why he has set up the Roger Federer Foundation, to help underprivileged children in his mother's native South Africa. And while it is true that other leading sports stars, among them Andre Agassi and Tiger Woods, also have charitable foundations, Federer is unusual in having set it up so early in his career and devoting so much energy to it. He flies to South Africa as often as he can to meet the children and see how things are going.

So, this young man would appear to be a paragon of virtue as well as a paragon of ability on the tennis court. There must be some flaws in his make-up, although the only thing anyone seems able to get their teeth into is his passing resemblance to the film director Quentin Tarantino, he of the pronounced jaw. There will doubtless come a time when Tarantino is fêted as a Federer lookalike rather than the other way around. In fact, it has probably arrived already.

A Life in Brief

BORN 8 August, 1981 in Basel, Switzerland

FAMILY Mother, Lynett, South African; father, Robert, Swiss. One sister, Diana

PARTNER: Mirka Vavrinec, whom he met when they represented Switzerland in tennis at the 2000 Olympics

CAREER Wimbledon Junior Singles champion and World no 1 Junior, 1998; reached finals at US Open, the same year and turned professional; won first ATP title in Milan, 2001; his first Wimbledon and Grand Slam title in 2002; Wimbledon, Australian and US Open Grand Slam titles, 2004, during which he gained 11 titles overall.

RECORD SO FAR THIS YEAR: 7 titles including ATP Masters Seriesm Miami, Hamnburg and Indian Wells.and S2.586m.

PRIZE MONEY TO DATE: $16.681m.

THEY SAY: "He's probably the most talented person ever to carry a racket around," Andy Roddick

HE SAYS: Some of my shots are very natural, but there is also a lot of practise and hard work behind my game. I love experimenting shots though.

Minnie
07-02-2005, 09:09 PM
Thanks Violet ... I had never heard the story about Martina Navratilova introducing Mirka to tennis before. Lovely - so Roger has a lot to be thankful to her for!!

Minnie
07-02-2005, 09:23 PM
Thanks Violet ... I had never heard the story about Martina Navratilova introducing Mirka to tennis before. Lovely - so Roger has a lot to be thankful to her for!!

lunahielo
07-02-2005, 11:57 PM
Originally posted by Minnie
Thanks Violet ... I had never heard the story about Martina Navratilova introducing Mirka to tennis before. Lovely - so Roger has a lot to be thankful to her for!!

That's the first time I've heard this, too. It's a wonderful story.
Thank you so much.

ToanNguyen
07-03-2005, 01:54 AM
Federer master of the beautiful game
By Brough Stott*
(Filed: 03/07/2005)

There's something in his smile. It only comes after the match and there is nothing flashy in it. The teeth may barely show but a warm and blissful wonder grows through the down-turned Federer face. At last he can be happy with what has gone before.


On Friday, Roger had those three sets against Lleyton Hewitt to smile upon, the first two as dazzling in their power and beauty and invention as anything you will see in tennis. Poor Lleyton hardly got a sniff as Roger stretched and hit and surprised him. It was highly charged. It was one-on-one combat, and yet for Federer the histrionics were confined to that little double-footed jumping turn of frustration when a would-be winner had strayed. Hewitt was important, but the real test was to play to the Federer potential, to try and paint that masterpiece on to the court.


There should be arrogance here but Federer's genius has a purity about it which is uniquely appealing. The next few weeks will see two other men with claims to be the greatest performer their sport, or any other, has ever seen. But for all their astonishing respective achievements, neither Lance Armstrong nor Tiger Woods handle themselves in and out of competition with an open charm anything like that of Roger Federer.


True, both Lance and Tiger may have new records up ahead and both can be winningly articulate when they wish. But there is also an unattractive jaggedness about Armstrong and an unappealing control-freakery in Woods which makes it hard to imagine either walking into a press conference as Federer did on Friday to modestly and wittily handle questions in English, French, German and Swiss/Deutch not even excluding the compulsory joke in each language about the cow Juliette, his hometown reward for Wimbledon 2003.


Before the tournament started, BBC TV asked 10 leading players to film a preview for them. Every one bar Federer found a reason to decline. A day later a walking interview with Radio Wimbledon hit a technical snag as he entered the most famous gates in tennis. "Could we ever do it again," gulped the hack. "Of course," said Federer, "I have the time."


Yes, he has the time. That was the glory of it on Friday. We all know that Hewitt is a scrapper, the fastest man in tennis, but here he was being pushed around by a force that was just awesome to behold. In no other sport do you get a full two hours of close-up study of the athlete in extremis. In tennis on the Centre Court you seem to be looking not just at a player's shots but into his very soul.


With Federer, even the physique is something of a contradiction. At 6ft 1in and nearly 13st, he is a big, almost heavy-looking figure with a crumpled face that in concentration is hardly a thing of beauty. Yet the moment he picks up the racket he is transformed into an extraordinary creature with a lightness to match the power, a speed to equal the stealth, and, above all, the hawk-eyed intelligence to harness the skill.


He doesn't just trade shots from the baseline. He is always keen to move you about until either the angle has got sharp enough to make the return impossible, or to give him the chance to leap around the backhand and hammer away with the full force of the forehand.


"A lot of people say that his backhand is his best shot," said Frew McMillan on Friday, "but they are wrong. The forehand is something else."


Later in the day the rain came and the TV gave the one billionth showing of the Borg-McEnroe tie-break in the 1980 final. Once again you were gripped by the drama and by the skill and nerve of the participants. But for power and speed they were on a different planet to the big Swiss cat who had made the Centre Court his own that afternoon.


In their separate ways both Borg and McEnroe were driven by fires from deep within. So, too, is Federer and in his early days he was a shouter and a racket-thrower of almost Supermac dimensions. What's exceptional about Roger is that he has fuelled the force and can talk about it. "I had the feeling that I was wasting too much energy on getting upset," he explained in all those languages on Friday, "but it took me another year or so to actually get the fire back because I was getting too quiet, too calm."


Today we will see him in his pomp and yet he's not 24 until next month. As a man and as a performer he is at this moment so close to perfection that there is a wistful thought that history says it cannot last. Life is an unsparing partner and distractions come to the mind just as injuries slow the body.


So let's relish while we can the winning made beautiful. If Roger Federer plays like he has this past fortnight we, as well as he, will have plenty to smile about.



One more match to go. You will do it, Roger. :worship: :worship: :worship:

Fedex
07-03-2005, 04:47 AM
Here's an interesting article on ESPN.

Stan Smith marvels at Federer's game
By Barry Lorge
Special to ESPN.com

WIMBLEDON, England -- One of the great things about Wimbledon is that so many past champions come back every year, as television commentators, coaches, tournament or tour executives, or simply as interested and knowledgeable spectators.

In the players' lounge, you can always find experts to analyze the current players from both observation and first-hand experience. This year, it seems as if they all are raving about Roger Federer, who will be going for his third straight men's singles title on Sunday against second-seeded Andy Roddick.

I asked Stan Smith, the 1972 champion and a former U.S. national coach, if Federer reminds him of any particular player.

"He reminds me of a great player, I tell you what," Smith said. "It's unbelievable. He has his own style. He doesn't serve huge, but he serves well, and he seems to hit some big serves when he needs to. He returns serve very well. … He doesn't try to overhit the ball."

The only time he saw Federer get flustered to the point of trying to muscle the ball too much, Smith said, was in the semifinals of this year's French Open final against Spanish left-hander Rafael Nadal, who won the title at age 18. Clay is Nadal's favorite surface. Grass is Federer's, though he has the skills and temperament to win on all surfaces.

"Against Nadal at the French, he sort of panicked in that match and overhit the ball, but that's unusual," Smith said. "He seems to understand the game very well. He knows when he has to go for shots, and he knows when he doesn't have to go for shots -- which is something that some players never understand.

"He's got no weaknesses. He's got confidence. He's been winning, so even if he gets behind, he doesn't panic, knowing that he can come back. One thing he does well that protects him on a fast surface like this against a really good server is that he returns serve very consistently. He has showed that in his Wimbledon career against Pete Sampras (whose four-year winning streak Federer snapped in the fourth round in 2001), [Mark] Philippoussis, [Goran] Ivanisevic, Roddick. Big servers are dangerous against almost any good player, but he seems to handle the big serve even better than guys like [Andre] Agassi or [Jimmy] Connors -- some of the best returners ever. Federer gets a lot of balls back. He's tough to ace.

"The key thing, to me, is that he moves unbelievably well, and he's in great balance when he hits almost every shot. That allows him to have such great consistency."

Does Federer's combination of quickness and strength remind him of anybody?

"His movement is more like Sampras -- very powerful, but also very graceful," Smith said. "The other thing that he has going for him is he is a smart player. Other smart players can figure out a different tactic to use, but they don't have the skills to do it effectively. Federer has the tools to execute changes in tactics."

Does he expect Roddick to do anything different from the two previous times he played Federer at Wimbledon, losing in straight sets in the 2003 semifinals and in four sets in last year's final?

"Roddick hasn't had a very good record against him," said Smith, noting that Roddick is 0-4 against Federer the past two years and 1-8 overall. "This is a surface where Roddick can be dangerous if he's on. He was on last year until the rain break, and then Federer was able to change things around a little bit. Roddick started missing. I think Roddick feels now that he doesn't have to go for shots quite as much, but he's going to have to serve well and attack all the time to be effective."

Should Roddick go to the net more than he usually does?

"Yeah, I think he needs to take advantage when he hits a big forehand and Federer runs wide to hit a slice backhand," Smith said. "Andy has got to be in on it and make him pay the price. Otherwise, Federer just floats it back deep and then he's able to run down the next ball. But if Roddick is able to come in, the next time Federer goes wide, he's going to maybe have to do something more with the ball. Maybe that way he'll start making some errors."

Tony Roche, Federer's coach, said the other day that Federer's serve-volley game is so effective because he uses it sparingly. He doesn't rush the net all the time. Did Smith concur?

"Yeah, he's effective because if the players start getting the ball back [in rallies], then he can come in," Smith said. "He's a very smart player. He has a good feel for the game. He's very good at the net. He misses very few volleys."

Shy
07-03-2005, 04:58 AM
Here's an interesting article on ESPN.

"His movement is more like Sampras -- very powerful, but also very graceful," Smith said. "The other thing that he has going for him is he is a smart player. Other smart players can figure out a different tactic to use, but they don't have the skills to do it effectively. Federer has the tools to execute changes in tactics."

."It is always nice to see that he usually can come up with a plan B or C as oppose to other players.

TenHound
07-03-2005, 06:17 AM
Thanks Minnie, I was very confused by that bit that someone wrote about the Brits not having affection for Roger. If you love the game, how could you not.

Anyway, the poor Brits had a mini-crisis - there was actually a man or two who hadn't yet sung Roger's praises. The Guardian took care of that happily & has 2 new beautiful articles up. But before I get to that, here's a snippet from a new one from the Times, from art. entitled "Quiet Please. Genius at work!" by Nick Pitt:

[I]Pancho Segura, who at 84 has progressed in status from master coach (having helped four Wimbledon singles winners) to oracle, put it thus: “Federer is the only complete player in the world. All the others are one-dimensional. Already he is one of the greats, and his potential is unlimited.”[I]

Article has history of his linkup w/Tony, in print for the first time to my knowledge.

The Observer profile "Swiss Roll" has this important bit from Michael Stich, which is the first time I've seen someone say in print what I've long contended - that total number of Majors won is just one measure of a player.

[I] Michael Stich, who won Wimbledon in 1991 and is part of Radio Five Live's team of pundits in SW19, thinks Federer already is the finest player in history. 'He's the most talented player I've ever seen, the best all-courts player. Better than Borg, McEnroe and the rest. Pete Sampras is the most successful ever in terms of Grand Slam wins [14], but I think Roger's got a better backhand and is stronger, smoother and better on clay than Pete - a more complete player. And he plays the more beautiful tennis.'[I]

Thank you, Michael, I agree. Tennis is the only sport that claims one's whole place in history is denoted by one statistic. He's willing to even go beyond statistics, which I've had a bear of a time convincing people to consider. Also, I think one must look at winning percentage during one's prime, winning % over Top 10 players during one's prime, and probably other things as well. Let me just say that every Champion has his/her signature crafted by their unique game, personality & the era they played in. Pete was a great Champion, but since watching Roger I've never thought that he had to win more than 14 to be considered greater. The physical demands of the game are too great now - this is the era of Terrible Shoes - and as Roger demonstrates it's far too one dimensional a measure. From the other end, AA's number of wins of Majors overstates his place because most of those were AO's won before the top players were playing there seriously, so the competition was minimal.

Stevens Point
07-03-2005, 12:26 PM
While waiting, maybe we could read. I am finding some articles related to today's final.

Stevens Point
07-03-2005, 12:30 PM
Roddick will give Federer the best challenge
By Barry Lorge
Special to ESPN.com

WIMBLEDON, England -- Here is why it is so fitting for Roger Federer to be called, in Wimbledon's quaintly anachronistic argot, "the gentlemen's singles champion."

It was during a tense and gripping semifinal match between Andy Roddick and Thomas Johansson that had been suspended overnight from Friday to Saturday that a rested, relaxed Federer was invited into the interview room. He was asked if he was happy to see his would-be opponents in Sunday's championship match running and gunning each other all over the Centre Court.

"No, not really," said the two-time defending champ, who reached the final by dismantling Lleyton Hewitt in straight sets Friday, before rain interrupted the second semi with Johansson about to serve at 5-6 in the first set. "I would be happy if they were over and done with, too, so they could also have their fair share of rest."

Super player, great sport -- respected in the locker room as well as on court. So clearly the No. 1 player in the world that he seems more than one notch above the rest, Federer doesn't want any unearned advantages. He certainly doesn't need any. He has won his last four matches against No. 2 Roddick (who knocked out Johansson in a gritty, four-set slugfest to set up a rematch of last year's final) and his last eight against No. 3 Hewitt.

Roddick knows the records and the head-to-heads. "Was it impressive?" he asked rhetorically of Federer's 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (4) rout of Hewitt. "Yes, very impressive. Was I surprised or shocked by it? Not really."

That may give you a clue as to why Federer is considered an almost prohibitive favorite to hoist the gentlemen's singles trophy for a third successive year.

Federer, winner of 35 straight matches on grass courts, is already being compared to Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras, who hold the longest Wimbledon winning streaks of the modern era. Federer acknowledged there was another reason he would just as soon have had the other semifinal finish on Friday -- so he could "prepare mentally" with one man in mind. When you are so far above the field, you are concerned less with an opponent's particular weapons than you are with your own state of mind.

This is not hubris, just the mentality of a champion. When Federer was asked whom he would prefer to see across the net on Sunday, he invoked not the famous neutrality of his native Switzerland but the instincts of a true champion.

"Maybe I would like to play Johansson just because he's got less experience," Federer said, his lips revealing a slight, wise smile before he went on: "But I think Roddick will be the classic matchup, something that I would be looking forward to even more than playing Johansson."

That is the right attitude for a Wimbledon legend in the making. Bring on the best opponent available.

Roddick it is. It took him a minute under three hours over two days to finally subdue Johansson, the 2002 Australian Open champion, 6-7 (6), 6-2, 7-6 (10), 7-6 (5). Roddick's shirttail is always flapping when he booms record-velocity serves and ferocious forehands, but this time his jersey and shorts were stained with grass and dirt from numerous dives on the turf trying to thwart Johansson's passing shots.

The pivotal juncture was the third-set tiebreaker. It didn't reach the grandeur, but rekindled some memories, of the 34-point "Battle of 18-16" in the 1980 final, when Borg lost the fourth-set 'breaker to John McEnroe but won his fifth consecutive and last gentlemen's singles title. The BBC showed that evergreen classic during the rain delay on Friday. Roddick and Johansson caught some of it on the telly. Their match was dead even at that stage, and the tiebreaker was well-played and splendidly suspenseful until Roddick -- who had saved three set points -- seized his third with a thunderous serve down the middle to take it, 12 points to 10.

It was during that magnificent 22-minute tiebreaker a quarter of a century ago that it hit McEnroe just how special the aura of Centre Court is. "You could definitely feel something in the air, more so than I've ever felt anywhere else. It was just the way it was really quiet," McEnroe said, spellbound still by the experience. "No one was saying a word. You could hear everything. That's when I knew this was the way tennis should be."

I asked Roddick if he could describe the atmosphere, the tension, the hush amid appreciative bursts of applause and cheering during the third-set tiebreaker with Johansson. "It was pretty intense," he said. "You don't start a tiebreaker thinking it's going to go 12-10. Backwards and forwards. I was so kind of keyed in on the match, I wasn't focusing too much on what was going on around me -- for a change." McEnroe had focused on that, either, he just noticed and knew this was the way tennis should be.

The fourth set went to a tiebreaker, too, which turned when Roddick's return of serve clipped the net cord and fell over for a winner to bring him to 6-5. Roddick raised his arm apologetically, then pounded another huge first serve that Johansson could only grope into the net. Game, set, match.

"It was lucky," Roddick said of the fortuitous net cord, confirming the obvious. "The timing of it couldn't have been any better for me. I felt guilty about it for a second, but then I got over it." It's still a gentlemen's game, but hey, there are limits.

Roddick was asked if he was relieved to get through. "Excited probably more than relieved. Relieved is maybe what I felt in the second round," he said, referring to the rain-suspended 5-setter he survived against Italian journeyman Daniele Bracciali. "But today I felt like I played great stuff. The level of the tennis was very, very high. I'm glad I was able to kind of keep it up and stay the course and get another shot at Roger."

Roddick, a year younger than Federer at 22, won the 2003 U.S. Open. He has a competitor's mentality, too. Bring on the champ. This is the way tennis should be.

Federer has cruised to the final losing only one set, to Nicolas Kiefer in the fourth round. "I watched bits and pieces of pretty much all his matches. You know, he's a pretty good tennis player," Roddick deadpanned. "It's going to be fun. I feel like I'm playing pretty well. Today I thought I played very well. I'm excited to have a go, for sure."

Roddick knows that practically no one fancies his chances of winning, but he is serving exceptionally well, which is the key to his game. He got 75 percent of his first serves in, and his second serve was a weapon as well. Against Johansson, he had 19 aces. He has not had a double fault in his last nine sets.

"I don't remember the last time I made it through nine sets in this kind of intensity without dumping some serves," Roddick said. "Early on here, I wasn't hitting my second serve great, but it started clicking the last couple of days."

He knows he will need everything clicking to have a chance against an on-form Federer.

"There's no question that he's been a better player over the past two years. That's a given. No one would argue otherwise," Roddick said, addressing his 0-4 head-to-head record since his only win over Federer, 7-6 in the third set on a hard court in Canada in 2003. Overall, Federer leads the series 8-1, which belies calling it as a rivalry. "The thing I try to think of is, I have to be better this time," Roddick continued, "not for the next 10 years, not for the next whatever. I have to be better this time. That's the kind of mindset I have to take into it."

In last year's final, Roddick won the first set and was in the match until a rain delay. When play resumed, Federer changed tactics and started following his serve to the net more, pulling away 4-6, 7-5, 7-6, 6-4.

Asked if he needs to throw caution to the often-swirling wind on Centre Court and take the risks, Roddick said: "At times, but I'm not going to try to overplay. At times in last year's final, I tried to play too well. Some things can get away from you. I'm going to have to go in and play my game and play well. It's as simple as that."

Well, actually not. There is nothing simple about trying to solve Federer at Wimbledon.

"Hopefully he'll think about it a little bit more than last year," Roddick said. "It comes down to big points. He won them last year. I'm going to have to try to win them this year."

But Federer had already said that his greatest strength is consistency, and that consistency comes from "mental strength." Again, that's not hubris, but the self-awareness of a champion. "I feel like I always go into every match knowing I can win it if my form is there," Federer said. "And if I'm not playing so well, sometimes I know that I can sneak through and just wait for the big moments, that I can play my good tennis right then. I think knowing that is very important because tennis is quite a mental sport."

Roddick, to his credit, is trying to take a page from Federer's preparation playbook and concentrate on what he can do on his side of the net.

"I can't really do more than play at my optimum," he said. "I have to hope that it's the best at the big moments. That's what Roger does so well. He's so talented. He plays the same at 5-all in the tiebreaker as he does at 2-1, 40-love on his serve in the first set. That's what separates him.

"I don't know if many people are expecting me to win, so it's a different situation. I'm going to come out and play free and I'm going to go after him. I'm going to at least try to take it to him a little bit."

That is the right attitude, the way tennis should be. But you can't escape the feeling that Roddick is going to be a heavy-hitting windmill, tilting furiously -- and in the end, futilely -- at the game's most accomplished and seldom-errant knight. The once and future gentlemen's singles champion.

Barry Lorge, former Washington Post staff writer and sports editor/columnist of The San Diego Union, has covered tennis in more than 25 countries on five continents. He co-authored the section on tennis in the Encyclopaedia Britannica.

Stevens Point
07-03-2005, 12:32 PM
Wimbledon men's final preview
By Miki Singh
Special to ESPN.com

The much-anticipated dream final is set. For a second straight year the two best grass-court players in the world, Roger Federer and Andy Roddick, collide for the Wimbledon championship. Last year, Roddick played about as well as he could have but in the end, even a sub-par Federer was just too good.

This year, Federer has again rolled through the draw dropping just one set to bump his current win streak of 35 straight wins on grass and 20 consecutive victories here at Wimbledon. In title matches, Federer has won an incredible 20 straight tournament finals and has dropped only one set in four Slam final appearances.

With a U.S. Open already in the bag, the 22-year-old Roddick has said this is the title he now wants to win the most. To finally get it, he'll have to beat Federer, someone he's only defeated once in nine prior tries. Since Roddick's lone victory in the 2003 Canadian Open semifinal, Federer has lost just one set to the American in four straight wins. In fact, Federer has lost just four sets to Roddick in their nine career meetings.

Roddick has won 32 of his last 34 matches on grass, with his only two losses coming to Federer here the last two years. While Federer's road to the final has been comfortable, Roddick's has been rocky despite what should have been a friendly draw. The No. 2 seed survived a five-setter in the second round with the lightly regarded "lucky loser" Daniele Bracciali, and then won another five-set test over two-time Wimbledon semifinalist Sebastien Grosjean. In the semifinals Saturday, Roddick needed four tough sets to outlast Thomas Johansson.

The Federer-Roddick matchup marks just the fourth time at Wimbledon that the same two players have advanced to successive finals in the Open Era, the most recent being the Boris Becker-Stefan Edberg meetings between 1988 and 1990.

Miki Singh is a tennis researcher for ESPN.

Stevens Point
07-03-2005, 12:33 PM
Articles
Day 13 Preview

Roger Celebrates
©EPA/ F.Coffrini

Saturday, 2 July, 2005

So The Championships have ended up with the men's final the seeding committee thought would come about: the top seed and title holder, Roger Federer, against the second seed and last year's runner-up, Andy Roddick.

There is a cheque for £630,000 on offer to the winner of this afternoon's contest on Centre Court. But for Federer and Roddick, what will be foremost in their minds is the raising of a gold-plated trophy that symbolises supremacy in the sport.

Federer, the 23-year-old Swiss who is world number one, is, going for his third straight Wimbledon title, intent on joining the likes of Fred Perry, Pete Sampras and Bjorn Borg who are previous winners of three (or more) Wimbledons in succession. And it will be Roddick's task, a task regarded by most as thankless and a few as hopeless, to attempt for the third year to deny Federer his date with destiny.

In 2003, the first time Roger roared through to win, he defeated Andy in the semi-finals, and last year their clash came in the final. So this will be a repeat of that 2004 occasion. The resilient Roddick insists: "It's going to be fun. I'm excited to have a go, for sure. There's no question that Roger has been the better player over the last two years. No one would argue otherwise. But I just have to be better on the day, not for the next ten years."

Federer has dominated their head-to-head record, as he has dominated almost everyone else. Roddick has won just one of their nine previous matches, a victory preceded by four defeats and followed by four more. Those last four wins have come at a cost of one set to the defending champion.

This will be the second year Federer and Roddick have met as number one and two seeds, something which is a comparative rarity in these days of stronger competition all round. Last year's occasion was the first time it had happened at The Championships since 1982, when Jimmy Connors, seeded two, defeated top seed John McEnroe.

Federer and Roddick are the two most successful grass court players in the world. Federer will attempt to make this afternoon's match his 36th consecutive victory on the turf, which would leave him five short of Borg's all-time mark of 41, while Roddick has won 32 of his last 34 on grass, the two losses being the aforementioned ones to Federer. These glowing grass court statistics have come about not only through excellence at Wimbledon but, in Roddick's case, through a hat-trick of titles in the Stella Artois event at Queen's Club, and in Federer's because he has also won three times in a row at the German tournament in Halle.

En route to the final, Federer has won 18 sets and dropped just one, collecting 119 games and conceding 73. Roddick's count is 18 sets won and five lost, with 136 games won and 95 lost. And victory today would clock up Federer's 30th career title, a formidable total for one so young.

He has also won every single one of his last 20 finals, a record going back to Vienna in 2003. Having also won one Australian and one US championship, Federer is going for his fifth Grand Slam crown win in succession, a record last achieved by the American, Tony Trabert, the only other player to manage it in the post-war years since 1946.

Roddick, in contrast, holds just the one Grand Slam, the US Open of 2003, but if he can pull off a shock today he will have earned it, having battled his way through two five-set matches, the first he has ever played at Wimbledon, as well as that tough four-setter against Thomas Johansson yesterday. So he will either be swinging in the groove, or a rather tired young man. We must wish him luck.

Written by Ronald Atkin

Stevens Point
07-03-2005, 12:35 PM
Articles
Federer Ready to Make History

Federer Screams
©Professional Sport/ T.Hindley

Saturday, 2 July, 2005

When he walks out on to Centre Court on Sunday, defending champion Roger Federer will have just one thing on his mind: victory.

"I've always told myself, and it's always been like this since I've played juniors, that if I get to finals, you know, I just don't want to lose them. I do not accept [loss]," Roger Federer said last year after taking his Championship title here.

Should he fulfill his personal pledge, Federer will join an elite group of men to have won three Wimbledon titles in a row. Both Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras have scored the hat-trick; Borg in fact won the Gentlemen's Singles five times in a row (1976-80) while Sampras managed the feat twice (1993-95 and 1997-2000). Prior to the open era, the great Fred Perry won three on the trot from 1934-36.

Federer is certainly aware that history is there for the making. "I would like to win here, two three, five, 10 in a row, it doesn't really matter to me. It's about The Championships itself. I'm really excited to be back again and walk out there to play", he said.

The world No.1 enters the final with 35 wins in a row on grass and seven tournament successes this year. He'll also bring to proceedings the cherished memories of his last two triumphs here. "My first experience was fantastic; it was the win over Sampras. Ever since, it's always been a dream for me to be able to play on Centre again," he said.

The Swiss star is modest about his comparison to Sampras and Borg but says sharing their legacy would be a tremendous thrill. "Sampras was one of my favorite players. Borg, only sort of got to meet him once. What he achieved is something almost beyond possible. To be in the same group as these two would be absolutely special to me," Federer said.

On Sunday, when he defends his title, he will face the same challenger as last year. Roddick, the second seed, may be the fastest server in the history of the game, but after a series of unconvincing wins at this tournament, he will need more than power to take on the Swiss genius.

The fiery American knows the challenge he faces. "He's probably the most talented person to ever carry a racquet around with the shots that he can come up with. He is a complete player. There have been a lot of good champions, but Roger is just classy," Roddick said.

But despite being the favourite, Federer does not take things for granted.

"I never feel unbeatable. There are too many players out there. It's a new day. You have to feel great. It starts from zero, like a soccer match basically. You never want to fall behind too much because it's tough to come back. The next match obviously is huge for me," he said.

But while being humble, Federer does not hide his ambition. "I am proud to be in my third consecutive Wimbledon final. That really means very much to me. I hope I can seize the opportunity."

Written by Sajid Shaikh

Mrs. B
07-03-2005, 12:37 PM
While waiting, maybe we could read. I am finding some articles related to today's final.

Steve, there is a good interview on Roger by Rene Stauffer on the Sonntag Zeitung, but i can't post the link. Also needs to be translated. ;)

babsi
07-03-2005, 12:39 PM
Wimbledon is really the "high season" - thanks :)

Stevens Point
07-03-2005, 12:49 PM
Steve, there is a good interview on Roger by Rene Stauffer on the Sonntag Zeitung, but i can't post the link. Also needs to be translated. ;)
Hallo Bebop! Can one find the article in the net?? Hmm, translation is always a difficult part, but people should be able to read good articles.

This is from Neue Zürcher Zeitung, but in German.

3. Juli 2005, 13:11, NZZ Online




Als Spieler wie Granit - als Mensch nicht

Roger Federer gilt als Tennis-Phänomen

Nicht der Wimbledon-Final zwischen Roger Federer und Andy Roddick hat die Massen am Samstag in die Londoner City gelockt, sondern das Live-8-Konzert im Hyde Park. Federer setzte sich über die Monsterveranstaltung zwar nur flüchtig ins Bild, aber jede Form von Hilfe für Benachteiligte erscheint ihm sinnvoll. Er selber ist darauf fokussiert, sich als Nr. 1 im Tennis zum dritten Mal in Folge im Final zu behaupten.


Von Urs Osterwalder aus Wimbledon

Der Schweizer spielt hier zwar nicht für einen wohltätigen Zweck, sondern um 630'000 Pfund für das eigene Konto. Aber just das ist für den noch nicht ganz 24-Jährigen Grund genug, seinerseits ein grosses Herz unter dem Tennis-Shirt zu tragen. Mit seiner Roger Federer Foundation unterstützt er unterprivilegierte Kinder in Südafrika. Dem Elend und Kummer in gewissen Zonen rund um den Globus dürfe man sich nicht verschliessen, vor allem dann nicht, wenn man selber das grosse Glück habe, sich auf der Sonnenseite des Lebens aufzuhalten, sagt er.


Roddick: «Federer ist nie hochnäsig»

Offensichtlich ist es nicht das Talent allein, das einen grossen Champion auszeichnet. Es ist nicht nur Federers Tennis-Magie, von der seine Berufskollegen, ehemalige Stars, die für TV-Stationen Kommentare abgeben, Medienschaffende und Zuschauer angetan sind. Vielmehr schafft sich der Baselbieter seine Beliebtheit auch dadurch, dass er durchschlagendem Erfolg zum Trotz ein ganz normaler und freundlicher junger Mann geblieben ist. Sein Finalgegner Roddick attestierte ihm grosse Klasse: «Er ist nie hochnäsig oder überheblich. Er begegnet den Leuten mit Respekt, gleichgültig, ob's der Mann ist, der die Spieler-Garderobe reinigt, oder Personal, das ihm im Restaurant bedient. Die Worte «bitte» und «danke» sind für ihn jederzeit eine Selbstverständlichkeit.» Mark Miles, der CEO der Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP), schätzt sich glücklich, dass die Tour der Männer durch eine Nummer 1 wie Federer repräsentiert wird. Einen Botschafter mit derart positiver Ausstrahlung zu haben, sei ein Glücksfall. Einen entgegenkommenderen Athleten, der selbstlos auch einmal eine Sonderleistung zum Vorteil der Standesorganisation erbringe, habe er noch nie erlebt.


Familie gibt Kraft zum Regenerieren

Die Basis für das Heranreifen eines derart vorbildlichen Charakters ist wie so häufig das Elternhaus. Was Rogerlein einmal gelernt hat, vergisst der Roger nimmer mehr, gleichgültig wie viele Grand-Slam-Titel er noch einheimsen wird. Die Familie (inklusive Lebenspartnerin Mirka Vavrinec) erlaubt ihm, die Kraft zu regenerieren, die Energie aufzutanken, die er auf der Tour verbraucht. Da ist er der Sohn, der Bruder, der Freund, der Mensch mit all seinen Emotionen, nicht das Tennis-Genie, das Reichtum scheffelt.

Auf dem Platz geniesst Federer die Bewunderung des Publikums. Die Liebhaber von Tennis-Dramen kann er hingegen selten befriedigen, zu einseitig verlaufen in der Regel seine Matches, zu regelmässig beissen die Gegner auf Granit. Und ein grossartiger Entertainer ist er auch nicht. Auf Einlagen als Komiker verzichtet er. Er unterhält mit Tennis-Feinkost, Raffinement technischer Art, einzigartigen Bällen, die nur er zu schlagen imstande ist. Das spricht für sein grosses Talent, aber auch dafür, dass er hart arbeitet und unerbittlich an technischen Details feilt. Sein ausserordentliches Gefühl für Flugbahn und Drall beweist er nicht nur während der Ballwechsel, sondern auch mit der Art, wie er etwa die Balljungen und -mädchen «bedient», wenn er ihnen eine Filzkugel zuspielt, sei's mit dem Racket, von Hand oder mit dem Fuss.


Wie unfallfreies Gehen auf dem Trottoir

Bei Federer sieht Tennis so leicht aus wie bei anderen unfallfreies Gehen auf dem Trottoir. Zumeist ist er sogar dann unschlagbar, wenn er nicht auf seinem höchsten Niveau spielt. Bei ihm sind die Qualitäten vieler Top-Spieler in einer Person vereint. Er variiert das Tempo nach Belieben, ist schnell und behende, ist auf seine Aufgabe konzentriert, kontrolliert seine Gefühle und kann situativ improvisieren.

Das weiss auch Roddick, der von bisher neun Matches gegen Federer acht verloren hat. Der Amerikaner behauptete sich am Samstag in der Fortsetzung des am Freitag wegen Regens unterbrochenen Halbfinals gegen den Schweden Thomas Johansson in vier Sätzen, von denen drei erst im Tie-Break entschieden wurden (6:7, 6:2, 7:6, 7:6). Er hoffe, die gute Form aus dieser Partie mit in den Final nehmen zu können, sagte Roddick und fügte hinzu, er denke da nicht an die schlechte Bilanz gegen Federer. «Ich muss am Sonntag besser sein, nicht für die nächsten zehn Jahre, nicht für die nächsten was auch immer, sondern just in diesem Match. Das ist, was sich in meinem Gedächtnis festsetzen, was ich auf den Platz mitnehmen muss.»


Final - und dann Ferien

Einen Nachteil mochte Roddick nicht erkennen im Umstand, dass er am Samstag noch spielen musste. Ihm bleibe bis zum Endspiel genügend Zeit, um sich zu erholen und mit einer Massage verwöhnen zu lassen. Federer absolvierte am Samstag eine Trainingseinheit, erfüllte einige Pflichten (z. B. mit Interviews in Englisch, Deutsch und Französisch) und schätzte sich glücklich, auch einmal an etwas anderes als an Tennis denken zu können, beispielsweise an die Ferien von noch nicht definierter Länge nach dem Turnier in Wimbledon.

Am Sonntag wird er wieder hundertprozentig auf das Endspiel fokussiert sein, die Partien der vergangenen zwei Wochen aus dem Gedächtnis streichen, dafür die letzten Matches gegen Roddick rekapitulieren und daraus die nützlichen Schlüsse für den Final gegen den Mann ziehen, der gesagt hat, Federer sei das grösste Talent, das je ein Racket mit sich herumgetragen habe. Danach darf er die Schläger getrost für einige Tage zur Seite legen.

Stevens Point
07-03-2005, 12:57 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/4643611.stm

lunahielo
07-03-2005, 01:03 PM
Thanks, Stevens Point...I can read that one....My German just isn't good enough for the other....but I know many can read it.

TenHound
07-03-2005, 03:43 PM
That BBC article lists AR's age as 29!! Hello...he's 22!

babsi
07-03-2005, 05:36 PM
Thank you,Steven your are quick around here :)

SUKTUEN
07-03-2005, 07:06 PM
thankyou so much~

Stevens Point
07-03-2005, 07:11 PM
This interview is from Saturday, but since this hasn't been posted here, so I post it here.

R. Federer - Day 12
Saturday, July 2, 2005

Q. Live 8 has just started. We just wondered what you felt about the whole project, Bob Geldof's efforts?

ROGER FEDERER: I really don't know much about it. I don't know what to say. Really, honestly, I heard it yesterday for the first time, what it is. I didn't know it before. I don't know the person you just mentioned.

Q. Trying to get rid of world poverty.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, obviously it's good. Obviously, I support it. I don't know what to say.

Q. We think of you as very charitable yourself, sponsoring people in South Africa. You may have a lot of compassion for what's happening. Second biggest event of the day.

ROGER FEDERER: Obviously, I heard about it just the other day. I would think it's good. I heard great musicians come together, which I think is great. It's for a good cause.

Is it for Africa?

Q. It is.

ROGER FEDERER: That's fantastic. Anywhere in the world we need help, let alone in Africa. It's definitely always a start. I think they do it once a year?

Q. Once every 25 years, once a lifetime, when it's needed.

ROGER FEDERER: Okay. Great. I only support it.

Q. Can I ask you about the foundation. In March you went to New Brighton, said it was an emotional experience. Does that put into perspective what goes on there and your status as a millionaire, one of the top sports athletes in the world?

ROGER FEDERER: Definitely, yeah. I think when you see poor areas in the world, it always makes you ‑‑ you wonder sometimes and you realize actually how lucky you are, to be able to travel the world, be in hotels. Maybe all the traveling is not that bad.

For me it was very emotional because it's really where my help goes to. It's not just something that really for me is I know I will see it one time and then never see it again, it's something I will be keeping in touch with. That's why for me it was very emotional, nice to see actually the people were very happy down there, as well, because you might think they're only miserable, maybe not so happy. But it was actually the absolute different.

Q. You visited an AIDS hospital as well, did you? Probably quite an experience as well.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, that was difficult because, you know, that maybe in a few days' time there's a kid less there or so. That really touches you very strongly, of course, too, yeah.

Q. On the subject of tennis, are you pleased to see the semifinalists are still out there?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not really. I would be happy if they would be over and done with, too, so they could also have their rest, their fair share of rest. Also for me mentally to be able to prepare for the opponent, I think that would be better, too.

But it is the way it is. As long as we get the semis through and the women's finals, then I think everybody's going to be (inaudible) happy here.

Q. Do you have a preference who you meet?

ROGER FEDERER: Maybe I would like to play Johansson just because he's got less experience. But I think Roddick will be the classic match‑up, something that I would be looking forward to even more than to play Johansson.

Q. There's some debate on what your greatest strength is. If you had to step back and single out one or two of the aspects of your game that have given you all the success, what would you say?

ROGER FEDERER: I think, you know, my consistency now over the last few years has been definitely something that's been incredible for me, where in the beginning I was really struggling to be consistent. But, you know, my favorite shot will always stay the forehand shot, you know. I consider that my biggest strength of my game.

Q. And your consistency has been built on what? Your conditioning? Your confidence? What two or three aspects really have given you that conditioning?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think mental, mental strength. I believe very strong. It's basically impossible to break down my mental part now these days. Doesn't matter how many matches I've lost or won, you know, I feel like I always go into every match knowing I can win it if my form is there. And also if I'm not playing so well, sometimes I know that I can sneak through and just wait for the big moments, that I can play my good tennis right then.

I think knowing that is very important because tennis is quite a mental sport.

Q. How will you spend the day today?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I'm happy the practice is through because it's something I don't really enjoy so much, the practice between the big occasions. There's not much you can practice on. There's basically nothing. I want to change to the next match. Today was sort of difficult because I was watching the live scores, you know, it drove me crazy.

I'm happy the practice is over. For now I'm just going to relax and do some stretching, stay back, and maybe go and drink a coffee or something.

Q. Will you draw from last year either mentally or tactically?

ROGER FEDERER: I think I will look at the last two matches here in Wimbledon I've played him, but also try to remember the other matches I've played against him, what worked, what didn't work.

I'll definitely have sort of a game plan against him. I think he came out really hitting the ball extremely hard last year, which was a surprise for me. But even though I had my chances to get back into the first set, I had a Love‑40 game... That was a different Andy Roddick than I expected. I also wonder how he's going to play me in case he wins today.

Q. You're creating your own legacy here every time you play. What would it mean you to join two other legends like Borg and Sampras by winning Wimbledon three times in a row?

ROGER FEDERER: Something very special. Sampras was one of my favorite players. Borg, only sort of got to meet him once. What he achieved is something for me almost beyond something possible, the five in a row, plus the sixth, plus the six French Opens he's achieved.

To be in the same group as these two guys, that would be absolutely special to me.

Q. Can you remember when you met him?

ROGER FEDERER: In Monte‑Carlo. Must have been in the year 2000 or so.

Q. Did he say to you he thought one day you might go on and threaten his record?

ROGER FEDERER: Not really back then, no. He called me after I beat Sampras in 2001 because he was going for the fifth, wasn't he?

Q. Yes.

ROGER FEDERER: To tie Borg. He was thankful that I beat Pete.

Q. You've beaten Lleyton eight in a row now. Is there any player, going back in your career, even Juniors, where you had that kind of hill to climb against them? I'm wondering how you sort of got out of it.

ROGER FEDERER: I guess a few guys who I've beaten many times in a row, but from the top guys, I think him and Andre are the ones I've only really beaten, Andre also seven in a row, if I'm not mistaken. I mean, that is fantastic. I never thought the record would turn out this way because in the beginning, they were both up in the records head to head. For me this is a great tournament. It definitely brought me the No. 1 position in the world.

Q. What I meant was, have you ever had a situation where the situation was reversed and you were down with that many?

ROGER FEDERER: Not seven or eight, no. Maybe four or five. Nalbandian, Henman. Henman, Nalbandian maybe.

Q. What is the plus of Tony Roche on grass especially?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, for me if grass or clay, it's not a difference. He just helps me out to get to know my game a little bit better, little things I could maybe improve and change and adapt to certain players on certain days. I definitely think I work more intense, especially between matches, before tournaments than I used to. I pay more attention to what I really work on. Okay, today is special because we know the situation I'm in. But other than that, you know, we just go through a match sometimes very brief. We don't spend hours talking to each other.

Obviously, I know how to adapt to the grass, as well. I had the record before he came on board. But he's definitely a big help for me.

Q. Having done so well last year on your own without a coach, now you have Tony, if someone said, "Why have a coach," what would you answer at this point?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I think also traveling maybe too long on your own ‑ I'm talking for myself because everybody's different ‑ but for me maybe traveling too long on my own, eventually maybe it's going to also backfire me let's say maybe in two years' time only, or maybe in three years' time, I don't know, or maybe in two months' time.

I thought it was the right moment to really work with somebody again. I was in the end lucky to get Tony because he told me no in the first place and then changed his mind. I was happy about that. I wish I could have started to work with Tony earlier.

My plan wasn't to be on my own for 12 months. It was more maybe the first three months of the year and then we'll see what happens. Quite quickly I realized it wasn't that easy to actually find a coach.

Q. How long between when you first asked him and when he said yes?

ROGER FEDERER: What was it? About October and November.

SUKTUEN
07-03-2005, 07:14 PM
Roger YOU ARE THE KING~!

Lady Natalia
07-03-2005, 07:29 PM
Where can one find Roger's post interview from today??

SUKTUEN
07-03-2005, 07:34 PM
it is post in wimby thread

Lady Natalia
07-03-2005, 07:38 PM
R. Federer - Day 13
Sunday, July 3, 2005


Q. You're only 23 years old. Do you feel now if you stay fit and healthy that you can eclipse the records of Borg and Sampras here at the All England Club?

ROGER FEDERER: I feel like I put myself into position. This was very, very big tournament and match for me today. Obviously to get the fifth one, fifth Grand Slam, but also the third Wimbledon. I knew the importance of this one, so I was pretty tense going into it.

After the first set, I really started to feel so good, you know, that I got so confidence. Obviously, for the next few years I'll definitely be a huge favorite also for this tournament. Doesn't mean necessarily I'll take them all.

Q. Andy said he hopes you get bored now so you can give him a chance. That is likely to happen?

ROGER FEDERER: It's hard for him, you know, because I really played a fantastic match ‑ one of my best in my life. Again, you know, the biggest, most important moment, you know, in a Grand Slam final, and I would consider this even bigger than the US Open final I played, so this is my best match maybe I've ever played.

I won't get bored so quickly, so I'm sorry.

Q. Where does it rank for you in the three? You cried the first, you cried this time, but not the second one.

ROGER FEDERER: I did then, too. I cried the second one, too, for sure (smiling).

Somehow ‑‑ well, the second one was a huge relief. The first one is the first one. Obviously, the second one was like some huge relief. I really had to fight really hard to get through. In the end, you know, I'm just like, "Wow, you know, how did I come back into this match?"

And today, it seemed like I was playing flawless. Everything was working. In a way, I think this one will actually take me longer to realize. I remember during the match and during the rain delay, and then when I came back, I never really felt like I'm actually playing. It's like I'm not living this correctly.

So, I don't know, it's a very strange feeling I have. It's probably going to take me days, months, weeks, years, I don't know, to realize this one, so...

Q. It's not your responsibility if your opponents don't turn up on the court and give you a hard time, but would you like them to push you a bit more?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I feel they push me. That's all there is sometimes. I played such good tennis I thought today that I didn't allow him to come into the match. I just need to play just a little bit less good, and right away the match is totally different.

I think all of them are trying as hard as they can. But it has worked. You know, you look at the Australian Open, you look at the French Open. It worked to beat me. Now, again, I'm very happy that semis and finals I didn't lose a set. That's fantastic. But most important of all is now the Wimbledon, because this is what means most to me.

Q. What was going through your mind when you knew you'd won? You collapsed on the floor, rolled around. What kind of emotions were running through your mind there?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, everything sort of started when I ‑‑ let me think. 4‑3, I was serving. I just broke, I think. I started to feel like, "Wow, eight more points on my serve and I'm all right." I started to really shake my head, like, "I'm so close again, you know. It's all in my power now. There's no more really Andy can do, except if I mess up here."

Then I held and I was sort of calm. He held easily, too. Then when I started to serve for the match, I mean, obviously the first point was big, was an ace. I really got nervous, you know, just hoping to make the first serve. Missed it, okay. Hit an ace on the second serve because he took the wrong side.

I felt my arm shaking, and I was just like, after he came back to 30‑15, I was like, "Why now? 30‑15? I want 40‑Love here." I was really getting nervous. I just tried to hit it as hard as I could at 40‑15, you know.

Obviously once it all happens, you don't know the reaction. And I think at 4‑3 I started to think, "How will it be with the trophy? How will it be my reaction? How is this? How is that?"

I'm like, "No, no, no, no, we're not there yet." I always have to calm myself down. Once it all happens, you don't know what happens. It's really strange.

Q. You're admitting you do get nervous. Visually it looks like a day in the park for you.

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, yeah. Heart rate starts going up.

Q. You don't show it.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, then I guess I don't show it. It's good, poker face.

Q. What is the key to going out and playing at the level you play so consistently? A lot of players have talent, but they go out and blow up, have a bad day. Why do you feel you can play at the level you do so regularly?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, maybe I lost too many matches which I should have won when I was younger, you know. So now it's turned around for me. Now I'm winning matches I maybe should lose sometimes.

I can't answer, you know, how consistent I'm playing. I amaze myself how incredible actually I use my talent to win. For those who follow me since I'm a youngster, they knew I had potential. But I don't think nobody would have ever thought it would be this extreme, basically dominating the game, winning three Wimbledons. One, you think, wow, that's fantastic. When you end up winning three, you're like really starting to wonder, "What have I done right in my career that this has happened to me?"

I'm very, very proud, because this is the most important tournament. To really now for the last I would say two, three years, I've put it together so consistently, I have a lot of pride in that, too.

Q. What impressed you most with yourself today?

ROGER FEDERER: The way I came out because I remember the way Andy came out in the finals last year. Now it was me this time, you know, because I really felt good on the serve, from the baseline, right away on the return as well. And I think that was definitely big, big for me, you know, to get that underway.

Even though I was down a break in the second, I know I will have my chances again to break against Andy.

Yeah, I mean, I think the rain delay was not really necessary, but it happened. Of course, it makes you wonder, you know, is this sort of payback time now to last year?

I'm happy with every aspect of my game, so...

Q. Tony Roche has had a lot of heartache here over the years particularly in that player's box in finals. Was it special for you to know he could be part of a winning partnership here in a Wimbledon final?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, he's won here more times than I have.

Q. In singles.

ROGER FEDERER: Doubles. I count that, too.

It's definitely special for him, I guess. You know, you have to ask him. For me, of course, I'm so happy for myself. But really happy that it also has worked out, our partnership. It's sort of not paid off, but after the semis in Australia which I thought it was fantastic, and the French was good, too, he was part of that, too. Now finally we get the win together.

I think we're very excited and happy. He's not a guy who shows too much emotions, but I felt like he's very carried away, too, in the moment itself when we saw each other. I think tonight at the champions dinner we get a chance to reflect more on that.

Q. How important is he now becoming, even though it started on a gradual basis, for your preparation?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I knew from the start that he might be a big help in my game. I'm happy I start to understand what he's trying to teach me. Even though maybe, you know, he's not traveling 30, 40 weeks a year, I still feel he gives me enough weeks and time together.

We've just been together about eight or nine weeks, which is a lot. You start to really know each other and start to understand each other. The language we actually talk, in tennis, that we actually know what we want to do. If he wants to walk away tomorrow, I have no problem. He's very easy in the relationship we have in tennis, in coach, you know. I just want him to know that. Every day and every week he gives me, I'm very thankful because I know how old he is, what he's been through, as a player, as a coach. He doesn't need it any more. So I'm very thankful to him.

Q. How would you react today if your name was Roddick and not Federer?

ROGER FEDERER: If what?

Q. If your name was Roddick, how would you react to a situation like that, someone dominating?

ROGER FEDERER: I think it would be ‑‑ in a way it makes you wonder, I guess. In another way, it's easy to accept because the other opponent played really well. That's the feeling I get. And I don't think Andy will look back too much with regrets on this match because I really thought I played as good as I could.

I think if he could have maybe played a little bit better, gotten off to a better start. You know, the score looks very one‑sided, but let's imagine he wins the second set, after saving the three set points, then the match looks totally different.

I think it's like Lleyton, as well. They played a good tournament. Semis or a finals in a Slam is always I think a good result, too. They'll go into the next tournament knowing that they'll need really some exceptional play to beat them. I think that's going to help them all the way through to the end of the year.

Q. Andy spoken about how proud he was to play in an era against somebody as great as you. He's going to have to deal with you for as long as you both play. Do you have any sympathy for what he faces over the next several years?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, be nice to him. He's a great player himself, too, and I respect him very much. I enjoy playing him and Lleyton I think almost the most because we are the ones who got to the sort of ‑‑ up to the highest positions, you know, all sort of together. We've always had good matches, even though of course our series are one‑sided.

I always enjoy playing him very much because he's very fair play. He's funny off court, on court. I always look forward to play him. The challenge of that big serve and the challenge of his game makes me play really good tennis, you know. I know how hard and how difficult he is to beat on the court. So for me this is definitely a very special moment, to be able to play like this in the finals of Wimbledon against him.

Q. If you continue to dominate at Wimbledon the way you are now, do you think your greatest opponent might end up being yourself?

ROGER FEDERER: No, no. Not quite there yet. No, I mean, I'll take match by match, day by day, year by year basically, next few years. So far I've been lucky not to have any injuries, to be able to play at the level I am.

But it's very draining and hard to keep that up all the time. Wimbledon and the grass has definitely been very good to me over the last few years. Of course, I'll try to be able to carry that even longer the next year.

SUKTUEN
07-03-2005, 07:46 PM
Roger is so great!!

Mrs. B
07-03-2005, 08:54 PM
Defending his turf
Federer blisters Roddick for third consecutive title
Posted: Sunday July 3, 2005 11:31AM; Updated: Sunday July 3, 2005 3:25PM


Roger Federer improved to 5-0 in Grand Slam finals and won his 21st straight final.
Simon Bruty/SI

WIMBLEDON, England (AP) -- Roger Federer strengthened his claim to greatness Sunday, winning his third consecutive Wimbledon title by beating Andy Roddick 6-2, 7-6 (2), 6-4.

With an impeccable performance, even by his high standards, the top-ranked Federer became the third man since 1936 to win three straight Wimbledon crowns, joining seven-time champion Pete Sampras and five-time winner Bjorn Borg.

"Nice group," Federer said during the trophy ceremony. "Sampras was one of my favorite players of all time. Borg, what you can you say about him, he's just fantastic. ... I hope it's not going to stop with three. Maybe one day I'll win a fourth one, but this one is already very, very great."

Federer defeated the second-seeded Roddick at Wimbledon for the third year in a row, including the past two finals, and leads the rivalry 9-1. Roddick is 32-0 against everyone else on grass since 2003.

"Pity for him," Federer said, "but I really did play my best."

Federer won his 21st consecutive final and improved to 5-0 in Grand Slam finals. The 23-year-old Swiss became the first man since Tony Trabert in 1953-55 to win his first five major finals.

On championship point Federer hit a 129 mph service winner, his fastest of the match. He screamed with joy, fell to his knees, rolled onto his back and covered his face with his hands. He rose and met Roddick with a hug, then raised his arms to the cheering crowd, tears in his eyes.

Federer finished with 49 winners and just 12 unforced errors, an astounding ratio. During the trophy ceremony, Roddick wryly acknowledged he wasn't in the mood to talk about being overmatched.

"I'm more in the mood for a beer right now," he said, prompting cheers from the Centre Court crowd. "I couldn't have asked more of myself. I put in all the work, and I wanted to win this so badly. This guy is the best for a reason and he really deserves a lot of credit. ... Maybe I'll just punch him or something."

It's not just the rivalry with Roddick that underscores Federer's superiority. In the semifinals, he easily beat No. 2-ranked Lleyton Hewitt for the eighth time in a row.

A rain delay after the second set slowed Federer for only 25 minutes in his pursuit of the title. He has won 36 consecutive matches on grass, including 21 at Wimbledon, since losing to Mario Ancic in the first round here in 2002.

Also winning a third title at the All England Club was Venus Williams, who overcame a championship point to beat top-ranked Lindsay Davenport in the women's final Saturday.

Federer's victory ended a brief Grand Slam slump. He won three major titles last year, then lost this year in the semifinals of the Australian Open and French Open.

As usual, Federer won with a mixture of precision and power. On one point he placed his serve on a line, hit his second shot on another line, then slammed an overhead winner. He hit 11 aces, including a sly one on a 108 mph changeup.

At the net, he made even difficult volleys look easy. During one exchange from close range, Roddick rifled three consecutive shots at Federer, who casually responded with graceful volleys, the third a winner.

Only Roddick's big serve kept things close. He had little chance in baseline rallies and tried coming forward, but Federer happily accepted the invitation to tee off on passing shots, hitting 16 for winners.

As Federer pulled away, there were shouts of "Come on, Andy!" from fans eager for a more competitive match.

Federer refused to cooperate, saving several of his most spectacular shots for the seventh game of the final set, when he broke for a 4-3 lead. Three passing shots won points, and he smacked one return so hard it sailed between the legs of an onrushing Roddick. Reaching behind him, Roddick somehow managed to block the ball back, but Federer put away his next shot.

Roddick stayed even only until the match's sixth game, when he made the mistake of hitting an overhead back to Federer, who yanked it crosscourt for a winner. That gave the Swiss a break point, which he converted.

Federer broke again to take the first set. After winning 20 of his first 21 service points, he was broken for the only time and fell behind 3-1 in the second set.

Federer broke back for 3-all. Roddick overcame two set points serving at 4-5, but in the tiebreaker he quickly fell behind, and when the deficit reached 5-2, he slammed his racket to the grass.

He shouldn't have been so hard on himself: In the first two sets, Federer hit 33 winners with just three unforced errors.

Federer improved to 7-1 in tiebreakers against Roddick, who has won one of 10 sets in their three Wimbledon showdowns.

For his 30th career title, Federer won $1.1 million and Roddick earned $557,550.

Stevens Point
07-03-2005, 09:21 PM
Updated: July 3, 2005, 2:36 PM ET
Becker, Connors call Federer 'a class above'
SportsTicker

LONDON -- Boris Becker hailed the "supreme" Wimbledon champion Roger Federer after the Swiss world No. 1 dominated American Andy Roddick to claim his third consecutive title.

Federer joined a group of just three men in the Open era (1968-present) to win three in a row at the All England Club with a 6-2, 7-6 (2), 6-4 victory.

And Becker believes the best is yet to come from 23-year-old Federer, who already has Pete Sampras' modern Wimbledon record of seven titles in his sights.

Becker, Wimbledon champion in 1985, 1986 and 1989, told the BBC: "Federer is on top of his game and at the pinnacle of his career right now -- we are watching greatness unfold. It really is a privilege to be a part of this whole time -- this year he was supreme out there, he was oozing confidence and I can't believe the way he played in the final.

"He is [a] different class to everyone else, he has raised the bar and everybody has got to look up to him. But the bad news is Roger is only going to get better. He is only 23 and he has got another three or four years of great tennis in him at least."

Eight-time Grand Slam champion Jimmy Connors -- victorious here in 1974 and 1982 -- also paid tribute to the Swiss star and warned Roddick things could be about to get worse before he can bridge the gap.

"Federer is certainly a class above," Connors said. "Roddick had a successful event and got to the final where he lost to the No. 1 player in the world. But for him to win the Championships and beat Federer he is going to have to suffer, to go away and pay the price, adapt his game and work out what can get him to the next level.

"Federer was really just a pleasure and a joy to watch."

Former British No. 1 John Lloyd also hailed Federer and predicted his dominance would continue for some time to come.

"You see magic moments when you're watching matches but Federer seems to have one almost every game," Lloyd said. "It's a privilege to watch him and he is the complete player.

"He is raising the bar all the time and the rest are going to have to work extremely hard to get near to him. He is on a different planet to everyone else."

Daniel
07-04-2005, 12:01 AM
Thanks for the interviews and articles :D :D

PaulieM
07-04-2005, 12:19 AM
Updated: July 3, 2005, 5:21 PM ET
This may be only beginning for FedererBy Barry Lorge
Special to ESPN.com


WIMBLEDON, England – In brushing aside Andy Roddick in straight sets Sunday to grasp his third successive gentlemen's singles title at Wimbledon, Roger Federer again produced some shots that seemed almost ethereal. That is a fitting place to begin trying to assess one of those rare talents that could elevate the whole game to a new stratosphere.

Federer has made the extraordinary his norm on the grass courts of Wimbledon, the exceptional his standard. He is so far above his contemporaries, at least at the All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club, he already shares the rarefied air of comparisons with transcendent champions of the past. They look like his only real rivals.



The serve is just one of many weapons at Roger Federer's disposal.
We thought it might be eons before we again saw the likes of Pete Sampras – seven-time singles champion at Wimbledon in 1993-94 and 1997-2000, winner of a record 14 Grand Slam titles. Now we are witnessing the continuing reign and ascendance of Federer, who was 19 when he dethroned Sampras in the fourth round in 2001. He won his first Wimbledon crown in 2002, and doesn't seem likely to give it up soon.

They were born under the same sign, Leo the Lion, a decade apart: Sampras on Aug. 12, 1971, in America, Federer on Aug. 8, 1981, in Switzerland. Leo is said to be the most dominant and spontaneously creative of the characters of the zodiac. Federer, who also won the Australian Open and U.S. Open last year, is four days older than Sampras was when he won his fifth major.

The only men in the Open Tennis era who have won more Grand Slam singles titles before they turned 24 were Bjorn Borg (8) and Mats Wilander (6). Boris Becker also had five at age 23. John McEnroe won his fifth at age 24, Stefan Edberg at age 25.

Certainly Roddick, the 22-year-old No. 2 seed and 2003 U.S. Open champ, seems to have lost ground to Federer since they met in last year's final here. Federer won that one, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 6-4. This time the scores were 6-2, 7-6 (2), 6-4.

Federer has now won 35 consecutive matches on grass over a three-year period, 21 of them at Wimbledon. Roddick has the second-best record on grass over that time – 32-3 – but has been able to take only one set in three meetings with Federer at Wimbledon. Overall, Federer is 9-1, head-to-head.

Roddick was asked if he thought Federer could be the best player ever. "You're not stretching far to make that argument, that's for sure," he said. "Time will tell. If he keeps up this level, then I think so. I don't know many people in history who would beat him."

The trophy presentation on Centre Court now has the feel of a coronation more than the culmination of a competition. After Sunday's triumph, Federer was asked how it felt to join the likes of Fred Perry (1934-36), Borg (1976-80), and Sampras as winners of Wimbledon hat tricks in successive years. "To be in that group," said Federer, who has a real reverence for Wimbledon and its incandescent stars, "is something very special."

Before Perry, you have to go back pre-1922, when the All England moved to its current home on Church Road from the old grounds on Worple Road, to find such streaks: Willie Renshaw (1881-86), Reggie Doherty (1897-1900), brother Laurie Doherty (1902-06), New Zealander Anthony Wilding (1910-13). But those are not really comparable.

Tennis was in its infancy then, strictly an amateur diversion for gentlemen and ladies and a glorious garden party. After the first tournament in 1877 through 1921, the format was a "Challenge Round." The defending champion waited for a challenger to play through the "All-Comers." Renshaw, the Dohertys and Wilding only played one match each year.



Roger Federer expects to return to Wimbledon many times in the future.
It should also be remembered that until the advent of "Open Tennis" in 1968 brought professionals back into the sport's mainstream tournaments, again making the Grand Slams truly grand, many Wimbledon champions turned pro to cash in on the barnstorming tours. Otherwise great champions such as Don Budge, Jack Kramer, Frank Sedgman, Tony Trabert, Lew Hoad, and Rod Laver might have "tripled" as well. Laver, in fact, did win four straight Wimbledons that he played – 1961-62 and 1968-69.

That is why it is so noteworthy that Laver – the only man to sweep all four Grand Slam titles (Australian, French, Wimbledon, U.S.) in one season twice, in 1962 as an amateur and 1969 as a pro – has said he is proud to be compared to Federer.

Federer was asked if he stays injury-free, could he eclipse the Wimbledon records of Borg and Sampras? "I feel like I put myself into position," he said. "This was a very, very big tournament and match for me. Obviously, to get the fifth Grand Slam, but also the third Wimbledon – I knew the importance of this one, so I was pretty tense going into it."

He didn't look it. His all-court game was in full flight from the start. The only time he looked human was after the last point, when he fell to his favorite lawn and rolled on the turf, then buried his head in a towel of regal purple and shed a few tears of joy.

"I really played a fantastic match, one of the best in my life," Federer said. Better even than his 6-0, 7-6, 6-0 rout of Lleyton Hewitt in last year's U.S. Open final? "I would consider this even bigger than the U.S. Open final, so this is my best match maybe I've ever played."

Federer is the first man to win the first five Grand Slam finals he played since Tony Trabert in the 1950s. The historical comparisons will continue. Federer lost the semifinals of this year's Australian Open to Marat Safin and French Open to Rafael Nadal, but he has won his last five matches against Roddick, his last eight against Hewitt, his last seven against Andre Agassi. The past champions are his measuring stick.

I lunched after Federer's semifinal slaughter of Hewitt here with John Newcombe, the Wimbledon singles champion of 1967 and 1970-71 and six-time doubles champion. The topic of conversation was Federer's potential place in history.

"I think he's got his own identity," said Newcombe, now a TV commentator to his native Australia. "He's playing a quality of tennis that is probably the best I've ever seen here. It's amazing. If you line him up against Sampras, give Pete an edge on the serve. Groundstrokes, both sides, you have to give the edge to Federer. Net game and mobility are about the same. Roger may be even a little better mover than Pete. Certainly his backhand is far better than Pete's was."

He has a creativity about him that few players have – or ever have had, I suggested.

"Absolutely," Newcombe said. "He's just fun to watch. I haven't heard anybody, of all the past champions that are here, who has come up with a weakness."

Imagine you were playing him, I said. What would you try to probe?

I mentioned that I had talked to Tony Roche – Newk's partner in five Wimbledon doubles titles, now Federer's coach – and asked if he compared Roger's talent to any particular player. "He plays a lot like Laver," Roche said, which may be the greatest compliment an Aussie tennis player can give. "His shotmaking, the way he is able to take a ball behind him and flick it for a winner, his ability to adapt to different surfaces, which in today's game is sort of unusual. Rocket is really the one he reminds me of."

Did Newk agree?



The champion also knows he has room to improve.
"Well, he's more creative than Rod because he's got a different racket," Newcombe said. "Had Rod played with today's rackets, he probably would have been able to do more, so it's pretty hard to compare, because Federer is hitting shots that Laver never hit. You couldn't play like Roger plays with a wooden racket. It's impossible."

For example?

"The half-volley topspin-drive passing shot from the back of the court," Newcombe said, laughing at how such a thing defies Newtonian physics. Yet he's seen it with his own eyes. "He hits the ball so hard, across the court, for a short angle, with a tremendous amount of topspin. How can you hit it that hard, with that much topspin? They're stringing their rackets differently now. The down strings are synthetic, and are strung at a certain tension, and the cross strings are natural gut, strung at a different tension. That allows players to impart more spin on the ball, and keep the control."

Court coverage, net game, backcourt game, flexibility of tactics, confidence and consistency, temperament, variety of pace and spin – can you find anything to quibble about in Federer's game?

"I think he's created his own space," Newcombe said. "Roger has put together a bloody complete package."

So will he challenge Sampras' record for Wimbledon and Grand Slam singles?

"The way things are going, he well could," Newcombe said. "He's only 23. There's no one around who can stop him on grass if he stays physically and mentally right."

And will Roche help him do that?

"Getting Tony to coach him is a very smart move," Newcombe said. "Federer realizes he has raised the bar on everyone, but now everyone else is going to want to get up there. So Roger is looking to raise the bar even higher. He went after Tony for a year before Tony agreed to do it Someone who does that – you're already No. 1 in the world, you've won Wimbledon twice, and you still want to get the very best coach you can find – you've got to think that guy is going to be around for a while.

"I think Tony will help with the slice backhand, volleys, the second serve – try to see if he can get a little bit more improvement on those shots – and just overall discuss the game at this level. I mean, he still has to conquer the clay, doesn't he? But he has won tournaments on clay; he has all the tools to win on any surface. And I don't think he's going to stop at three Wimbledons. I think he's going to finish up writing his own bit of history here."

The really great ones do raise the standard for the whole game, don't they?

"Yeah, and I think Federer is doing that and will continue to do it because he's going about it the right way," Newcombe said. "It's scary, but he's not content with where he is now. He doesn't have a big entourage around him like some of these other guys. He's just doing his job, and enjoying it. I think his interviews are great. He's very honest, very straightforward, very polite to other players, and very humble about his own ability and accomplishments."

In several languages, too: English, Swiss German, French, occasionally Italian.

"I think everyone everywhere who loves tennis is just enthralled with his game," Newcombe said. "It's just beautiful to watch."

Maybe even ethereal.


Barry Lorge, former Washington Post staff writer and sports editor/columnist of The San Diego Union, has covered tennis in more than 25 countries on five continents. He co-authored the section on tennis in the Encyclopaedia Britannica.

PaulieM
07-04-2005, 12:25 AM
Defending his turf
Federer blisters Roddick for third consecutive title
Posted: Sunday July 3, 2005 11:31AM; Updated: Sunday July 3, 2005 5:52PM


Roger Federer improved to 5-0 in Grand Slam finals and won his 21st straight final.
Simon Bruty/SI


WIMBLEDON, England (AP) -- Roger Federer felt tense before facing Andy Roddick in the Wimbledon final and jittery during it, his right arm shaking, his heartbeat rising.

Or so Federer says.

We'll have to take his word for it because there wasn't a hint of anything but cool confidence from Federer while crafting a 6-2, 7-6 (2), 6-4 victory over Roddick on Sunday to become just the third man since 1936 to win three consecutive titles at the All England Club.

In a rematch of the 2004 Wimbledon final, Federer used a full assortment of creative strokes to paint his latest tennis masterpiece on the sport's most prestigious canvas and claim his fifth title in the last nine Grand Slams.

"It's hard for him because I really played a fantastic match -- one of the best of my life," said Federer, the first man in 50 years to win his first five major finals.

"Today it seemed liked I was playing flawless. Everything was working."

He finished with 49 winners and 12 unforced errors, an unheard-of ratio. He out-aced Roddick 11-7. He broke Roddick four times.

Roddick charged the net early, coming in behind second serves, chipping and charging, using deep approach shots. But it didn't take long for the No. 1-ranked Federer to calibrate his passing shots, and he finished with 16.

"I'm not going to sit around and sulk and cry. I did everything I could," the second-seeded Roddick said. "I tried going to his forehand and coming in. He passed me. I tried going to his backhand and coming in. He passed me. Tried staying back. He figured out a way to pass me, even though I was at the baseline."

Federer's performance, filled with "How'd he do that?" moments, left everyone gushing. Even Federer made reference to how he's "dominating the game."

Three-time Wimbledon champion Boris Becker said: "We are watching greatness unfold."

John McEnroe breathlessly told NBC's viewers: "People think I'm kidding or that I'm just talking him up when I say he's the greatest talent of all time, but I believe that."

Playing the best brings out Federer's best. He's 9-1 against Roddick and has won eight straight matches against Lleyton Hewitt, including Friday's semifinals.

Federer is at a level where his competition lies not with the Roddicks and Hewitts, but the greats of the past. The Swiss star joined Bjorn Borg (1976-80), Pete Sampras (1993-95, 1997-00) and Fred Perry (1934-36) as the only men in the last 90 years to triumph at Wimbledon three years in a row.

Federer's grass-court winning streak is 36 matches, second only to Borg's 41.

"He's really quite a genius," said Federer's coach, Tony Roche, "especially on grass."

Federer is a little more than a month shy of his 24th birthday, just like Sampras was when he won the fifth of his record 14 major titles.

Then there's this remarkable statistic: Federer has won 21 straight finals; the previous record was 12, shared by McEnroe and Borg.

Poor Roddick. On grass the past three seasons, he's 32-0 against everyone else and 0-3 against Federer.


Andy Roddick's 1-9 record against Roger Federer includes losses in each of the past three Wimbledons.
Simon Bruty/SI
Roddick's record-setting serve and forehand were good enough to win the U.S. Open and reach No. 1 in 2003, and he's added plenty to his game since then, improving his backhand, returns and volleying.

"It's tough knowing that you're a better player than you were two years ago," Roddick said, "but not having a lot to show for it."

To his credit, he never packed it in, and with help from a backhand down the line, Roddick broke for a 2-1 lead in the second set, then punched the air three times.

Won't see that from Federer. There's no way to tell from his body language whether he won or lost a point. He walks along the baseline, perhaps flicking a bead of sweat from his brow or tucking strands of hair into his white bandanna.

Inside, though, he's churning.

"I knew the importance of this one, so I was pretty tense going into it," Federer said. "Then when I started to serve for the match ... I really got nervous."

Sure, Roger.

As nervous as you were down a break in the second set?

Federer broke back to 3-all with two terrific shots. Roddick followed a second serve to the net and hit a crisp volley, but Federer slid over for a forehand pass. Then Federer stretched to return a 120 mph serve and forced Roddick to sail a backhand long.

Later, Roddick hit a tremendous return, followed by a sharp shot. His reward? Yet another passing shot off Federer's racket.

"It deflates you and it puts more pressure on you," Roddick said, "because you feel like, 'OK, if I'm playing points like that, maybe I have to try to do something better.' I don't know if I can."

When he pushed a forehand into the net to fall behind 5-2 in the tiebreaker, Roddick spiked his racket. That's something Federer was known to do as a junior, but his persona has matured along with his game.

"He's just become so solid mentally," Roddick said.

A light rain was falling as the second set ended, and play was halted for 25 minutes. A chance for Roddick to regroup? For Federer to lose momentum?

Hardly. The hits just kept on coming. A 108 mph ace on the chalk. A lob over the 6-foot-2 Roddick. A half-volley backhand on the run that somehow became an unreachable drop shot. Even a shanked shot found a corner.

The final break came at 3-3 in the third.

Federer made two lunging saves, then -- snap! -- went from defense to offense, coming from well off the ball for a forehand winner. On the next point, Federer hit a return so hard that the only way for Roddick to make contact was to swing his racket behind his back and through his legs. Federer ended the game with a backhand and lifted a fist while Roddick lowered his head.

Federer's celebration was slightly less muted three games later. He opened with two aces, catching Roddick leaning the wrong way on one, and finished with a 129 mph service winner to close it out.

Federer dropped to his knees the way Borg used to on that lawn, then rolled in the grass, tears welling.

Roddick graciously walked to that side of the net for a handshake and embrace.

"I don't know many people in history who would beat him," Roddick said. "You just have to sit back and say, 'too good,' sometimes. Hope he gets bored or something."

Copyright 2005 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

TenHound
07-04-2005, 12:48 AM
A Must-read by Nick B. in the Independent - exc. article - 2 things stand out:

1) His characterization of Roger:
" Roger Federer is virtually indescribable. Whatever we say about him cannot express the jaw-dropping, breathtaking brilliance of his play. He moves like a whisper and executes like a wrecking ball. It is simply impossible to explain how he does what he does."

***He Moves Like a Whisper & Executes like a Wrecking Ball!***

2) Finally, those who matter have dropped the "Pete's won 14, so he's the best" line, that Roger's play demonstrates to be so one-dimensional. He baldly & boldly states:

"No one knows what tomorrow will bring, when an injury or a personal crisis could change your life and end your career. But in my opinion, shot for shot, Federer is the best player who has ever played the game."

After only 3 yrs. @the top - his 2nd @#1 - Nick puts him in the class w/Gretzky, Ali & Jordan.

Daniel
07-04-2005, 01:28 AM
A Must-read by Nick B. in the Independent - exc. article - 2 things stand out:

1) His characterization of Roger:
" Roger Federer is virtually indescribable. Whatever we say about him cannot express the jaw-dropping, breathtaking brilliance of his play. He moves like a whisper and executes like a wrecking ball. It is simply impossible to explain how he does what he does."

***He Moves Like a Whisper & Executes like a Wrecking Ball!***

2) Finally, those who matter have dropped the "Pete's won 14, so he's the best" line, that Roger's play demonstrates to be so one-dimensional. He baldly & boldly states:

"No one knows what tomorrow will bring, when an injury or a personal crisis could change your life and end your career. But in my opinion, shot for shot, Federer is the best player who has ever played the game."

After only 3 yrs. @the top - his 2nd @#1 - Nick puts him in the class w/Gretzky, Ali & Jordan.

and with only 5 GS they say nice things about him, what will they say when he wins the USO later this year? ;)

Daniel
07-04-2005, 09:33 AM
Federer express

Roger wins third consecutive Wimbledon title

By Howard Fendrich, The Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England -- Roger Federer felt tense before facing Andy Roddick in the Wimbledon final and was jittery during it.
Or so Federer says.

We'll have to take his word for it because there wasn't a hint of anything but cool confidence from Federer while crafting a 6-2, 7-6 (2), 6-4 victory over Roddick on Sunday to become only the third man since 1936 to win three consecutive titles at the All England Club.

In a rematch of the 2004 Wimbledon final, Federer used a full assortment of creative strokes to paint his latest tennis masterpiece on the sport's most prestigious canvas and claim his fifth title in the last nine Grand Slams.

"It's hard for him because I really played a fantastic match -- one of the best of my life," said Federer, the first man in 50 years to win his first five major finals.

"Today it seemed liked I was playing flawless. Everything was working."

He finished with 49 winners and 12 unforced errors, an unheard-of ratio. He out-aced Roddick 11-7 and broke Roddick four times.

Roddick charged the net early, came in behind second serves and used deep approach shots. But it didn't take long for the No. 1-ranked Federer to calibrate his passing shots. He finished with 16.

"I'm not going to sit around and sulk and cry. I did everything I could," the second-seeded Roddick said. "I tried going to his forehand and coming in. He passed me. I tried going to his backhand and coming in. He passed me. Tried staying back. He figured out a way to pass me, even though I was at the baseline."

Three-time Wimbledon champion Boris Becker said: "We are watching greatness unfold."

John McEnroe told NBC's viewers: "People think I'm kidding or that I'm just talking him up when I say he's the greatest talent of all time, but I believe that."

Playing the best brings out Federer's best. He's 9-1 against Roddick and has won eight consecutive matches against Lleyton Hewitt, including Friday's semifinals.

Federer is at a level where his competition lies not with the Roddicks and Hewitts, but the greats of the past. The Swiss star joined Bjorn Borg (1976-80), Pete Sampras (1993-95, 1997-00) and Fred Perry (1934-36) as the only men in the last 90 years to triumph at Wimbledon three years in a row.

Federer's grass-court winning streak is 36 matches, second only to Borg's 41.

"He's really quite a genius," said Federer's coach, Tony Roche, "especially on grass."

Federer is a little more than a month shy of his 24th birthday, just like Sampras was when he won the fifth of his record 14 major titles.

Federer also has won 21 consecutive finals; the previous record was 12, shared by McEnroe and Borg.

Poor Roddick. On grass the past three seasons, he's 32-0 against everyone else and 0-3 against Federer.

Roddick's record-setting serve and forehand were good enough to win the U.S. Open and reach No. 1 in 2003, and he's added plenty to his game since then while improving his backhand, returns and volleying.

"It's tough knowing that you're a better player than you were two years ago," Roddick said, "but not having a lot to show for it."

Federer broke back to 3-all in the second set with two terrific shots. Roddick followed a second serve to the net and hit a crisp volley, but Federer slid over for a forehand pass. Federer then stretched to return a 120 mph serve and forced Roddick to sail a backhand long.

Roddick later hit a tremendous return, followed by a sharp shot. His reward was another passing shot from Federer.

"It deflates you and it puts more pressure on you," Roddick said, "because you feel like, ‘OK, if I'm playing points like that, maybe I have to try to do something better.' I don't know if I can."

When he pushed a forehand into the net to fall behind 5-2 in the tiebreaker, Roddick spiked his racket. That's something Federer was known to do as a junior, but his persona has matured along with his game.

"He's just become so solid mentally," Roddick said.

A light rain was falling as the second set ended, and play was halted for 25 minutes. A chance for Roddick to regroup? For Federer to lose momentum? Hardly.

The final break came at 3-3 in the third.

Federer made two lunging saves, then came from well off the ball for a forehand winner. On the next point, Federer hit a return so hard that the only way for Roddick to make contact was to swing his racket behind his back and through his legs. Federer ended the game with a backhand.

Federer opened the next game with two aces and finished with a 129 mph service winner to close it out.

Federer dropped to his knees the way Borg used to, then rolled on the grass. Roddick graciously walked to that side of the net for a handshake and embrace.

"I don't know many people in history who would beat him," Roddick said. "You just have to sit back and say, ‘Too good,' sometimes. Hope he gets bored or something."

babsi
07-04-2005, 11:06 AM
Thanks for posting :)

It´s nice to read all those articles - and there are more to come - BUT I´m not going to foul myself,because it´s the same press guys that have and will will turn around to diss Roger at the next chance .I´m not willing to buy into there crap,so I not going to get cought up in there praise either!
Better to make up your own mind,what to think about Roger - and not much care for anyone elses!

Yasmine
07-04-2005, 11:13 AM
I have access to Wimbledon interviews and videos online... but I had to pay for it so I tried to take the link for you guys... He's great in the press conference:p (as expected:D)
mms://rxs-lvl3-lon16.rbn.com/farm/*/bt/bt/secure/wmdemand/wimbledon/9048032_700.wmv?rbnkey=20050704100918b36b638242c70 db36cf18bc301d961
Please let me know if that works;)

Nocko
07-04-2005, 11:20 AM
I have access to Wimbledon interviews and videos online... but I had to pay for it so I tried to take the link for you guys... He's great in the press conference:p (as expected:D)
mms://rxs-lvl3-lon16.rbn.com/farm/*/bt/bt/secure/wmdemand/wimbledon/9048032_700.wmv?rbnkey=20050704100918b36b638242c70 db36cf18bc301d961
Please let me know if that works;)
:awww: It doesn't work.... :sad: But anyway thanks very much, Yasmine. :hug:

Yasmine
07-04-2005, 11:21 AM
i've been listening to Roddick's interview :haha: great reactions when journalists asked him if there was anything negative he could say about Roger as a person...
Firstly he said he cut his hair, so that's sorted now :lol: (actually I agree I prefer him with shorter hair as he has now :devil: )...
And someone asked again he said he didn't know him that well, he could find out for the journalist if they wanted :haha: Great humour and sportsmanship! :worship:

Nocko
07-04-2005, 11:27 AM
:haha: Pandy! :hug:

ytben
07-04-2005, 12:12 PM
Thanks for posting :)

It´s nice to read all those articles - and there are more to come - BUT I´m not going to foul myself,because it´s the same press guys that have and will will turn around to diss Roger at the next chance .I´m not willing to buy into there crap,so I not going to get cought up in there praise either!
Better to make up your own mind,what to think about Roger - and not much care for anyone elses!

Yeah exactly Susanne, this is why I also don't pay much attention to the articles, only look for some nice quotes from fellow tennis players.

Havign said that, thank you for posting the articles people :kiss:

PaulieM
07-04-2005, 12:45 PM
Roche claims a Wimbledon singles win
July 4, 2005 - 1:14PM

After losing six Wimbledon finals as player and coach, Tony Roche has finally broken his jinx.

He was on a pretty sure thing this time, though, after teaming up with world No.1 Roger Federer whom he rated as the closest thing to an Australian you could get this side of the Pacific.

Roche admitted as he sat in the players' box at Centre Court he was worried he may have brought his Wimbledon final curse down on Federer.

But the Swiss was untouchable in his straight sets caning of second seed Andy Roddick, prompting Roche to compare Federer to his great Australian contemporaries Rod Laver and Lew Hoad.

"I thought maybe I was a jinx," Roche said.

"It's Roger's moment, but I'm happy I've been able to be associated with somebody that's won Wimbledon.

"It's been a long time, I've had a lot of tough finals but for me it was just great to see somebody play that type of tennis, I think it was something special.

"This place is always special to the Australians and even though Rog is not Australian, he's as close as you can get to one.

"Just the way he plays, he reminds me so much of Rod and Lew.

"A lot reminds me of Rod Laver, he's a genius with what he can do."

And Roche knows about Laver's genius, losing to the Queenslander in straight sets in the Wimbledon singles final in 1968, although he won five doubles titles with John Newcombe.

As one of the game's most respected coaches, he then took New Zealand's rank outsider Chris Lewis to the 1983 final, Ivan Lendl to the decider in 1986 and 1987 and Pat Rafter in 2000 and 2001.

They lost them all.

So Roche's relief when Federer's forehand passed Roddick to claim his third title was obvious.

"He's not a guy who shows too much emotion, but I felt like he's very carried away too in the moment itself when we saw each other," Federer said.

Federer approached Australia's former Davis Cup coach late last year and asked him to improve what already seems to be the perfect game.

Roche, 60, admits there's "not much" he can do for the world No.1 who followed Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras as the only players of the open era to win a hat-trick of Wimbledon titles.

Roche was not prepared to take on the job fulltime so works with Federer only in the lead up to the four grand slam tournaments.

There is no contract between the two, just an understanding and a close relationship in which Roche acts more mentor than hands-on coach.

"It's more having someone there who's been through it, knows the pressure when you get on the practice court, understanding what he's going through," Roche said.

"Roger won three of the four slams on his own last year, I think he knows what he's got to do."

Roche is Federer's second Australian coach, following the late Peter Carter who steered the teenage Swiss through to his debut as a professional.

"He likes Australians, he feels comfortable with them and he was happy with the amount of weeks I could do with him," Roche said.

Federer was determined to secure an uncertain Roche, even if only for a few weeks a year, and flew especially to Sydney last December to train with him and convince him to join up.

"I knew from the start he might be a big help in my game," Federer said.

"Even though he 's not travelling 30-40 weeks a year, I still feel he gives me enough weeks and time together.

"Every day and every week he gives me, I'm very thankful because I know how old he is, what he's been through, as a player, as a coach. He doesn't need it anymore, so I'm very thankful to him."

Federer feels so comfortable with Australians, he even mingled with several of the touring Ashes cricketers in the players' area after his win.

Roche will not see Federer again until a couple of weeks before the US Open next month, but will not stay with him for the tournament, staying instead at home to help coach Australian juniors.

© 2005 AAP
Brought to you by

Puschkin
07-04-2005, 01:16 PM
There are many overpraising articles today, they are great to read, but all somehow the same.This one stands out, it is about the hard part.

Champion is reaping rich rewards from 10 years of toil
Eleanor Preston


As Roger Federer glided to ball after ball on Centre Court yesterday, Pierre Paganini, the man responsible for the Wimbledon champion's remarkable speed and agility, could afford to sit back and enjoy the fruits of a decade of hard work with the World No1.
"Roger is definitely fitter than he was four or five years ago and that's because of the work he does," said Paganini yesterday, half an hour after watching Federer win his third Wimbledon title in a row.

"Tennis is played not just with the hands but with the feet, especially for Roger," said Paganini. "In an intense match or a very long match his footwork has to stay perfect in order for him to make those shots and the reason he can put his feet in exactly the right place over and over again is because he is strong physically and mentally. He was tired even before Wimbledon but he never let it show because even when he is tired his footwork is very precise. You can do that when you are physically and mentally strong. Sometimes his best muscle is his head."
Like most players, Federer has assembled a team around him to keep himself in optimum shape. Paganini works in consulation with Federer's coach of seven months, Tony Roche, and Pavel Kovac, the physiotherapist who travels with Federer to take care of the aches and pains that come as an inevitable result of the hours he spends on court and in the gym.

"I think the most impressive thing about Roger is that he works even harder now than he did before he became really successful," said Paganini. "A lot of players don't mind working hard on the way up because they are desperate to get better and they find it hard to motivate themselves once they start winning big titles, but not Roger. He just keeps wanting to work harder. He works like a challenger even though he is a champion."

Paganini has been helping Federer make tennis look easy for the last 10 years and together they put in 100 hours of fitness training throughout the season, either at tournaments or when Federer is at home in Switzerland. They do a combination of strength and endurance work, circuit training, running and a wide range of exercises designed to practice all the movements Federer is likely to make on a tennis court.

Prior to a big tournament they will work for 10 hours a week or more, depending on the surface he is going to play on, but Paganini says he never hears so much as a murmur of fuss from Federer.

"Roger is a pleasure and a privilege to work with," said Paganini. "He never complains about having to work hard as long as he understands why he is doing it. He asks me what we are doing and why and then he gets to work. He knows that he is talented and that the fitness work we do is going to bring that talent through.

"He's always been the same. You can have all the shots but if you aren't there in time it doesn't matter and Roger knows that. Even when I am really tough on him he never stops working and he never wants to stop. That's the kind of man he is and that's why he is a champion. He really is an amazing person."

Source: http://sport.guardian.co.uk/wimbledon2005/story/0,16055,1520730,00.html#article_continue

ytben
07-04-2005, 04:11 PM
Puschkin you are right, this article does stand out :D Great read! :yeah:

Sometimes Roger makes it look so easy on the court, people easily makes mistake to think that he just gets lucky to be born with all those talents. They didn't realize how much hard works he has put behind the scene.

Shabazza
07-04-2005, 04:32 PM
Puschkin you are right, this article does stand out :D Great read! :yeah:

Sometimes Roger makes it look so easy on the court, people easily makes mistake to think that he just gets lucky to be born with all those talents. They didn't realize how much hard works he has put behind the scene.
exactly - great article :yeah:

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:40 PM
Swiss magic is truly something to behold
Nick Bollettieri at Wimbledon
Published: 04 July 2005
Roger Federer is virtually indescribable. Whatever we say about him cannot express the jaw-dropping, breathtaking brilliance of his play. He moves like a whisper and executes like a wrecking ball. It is simply impossible to explain how he does what he does.

He is not unbeatable - no one is ever unbeatable - but he's as close it comes, especially on grass. He is a genius, a magician. He is an athlete of such complete mental and physical power and calm combined that he is, I believe, unique in the history of tennis.

In winning a third consecutive Wimbledon title yesterday against Andy Roddick, he joined Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras as the only men since the 1930s to achieve the feat. I saw both of them play, in their prime. Federer does not yet have the 14 Grand Slam titles of the record holder, Sampras, or the 11 of Borg. And he may not get them. No one knows what tomorrow will bring, when an injury or a personal crisis could change your life and end your career. But in my opinion, shot for shot, Federer is the best player who has ever played the game.

Sampras was a wonderful champion, a great, no question. But he did have weaknesses, including a less than perfect return of serve on the backhand side sometimes. And great though his mobility was, Federer's is better. He makes everything look so easy, almost effortless.

Borg was another true great, but he was a machine. He broke you down mentally. He did not overpower you in the way that Federer does. Federer's shots can be so blistering, so uncannily placed that they leave nothing to say but "How?"

We can talk about details. Federer held seven of his service games to love yesterday. He had not a single double-fault. He hit 49 winners, many of them stunning cross-court forehands from nowhere that he had any right to be, or backhands down that line that left you thinking "Holy mackerel. Awesome. How?"

If one single point exemplified what Federer did yesterday it was the first point of the seventh game in the third set, with Roddick serving. After a 16-shot rally that almost defied belief, Federer hit a running forehand rocket down the line past Roddick. Unbelievable.

But these are just details. Federer is on another level to any other player in the world right now. And when you push him, he just plays better. Not always, of course. No one can do always. But as close as it comes. He hits shots that bamboozle, confuse and defeat. He is consistently beating the very best players that the world has to offer, and beating them comfortably.

It will be no consolation to Roddick today, but it would not have mattered who Federer faced yesterday. He would have won. Roddick did not play badly. Lleyton Hewitt did not play badly in the semi-final. It's just that Federer's talent is not of this planet.

Roddick's only chance at all was to serve massively the whole time and not make a single error. He did OK, and he was coming to the net, but you cannot give Federer more than one volley because he's better than you. Simply better.

Very few people in the history of sport have such a dominance, an aura, in their prime. Muhammad Ali, Michael Jordan and Wayne Gretzky spring to mind. Federer is that good. He is so calm. His composure just does not slip. He has something within him, something so special that whatever the future brings, we should just be glad we have seen him play.

Roger Federer is virtually indescribable. Whatever we say about him cannot express the jaw-dropping, breathtaking brilliance of his play. He moves like a whisper and executes like a wrecking ball. It is simply impossible to explain how he does what he does.

He is not unbeatable - no one is ever unbeatable - but he's as close it comes, especially on grass. He is a genius, a magician. He is an athlete of such complete mental and physical power and calm combined that he is, I believe, unique in the history of tennis.

In winning a third consecutive Wimbledon title yesterday against Andy Roddick, he joined Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras as the only men since the 1930s to achieve the feat. I saw both of them play, in their prime. Federer does not yet have the 14 Grand Slam titles of the record holder, Sampras, or the 11 of Borg. And he may not get them. No one knows what tomorrow will bring, when an injury or a personal crisis could change your life and end your career. But in my opinion, shot for shot, Federer is the best player who has ever played the game.

Sampras was a wonderful champion, a great, no question. But he did have weaknesses, including a less than perfect return of serve on the backhand side sometimes. And great though his mobility was, Federer's is better. He makes everything look so easy, almost effortless.

Borg was another true great, but he was a machine. He broke you down mentally. He did not overpower you in the way that Federer does. Federer's shots can be so blistering, so uncannily placed that they leave nothing to say but "How?"

We can talk about details. Federer held seven of his service games to love yesterday. He had not a single double-fault. He hit 49 winners, many of them stunning cross-court forehands from nowhere that he had any right to be, or backhands down that line that left you thinking "Holy mackerel. Awesome. How?"
If one single point exemplified what Federer did yesterday it was the first point of the seventh game in the third set, with Roddick serving. After a 16-shot rally that almost defied belief, Federer hit a running forehand rocket down the line past Roddick. Unbelievable.

But these are just details. Federer is on another level to any other player in the world right now. And when you push him, he just plays better. Not always, of course. No one can do always. But as close as it comes. He hits shots that bamboozle, confuse and defeat. He is consistently beating the very best players that the world has to offer, and beating them comfortably.

It will be no consolation to Roddick today, but it would not have mattered who Federer faced yesterday. He would have won. Roddick did not play badly. Lleyton Hewitt did not play badly in the semi-final. It's just that Federer's talent is not of this planet.

Roddick's only chance at all was to serve massively the whole time and not make a single error. He did OK, and he was coming to the net, but you cannot give Federer more than one volley because he's better than you. Simply better.

Very few people in the history of sport have such a dominance, an aura, in their prime. Muhammad Ali, Michael Jordan and Wayne Gretzky spring to mind. Federer is that good. He is so calm. His composure just does not slip. He has something within him, something so special that whatever the future brings, we should just be glad we have seen him play.
http://sport.independent.co.uk/tennis/article296653.ece

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:41 PM
Roddick becomes nowhere man against the Swiss pass master
Paul Newman at Wimbledon
Published: 04 July 2005
Andy Roddick might take heart from the example of one Joshua Pim as he tries to put together the pieces after his dismantling yesterday by Roger Federer in the singles final here on Centre Court for the second year in a row.

In 1892, Pim - no relation to the landlord who invented the health tonic which is now synonymous with the world's most famous tennis tournament - lost in the final for the second successive year to Wilfred Baddeley, a fellow Briton, who must have fancied his chances of dominating for years to come. The two men duly met in the final the following year, but this time Pim turned the tables - a feat which he went on to repeat 12 months later.

Roddick needs any straw he can clutch, for the 22-year-old American is in danger of being remembered as a man who had the misfortune to be born within 12 months of one of the greatest players in the history of the game.

It is now nearly two years since Roddick won his first Grand Slam title, the US Open, and he has yet to win a second. Almost everywhere he turns - and especially here at Wimbledon - Federer is in his way.

How good is Roddick? While he has struggled to make his mark on slower courts, he has won a remarkable 32 of his past 35 games on grass. His only defeats were here at the hands of Federer in the 2003 semi-final and in the 2004 and 2005 finals.

It was hard to find fault with the American's performance yesterday. He tried staying on the baseline, serving and volleying, even chipping and charging on Federer's serve.

The power and precision of the Swiss champion's baseline play and his seemingly effortless movement meant that Roddick's best chance lay in getting to the net, but time and time again Federer passed him down both flanks.

"I did everything I could," Roddick said. "I tried going to his forehand and coming in - he passed me. I tried going to his backhand and coming in - he passed me. I tried staying back - he figured out a way to pass me, even though I was on the baseline. He passed me with a little backhand cross-court about 68 times. On break point in the third set I covered that shot. I said, 'OK, I'm going to run cross-court'. I covered it, but I was at full stretch and I didn't get to it.

"There was another point, at 30-30 on his serve, when I hit about as good a return as I could, up the line. I hit it really hard, but he got there. I came in and took a full swing at a forehand cross-court, but he was there and just put it past me.

"I don't know if I could have hit two better shots. It deflates you. You think, 'OK, if I'm playing points like that maybe I have to try to do something better'. But I don't know if I can.

"He played head and shoulders above the way he played last year. I probably played a more complete match this year. Last year I played well in spurts, but I was really hit-and-miss. If I played last year the way I did this year I'd probably have won."

Might Federer be the best player in the history of tennis? "You're not stretching far to make that argument. If he keeps up this level, then I think so."

Roddick, to his credit, does not regret having to play in the Federer era.

"I'm just going to continue to work hard: I'm not going to sit around and sulk," the American said. "You just have to sit back and say 'too good' sometimes. And hope he gets bored or something."

Andy Roddick might take heart from the example of one Joshua Pim as he tries to put together the pieces after his dismantling yesterday by Roger Federer in the singles final here on Centre Court for the second year in a row.

In 1892, Pim - no relation to the landlord who invented the health tonic which is now synonymous with the world's most famous tennis tournament - lost in the final for the second successive year to Wilfred Baddeley, a fellow Briton, who must have fancied his chances of dominating for years to come. The two men duly met in the final the following year, but this time Pim turned the tables - a feat which he went on to repeat 12 months later.

Roddick needs any straw he can clutch, for the 22-year-old American is in danger of being remembered as a man who had the misfortune to be born within 12 months of one of the greatest players in the history of the game.

It is now nearly two years since Roddick won his first Grand Slam title, the US Open, and he has yet to win a second. Almost everywhere he turns - and especially here at Wimbledon - Federer is in his way.

How good is Roddick? While he has struggled to make his mark on slower courts, he has won a remarkable 32 of his past 35 games on grass. His only defeats were here at the hands of Federer in the 2003 semi-final and in the 2004 and 2005 finals.

It was hard to find fault with the American's performance yesterday. He tried staying on the baseline, serving and volleying, even chipping and charging on Federer's serve.

The power and precision of the Swiss champion's baseline play and his seemingly effortless movement meant that Roddick's best chance lay in getting to the net, but time and time again Federer passed him down both flanks.
"I did everything I could," Roddick said. "I tried going to his forehand and coming in - he passed me. I tried going to his backhand and coming in - he passed me. I tried staying back - he figured out a way to pass me, even though I was on the baseline. He passed me with a little backhand cross-court about 68 times. On break point in the third set I covered that shot. I said, 'OK, I'm going to run cross-court'. I covered it, but I was at full stretch and I didn't get to it.

"There was another point, at 30-30 on his serve, when I hit about as good a return as I could, up the line. I hit it really hard, but he got there. I came in and took a full swing at a forehand cross-court, but he was there and just put it past me.

"I don't know if I could have hit two better shots. It deflates you. You think, 'OK, if I'm playing points like that maybe I have to try to do something better'. But I don't know if I can.

"He played head and shoulders above the way he played last year. I probably played a more complete match this year. Last year I played well in spurts, but I was really hit-and-miss. If I played last year the way I did this year I'd probably have won."

Might Federer be the best player in the history of tennis? "You're not stretching far to make that argument. If he keeps up this level, then I think so."

Roddick, to his credit, does not regret having to play in the Federer era.

"I'm just going to continue to work hard: I'm not going to sit around and sulk," the American said. "You just have to sit back and say 'too good' sometimes. And hope he gets bored or something."
http://sport.independent.co.uk/tennis/article296656.ece

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:42 PM
Historic hat-trick puts Federer up with legends of the game
John Roberts at Wimbledon
Published: 04 July 2005
Historic hat-trick puts Federer up with legends of the game An abiding image of yesterday's men's singles final is not one of the magnificent Roger Federer lifting the trophy for the third year in a row. It is of his opponent, Andy Roddick, making desperate lunges, left and right, as the ball sped past his outstretched racket.

As this proceeded, for an hour and 41 minutes, a colleague in the press seats wanted to know whom the Swiss maestro was most like. He settled for an amalgam of Pete Sampras, Stefan Edberg, Ilie Nastase - but with Bjorn Borg's concentration - and a little bit of Ken Rosewell thrown in as well.

It was a pointless exercise. Federer is like Federer and nobody else. In times hence, if the sport is exceedingly fortunate, people will be asking if some new wizard with a racket is a bit like Federer.

"I really played a fantastic match, perhaps the best of my life," Federer said, with no reason for false modesty after beating Roddick, 6-2, 7-6, 6-4. There were tears after his triumph - tears of joy, pride, and relief - as there were after he won his first title here against Mark Philippoussis in 2003. "And I can tell you I cried last year, too," he said.

The 23-year-old has already accumulated an impressive catalogue of numbers. Along with his Wimbledon hat-trick he has won Grand Slam singles at both the Australian Open and the US Open. His win against Roddick advanced his unbeaten sequence of grass-court matches to 36. He has won his last 21 ATP Tour finals on all surfaces, losing three times in 78 matches.

Moreover, this complete player, whose three consecutive Wimbledons puts him alongside Sampras, Borg and Fred Perry, sees room for improvement, particularly on the backhand that looked anything but weak wing as he whisked the ball past Roddick.

Roddick might not have unsettled Federer yesterday, but he did take the opening set of their final last year. Only Germany's Nicolas Kiefer, in the third round, was able to take a set off Federer in this year's campaign. He has dropped only four in total in 21 matches in the last three years on the Wimbledon lawns.

Having extended his domination of Lleyton Hewitt, the third seed, in the semi-finals to eight matches in a row, Federer demonstrated yesterday why he also "owns" Roddick, who has only defeated him once in their 10 meetings.

He was eager yesterday to start the match confidently and not allow Roddick to establish himself as the American did in the first set last year. After the protagonists had sparred in the opening five games, Federer cut loose and broke for 4-2.

He passed Roddick with a backhand down the line to 30-40. Roddick erased the break point with a forehand volley behind a second serve. Federer created a second opportunity with a forehand drive off his opponent's smash, and Roddick hit a forehand long after Federer returned his serve. Federer, smoothly into his game, secured the set after only 22 minutes with a second break in the eighth game, passing Roddick with a cross-court backhand return of a 122 mph serve.

Roddick, undismayed, broke for 2-1 in the second set, with a forehand drive that Federer could only volley into the net, and held his lead until the sixth game. Federer then created two break points, making light of Roddick's backhand volley with a forehand pass down the line. The American hit a backhand long on the first break point.

Determination enabled Roddick to salvage two set points with service winners at 5-4 down and he was able to take the set to a tie-break from deuce on his serve in the 12th game.

Federer won the first three points of the shoot-out before beckoning Roddick with two less-than-sharp service points. That was as far as Roddick was allowed to advance, Federer taking the next four points in a row for 7-2.

Wimbledon would be nothing without tradition, and Alan Mills, the referee, and Chris Gorringe, the chief executive, presided over one last rain delay before receiving their retirement gifts. On this occasion, the tarpaulin was on and off in 25 minutes.

When the players returned, there was little change in tactics. Roddick, two sets to love down, had to continue taking risks in an attempt to break Federer's concentration and, more importantly, his serve.

Try though he did, Roddick again found that some of his best moves were merely a prelude to Federer's next display of magic. That came on Roddick's serve in the opening point of the seventh game, when Federer clipped an angled backhand and glided across the court to meet Roddick's backhand volley with a backhand pass down the line.

When the applause died down, Federer also took the second point, leaving his opponent with little option but to try and play a shot through his legs, which achieved no reward but amused the spectators.

Federer's backhand drive created two break points. Roddick served away the first but was passed on the second with yet another cross-court backhand as Federer made the decisive break. Afterwards he related his thoughts as he was serving for the treble: "I got nervous. I missed my first serve, then hit an ace on second serve because he took the wrong side. I felt my arm shaking. After he came back to 30-15, I thought, 'Why now?' I was really nervous - I just hit [my serve] as hard as I could at 40-15."

Historic hat-trick puts Federer up with legends of the game
An abiding image of yesterday's men's singles final is not one of the magnificent Roger Federer lifting the trophy for the third year in a row. It is of his opponent, Andy Roddick, making desperate lunges, left and right, as the ball sped past his outstretched racket.

As this proceeded, for an hour and 41 minutes, a colleague in the press seats wanted to know whom the Swiss maestro was most like. He settled for an amalgam of Pete Sampras, Stefan Edberg, Ilie Nastase - but with Bjorn Borg's concentration - and a little bit of Ken Rosewell thrown in as well.

It was a pointless exercise. Federer is like Federer and nobody else. In times hence, if the sport is exceedingly fortunate, people will be asking if some new wizard with a racket is a bit like Federer.

"I really played a fantastic match, perhaps the best of my life," Federer said, with no reason for false modesty after beating Roddick, 6-2, 7-6, 6-4. There were tears after his triumph - tears of joy, pride, and relief - as there were after he won his first title here against Mark Philippoussis in 2003. "And I can tell you I cried last year, too," he said.

The 23-year-old has already accumulated an impressive catalogue of numbers. Along with his Wimbledon hat-trick he has won Grand Slam singles at both the Australian Open and the US Open. His win against Roddick advanced his unbeaten sequence of grass-court matches to 36. He has won his last 21 ATP Tour finals on all surfaces, losing three times in 78 matches.

Moreover, this complete player, whose three consecutive Wimbledons puts him alongside Sampras, Borg and Fred Perry, sees room for improvement, particularly on the backhand that looked anything but weak wing as he whisked the ball past Roddick.

Roddick might not have unsettled Federer yesterday, but he did take the opening set of their final last year. Only Germany's Nicolas Kiefer, in the third round, was able to take a set off Federer in this year's campaign. He has dropped only four in total in 21 matches in the last three years on the Wimbledon lawns.

Having extended his domination of Lleyton Hewitt, the third seed, in the semi-finals to eight matches in a row, Federer demonstrated yesterday why he also "owns" Roddick, who has only defeated him once in their 10 meetings.
He was eager yesterday to start the match confidently and not allow Roddick to establish himself as the American did in the first set last year. After the protagonists had sparred in the opening five games, Federer cut loose and broke for 4-2.

He passed Roddick with a backhand down the line to 30-40. Roddick erased the break point with a forehand volley behind a second serve. Federer created a second opportunity with a forehand drive off his opponent's smash, and Roddick hit a forehand long after Federer returned his serve. Federer, smoothly into his game, secured the set after only 22 minutes with a second break in the eighth game, passing Roddick with a cross-court backhand return of a 122 mph serve.

Roddick, undismayed, broke for 2-1 in the second set, with a forehand drive that Federer could only volley into the net, and held his lead until the sixth game. Federer then created two break points, making light of Roddick's backhand volley with a forehand pass down the line. The American hit a backhand long on the first break point.

Determination enabled Roddick to salvage two set points with service winners at 5-4 down and he was able to take the set to a tie-break from deuce on his serve in the 12th game.

Federer won the first three points of the shoot-out before beckoning Roddick with two less-than-sharp service points. That was as far as Roddick was allowed to advance, Federer taking the next four points in a row for 7-2.

Wimbledon would be nothing without tradition, and Alan Mills, the referee, and Chris Gorringe, the chief executive, presided over one last rain delay before receiving their retirement gifts. On this occasion, the tarpaulin was on and off in 25 minutes.

When the players returned, there was little change in tactics. Roddick, two sets to love down, had to continue taking risks in an attempt to break Federer's concentration and, more importantly, his serve.

Try though he did, Roddick again found that some of his best moves were merely a prelude to Federer's next display of magic. That came on Roddick's serve in the opening point of the seventh game, when Federer clipped an angled backhand and glided across the court to meet Roddick's backhand volley with a backhand pass down the line.

When the applause died down, Federer also took the second point, leaving his opponent with little option but to try and play a shot through his legs, which achieved no reward but amused the spectators.

Federer's backhand drive created two break points. Roddick served away the first but was passed on the second with yet another cross-court backhand as Federer made the decisive break. Afterwards he related his thoughts as he was serving for the treble: "I got nervous. I missed my first serve, then hit an ace on second serve because he took the wrong side. I felt my arm shaking. After he came back to 30-15, I thought, 'Why now?' I was really nervous - I just hit [my serve] as hard as I could at 40-15."
http://sport.independent.co.uk/tennis/article296652.ece

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:42 PM
FEDERER CAN BE GREATEST - RODDICK
Roger Federer is on his way to becoming the greatest tennis player in history.

That is the view of Andy Roddick, as well as many other tennis experts, after being on the wrong side of a Swiss demolition act in the Wimbledon men's singles final for the second time in a row.

"If he keeps up this level I don't see too many people in history who would beat him," insisted Roddick as he came to terms today with competing in an era which Federer appears capable of dominating for the next decade.

Federer could not have strolled more elegantly or impressively to his third successive Wimbledon crown, beating Roddick 6-2 7-6 6-4 to join an elite club of hat-trick champions which includes Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras.

At 23 and if he retains his health and fitness Federer could even eclipse the seven Wimbledon singles title haul of Sampras.

Which is why Roddick was philosophical about his defeat.

"I'm not going to beat myself up about getting to the final and doing better than 126 other guys and losing to a guy that everybody is debating whether he's the best of all-time or not," said Roddick. "I'm not going to ruin what I've accomplished just because he was better than me.

"I want another crack at him. I still want to go against him again. You want to compete against the best. He's the measuring stick, so you kind of know where you are and where you go. I'd love to keep playing him."

The fact, however, is that Federer has now won 21 straight finals on the ATP tour.

"He's as close as there has been to unbeatable," admits Roddick, who also lost to Federer in last year's final and in the semi-final in 2003. "I felt I played decent and got straight-setted.

"He played head and shoulders above how he played last year. He hit 49 winners and 12 errors. You just have to sit back and say 'too good' sometimes. I hope he gets bored or something."

That is unlikely considering Federer has an appetite for titles, a hunger for records and a healthy respect for tennis history.

"This was a very big match and tournament for me to get my fifth Grand Slam and third Wimbledon," said Federer. "I was pretty tense but after the first set I started to feel so good and so confident. Obviously for the next few years I will be a huge favourite for this tournament."

Even so today Federer, who admitted he had played a "flawless" final, was still trying to work out quite how his career has flourished so spectacularly over the last two years.

"Maybe I lost too many matches I should have won when I was younger," he said. "Now it's turned around for me. Now I'm winning matches I should lose sometimes. I amaze myself how incredibly I use my talent to win. Those who followed me since I was a youngster knew I had the potential but I don't think anyone would ever have thought it would be this extreme, basically dominating the game, winning three Wimbledons.

"One, you think, that's fantastic. When you end up winning three, you're really starting to wonder 'what have I done right in my career that this has happened to me?' I'm very, very proud."

The esteem in which Federer is held by his fellow players was summed up by Roddick who revealed that, despite his two final losses to Federer at Wimbledon, he was proud to be playing in the same era.

But for those players who might think Federer has only ice in his veins there was a hint of hope from the mouth of the Swiss himself when he admitted he had to stop himself thinking about receiving the trophy mid-way through the final set and that he suffered from nerves like anyone else.

"When I started to serve for the match I really got nervous," said Federer. "I felt my arm shaking. Even at 4-3 I started to think 'how will it be with the trophy?' How will my reaction be?' I'm like 'no, no, no, we're not there yet.' I always have to calm myself down. It's really strange."
http://www.sportinglife.com/tennis/news/story_get.cgi?STORY_NAME=wimbledon/05/07/04/WIMBLEDON_Federer_Roddick.html

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:43 PM
FEDERER: TOUGH TO MAINTAIN FORM
World-beater Roger Federer has offered a glimmer of hope to his rivals hoping to bridge the yawning gap between them and the Wimbledon champion.

The Swiss ace earned the right to line up alongside modern legends Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras when he beat Andy Roddick to complete a hat-trick of triumphs at the All England Club and has been tipped to dominate Wimbledon for years to come.

The 23-year-old world number one believes there is yet more improvement to come in his game but revealed he may find it difficult to sustain his performance at the current levels.

"I'm not quite there yet," he warned. "I'll take it match by match, day by day, year by year basically for the next few years.

"So far I've been lucky not to have any injuries. But playing at the level I am is very draining and it's hard to keep that up all the time.

"Wimbledon and the grass has definitely been very good to me over the last few years and, of course, I'll try to carry that even longer the next year."

Federer's straight-sets win over Roddick extended his unbeaten run on grass to 36 matches going back to the first round of Wimbledon in 2002 and he is on course to break the record of 41 set by Borg from 1976-81 in next year's semi-finals.

But Federer, who has lost just eight of the last 101 sets he has played on grass, believes he is still vulnerable, especially on clay and hardcourt, pointing to his defeats in the semi-finals of the opening two Grand Slams this year in Melbourne and Paris.

"I feel the others push me," he insisted. "I think all of them are trying as hard as they can and it has worked.

"Look at the Australian Open, look at the French Open. It worked to beat me there."

Meanwhile, Federer paid tribute to veteran coach Tony Roche, who won five doubles titles with John Newcombe at Wimbledon from 1968-74 but whose only men's singles final appearance ended in defeat to Rod Laver.

Federer travelled the whole of last year without a coach but linked up with the Australian on a part-time basis before the Australian Open in January and celebrated his fifth Grand Slam title with him at last night's champions dinner.

"It's definitely special for him," said Federer. "Of course, I'm so happy for myself but I'm really happy that our partnership has worked out.

"He's not a guy who shows too much emotion but he was very carried away, too."

Federer, who was coached by former Swedish ATP pro Peter Lundgren when he won Wimbledon for the first time in 2003, believes Roche has played an integral part in the improvement in his game this year.

"I knew from the start that he would be a big help," he said. "I'm starting to understand what he's trying to teach me. Even though he's not travelling with me for 30 or 40 weeks of the year, I still feel he gives me enough time.

"We've just been together about eight or nine weeks, which is a lot. You start to really know each other and start to understand each other in that time. We actually know what we want to do.

"But, if he wants to walk away tomorrow, I have no problem. He's very easy in the relationship we have.

"I just want him to know that. I'm very thankful for every day and every week he gives me because I know how old he is and what he's been through, as a player and as a coach. He doesn't need it any more. So I'm very thankful to him."
http://www.sportinglife.com/tennis/news/story_get.cgi?STORY_NAME=wimbledon/05/07/04/WIMBLEDON_Federer_Nightlead.html

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:43 PM
Federer acquires mantle of greatness
By Bill Barclay

LONDON, July 3 (Reuters) - An irresistible Roger Federer acquired the mantle of sporting greatness that has long seemed his destiny at Wimbledon on Sunday.

In beating American Andy Roddick 6-2 7-6 6-4 the 23-year-old Swiss took his place alongside Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras as the only men to have won a hat-trick of singles titles at the All England Club since World War Two.

Federer played his now-familiar role of elegant executioner on a day when Roddick, whose defeat completed an unwanted hat-trick of losses to the peerless Swiss at Wimbledon, was left embarrassed and defenceless on Centre Court.

"This is the best match maybe that I've ever played," said Federer after walking off court brandishing the golden Challenge Cup in one hand.

"Today it seemed like I was playing flawlessly. I'm very, very proud because this is the most important tournament.

"Sampras was one of my favourite players all time and Borg was just fantastic. To be in that group feels very special."

Federer's victory took his tally of consecutive wins on grass to 36, five short of Borg's record. His astonishing run of consecutive victories in finals now stands at 21 and it was his fifth grand slam title overall.

The only blemish remains his failure so far to win the French Open claycourt grand slam but at 23 he still has time to master the surface he plays least on.

On grass, however, Federer has had no equal for over three years.

Second seed Roddick arrived on an overcast Centre Court with two principal weapons: a booming serve that could clear the pigeons from Hyde Park and an equally brutal forehand.

Federer, in contrast, does not have one stand-out shot. They are all outstanding and after an even start, the first set quickly turned into an orgy of sumptuous winners by the Swiss top seed.

Roddick knew that his only chance was to serve-volley but he is a baseliner at heart and his attempts to approach the net on Sunday ranged from the tentative to the downright embarrassing.

Between 2-2 and leading 1-0 in the second set Federer played extraordinary tennis, designing passing shots and winners at will to leave his opponent and audience spell-bound.
HOPELESS EFFORT

Repeatedly Roddick was left stranded by wondrous passes, the best of which was a feathered backhand crosscourt winner to secure the set.
The American, who lost in the 2003 semi-finals to Federer as well as last year's final, was a break up at 3-1 in the second set after Federer made a rare forehand error to lose his serve for the only time in the match.

An outrageous, elastic backhand volley winner by Federer helped him to break back and suddenly it was time for Roddick to be embarrassed again.

First the 22-year-old shook his head in disbelief after Federer completely wrong-footed him with a second service ace, then the Swiss showed almost fatherly concern for his rival after leaving him in an undignified heap on the grass with a punched backhand volley.
With some difficulty Roddick held serve to force the tiebreak but in it he produced a stream of errors and threw his racket down in disgust as Federer took it 7-2.

Respite arrived for the American in the form of a 25-minute break due to barely discernible drizzle but it changed nothing.

At 3-3 in the third set Federer produced the shot of the match, skewering a forehand pass down the line from deep behind the baseline. Two backhand passes followed and the decisive break was his.

By now Roddick was approaching the net with all the confidence of a blind man crossing a busy road and he even laughed at himself after another hopeless effort in the following game.
When the end finally came, the American was little more than an admiring spectator.
"I'm in the mood for a beer right now," said Roddick as he clutched the loser's salver. "He's such a complete player...maybe I'll just punch him or something, I don't know.

"But I'm not going to sit around and sulk and cry. I did everything I could.
"I tried going to his forehand and coming in. He passed me. I tried to go to his backhand and coming in. He passed me. I tried staying back. He figured out a way to pass me."

A court-splitting serve brought Federer his victory and only then did the Swiss capitulate, emitting a scream of delight before drooping first to his knees and then on to his back, his usually serene features crumpled with emotion.
Before the final, American John McEnroe, who won three Wimbledon titles in the 1980s, described Federer as "the most beautiful player that I have ever seen".
It was never more the case than on Sunday.
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/breakingnews/feedstory/0,14604,-5116013,00.html

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:44 PM
Roger ready to rewrite records
By Caroline Cheese
Roger Federer is not frightened to admit that history is within his grasp.

His third straight Wimbledon title was his fifth Grand Slam crown, his 21st consecutive victory in a final and his 32nd match without defeat on grass.

Understandably, he has stopped bothering with false modesty.

When asked on Sunday whether he could eclipse Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras at Wimbledon, he said: "I feel like I've put myself into position.

"This was a very big tournament for me. Obviously to get the fifth Grand Slam, but also the third Wimbledon. I knew the importance of this one, so I was pretty tense going into it.

"Obviously, for the next few years I'll also definitely be a huge favourite for this tournament."

With the hat-trick under his belt, Federer can now target Sampras' four in a row and Borg's record five.

At 23, the Swiss is also on track to eclipse Sampras' total of seven Wimbledon crowns and 14 Grand Slam titles.

At the same age, Sampras had won one more major and had also triumphed three times at the All England Club.

SAMPRAS AT 23 v FEDERER AT 23
6-------- Grand Slams ---------5
3------ Wimbledon titles ------3
34------- Total titles ----------30

The American, who is almost exactly 10 years older than Federer, has already tipped his successor as the world's dominant force to emulate his achievements.

"I think he can dominate tennis for as long as I did," Sampras said last year. "He is head and shoulders above the rest."

Federer is compared to Sampras more than any other player, probably because the American is still fresh in people's memories.

Boris Becker told BBC Sport on Sunday he thought Sampras would currently edge out Federer in five sets if both met at the height of their powers - though he did qualify that by suggesting his verdict might change as and when Federer accumulates more titles.

But Federer's coach, Tony Roche, believes his pupil is actually more like fellow Australian Rod Laver, who for many remains the greatest player of all time.

"Like Rod, Roger has the skills with so many options and a wonderful variation of strokeplay," said Roche.

"He can rally from the baseline, use the slice and drop shots and play the winning volley. I haven't seen such a complete player around for so long and I'd put him up there with Laver."

Laver himself said he would be "honoured" to be compared to Federer in terms of talent.

"He is capable of anything," said the 66-year-old. "Roger could be the greatest tennis player of all time."

I definitely feel there's room for improvement
Roger Federer

But while Laver twice won all four Grand Slam titles in a season, that feat has so far eluded Federer.

To that end, Federer employed Roche on a part-time basis at the start of the season after spending all of last year without a coach.

Roche's 1966 triumph at the French Open, a tournament Federer has struggled at, was thought to be key in his appointment - a sign that the Swiss still sees weaknesses in his game.

Even on grass, a surface on which he has not been beaten since 2002, Federer has identified improvements he could make.

"I definitely feel there's room for improvement," Federer told BBC Five Live on Sunday.

"I would love to have volleyed better and be more at the net and finish off more points at the net.

"But it seems in this era it's very difficult because the guys just return and pass so well these days."

Even if Federer retired tomorrow however, his performance against Andy Roddick in Sunday's final would stand as evidence that he may be the most talented player in history.

Renowned coach Nick Bollettieri says Federer "moves like a whisper and executes like a wrecking ball. It is simply impossible to explain how he does what he does."

John McEnroe, whose tennis idol was Laver, said: "He is the greatest natural talent in tennis I've ever seen. I love to watch the guy play, he's an awesome talent."

High praise indeed, but in Federer's case, entirely deserved.

Story from BBC SPORT:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/sport1/hi/tennis/4648467.stm
Published: 2005/07/04 12:56:51 GMT
© BBC MMV

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:44 PM
'What have I done right for this to happen?'
Richard Jago at Wimbledon
Monday July 4, 2005
The Guardian

Roger Federer is not given to boastfulness. Questions about whether he can be compared with the all-time greats usually bring an affable deflection about how young he still is.
Yesterday, after his third consecutive title, he surprised everybody by saying "I feel like I put myself into position" to emulate the likes of Bjorn Borg, who won five consecutive Wimbledons, and Pete Sampras, who won seven in total.

"Obviously for the next few years I'll definitely be a huge favourite for this tournament," Federer added. "That doesn't mean I'll necessarily take them all."

Federer admitted he had been "quite concerned before the semi-final [against Lleyton Hewitt] and final", adding that "this is a huge relief for me".
He had been shaking with nerves for several points before the end of the match, and even allowed himself to break one of the golden rules of sports psychology by thinking about what would happen if he won.

"I started to feel like 'Wow, eight more points on my serve and I'm all right.' I started to really shake my head, like 'I'm close again you know. It's all in my power now'."

Thoughts like that would have messed some players up at once. Federer paid for it by getting uptight, but had what it took to recover without damage. "I felt my arm shaking," he admitted. "And I think at 4-3 I started to think: 'How will it be with this trophy? What will be my reaction? How is this? How is that?

"And I'm like: 'no, no, no, we're not there yet'. I always have to calm myself down. Once it all happens, you don't know how you will react."

Somehow managing not to sound too immodest, Federer added: "I amaze myself how incredible it is that I use my talent to win. For those who followed me since I was a youngster, they knew I had potential. But I don't think anybody would have ever thought it would be this extreme, basically dominating the game, winning three Wimbledons.

"One, you think, that's fantastic. When you end up winning three, you start to wonder 'What have I done right in my career that this has happened to me?'"

Finally Federer is asking the same questions as everyone else.
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/wimbledon2005/story/0,16055,1520767,00.html

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:46 PM
Flawless Federer can rewrite the record books

World No1 produces a supremely confident display of grace and poise as he brushes aside Roddick to become only the eighth man to win the Wimbledon title three years in a row

Stephen Bierley at Wimbledon
Monday July 4, 2005
The Guardian

Perfection comes in many guises and yesterday afternoon perfection was Roger Federer. Such was the small consolation for Andy Roddick. The American has lost only three matches out of 35 on grass since 2002 and all of them, two finals and a semi-final, have been against the Swiss on the Centre Court at Wimbledon. "Maybe I'll punch him next time," he said.
It was an awesome performance by Federer, recalling the final of 1999 when Pete Sampras annihilated his oldest rival, Andre Agassi. It was not that Roddick played poorly, although he never replicated the sustained power that had rocked Federer in the first set of last year's final.

The difference another 12 months has made is that Federer's mental grip on Roddick has grown even tighter. From the moment this final began the American never looked as though he ever quite believed he might win, whereas Federer, who would probably appear unruffled in a force 10 gale, exuded supreme confidence.
Federer, still only 23, had already noted that the honours board at the All England Club had space enough to add his name a few more times. "This is the title everybody wants to win," said Federer who, having beaten Australia's Mark Philippoussis in 2003, cannot stop. By beating Roddick he became the eighth player to win the men's singles title for three successive years, the most recent being Britain's Fred Perry, Sweden's Björn Borg and the seven-times champion Pete Sampras.

The statistics now flow from Federer in almost the same profusion of excellence as his many and varied shots. This was his 36th successive victory on grass and his 21st consecutive victory in a final. In all he has lost only three matches this year and a mere nine since the beginning of last year. This was his fifth grand slam title, including the Australian and US Opens last year.

Those who watched him in his early days were all too aware that his was a special talent and notably on grass, as his fourth-round Wimbledon victory over Sampras, then the defending champion, in 2001 indicated. What nobody could be sure of was whether this talent would stay in tight bud or whether it would burst into glorious flower. All doubts were removed on the Centre Court two years ago and his special status in the game has been reinforced ever since.

"He played head and shoulders above what he played last year," said Roddick, who believed he had himself "played a more complete match" this time. The truth is that Roddick - currently ranked third in the world - is not in the same class, and of the other current top five players - Russia's Marat Safin, Rafael Nadal of Spain and Lleyton Hewitt of Australia - is the least likely, whatever the surface, to give Federer trouble.

To be fair to Roddick, a thoroughly engaging character who carries the burden and pressure of American expectations with remarkable good humour, he had needed to complete his rain-delayed four-set semi-final against Thomas Johansson on Saturday, and this may have taken the edge of him physically. Certainly his serve and forehand were never at their most venomous or paralysing, though lesser players than Federer might have wilted.

It is often the case that large and strong men are not particularly graceful which is true of Roddick. Federer, on the other hand, has grace in abundance, both of movement and shot. He is the stealth destroyer, gliding over the grass with elegance of a cheetah running down a gazelle. His serve is by no means the biggest, yet such are the variations that it is one of the most difficult to read. When Roddick broke it, for the only time, in the second set to lead 2-1, the shock was profound, although the effect was not.

Federer had already shown in the opening set, which lasted an abrupt but thrilling 22 minutes, that he had the measure of Roddick's serve, while his fabulous range of ground strokes was likely to undermine the American in any prolonged rally. Roddick, not a natural volleyer, attempted to force changes to the pattern of play by charging the net. Federer watched, waited and then passed him time after time.

This was a wonderful watch, even if the fascination became a just a touch morbid during the third and final set which had been held up briefly by a spell of fine drizzle. Roddick did all in his limited power to staunch the flow of winners but Federer was a class apart, as he had been all fortnight. Not that Roddick was about to get down on himself. "You know I'm not going to sit here and beat myself up after a losing to a guy that everybody here is debating whether he's the best of all time," said the American.

From now on Federer will be playing history. Whether or not he becomes the best of all time, only time will tell. What can be said with complete certainty for the moment is that nobody who has watched him can possibly doubt that he is the most gifted player of the current generation, as well as being the most entertaining to watch, as he displayed in abundance here. "I played a fantastic match, one of the best of my life. It seemed like I was playing flawless tennis, with everything working," he said. "There was really nothing Andy could do unless I messed things up."

Federer was imbued with an inner calm that left him almost puzzled by the ease of it all. It was as if he had stepped out of himself and was watching down, god-like from above. "It was very strange". Not to Roddick, though. He knew well enough that the man on the other side of the net was something other than mortal.

How hat-trick heroes compare
Fred Perry
Born May 18 1909 in Stockport, Cheshire
Wimbledon singles titles 3 - 1934, 1935 and 1936
Grand Slam singles titles 7
Died February 2 1995

Bjorn Borg
Born June 6 1956 in Sodertaljie, Sweden
Wimbledon singles titles 5 - 1976-1980
Grand Slam singles titles 11

Pete Sampras
Born August 12 1971 in Washington DC
Wimbledon singles titles 7 - 1993-1995, 1997-2000
Grand Slam singles titles 14

Roger Federer
Born August 8 1981 in Basle, Switzerland
Wimbledon singles titles 3 - 2003-2005
Grand Slam singles titles 5
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/wimbledon2005/story/0,16055,1520761,00.html

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:46 PM
Roddick faces up to the force of genius
Paul Weaver at Wimbledon
Monday July 4, 2005
The Guardian

On the day that Roger Federer ceased to be a mere champion and became a one-man dynasty, the rest of the tennis world swallowed hard and realised it had to play catch-up or travel in the direction of oblivion.
Not all dynasties need to be overthrown, of course; some implode. When a handful of wheezing golfers finally caught up with Tiger Woods there was a certain recognition that there had been a degree of unintended collaboration from the great man himself.

Chelsea's rise to dominance in domestic football was made easier by the fact that Manchester United had already started to creak from within.
But Federer's game not only rebuts the notion of implosion; it suggests there is room for further improvement, a raising of the bar. He is only 23 and has a level head. And, with his keen sense of history and personal destiny, he is hungry for more grand slam titles. He also works very hard, though one would not know it, echoing the words of the former England football manager Ron Greenwood, who once said, "Football is a very simple game but you have to work very hard to keep it simple."

Federer did not bother with a coach until this year but now he has Tony Roche, who would appear to have the easiest job in all sport. But, even when a man has seen a diamond fall into his lap, there is an inclination to polish it.

This, then, is the dilemma facing Federer's distant pursuers: to hunt down the speck on the horizon. It is a problem we all share for, unless the competition is glitzy, how are we to judge Federer?

Bjorn Borg's greatness was defined by Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe, Pete Sampras's by Boris Becker and Andre Agassi, David's by Goliath.

Andy Roddick, who was beaten in 101 minutes yesterday and who would presumably like to consign the experience to Room 101, squared up to the task yesterday evening.

When asked whether other players had to raise their game or hang around until Federer lost his, he replied: "I think it's a bit of both. But he's gotten better already. The thing that separates him now - and I mean the most physically gifted player I've played against - and last year is that he's become so solid mentally.

"Even two years ago I would have had a lot better shot, even though I only beat him once. But he's become a mental force too. You put those two together and it's a tough combination."

Insisting that Federer had played much better than in last year's final, he added: "I probably played a more complete match this year. Last year I only played well in spurts.

"But this time I was really bringing heat too. I was going at him, trying different things. You just have to sit back and say 'too good' sometimes. He's probably as close as has been to unbeatable. I don't know many people in history who would beat him.

"I actually played decent and the stats are decent and I got straight-setted. It's tough knowing that you're a better player than you were two years ago and not having a lot to show for it."

So where does he go from here? "Home, fast," was the initial reply. "I will have to go on working. We all will. There's not much else you can do. I'm not going to sit around and sulk and cry. I did everything I could. I tried playing different ways.

"I tried going to his forehand and coming in. He passed me. I tried going to his backhand and coming in. He passed me. I tried staying back but he figured out a way to pass me even though I was on the baseline.

"My coach said I mixed up the serve and volleys, mixed up the pace on the second and first serve, I returned decently and didn't miss a lot of second - serve returns. This year I had a game plan and it wasn't enough." As John Cleese once observed, disappointment is bad enough but it is the hope that really gets you.

"It's pretty frustrating but I'd feel more pissed off if I didn't do the things I wanted to do," Roddick added. "There are times when you have to tip your hat and say 'You were better than I was.' I just said 'Congratulations'. There's not much else to say. I have loads of respect for him, as a person as well. I've told him before, 'I'd love to hate you but you're really nice.'"

When asked whether there was anything negative he could say about the triple champion, anything to work on, he replied: "Well, he cut his hair; that was all we had going for us before. If I said anything else it would be out of jealousy or spite."

There was one Federer shot, in particular, that he remembered only too well. "He passed me with the backhand cross-court about 68 times. On break-point in the third set I covered that ball. I looked for it. And I was at full stretch and I didn't get to it. I looked at it and it was by me. I saw chalk fly and I was pissed off."

This, then, is all the rest of the tennis world can do: go home, work harder and at the same time hope the genius from Basle loses his edge. In the meantime Roddick is looking forward to one consolation. "I need a beer," he said.
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/wimbledon2005/story/0,16055,1520731,00.html

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:47 PM
Wimbledon 2005
Roger teams up with his own heroes
By LEO SCHLINK in London
July 5, 2005

TONY Roche used Australia's cricketers as a logistical masterstroke in Roger Federer's rampant Wimbledon victory.

Aware of Federer's adoration of the Australian team, Roche spent the eve of the final with the Swiss maestro watching the tied Natwest one-day match on television against England at Lord's.

And then, with Federer's anxiety levels soaring before the final with Andy Roddick, Roche ushered Glenn McGrath, Adam Gilchrist and Jason Gillespie into the hallowed All England Club change rooms.

The distracting ploy worked wondrously as Federer advanced to a regal 6-2 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 dismissal of second seed Roddick.

"He loves the Aussies and the boys came into the dressing room just before the match," Roche said.

"Five minutes before he went on, he was still talking to them. I guess for 10 minutes they were there.

"Which is good to take his mind a little bit off the match and he loves cricket. It was so good that those guys came in."

Federer's interest in cricket – and the Australians in particular – stems from his South African mother Lynette and his connection with South Australian coach Peter Carter.

The Federer family almost moved to Australia from Switzerland 12 years ago when his father Robert was offered a job in Sydney.

Carter, who was killed in August 2002 while holidaying in South Africa, secured a place for Federer in the South Australian training squads, but ultimately the family decided not to relocate.

But Federer, who chatted at length with the cricketers outside the player restaurant after his win, continues to idolise Australia's world-beaters.

And he proved as much to Roche as the pair sat watching a gripping one-day final.

"He knows a lot about the game," said Roche. "And he's definitely behind the Aussies."

So much so, in fact, Roche considers Federer an honourary Australian.

"This place [Wimbledon] is very special to the Australians and even though Roger is not Australian, he's as close as you can get to one," Roche said.

"Just the way the guy plays, he reminds me so much of Rod [Laver] and Lew [Hoad]. I keep telling him good stories about the Aussies and their characters and he enjoys those stories."

Federer dedicated his first Wimbledon victory to the memory of Carter, who coached him for five years and was poised to become the Swiss Davis Cup captain when he died.

An expressive, generous character, Federer wept for hours during a memorial service for the Barossa Valley mentor despite the comforting words of former Melbourne captain Todd Viney and Andre Agassi's coach Darren Cahill.

Roche is now his man and Federer was elated to have finally given the veteran Sydneysider his first taste of Wimbledon success after six separate disappointments as both a player and coach.

"It's definitely special for him," Federer said. "I'm so happy for him but really it has worked out for our partnership.

"We're excited and happy. I knew from the start that he might be a big help in my game. I'm happy I start to understand what he's trying to teach me."

Roche does not have a contract with Federer and will not be at the US Open.

Instead he will travel to Dubai next month for a two-week training period.

Roche, beaten in the 1968 final by Rod Laver, sat on the losing side at Wimbledon for finals involving Chris Lewis (1983), Ivan Lendl (1986-87) and Pat Rafter (2000-01).

After so many setbacks he considered he was a millstone for his players.

"It's been a long time," he said. "I had a lot of tough finals but for me it was just great to see somebody play that type of tennis. It was special.

"I thought maybe I was a jinx."
http://dailytelegraph.news.com.au/story.jsp?sectionid=1264&storyid=3389517

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:47 PM
Wimbledon 2005
Ruthless Roger can steamroll Pete
By LEO SCHLINK in London
July 5, 2005

TONY Roche has paid Roger Federer the ultimate accolade, predicting the Swiss conjurer can surpass Pete Sampras as the most successful player in grand slam history.

An arch-conservative and rarely inclined to overstatement, Roche believes Federer is now on par with Australian titans Rod Laver and Lew Hoad.

And in the throbbing aftermath of Federer's stellar 6-2 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 whipping of Andy Roddick, Roche considered the Swiss' fifth major as merely the entree for a dash at Sampras' imposing record of 14 slams.

"It's certainly possible," Roche said. "It's a bit like comparing Tiger Woods with Jack Nicklaus, but the way he plays the game reminds me of Rod and Lew.

"He's very special.

"He's gone through the two weeks here dropping only one set and his tennis is something special.

"It's up there with Rod and Lew, two of the greatest Australians, and I think they would be very proud of the way he played.

"When you're playing a complete player like Rod Laver, it's very, very difficult because once you go out of your comfort zone, then the player already has had a victory, a moral victory.

"And that's what happens when you play Federer, things are not comfortable with your game."

Just 23, Federer has dominated the sport since breaking through at Wimbledon two years ago. He is now only the eighth man in history to complete a Wimbledon hat-trick.


He has won his past 21 finals and holds an unbeaten 36-match streak on grass, second only to Swede Bjorn Borg's 41-match reign at Wimbledon between 1976-81.

Once insecure and temperamental, Federer now believes anything – including overtaking Sampras' record and French Open victory – is possible.

"I feel like I've put myself into a great position," he said. "I really played a fantastic match, one of the best of my life.

"I was playing flawless. I have such strong self-belief now.

"I amaze myself how incredible actually I use my talent to win.

"For those who follow me since I'm a youngster, they knew I had potential.

But I don't think nobody would have ever thought it would be this extreme, basically dominating the game, winning three Wimbledons."

Federer has not lost on grass since he was claimed by Mario Ancic here three years ago when his former nemesis Lleyton Hewitt triumphed.

He has dropped just three matches this season and has secured eight titles after losing in the semi-finals of both the Australian Open and French Open.

With Roche content to continue in a consultancy role indefinitely – the pair does not have a contract – Federer has achieved the first of two seasonal goals.

The second is to retain the world No. 1 ranking, which is virtually a certainty barring an accident or an unprecedented form reversal.

By hitting 49 winners and only 12 unforced errors and dropping serve once, Federer again exposed Roddick for the impostor only the All-England Club seeding committee failed to see.

"I'm not going to sit around and sulk and cry. I did everything I could," said Roddick after losing his ninth match in 10 outings against Federer.

"I tried going to his forehand and coming in. He passed me. I tried to go to his backhand and coming in. He passed me. I tried staying back. He figured out a way to pass me."

Full of bluster and hype before the match, the Roddick ego was levelled in just 101 minutes as John McEnroe gushingly described Federer as the most beautiful player he had ever seen.

When the new standings come out today, Hewitt will have strengthened his grip on the No. 2 ranking as Roddick slips further from touch behind Roland Garros winner Nadal.
http://dailytelegraph.news.com.au/story.jsp?sectionid=1264&storyid=3389519

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:48 PM
Roche claims a Wimbledon singles win
July 4, 2005 - 1:14PM

After losing six Wimbledon finals as player and coach, Tony Roche has finally broken his jinx.

He was on a pretty sure thing this time, though, after teaming up with world No.1 Roger Federer whom he rated as the closest thing to an Australian you could get this side of the Pacific.

Roche admitted as he sat in the players' box at Centre Court he was worried he may have brought his Wimbledon final curse down on Federer.

But the Swiss was untouchable in his straight sets caning of second seed Andy Roddick, prompting Roche to compare Federer to his great Australian contemporaries Rod Laver and Lew Hoad.

"I thought maybe I was a jinx," Roche said.

"It's Roger's moment, but I'm happy I've been able to be associated with somebody that's won Wimbledon.

"It's been a long time, I've had a lot of tough finals but for me it was just great to see somebody play that type of tennis, I think it was something special.

"This place is always special to the Australians and even though Rog is not Australian, he's as close as you can get to one.

"Just the way he plays, he reminds me so much of Rod and Lew.

"A lot reminds me of Rod Laver, he's a genius with what he can do."

And Roche knows about Laver's genius, losing to the Queenslander in straight sets in the Wimbledon singles final in 1968, although he won five doubles titles with John Newcombe.

As one of the game's most respected coaches, he then took New Zealand's rank outsider Chris Lewis to the 1983 final, Ivan Lendl to the decider in 1986 and 1987 and Pat Rafter in 2000 and 2001.

They lost them all.

So Roche's relief when Federer's forehand passed Roddick to claim his third title was obvious.

"He's not a guy who shows too much emotion, but I felt like he's very carried away too in the moment itself when we saw each other," Federer said.

Federer approached Australia's former Davis Cup coach late last year and asked him to improve what already seems to be the perfect game.

Roche, 60, admits there's "not much" he can do for the world No.1 who followed Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras as the only players of the open era to win a hat-trick of Wimbledon titles.

Roche was not prepared to take on the job fulltime so works with Federer only in the lead up to the four grand slam tournaments.

There is no contract between the two, just an understanding and a close relationship in which Roche acts more mentor than hands-on coach.

"It's more having someone there who's been through it, knows the pressure when you get on the practice court, understanding what he's going through," Roche said.

"Roger won three of the four slams on his own last year, I think he knows what he's got to do."

Roche is Federer's second Australian coach, following the late Peter Carter who steered the teenage Swiss through to his debut as a professional.

"He likes Australians, he feels comfortable with them and he was happy with the amount of weeks I could do with him," Roche said.

Federer was determined to secure an uncertain Roche, even if only for a few weeks a year, and flew especially to Sydney last December to train with him and convince him to join up.

"I knew from the start he might be a big help in my game," Federer said.

"Even though he 's not travelling 30-40 weeks a year, I still feel he gives me enough weeks and time together.

"Every day and every week he gives me, I'm very thankful because I know how old he is, what he's been through, as a player, as a coach. He doesn't need it anymore, so I'm very thankful to him."

Federer feels so comfortable with Australians, he even mingled with several of the touring Ashes cricketers in the players' area after his win.

Roche will not see Federer again until a couple of weeks before the US Open next month, but will not stay with him for the tournament, staying instead at home to help coach Australian juniors.
http://www.theage.com.au/news/Sport/Roche-claims-a-Wimbledon-singles-win/2005/07/04/1120329367241.html?oneclick=true

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:49 PM
Federer leaves his rivals trailing
By Caroline Cheese
BBC Sport at Wimbledon

Roger Federer looked a little shocked when a final unstoppable serve won him a hat-trick of Wimbledon titles.
He was the only one who was in the least bit surprised.

The world number one was supreme throughout the tournament, culminating in a display of jaw-dropping quality in the final against Andy Roddick.

After semi-final defeats at the Australian and French Opens, Federer has proved, if any still doubted it, he is the world's best.

On grass, he is simply untouchable.

He made world number two Lleyton Hewitt look toothless in the semi-finals, and then made a mockery of Roddick's much-vaunted power in the final.

Wimbledon seems set to witness a long and glorious Federer reign, but it would be nice if someone could at least make it difficult.

TOP FIVE STARS
Roger Federer
An SW19 legend already - and he's only 23
Andy Murray
The teenager lit up Wimbledon after Henman's dismal exit
Feliciano Lopez
Serve-volleyed his way into the quarters - the first Spaniard in 33 years to get that far
Fernando Gonzalez
The big-hitting Chilean is unmissable entertainment
Jimmy Connors
A compelling presence in the commentary box

While Roddick and Hewitt have time on their sides, it seems to have run out altogether for Tim Henman.
Henman's Wimbledon campaign ended in the same way it began - with a whimper.

The British number one struggled from two sets down in his opening match and when he went out to Dmitry Tursanov, it was telling that no one was all that surprised.

But just as a downcast Henman was trudging off Centre Court, 18-year-old Andy Murray was preparing to push his defeat off the back pages.

After destroying 14th seed Radek Stepanek in the second round, the teenager went on to light up the Championships with a remarkable Centre Court debut.

Murray left a capacity crowd in awe of both his talent and competitive spirit as he threatened another seismic shock against former finalist David Nalbandian.

His body ultimately let him down but as Murray took the subsequent hype and hysteria in his stride, the Scot indicated that when Henman retires, he may not be missed as much as first feared.

Murray was not the only teenager to star at Wimbledon.

TOP FIVE FLOPS
Tim Henman
No one really expected him to win, but nor did they expect a tetchy second-round defeat
Mario Ancic
The Croat was an outsider for the title until he succumbed meekly to Felicano Lopez
Marat Safin
Suffered defeat in third round - and didn't seem all that bothered
Ivo Karlovic
The Queen's finalist flamed out in the first round
Boris Becker's suit
Becker opted for a powder blue number coupled with pink tie on men's final day

French duo Gael Monfils and Richard Gasquet gave a good account of themselves in reaching the third and fourth round respectively.
Rafael Nadal went out in the second round, but the genial Spaniard has vowed to work on his grass-court skills and mount a title challenge in the future.

Nadal has hogged the headlines in his home country all year, but once he went out, his doubles partner Feliciano Lopez grasped the opportunity to step into the limelight.

Lopez's sublime serve and volley skills removed title contenders Marat Safin and Mario Ancic as he became the first Spaniard for 33 years to reach the last eight.

Fernando Gonzalez was another to make a welcome appearance in the quarter-finals, the flamboyant Chilean racking up four straight-sets victories before running into Federer.

But while there were plenty of characters to entertain the Wimbledon crowds, there were precious few memorable matches.

Roddick's semi-final against Thomas Johansson was probably the highlight in terms of quality on both sides of the net, while Murray's five-set defeat to Nalbandian wins the prize for 'Best Dramatic Exit'.

But in the end, the Wimbledon men's singles provided a very predictable, yet awe-inspiring, climax as Federer joined greats like Pete Sampras, Bjorn Borg and Fred Perry in winning three in a row.

Story from BBC SPORT:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/sport1/hi/tennis/4646211.stm

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:49 PM
Federer 'too good' against RoddickSwiss bullies American with potent mix of power, placement on back-court rallies
By TOM TEBBUTT

Monday, July 4, 2005
Updated at 10:44 AM EDT
Special to The Globe and Mail

LONDON -- An hour after yesterday's Wimbledon final, champion Roger Federer stood on the pedestrian bridge between the men's locker room and the players' patio with a crowd cheering loudly below.

After looking down and waving to fans gathered on either side, he decided to have a little fun. Like an orchestra conductor, he raised his arms and swayed them from side to side, directing the groups on either side to respond to each other with an even bigger roar.

He was the maestro, just as he had been in defeating Andy Roddick 6-2, 7-6 (2), 6-4 to win his third Wimbledon in a row.

Federer set the tone early -- flashing gorgeous backhand, cross-court passing shots, serving skillfully and generally bullying Roddick in the back-court rallies with a potent mix of power and placement.

Roddick won his first eight serving points, but Federer soon ended that in the sixth game and went on to break serve to lead 4-2, giving him the separation he needed to hit even more masterfully.

Roddick, the No. 2 seed, made a stand by breaking serve early in the second set, but the top seed did not flinch and came back to win it in a tiebreaker going away. After a 20-minute rain delay, Federer took the third set, finishing with a service winner.
Federer has now won 36 matches in a row on grass, while Roddick, on the same surface over the same period, is 35-3, all three losses coming to Federer at Wimbledon.

"He's as close as he has been to unbeatable," said Roddick, also runner-up in 2004. "Look at the stats -- 49 winners and 12 unforced errors [for Federer]. I was bringing heat, going at him, trying different things. You just have to sit back and say, 'too good' sometimes."

Federer said: "I played another sick match and it was a pity for him. I really did play my best."

Federer arrived at Wimbledon after a tough loss to Rafael Nadal in the French Open semi-finals and a victory at the grass-court event in Halle, Germany.

"I was really exhausted," he said. "But I somehow got things going starting with my first match."

Yesterday, he was in the zone, a state he described saying: "When you need one, you hit an ace. When you have to hit a passing shot, it's there. It seemed like I was playing flawless."

Roddick said Federer was the "most physically gifted player I've ever played against," and has also become "a mental force."

Always straightforward in his self-assessment, Federer said: "I amaze myself how incredibly I use my talent to win.

"As a youngster, I had potential. I don't think anybody ever thought it would be this extreme, basically, dominating the game, winning three Wimbledons," he said. "I'm very proud."

Federer plans to take a vacation before playing in the Rogers Cup in Montreal beginning Aug. 8 (his 24th birthday), although he said he will still be doing "physical training" and "tennis training."

Joining the Swiss as a three-time Wimbledon champion was Venus Williams. On Saturday, she defeated Lindsay Davenport in an epic 4-6, 7-6 (4), 9-7 final that lasted 2 hours 45 minutes, the longest women's final in history.

Williams became the first Wimbledon champion since 1935 (Helen Wills of the U.S.) to save a championship point. That occurred with Davenport leading 5-4 in the third set and Williams serving at 30-40, when she coolly executed a perfect, backhand, down-the-line winner into an open court.

The match paled beside the frantic shot-making and fevered atmosphere of the semi-final between Williams and defending champion Maria Sharapova. But that was only until Davenport began to visibly suffer from a lower back problem while serving for a 5-2 lead in the final set.

She led 40-15, but Williams rallied to win the game. Davenport then took an injury timeout, leaving the court for treatment.

When she returned, she was not moving as well and the match had a new, dramatic element: could Davenport be mobile enough to still have a chance to win?

While admitting she was initially concerned her back might "completely lock up," Davenport said that "toward the end of the match, it really wasn't a factor."

The 29-year-old Californian had to be disappointed because she reached a consistently higher level than Williams.

"I played great," the top seed said. "There's not many times when I feel like I've played well and I haven't won."

Paying tribute to Williams, she said: "When the chips were down for Venus, she played unbelievable. She just took it away from me every time I got ahead."

"I knew my destiny was to be in the winner's circle," said the 14th-seeded Williams, 25, reflecting on the time since her last major title at the 2001 U.S. Open. A time that included five consecutive losses to her sister, Serena, in Grand Slam finals in 2002 and 2003, as well as six months out of tennis in 2003 with a serious (and still troublesome) abdominal strain.

That destiny crystallized in one moment when she bravely hit that backhand winner facing match point. It was the difference in a memorable Wimbledon final which had the most games in a third set in 56 years.

Asked for her thoughts about both players deserving to win, Davenport smiled wistfully and said: "It's never happened in a tennis match. I wish it could have."

Federer's feats

Roger Federer joins Rod Laver (four), John Newcombe (three), Bjorn Borg (five), John McEnroe (three) Boris Becker (three) and Pete Sampras (seven) as the only players to win three or more Wimbledon titles since Englishman Fred Perry (1934-36).

Has won his last 21 tournament finals dating back to July, 2003, when he lost to Jiri Novak in Gstaad, Switzerland.

Has lost only four sets in winning 21 matches at Wimbledon in 2003, 2004 and 2005. Has never been pushed to five sets.

Is the first player to win his first five Grand Slam finals since American Tony Trabert in 1955.

Has won 36 matches in a row on grass. Borg has record -- 41.

Only Borg, 22, Boris Becker, 23 and two months, and Mats Wilander, 23 and five months, have won their first five Grand Slam singles titles at a younger age than Federer, 23 and 10 months.

Tactical change: In winning his first Wimbledon title in 2003, he served and volleyed on 302 of 504 points -- about 60 per cent. In winning in 2005, he served and volleyed 87 of 523 points -- about 19 per cent.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20050704.TENNISS04/BNPrint/theglobeandmail/TopStories

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:50 PM
It's lucky seven as Roche has a big win
By Richard Hinds in London
July 5, 2005

Champions … Roger Federer and Tony Roche.
Photo: Getty Images

It had taken Tony Roche seven attempts as player and coach to be part of a men's singles victory at Wimbledon. When that moment finally came, as coach of Roger Federer, the renowned mentor knew he had been part of something very special.

So much so that he was moved to pay the Swiss champion what is, from a man who viewed first-hand his country's days of tennis glory, the ultimate compliment.

"There is a lot that reminds me about Rod Laver," said Roche of Federer. "He is a genius, really."

Roche, who lost his only Wimbledon singles final to Laver in 1968, did not stop there. Asked about Federer's near-perfect performance in the final, he said: "It's up there with Rod and Lew [Hoad], two of the greatest Australians. I think they would be very, very proud of the way Roger played today."

For Roche, a five-times Wimbledon doubles champion, there was a sense of pride and also relief. "It's been a long time," he said. "I've had a lot of tough finals, but for me it was just great to see someone play that type of tennis, it was something special."

Having coached Chris Lewis, Ivan Lendl (twice) and Pat Rafter (twice) in losing Wimbledon finals, Roche admitted to some nerves before Federer walked on to the court. "I thought maybe I'm a jinx," he said. "It's Roger's moment, but I'm happy [to be] associated with someone who has won Wimbledon."

Having finally agreed to take on an occasional coaching role with Federer late last year, Roche faced a difficult assignment. How could he improve the game of a man who already held three of the four grand slam trophies? When Federer lost in the semi-finals of the Australian and French Opens this year, there might even have been the temptation for outsiders to suggest the partnership was not working.

Besides the fact that Federer feels comfortable in the company of Australians - his former coach, the late David Carter, was from Adelaide - Roche says it's his experience that Federer requires.

"It's just more having someone there who has been through it, who knows the pressure on the practice court [and] what he's going through," he said.

Federer, who travelled to Sydney last December to work with Roche for two weeks, is glowing in his praise for him. "We've just been together about eight or nine weeks [consecutively], which is a lot," he said. "You start to really know each other and start to understand each other."

While the arrangement operates on a handshake agreement - and Roche will not even be at the US Open in August because he has a commitment to work with juniors in Australia - Federer is grateful for what time he gets.

The patriotic Roche had found it uncomfortable helping to plot the downfall of Lleyton Hewitt in the semi-finals. "I would have rather been somewhere else," he said. But, in Federer, Roche says he is working with a man who has some Aussie sensibilities. "Even though Roger is not Australian, I think he is as close as you can get," he said.
http://www.smh.com.au/news/tennis/its-lucky-seven-as-roche-has-a-big-win/2005/07/04/1120329386778.html?oneclick=true

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:50 PM
how about this stat?
Roger Federer (SUI) vs Andy Roddick (USA)

2005 Wimbledon, Grass, F, Federer 6-2 7-6 6-4
2004 Bangkok, Hard, F, Federer 6-4, 6-0
2004 Canada TMS, Hard, F, Federer 7-5, 6-3
2004 Wimbledon, Grass, F, Federer 4-6, 7-5, 7-6, 6-4
2003 Tennis Masters Cup, Hard, SF Federer 7-6, 6-2
2003 Canada TMS, Hard, SF Roddick 6-4, 3-6, 7-6
2003 Wimbledon, Grass, SF Federer 7-6, 6-3, 6-3
2002 Basel, Carpet, QF Federer 7-6, 6-1
2002 Sydney, Hard, SF Federer 7-6, 6-4
2001 Basel, Carpet, QF Federer 3-6, 6-3, 7-6

Federer leads 9-1

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:51 PM
Wimbledon
July 3, 2005
Fabulous Federer Claims Third Consecutive Wimbledon Crown

World No. 1 Roger Federer captured his third consecutive Wimbledon championship after defeating second seed Andy Roddick in straight sets at the All England Club.

Federer's 6-2, 7-6(2), 6-4 in 1 hour, 41 minutes means he joins Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras as the only players to win three straight Wimbledon titles in the Open Era (since 1968).

Federer's victory also means he extends his unbeaten record in ATP finals to an incredible 21 since his last loss in Gstaad 2003 to Jiri Novak, as well as extending his unbeaten grass court streak to 36 matches. He has not lost a match on grass since going down to Mario Ancic in the first round at Wimbledon in 2002 and is just five matches short of equaling Borg's unbeaten record of 41 on the surface.

It is the fifth Grand Slam championship for the 23-year-old Swiss star who becomes the first player to win his first five Grand Slam finals since Tony Trabert in 1955. Federer increases his INDESIT ATP 2005 Race lead to 238 points ahead of Rafael Nadal. He has now won eight titles this year and improves to 58-3. Both marks are the best on the ATP circuit .

In the championship match – the first repeat final at Wimbledon since Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker played three consecutive finals between 1988-90 – Federer took the first set in just 22 minutes with two breaks of serve, but Roddick hit back and broke early in the second before opening up a 3-1 lead.

However, Federer produced more impressive winners from all parts of the court to break back for 3-3 and held two set points on Roddick's serve while leading 5-4. However, the American produced two service winners to stop the danger and eventually forced a second set tie-break.

Federer came into the match having won six of their seven tie-breaks, with Roddick's only success coming in his only victory against Federer in Montreal 2003. And it was the Swiss who took the early advantage, leading 3-0 with two mini-breaks. Roddick won the next two points on Federer's serve only for the World No. 1 to win the next four points and take a two-set lead.

At that point, the players went off court for a 25-minute rain delay, with Federer having produced 33 winners and only three unforced errors. When they returned, Roddick seemed more relaxed and held serve comfortably until 3-3. Federer then changed into another gear and gained the crucial break with another impeccable cross court backhand pass – one of his 49 winners throughout the match.

Serving for the Championship at 5-4, Federer made no mistake, firing aces 10 and 11 to go up 30-0 and another service winner earned him his third place in the record books. After falling to his knees, tears of relief and joy began to flow as the two stars embraced at the net.

Federer's victory means he has won nine of his 10 meetings against Roddick, who was looking to claim his second Grand Slam title alongside his win at the US Open in 2003. The American has lost just three matches on grass in the last three years – each one coming at the hands of Federer.

En route to the final, Federer had dropped just one set, with that coming against Nicolas Kiefer in the third round. He also defeated former World No. 1s Juan Carlos Ferrero (fourth round) and Lleyton Hewitt (semifinal) before overcoming 2003 year-end World No. 1 Roddick in the final.

http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/wimby_0703.asp

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:52 PM
AWESOME ROGER UTTERLY DOMINANT
Roddick - well beaten (Getty Images).
By Andy Schooler

Roger Federer started as the 1/7 favourite to complete a hat-trick of Wimbledon titles against Andy Roddick on Centre Court.

The 23-year-old Swiss was bidding to become only the third player in the Open era - Pete Sampras and Bjorn Borg being the others - to win the event three years in succession.

He also held a 8-1 winning record against his big-serving opponent coming into the match, which was a repeat of last year's final.

Federer started with a hold to love, a feat duly repeated by Roddick.

The American finally took a point against the serve in game three, but Federer, showing some great reactions at the net, held to 15 to lead 2-1.

Roddick crashed down the first ace in the next game. He clearly knew he had to attack and the second seed was coming to the net more often than usual in the early stages.

Serve was dominating and when Federer held to lead to love to lead 3-2, still only one point had been won by the receiver.

That changed in the sixth game as Federer made a move and produced the first break points.

Roddick saved one with a serve-volley play on second serve, but then a poor overhead followed by a shot beyond the baseline saw the world number one move ahead 4-2.

Another error from Roddick in his next service game - a wide forehand - brought up set point and Federer took it, albeit with a mishit backhand which landed on the line.

It had been a near-perfect set from the top seed - he had dropped one point on his serve, hit one unforced error and cracked 15 winners.

The pattern continued as the second set began with the champion holding to love.

Thankfully for him, Roddick stopped a run of five straight games against him with a hold to 30 in game two.

Federer's first sloppy game followed and gave Roddick his opportunity to get himself back in the match.

The American moved to 15-40 and although Federer saved one break point with an ace, a forehand volley into the net put Roddick 2-1 ahead with a precious break of serve.

Usually one break would be good enough for a man with a serve like Roddick's, but against Federer nothing is certain.

Indeed, the Swiss had a break-back chance in the very next game, only for Roddick to steel himself and move 3-1 up.

Roddick's serve was coming under threat regularly now and some superb play from Federer saw him break back in the sixth game to leave the American shaking his head in disbelief.

The 2003 US Open champion was sent sprawling to the turf in the next game as he tried in vain to reach another Federer winner.

The score progressed to 5-4 at which point Roddick stepped up to serve to stay in the set.

He almost cracked as Federer turned up the heat again, but twice on set point he produced unreturnable serves to stay alive.

An easy hold from Federer, which included a sensational forehand crosscourt, put the pressure immediately back on his opponent at 6-5.

He forced the tie-break but it was to have a predictable outcome, even though the way it unfolded was something of a surprise.

Roddick recovered two mini-breaks to get to 2-3, but from there Federer took control again, winning the next four points to open up a two-set lead.

Rain had begun to fall during the breaker and when it finished umpire Wayne McEwen suspended play and the covers came on.

Perhaps that was good news for Roddick who was being thoroughly outplayed.

The rain had come to Federer's rescue in last year's final - would it work in reverse this time?

Roddick certainly hoped so, but he also knew he now faced a five-setter if he was to lift the trophy and that was a big ask given he had played more than three sets on Saturday when Federer had been resting up.

Play resumed after a 25-minute break.

Upon the resumption, Roddick served the first double fault of the match, but managed to hold to 30.

Roddick took Federer to deuce in the next game, some kind of feat, but serve continued to hold sway to 3-3.

Then the shot of the match - a forehand winner on the run down the line off a low ball - provided Federer with the platform to break.

And break he did, moving into a 4-3 lead with another superb winner, a top-spin crosscourt backhand which left the American in deep, deep trouble.

At 3-5, Roddick served to stay in the match and held to 15.

However, Federer was left serving for the title.

And he had no problems, completing victory with an unreturnable serve which wrapped up an utterly convincingly 6-2 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 win.
http://www.sportinglife.com/tennis/wimbledon2005/news/story_get.dor?STORY_NAME=wimbledon/05/07/03/manual_152858.html

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:52 PM
BECKER HAILS 'SUPREME' FEDERER
Federer - simply the best (Getty Images).

Boris Becker hailed the "supreme" Wimbledon champion Roger Federer after the Swiss world number one destroyed Andy Roddick to claim his third consecutive title.

Federer joined a group of just eight players in history to win three in a row at the All England Club with a 6-2 7-6 6-4 victory.

And Becker believes the best is yet to come from 23-year-old Federer who already has Pete Sampras' modern Wimbledon record of seven titles in his sights.

Becker, champion in 1985, 1986 and 1989, told the BBC: "Federer is on top of his game and at the pinnacle of his career right now - we are watching greatness unfold.

"It really is a privilege to be a part of this whole time - this year he was supreme out there, he was oozing confidence and I can't believe the way he played in the final.

"He is different class to everyone else, he has raised the bar and everybody has got to look up to him.

"But the bad news is Roger is only going to get better. He is only 23 and he has got another three or four years of great tennis in him at least."

Eight-time Grand Slam champion Jimmy Connors - victorious at SW19 in 1974 and 1982 - also paid tribute to Swiss star Federer and warned Roddick things could be about to get worse before he can bridge the gap.

"Federer is certainly a class above," said Connors.

"Roddick had a successful event and got to the final where he lost to the number one player in the world.

"But for him to win the Championships and beat Federer he is going to have to suffer, to go away and pay the price, adapt his game and work out what can get him to the next level.

"Federer was really just a pleasure and a joy to watch."

Former British number one John Lloyd also hailed Federer and predicted his dominance would continue for some time to come.

Lloyd said: "You see magic moments when you're watching matches but Federer seems to have one almost every game.

"It's a privilege to watch him and he is the complete player.

"He is raising the bar all the time and the rest are going to have to work extremely hard to get near to him. He is on a different planet to everyone else."

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:52 PM
FEDERER COMPLETES TITLE HAT-TRICK
Federer reacquaints himself with the trophy.
By Andy Schooler

Roger Federer completed a hat-trick of Wimbledon titles by destroying Andy Roddick in straight sets on Sunday.

By winning 6-2 7-6 (7-2) 6-4, Federer joined Pete Sampras and Bjorn Borg as the only men in the Open era to have won three singles titles in a row at the All England Club and the eighth in all.

Federer, in tears as he lifted the Challenge Cup, admitted that completing a hat-trick was a special moment in his life.

"It's a pity for him (Roddick) but I really did play my best," he told the crowd. "To win it a third time is really special.

"It has been easier than the second somehow, I don't know know why.

"I felt better throughout the tournament, even though there was pressure on me because of my semi-final losses at the Australian and French Opens.

"I came here with huge expectations but this is almost a dream, I cannot believe it.

"Sampras was one of my favourite players of all time. Borg was fantastic and Fred Perry too. But I hope I'm not going to stop at three."

He added: "Today it seemed I was playing flawless, everything was working.

"I played a fantastic match, one of the best in my life. The most important tournament, even more than the US Open, so this is the best match I've ever played."

Indeed the world number one was once again in superb form as he left his opponent baffled by his quality of his tennis.

Federer, combining superb defence with brilliant passing shots, played a near-perfect opening set.

He dropped just one point on his serve, hit just one unforced error and cracked 15 winners (he would finish with 49 in total) to leave Roddick perplexed.

Roddick gave himself brief hope when he broke at the start of the second set and moved 3-1 ahead.

However, Federer was quick to retrieve the situation, levelling at 3-3 with shots that left Roddick shaking his head in disbelief.

The second seed did well to fend off two set points - both with unreturnable serves - in the 10th game, but it only delayed the inevitable.

In the tie-break, Federer ran away with things, taking it 7-2 to open a two-set lead.

At that point, with Roddick facing a mountainous task, the rain arrived.

After 25-minute delay, ther match resumed but the interruption did not change the flow.

Federer continued to dominate and in the seventh game he produced the shot of the match - a stunning forehand winner down the line - to set up the break of serve which would prove the nail in Roddick's coffin.

Minutes later he was serving out for a third title, which he clinched with an unreturnable serve.

Roddick admitted the straight-sets defeat was difficult to take, saying: "I'm more in the mood for a beer right now.

"I couldn't have asked for more of myself. I wanted to win this tournament so badly but this guy is the best for a reason. He deserves a lot of credit.

"I ran out of options because he's the complete player."

It was hard to argue.

The victory was Federer's 36th in a row on a grasscourt and he now has more records in his sights.

Borg won 41 grasscourt matches - a record the Swiss could beat here in 12 months time.

The Swedish star also won five consecutive titles on Centre Court - a record Federer is now threatening to break - while even Sampras' mark of seven championships in all no longer looks unbeatable.
http://www.sportinglife.com/tennis/wimbledon2005/news/story_get.dor?STORY_NAME=wimbledon/05/07/03/manual_111807.html

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:53 PM
Punchline that says it all
By Andrew Baker
(Filed: 04/07/2005)

What do you give the man who has everything? A third successive Wimbledon men's singles title. Might as well gift Roger Federer the next three championships, too, since it is well-nigh impossible to envisage anyone else winning them.

According to the seeding committee, the player defeated in straight sets yesterday afternoon was the second best in the tournament. So what were Andy Roddick's thoughts on the best way to defeat Federer here in future? "Maybe I should just punch him," Roddick said.

That is the kind of hold that the Swiss master is starting to exert over his challengers at the All England Club. There is an aura about him here, a sense that he knows something that nobody else does, that he possesses a unique understanding of what it takes to win on the grass of SW19.

Two years ago, when Federer first lifted the AELTC Challenge Cup, it was still possible to discern chinks in his grasscourt armour: a serve that lacked killer power, a backhand still in development. But as Roddick generously observed yesterday, the champion just keeps getting better, and yesterday's performance was as close to faultless as you are likely to see.

The knowledgeable crowd here are aware of what a gem they have been watching. Under normal circumstances during the second week (i.e., with no British player to cheer) it is common for the Wimbledon crowd to give their allegiance to the underdog. So it was a little surprising to hear a greater volume of cheering for the defending champion as the players walked out to begin their match.

Wimbledon loves Federer, and the affection is reciprocated. It is not just that the fans adore his talent, they also appreciate his personality. He is not a showman, in the Becker/Connors/Agassi mould, but his self-deprecating, shy-smiling demeanour appeals to something in the British character. So if we cannot have our own winners, we are happy to adopt one from the Swiss.

Roddick is popular, too, since he is as useful with one-liners as he is with two-handed backhands. If we have to get used to watching him lose in the final here year after year, the compensation is that he is prepared to be funny about it in the aftermath. One suspects that Roddick would rather collect trophies than jokes, though, and he started yesterday's match as if determined to put an end to the hoodoo hold that Federer seems to have over him at present: Roddick has won only once in 10 meetings.

The Swiss was in an equally stubborn mood, though, with the result that only a solitary point went against serve in the first five games, which passed in only 10 minutes. This was Express Tennis, just as it used to be in the days of Boom-Boom Becker and Goran Ivanesevic.

But suddenly there was a hint, the merest suggestion of weakness in the Roddick serve, and Federer was all over him, raining down shots from all sides and forcing an overhit forehand and the break.

Just then, a helicopter trailing a banner that promoted an Australian airline droned close to the court. "Lleyton Hewitt," an onlooker murmured. "Take cover."

Federer refused to be distracted. Roddick managed a break early in the second set but never looked like hanging on to it, and he faded rapidly in the ensuing tie-break. In the third, the American was hanging on gamely until the seventh game, which was a microcosm of the whole match.

Roddick was serving consistently at more than 130 mph, but Federer was dominant. He passed, lobbed, volleyed, hit down the line. Roddick was reduced to comedy shots from beween his legs, exasperated lunges. He tried rushing the net, and found the ball rushing past him.

It was all too much. Roddick was playing fantastic tennis - he would later say that he had played far better than he did in last year's final, when he had won the first set - but Federer was playing better.

Afterwards, Roddick - who has a wonderful facility for maintaining his sense of humour under the most trying circumstances - offered his own summary of the match. "I did everything I could," he said. "I tried playing different ways. I tried playing to his forehand and coming in. He passed me. I tried going to his backhand and coming in. He passed me. I tried staying back, and he figured out a way to pass me, even though I was at the baseline."

We always wonder what players say to each other when they meet at the net at the conclusion of a final. This time Federer had spent so long on the ground drinking in the cheers that Roddick was able to walk around the net and embrace him in mid-court. "I just said 'Congratulations'," Roddick disclosed later. "There's not much else to say. I have loads of respect for him. I've told him before, 'I'd love to hate you but you're really nice'."
www.telegraph.co.uk/wimbledon

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:53 PM
Flawless Federer out on his own
By Mark Hodgkinson
(Filed: 04/07/2005)

There was a double sense of satisfaction for Roger Federer at Wimbledon yesterday as he not only won the title, achieving a third successive triumph at the All England Club, but also played the finest tennis of his career, a performance of real sparkle and gloss, to defeat Andy Roddick in straight sets.

Awesome: an emotional Roger Federer wins the final set
The Swiss, who has long been considered a tennis genius, was quite brilliant on Centre Court, hitting the ball with the lightest of touches, some mischievous spin and then great power and pace. His control over the ball and over the final was absolute, as he demolished Roddick, the second seed and his closest rival on a grass court, 6-2, 7-6, 6-4.

The sheer one-sided nature of the match - it could hardly be called a contest - gave fresh impetus to the debate over whether Federer could be the greatest player in the history of the sport. It is not just that he is so successful, here winning the fifth grand slam title of his career, but that he plays with such elegance and grace, that his tennis is so easy on the eye.

"This is probably the best match that I have ever played in my career," Federer said. "I was playing flawless tennis. Everything was working well. I think it will take a while for me to realise what I have achieved here, possibly days, weeks or even months. It didn't really feel like I was playing. It was a strange feeling on the court."

Federer joined Sweden's Bjorn Borg and American Pete Sampras as the only men since the Open era began in 1968 to win three golden trophies in a row at Wimbledon. He will almost certainly threaten Borg, who won five titles, and possibly even Sampras, who has won a record seven titles at the All England Club.

It was difficult to recall a more complete performance at the All England Club in recent times. Probably only the 1999 final, when Sampras took apart Andre Agassi in straight sets, would come close. It was the second year in succession that Federer had beaten Roddick in the final, last year requiring four sets and the help of a rain break.

Federer said he had surprised himself with what he had achieved here. "I amaze myself how incredibly I use my talent to make me win," he said. "For those who followed me as a youngster, they knew I had potential. But I don't think anybody would have thought it would be this extreme, dominating the game and winning three Wimbledon titles in a row.

"After one you think, 'Wow, that is fantastic'. When you end up winning three in a row, you really start to wonder, 'What have I done right in my career that this has happened to me?' I'm very proud as this is the most important tournament. I have played so consistently over the last few years and I take a lot of pride from that."

Federer was highly emotional in the moments after his victory, returning to his chair to cry behind a towel.

The year had started with talk of Federer achieving the Grand Slam, a calendar sweep of the four majors, but he lost in the semi-finals of the Australian Open and in the semi-finals of the French Open at Roland Garros. That was on a hard court and then red clay, and this was on the green grass of the All England Club; his priority for the season was always to retain his Wimbledon title.

Federer has an extraordinary array of shots available on a grass court. He can apply the softest of touches to a tennis ball, playing with great elegance and deception, but he is also capable of raw power, of giving his shots an almighty whack. It is the combination of the two, craft and power, which makes him so deadly. Roddick looked for a possible Federer technical flaw, a slight weakness, but there was none.

The Roddick game is considerably more one-dimensional. His tennis is built around power - he has an immense serve and a whip-crack forehand - but his backhand is hardly the most effective of shots. Federer put him under pressure by hitting deep and hard towards the backhand side, with the shot frequently malfunctioning. Almost every time Federer attacked that side he had some reward.

But there was little that Roddick could do. Federer showed yesterday that he is a genius on a grass court.

"I'm in the mood for a beer right now," Roddick said afterwards. "I couldn't have asked any more of myself, and I wanted to win this tournament so badly, but there's a reason why he's the best and has won this tournament for the last three years. You run out of options because Roger is such a complete player. Maybe I'll just punch him or something before we go on court next time."
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml;jsessionid=UIAND1KMVHGPXQFIQMFSNAGAVCBQ 0JVC?xml=/sport/2005/07/04/stfron04.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/07/04/ixtenn.html

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:54 PM
July 04, 2005
Like Hamlet, this had the air of inevitability
By Simon Barnes

SO ROGER FEDERER has won three Wimbledons in a row. Who will be the first to say that it’s all rather a bore? But listen: don’t do it around me, not unless you want the most frightful earful. You thought that was boring? Huh! Perhaps you should try something a bit less intellectually demanding. Shakespeare, for example.
You can enjoy sport, like everything else, on many different levels. You can buy Van Gogh table-mats and spill your soup on them, or you can give Van Gogh a lifetime of study. Yesterday afternoon lacked cheap thrills: above all, it lacked uncertainty. It was without any of sport’s usual soap-opera pleasures.

And it was as good as sport gets. Federer beat Andy Roddick in straight sets, 6-2, 7-6, 6-4, and it was never for an instant in doubt. You know from the first act that Hamlet will end badly for Hamlet: you knew from the first handful of games that yesterday afternoon’s men’s singles final would end badly for Roddick. That did not detract from the pleasure — au contraire.

Federer has joined the hat-trick men. I missed Fred Perry, but I know about Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras. They are appreciated now as the very greatest of champions but, at the time, those who preferred soap opera to sport complained of boredom. Now Federer is in their company and not by chance. He has done it by the same means as the other two: excellence. And if you find excellence boring, then direct your attention away from sport, where excellence is the goal, even if it is rarely found. Instead, concentrate your mind, such as it is, on EastEnders, where they value cheap gratification above such tedious matters as excellence.

Last year, Federer won his second Wimbledon championship despite playing badly. He won ever-so-slightly ugly. This pleased me deeply: it showed the steel beneath the silk, the rock behind the velvet. But there has been no such thing as ugliness to contemplate this time around.

I have had the privilege of covering Federer’s last three matches in the tournament. Each opponent played well, and each one of them played in a radically different style: Fernando González, a shot a ball plus a demented forehand; Lleyton Hewitt, all-court angle-finder; Roddick, power mixed with more power. And here’s the genius of it: each person’s game seemed specifically constructed as a showcase for Federer’s talents.

And each person lost in straight sets. You come up with the game, Federer will come up with the counter-game. You raise your game, Federer will raise his. Raise again, again, you really are that good . . . but Federer has more raises than anyone else on earth. And he has improved since he first won; he is improving all the time and getting mentally stronger.

Roddick came in with a gameplan based on aggression. He charged about the court in a blazing passion to set things aright — or was he actually being lured? He came out to set the agenda and suffered the spooky feeling that he was doing exactly what Federer wanted. Worse, he was doing exactly what Federer told him: told him by means of power and angle and accuracy and tempo.

There was a point when Federer made a startling mis-hit — he puts so much in to every ball that such things happen — and somehow turned that into his own advantage. It was as if he had deliberately set Roddick up with a shot off the frame — a nonsense of course, but that is the illusion he creates. This kind of perfection is mesmerising rather than exciting and it certainly mesmerised Roddick. By the end, he must have felt like a man fighting a ghost.

Not even the rain dismayed Federer. He broke Roddick twice in the first set — Roddick the best server in the tournament — and dropped a single point on his own serve. Federer was broken in the second set, but he broke back and wiped out Roddick in the tie-break. After the rain he simply carried on as before with a classic seventh-game break and hold of serve to win.

Don’t cheer. Sigh. Sigh, and then wag your head in baffled, joyful silence. This was something very special, as good a bit of sport as I have seen, and I have seen a fair bit here and there. And think of Borg and Sampras: how these people are appreciated now, but were thought of really rather dull at the time. On Centre Court yesterday, Roddick was the man who had most of the support: you can do it, Andy! But Federer is the one who can do it. Achieve serious greatness in sporting terms, that is. And I think it would be an interesting and instructive thing if we were to appreciate him while he is actually playing. He failed to bring us a five-set nail-biter. Instead, when it came to the end of the tournament, he brought us three successive matches of incremental brilliance.

There are people who will tell you that Sunflowers is a bit of a cliché and that Hamlet is too full of quotations. The same people will tell you that Federer is boring. You can find shallowness in all things, and you can find profundity. It all depends on what kind of a person you are, or whether or not you are concentrating.

CENTRE COURT'S HAT-TRICK HEROES

BY CLAIMING his third successive Wimbledon singles title yesterday, Roger Federer joined an elite band in the hat-trick club. Fred Perry became the first in 1936, after the abolition of the challenge round in 1922, Bjorn Borg captured five in a row from 1976 and Pete Sampras managed the feat on two occasions. One of Federer’s more unusual benefits for winning Wimbledon is the presenting of a cow by the organisers of the Swiss Open.

ROGER FEDERER 2003-05
Grand-slam titles: 5 (Wimbledon 2003, Australian Open 2004, US Open 2004, Wimbledon 2004, Wimbledon 2005).

PETE SAMPRAS 1993-95, 1997-2000

Grand-slam titles: 14 (US Open 1990, US Open 1993, Wimbledon 1993, Australian Open 1994, Wimbledon 1994, US Open 1995, Wimbledon 1995, US Open 1996, Australian Open 1997, Wimbledon 1997, Wimbledon 1998, Wimbledon 1999, Wimbledon 2000, US Open 2002).

BJORN BORG 1976-80

Grand-slam titles: 11 (French Open 1974, French Open 1975, Wimbledon 1976, Wimbledon 1977, French Open 1978, Wimbledon 1978, French Open 1979, Wimbledon 1979, French Open 1980, Wimbledon 1980, French Open 1981).

FRED PERRY 1934-36

Grand-slam titles: 8 (US Open 1933, Australian Open 1934, Wimbledon 1934, US Open 1934, French Open 1935, Wimbledon 1935, Wimbledon 1936, US Open 1936).
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2641-1679996_2,00.html

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:54 PM
July 04, 2005
'Unbeatable' Federer on a roll to claim triple crown
By Neil Harman, Tennis Correspondent

ROGER FEDERER’S description of his third Wimbledon title in successive years as a pity for Andy Roddick was a pity shared by every other professional who will don their whites, blues or yellows in the next few months searching for the answer to what has become the sport’s perpetual conundrum. How does one cope with greatness? Yes, Marat Safin, of Russia, and Rafael Nadal, the young Spanish bull, have beaten Federer in grand-slam tournament semi-finals this year, Richard Gasquet, the teenage Frenchman, contrived an astonishing victory in Monte Carlo when the stakes were not quite so high, but give Federer the grass, give him the Centre Court, give him Wimbledon and you are dealing with an entirely different phenomenon.
Roddick — whose “arghs” and “cummmns” (he doesn’t do a full “c’monnn” like Lleyton Hewitt but mutters it beneath his breath) will be the sounds most associated with the 2005 final — would not want to be seen as a player to be pitied. He accepts that when he steps out, he wants to thrash his opponent and, more often than not, that is the way it is. Federer, though, has Roddick in his thrall as nine victories in their ten meetings bears formidable testimony. This, he said, was the greatest performance of his life. “I remember during the match, the rain delay, I didn’t even feel as if I was playing, it was so strange. But I will remember this moment forever,” Federer said.

Federer knew that there had been significant improvements in Roddick between last year’s final and this in his movement, his speed off the mark, his eye for a chance and his ability to take it. That has worked against 95 per cent of those who have crossed his path — he still finds clay a real handful — but it is not enough against Federer. Yesterday’s 6-2, 7-6, 6-4 victory for the Swiss No 1 seed was a triumph for the man who stayed in perfect balance against one who stumbled, stretched, staggered and slid. The only time the champion lost his footing was in the throes of his victory roll, which was obviously not one he had taken the time to perfect. There will be plenty more occasions for that.

Federer becomes the eighth player who has won three successive men’s singles titles at Wimbledon and the third in the Open era, behind Bjorn Borg — who won five in a row — and Pete Sampras, who won three in a row and then four, interspersed with his 1996 defeat by Richard Krajicek, of the Netherlands.

Four British players have achieved the task, Willie Renshaw, Reggie and Laurie Doherty and Fred Perry, along with the dashing Tony Wilding, the New Zealander.

Times have changed, talent comes in different shapes and sizes but few men are the complete package. It is difficult to imagine Federer on anything other than a supremely even keel, the essence of unflappable stability.

The first game of the final was a statement: I’m ready. He did not make an error, but then Roddick did the same, holding to love, there was only one point against serve in the first five games before Federer struck, whacking a forehand winner when Roddick could not quite lace a smash, and a driven service return forced a mis-hit forehand. For a split second it looked as if the No 2 seed was in danger of being demoralised, even more so when he dropped the set in 21 minutes.

What does Federer do, but send down two aces in his first service game of the second set, then allow himself to be broken, a first unstoppable backhand pass from the American and a couple of unforced errors, two of only 12 in the match. But Roddick was not serving with sufficient oomph to be as secure as he should have been. Federer responded to break in the sixth game, Roddick fought off two set points in the tenth game, but despite dropping two points in succession on his own serve in the tie-break, took all four against Roddick to win it 7-2. A splash of rain delayed the final for 25 minutes but whether he listened to Boris Becker (“live for the moment”) or Jimmy Connors (“go for the jugular”) during the break, it was Roddick who had to try to defy a legend. That defiance lasted until the seventh game when another backhand pass signalled that the deed was as good as done.

Roddick said: “He is as close as there is to unbeatable. I felt I played decent, the stats are decent and I got straight-setted. I’m going to continue to work hard, I’m not going to sulk and cry, I tried playing different ways, I tried to go to his forehand and came in, and he passed me and I tried the same to his backhand, and he passed me. It’s not as if I have a lot of questions leaving the court. I hoped he gets bored or something, I don’t know.

Andrew Kennaugh, 18, from Weybridge, failed to become the first Briton in a decade to win the boys’ doubles title. Kennaugh and Sam Groth, his Australian partner, were beaten 6-4, 6-1 by Jesse Levine and Michael Shabaz, of the United States
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2641-1679986,00.html

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:55 PM
Federer master of the beautiful game
By Brough Stott
(Filed: 03/07/2005)

There's something in his smile. It only comes after the match and there is nothing flashy in it. The teeth may barely show but a warm and blissful wonder grows through the down-turned Federer face. At last he can be happy with what has gone before.

On Friday, Roger had those three sets against Lleyton Hewitt to smile upon, the first two as dazzling in their power and beauty and invention as anything you will see in tennis. Poor Lleyton hardly got a sniff as Roger stretched and hit and surprised him. It was highly charged. It was one-on-one combat, and yet for Federer the histrionics were confined to that little double-footed jumping turn of frustration when a would-be winner had strayed. Hewitt was important, but the real test was to play to the Federer potential, to try and paint that masterpiece on to the court.

There should be arrogance here but Federer's genius has a purity about it which is uniquely appealing. The next few weeks will see two other men with claims to be the greatest performer their sport, or any other, has ever seen. But for all their astonishing respective achievements, neither Lance Armstrong nor Tiger Woods handle themselves in and out of competition with an open charm anything like that of Roger Federer.

True, both Lance and Tiger may have new records up ahead and both can be winningly articulate when they wish. But there is also an unattractive jaggedness about Armstrong and an unappealing control-freakery in Woods which makes it hard to imagine either walking into a press conference as Federer did on Friday to modestly and wittily handle questions in English, French, German and Swiss/Deutch not even excluding the compulsory joke in each language about the cow Juliette, his hometown reward for Wimbledon 2003.

Before the tournament started, BBC TV asked 10 leading players to film a preview for them. Every one bar Federer found a reason to decline. A day later a walking interview with Radio Wimbledon hit a technical snag as he entered the most famous gates in tennis. "Could we ever do it again," gulped the hack. "Of course," said Federer, "I have the time."

Yes, he has the time. That was the glory of it on Friday. We all know that Hewitt is a scrapper, the fastest man in tennis, but here he was being pushed around by a force that was just awesome to behold. In no other sport do you get a full two hours of close-up study of the athlete in extremis. In tennis on the Centre Court you seem to be looking not just at a player's shots but into his very soul.

With Federer, even the physique is something of a contradiction. At 6ft 1in and nearly 13st, he is a big, almost heavy-looking figure with a crumpled face that in concentration is hardly a thing of beauty. Yet the moment he picks up the racket he is transformed into an extraordinary creature with a lightness to match the power, a speed to equal the stealth, and, above all, the hawk-eyed intelligence to harness the skill.

He doesn't just trade shots from the baseline. He is always keen to move you about until either the angle has got sharp enough to make the return impossible, or to give him the chance to leap around the backhand and hammer away with the full force of the forehand.

"A lot of people say that his backhand is his best shot," said Frew McMillan on Friday, "but they are wrong. The forehand is something else."

Later in the day the rain came and the TV gave the one billionth showing of the Borg-McEnroe tie-break in the 1980 final. Once again you were gripped by the drama and by the skill and nerve of the participants. But for power and speed they were on a different planet to the big Swiss cat who had made the Centre Court his own that afternoon.

In their separate ways both Borg and McEnroe were driven by fires from deep within. So, too, is Federer and in his early days he was a shouter and a racket-thrower of almost Supermac dimensions. What's exceptional about Roger is that he has fuelled the force and can talk about it. "I had the feeling that I was wasting too much energy on getting upset," he explained in all those languages on Friday, "but it took me another year or so to actually get the fire back because I was getting too quiet, too calm."

Today we will see him in his pomp and yet he's not 24 until next month. As a man and as a performer he is at this moment so close to perfection that there is a wistful thought that history says it cannot last. Life is an unsparing partner and distractions come to the mind just as injuries slow the body.

So let's relish while we can the winning made beautiful. If Roger Federer plays like he has this past fortnight we, as well as he, will have plenty to smile about.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml;jsessionid=VE3YYS3SLOPLXQFIQMGCM5OAVCBQ UJVC?xml=/sport/2005/07/03/stbruff03.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/07/03/ixtenn.html

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:56 PM
Depth may put Sampras record beyond Federer
By John McEnroe
(Filed: 03/07/2005)

This may not be the right time to say it, with Roger Federer on the verge of claiming his third Wimbledon title, but I think as time goes by we will see what a remarkable achievement it was by Pete Sampras to win here seven times. I don't think the Swiss, maybe even a better player than Sampras when compared on all surfaces, will surpass his record.

I'm not saying it's impossible and I do believe that he will win, maybe, as many as five Wimbledon titles, I just think that there is more depth in the game today than there was in Sampras's era, guys who could step up on the grass, like Rafael Nadal and Marat Safin. The big Russian threatened to do so this time, but in the end, as usual, left the Championships prematurely. When Federer gets to five then we can start talking about his chances of overhauling Pete, but not before.

Power and physical strength will always be the greatest threat to Federer because he has just about everything else in his game and, of course, no little power himself. It's why Andy Roddick has a chance in today's final. A puncher will always have a chance. Power can be paralysing as I found to my cost towards the end of my career. It can shut you down.

It would have been tough for me to beat Federer in my prime because while I had an all-round game like him it wasn't quite as good as his. I would have come at him, but I would have posed him less of a threat than someone like Sampras or Boris Becker. These guys had serious power. I remember playing Becker in an exhibition match in Atlanta in 1985 when he had just turned 18 and thinking, "How does a guy serve this big at this age?" He had the biggest serve in the history of tennis.

He would have played his game against Federer and come at him. I would love to have seen it. I know Sampras lost to Federer here in 2001 but he was a little past his best. He had, of course, a better serve than Federer - second serve particularly - and he would hit the lines with it, too. Even if you got the ball back it was not as if the point was won, you then probably had to deal with his volley. I know Boris shares the view with me that Sampras would still have had the edge over Federer on grass.

In my position nowadays as a commentator it can be difficult to comprehend how physically strong today's players are or how difficult conditions are when you're cocooned away in that air-conditioned booth. It's one of the reasons why I like to get out and feel things, walk the courts and have a hit with players. I had a hit with Safin before his third-round match against Feliciano Lopez. I was looking forward to seeing if I could return the ball when he rifled one at me. I wanted to fully understand what facing his kind of power was like.

Unfortunately, he seemed to hold back a bit - perhaps he took pity on the old man. If you'd asked me afterwards I'd have said he wasn't ready to play which, as it turned out, was probably right. Yet I feel we were given a glimpse this summer of the kind of challenge he can offer Federer on grass. We know what threat he poses to him on hard-courts from his semi-final victory over Federer in the Australian Open, but I think his narrow three-set defeat to Federer in the Gerry Weber Open in Halle told us he can be a danger on grass, too.

Safin has real power. We saw it against Mark Philippoussis and in the first round against Paradorn Srichaphan. Roddick has comparable power in his serve and forehand and he has to believe it will be enough to carry him through today. It was very nearly enough in last year's final when he played the best I have seen him play. I would advocate him trying to blast Federer off the court again, but if it doesn't work he may have to come in occasionally behind his serve, if only to unbalance Federer.

One of the things that Roddick has in his favour is that Federer cannot prepare to face the kind of power which the Texan can lay on the line. It's not like he can turn to Tony Roche, his coach, and say, "Get me a guy who can serve at 140-150 mph to hit with." Judging by chats I've had with Roddick in the locker room recently it would seem that last year he was more confident but was not as fit as he would have liked to have been. This year he's fitter but less confident, which is understandable after some of the losses he's had to endure against Joachim Johansson (US Open), Nadal (Davis Cup final), Lleyton Hewitt (Australian Open) and Ivan Ljubicic (Davis Cup), not to mention a tough time on the European clay courts.

Roddick isn't a natural serve and volleyer. He's working on being more comfortable at it. It's knowing when to do it that's the key, which is a problem Tim Henman has had on grass in recent years. Federer turned last year's final around after the rain delays by coming to the net more when he noticed Roddick tire a little. Changing strategy during the course of a match is one of the champion's strengths.

He has spoken about wanting to volley more in order to make life a little easier for himself and when you look at his game you wonder why he doesn't do it more often because he has a big serve and he can certainly volley. I think he enjoys floating around on he baseline and while he can dominate matches from back there he sees no reason to come in, although I think it would be smart as it would add another string to his bow.

Finally, while still on the subject of defending titles, young Maria Sharapova found out how difficult it is to do it when you're expected to, but she's got many more years to discover the knack of how to do it. Serena Williams, on the other hand, thought she could regain her's by working hard for one week. I'm sorry, Serena, as talented as you are, one week's hard practice isn't quite going to cut it.

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:57 PM
Awesome Federer Joins the Greats
©EPA/ F. Coffrini
Sunday, 3 July, 2005

At what point do the various terrifying statistics about Roger Federer's current form amount to a public health warning?

Is there any opponent alive who does not know that the Swiss has won every single final in which he has appeared for the last two-and-a-half years?

By the time he next plays on grass in the summer of 2006, it will be four years and 37 matches since he last lost on the surface. Of his last 101 sets played on grass (including Sunday's Wimbledon final), he has lost only eight. Just to clarify the full steamroller value of that statistic: on average about one opponent in 16 gets to win a whole set before - of course - losing the match.

Hence the public health warning for those foolish enough to attempt taking on Federer at grasscourt tennis. Don't try it, kids. Just say no.

This afternoon on the Centre Court, Andy Roddick thought it was safe to go back in the Wimbledon water after last year's defeat to Federer in the final. He rapidly found out it was a very bad idea. Twenty-two minutes and the first set was gone, courtesy of one Federer error and 15 outright winners. At this rate he would be lifting the golden trophy in a little over the hour. Even his mishits were good.

Roddick looked appalled. After yesterday's longest women's final in history, would this be the shortest ever men's? One check of the record books proved that Roddick was at least out of the woods on that one. The record from 1881 stands at 37 minutes.

Indeed, by the time 37 minutes of this match had elapsed, Roddick had some actual good news - he had broken Federer's serve, and was 3-2 up in the second. It made him yelp with joy, as if he were about to serve for the match. Unfortunately, come 41 minutes, the good news was over. The Swiss had broken back. Perhaps Roddick was affected by his rain-delayed semi-final against Thomas Johansson lingering into Saturday. It was a tough match, despite being contained within four sets. But then, maybe it would not have mattered if Roddick had holidayed on a palm-fringed South Seas island for a month before taking on his adversary today.

Certainly the bookmakers had no doubt as to the result. They had Roddick at 9-2 for the title, with Federer at 1-8 - that is, stake eight bucks to get just one extra back. Unrewarding odds, but they seemed quite reasonable when Federer had two set points at 5-4. Roddick rescued them, but Federer's brand of tennis was too preposterously good. Roddick was having to play out of his skin to capture so much as a point.

He deserved some kind of trophy simply for taking the second set into the tiebreak. Unfortunately, of the seven tiebreaks these men had played against one another in previous meetings, six of them had gone to - no surprises - Federer.

When Roddick sent a forehand into the net for 2-5, he hurled his racket to the hallowed turf in frustration. It was difficult not to have sympathy with him. He was producing some great stuff. The problem was that Federer's stuff was greater still. An overlong Roddick forehand sealed the set for his rival. It must have been wholly in keeping with the American's mood that at precisely that moment, the rain came down.

Before today, seven men had won Wimbledon three times in succession, but only two in the Open era - Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras. Was Federer about to join that elite company? Not if Roddick could regroup in the rain break. After all, he is no mean grasscourt player himself. The facts back up the Wimbledon seeding committee. Before today he had won 34 out of his last 36 matches on grass. Using your skill and judgment, see if you can work out which player delivered those two defeats.

After a 25-minute break for the rain, they were back. Roddick would need divine intervention now if he were to avoid his ninth defeat to Federer in ten meetings. Judging by the way the Swiss broke Roddick for 4-3, even the Almighty is no match for Federer on a tennis court. Roddick looked shattered, like a helpless witness to some catastrophic incident. Eight minutes later Federer was in the history books with Borg and Sampras.

So despite his television advertisement for a well-known credit card, Roddick will not be requiring a second seat on the flight home to accommodate his replica winner's trophy. That honour went to Federer, the player who chose tennis over football at the age of 10 because he wanted to know that, win or lose, his results were down to him and him alone. Who can guess how many more times Federer will kiss the golden trophy at Wimbledon? No wonder John McEnroe calls him "a beautiful player - the greatest natural talent I've ever seen".

Written by Kate Battersby

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 04:57 PM
Federer the Flawless
©EPA/ F. Coffrini
Sunday, 3 July, 2005

Roger Federer said after beating Andy Roddick in straight sets in the Wimbledon final today: "It is a pity for him. I really did play my best tennis. This is very special to me. This was easier than defending the title a second time."

When BBC TV presenter Sue Barker pointed out to Federer after he received the trophy that he had now joined a group of three-times Wimbledon Champions that included Fred Perry, Pete Sampras and Bjorn Borg, the Swiss said: "That's a nice group. To be in with those guys is very special. But I hope it will not stop at three. Grass is good for me. I was quite confident before the semis and final. This is huge for me."

Federer admitted that he was very tense as he headed into the Wimbledon final as he tried for that third title. "This was a very big tournament and match for me today - to get the fifth Grand Slam and also the third Wimbledon. I knew the importance of this one so I was pretty tense going into it. After the first set I started to feel so good that I got so confident. Obviously for the next few years I'll definitely be a huge favourite for the tournament."

He paid tribute to Roddick, saying: "It's hard for him because I really played a fantastic match - one of the best of my life. The biggest most important moment is in a Grand Slam final and I would consider this even bigger than the US Open final I played. So this is my best match maybe I ever played. Today it seemed like I was playing flawless. Everything was working.

"I can't answer how consistent I am playing. I amaze myself how I use my talent to win. Those who followed me since I was a youngster knew I had potential. But I don't think anybody would have thought it would be this extreme, basically dominating the game, winning three Wimbledons. One you think, wow, that's fantastic. When you end up winning three, you are really starting to wonder. What have I done right in my career that this has happened to me? I'm very, very proud because this is the most important tournament."

Federer said he was impressed with his start in the final. "I remember the way Andy came out in the finals last year. Now it was me this time because I felt really good on the serve, and on the return as well. I think that was definitely big, big for me to get that under way. Even though I was down a break in the second, I knew I would have my chances again to break against Andy."

Looking ahead, Federer said: "I'll take match by match, day by day, year by year. So far I have been lucky not to have any injuries, to be able to play at the level I am. But it is very draining and hard to keep that up all the time. Wimbledon and the grass have definitely been very good to me over the last few years. I'll try to carry that even longer the next year."
Written by Barry Newcombe

Federer Wins Third Crown
©Getty Images/ C. Brunskill
Sunday, July 3, 2005

Roger Federer claimed his place in tennis history when he won his third straight men's singles title at The Championships by defeating Andy Roddick 6-2, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4 in one hour and 41 minutes. The 23-year-old Swiss has now won 36 consecutive matches on grass and this brilliantly worked victory was even clearer cut than his four-set win over the American a year ago.

As Roddick, a sporting and gallant loser, admitted: "He has become such a complete player." A truer sentence was never spoken of the astonishing Federer, who buried his face in a towel to conceal his tears of joy at his achievement of joining such modern-era greats as Fred Perry, Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras in collecting a Wimbledon hat-trick. "And I hope it is not going to stop at three," he told the Centre Court crowd after collecting the golden trophy from the Duke of Kent.

The outcome of this match was never in doubt from the opening moments. Federer went into the final leading Roddick by eight victories to one in their career head-to-head record and it was rapidly clear why. Roddick, the second seed, held serve twice in a crash-bang start to the match in which only one point was conceded on serve in the first five games.

Then Federer struck. Roddick fended off danger by saving one break point with a full-blooded forehand winner but when Federer conjured a second opening, that Roddick forehand let him down, projecting the ball over the baseline. Federer cemented the advantage by holding serve to love. With the 22-year-old American struggling to stem the flood tide, the champion reached set point as Roddick sent a forehand wide. Federer clinched the first set in just 22 minutes with a backhand cross court which, although not cleanly hit, fell in for a winner.

Roddick was faced with digging himself out of a hole earlier than he had expected. To his credit, his response was positive. He broke Federer for what was to be the only time in the match to lead 2-1 in the second set as the Swiss dumped a forehand volley into the netting.

The American's hopes of holding on to the second set lasted for only three games before Federer broke back, the brilliance and pace of his ground strokes forcing Roddick into error. To his credit, Roddick battled marvellously against the flood tide, even saving two set points at 4-5 and taking the set into a tie-break.

This was the time for Federer to put his foot on the pedal and he duly did so, taking a 3-0 lead with a double break of serve. He conceded only two points in the tie-break to move two sets clear after one hour and 11 minutes, at which point rain forced the players off court for 25 minutes.

When they returned, the man British Davis Cup player John Lloyd calls "the only complete tennis player on the planet" was rapidly back into his stride on a court he rightly feels is his home. A determined Roddick traded strokes and points for the opening six games, but any hope that he might take this final into a fourth set was wrecked when Federer broke serve for a 4-3 lead with one of his specialty "miracle" shots, a stunning backhand cross-court winner.

Serving for the match at 5-4, Federer emphasised his genius with two aces, his 10th and 11th, and closed it out on his first match point with a service winner. He fell forward on to his knees and then rolled on to his back. The best player in the world had gained a deserved reward.

Written by Ronald Atkin

Centre Court - Gentlemen's Singles - Finals
Roger Federer SUI (1) 6 77 6
Andy Roddick USA (2) 2 62 4

Shabazza
07-04-2005, 05:28 PM
wow :eek: this must be a lot of work to find all those articles - thx Rogifan :yeah:

*Ljubica*
07-04-2005, 05:44 PM
Hi Roger fans :wavey: amd congratulations for the Wimbledon success. Today I was reading the pre-Wimbledon edition of the British tennis magazine "Ace" which has quite a nice article about Roger, talking mainly about his day-to-day life, how he relaxes before matches etc. I've had a quick look back through this Forum and I can't seem to see it here though I admit I'm not a regular visitor here so I may have missed it. Unfortunately there is no Internet link to the magazine so I'ill have to copy type it if anyone is interested - but just wanted to check if any of you have seen it before I started typing. If you have got it here already somewhere, it's pretty daft of me typing it all again, - but it is interestiong and I'm sure some of you would like to read it.

Mrs. B
07-04-2005, 06:32 PM
Hi, Rosie! Nice of you to drop by! :)

Yes please, do share with us this article if you dont mind typing it. :hug:

*Ljubica*
07-04-2005, 06:57 PM
OK - my pleasure. I guess there's nothing in it that seasoned Roger fans don't know already - but I thought what he said about Mirka was really sweet.

From: Ace Magazine - Issue 100 - July 2005

"Speaking exclusively to "Ace", Roger Federer took time off from a hectic schedule to describe his daily routine"

ROGER FEDERER - A DAY IN THE LIFE OF THE WORLD NUMBER 1


OUT OF BED
As No. 1 I get to play at the prime time, usually between 2pm and 7pm. That means I get to sleep in a little bit more. I'm a person who needs a lot of sleep. I'm only really happy if I get my nine or ten hours. So I wake up around 9.30am and begin the day with 20 minutes or so of stretching.

EAT, PACK, CHECK
I'm not the biggest breakfast eater. I prefer lunch and dinner, I have mostly cereal and orange juice, and a coffee if I'm really tired - perhaps eggs Benedict once in a while.

After breakfast I make sure my tennis bags are packed - something I do myself. I check that I have enough match shirts, shoes, shorts, socks, strings and rackets. Once I am at a court I check again that all my rackets are there and ready. You have to be able to play in any situation and I have to know I can always switch to another racket.

When I get to the court I warm up for half an hour - always on my match court if I can. This is two or three hours before the mach and I have to fit in lunch in between. I get to choose with whom I warm up; sometimes it is with other players. I warm up for 5 or 10 minutes, then I do just what you see me do later in the pre-match warm up ....and if there is time maybe we play a tiebreak.

GET READY
After that I take a shower, get ready, put my match gear on, or maybe just a practice shirt as I still have to eat. Lunch is almost always pasta before a match. Then it's time to hang about in the lounge with my friends, or with other players in the locker room. I very rarely play cards and sometimes I won't even go to the locker room; in the early rounds there can be a lot or players around and I want to be quiet and private. Maybe I'll watch TV - I don't tend to read much - or watch one of the other matches. I like to keep an eye on the match before mine.You never know, if there's a sudden injury you could be on court.

Before a final, or a match against a top player, I will tend to get nervous. but not so ,much before a regular match. but it's important that the intensity is there. If you have to wait too long before your match it can make you flat, especially in Wimbledon or a tournament where it rains a lot.

Then comes the match and that's the easy part - no, that's a joke!!

The match over, it's "bad luck" or "congratulations" from other players. while the ATP representative asks how much time you would like before the Press Conference. Usually I say half an hout, - 15 minutes if I want to get out quickly. So I shower, get ready, do the press conference - in 3 different languages - then radio and TV, and then I go back to the Hotel, have dinner and either stretch or have a massage.

KICK BACK AND RELAX
At dinner I will watch what I eat. I don't eat a huge steak the night before I play for example. I don't know if that is right or wrong but I make sure I eat a lot of salad and pasta, rice and chicken. It's not often that I have a beer or a glass of wine unless there is an occasion of some sort, and I try not to during a tournament.

I don't really analyse the day though sometimes I will talk about the match with my team, check if they had different thoughts about things. but mainly I want to take it easy, have a nice relaxing evening and forget about tennis.

I am happiest if I have some time to do something with my girlfriend Mirka. Maybe we will watch TV together, or go for dinner, just the two of us...we don't tend to watch movies together because Mirka falls asleep! Instead we watch the National Geographic Channel. I don't know about trying to imitate panthers on court, but we both love animals so we love those channels.

These days are good for me, though of course at times they are very stressful. Autographs, TV crews, interviews - it's a never ending story. Sometimes I have enough of it but in general I love my tennis life. When I am 30 or so I will have time for other stuff - but at the monent I really love it. I don't keep a diary - the media does that for me!

How does that compare with a day off tour? Well I just don't have too many of those! I still live in Basel so that I am close to my parents. My mother loves to cook for me - very healthy meals. When I'm home I try to catch up with everybody. I don't want to become a stranger to my friends.

A rest day off is when no one is around me except Mirka, or when I have a day off at home with my family. I'm happy when my girlfriend is happy. It's great when I can make her feel good because around the world she does everything to make me happy. So when I have the chance to ask her what she'd like to do and she says maybe we can go and have a coffee in the city, then I say let's go. For me it's an unbelievable treat.

Mrs. B
07-04-2005, 07:08 PM
thanks for this, Rosie! that's really sweet of Roger to acknowledge Mirka. :hearts:

Mrs. B
07-04-2005, 07:11 PM
and this is how he talked about his dad. :haha:

"He still gets mad at me when I miss a backhand or a forehand but now I can accept it because I know he doesn't know as much about the game as I thought he knew!"

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 07:17 PM
Hi Rosie, yes I'd love to read the article -- which issue is it? I have a hard time finding this mag here. Love your kittycat! Hope all is well w you! ;)

RogiFan88
07-04-2005, 07:19 PM
Oops, posted before I saw this new page! Thanks, Rosie!

*Ljubica*
07-04-2005, 07:23 PM
Oops, posted before I saw this new page! Thanks, Rosie!

You're welcome :hug: It's Issue Number 100 anyway - glad you like my sweet Wilby :cat: Sometimes my cats make a more attractive alternative for an avatar than David :devil:

RogiNie
07-04-2005, 08:10 PM
thanks Rosie and rogifan! :hug:

Shabazza
07-04-2005, 10:40 PM
thanks Rosie nice article :)

Nathy
07-04-2005, 11:37 PM
@ Rosie: A huuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuge thanks!!! What a nice article!! Roger is so sweeeeet with Mirka! Both are lucky to be with the other! What a sweet couple :hearts:

onewoman74
07-05-2005, 03:50 AM
I just posted this article in general messages...I don't know if it's been posted already in Fed's forum...forgive me if it's a redux. I read Tennis Magazine today and I found this article to be one of the best I've read on Fed and his game...Enjoy!!



Federer was a solid Top 10 player. Now some are calling him the greatest of all time. What changed?


Federer will try to dance through the draw for the third straight year at Wimbledon. Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images.
By Andrew Corsello

An odd thing happened in the final of the NASDAQ-100 Open in early April—one of those subtle, spooky, turn-on-a-dime moments before which things are one way, and after which they are very much another. Up until the end of the third set, 18-year-old Spaniard Rafael Nadal was doing what rational people say cannot be done: beating the living daylights out of the great Roger Federer. Nadal was beautifully unconscious, leaping about, taking brazen risks, afloat, untouchable. He broke Federer twice in the first set, taking it 6-2, and won a second-set tiebreaker. Federer, for once, looked bewildered. Where the world’s No. 1 usually struts through matches with the confidence of one who can see two or three shots into the future, who knows far in advance where the ball will be and positions himself accordingly, Federer seemed trapped in some kind of psychic goo, a whole second or two behind the reality his opponent was occupying. The champ kept staring dumbly, with slumped shoulders, at the spots where Nadal’s winners were landing, as if to ask, Is this really happening?

If Federer and Nadal had been playing in, say, the 1998 NASDAQ final, the crowd would have been treated to a ribald display of John McEnroe–style punkdom. “As a teenager, I was a terrible hothead,” Federer admits. “I screamed. I cried on the court. I couldn’t control it. If I didn’t make the shot I wanted, I would get angry. Then, when I missed a second shot, I would think, Now the racquet has to go.” Federer has often spoken of one incident during his teens when his father called from the stands for his son to cut the histrionics; Federer retorted that the old man should go get a drink and leave him alone. Pops responded later, quite reasonably, by shoving young Roger’s face into a nearby snow bank. But this was 2005, and even as Nadal whipped him around the court, Federer displayed the imperturbable dignity that has become his trademark. The racquet stayed in hand. He didn’t bark or howl. He didn’t upbraid the linesmen.

Part of Federer’s quietude is simply the result of maturation. But part of it is also strategic. When asked what he does to get into the zone, physically and psychologically, he says, “I try to stay very much in the present tense. To think only about the moment that I am in a point, and to not even think about that if I can. It’s no good if when I’m playing, I’m thinking ahead to the next match or the next tournament. And it’s really no good if I’m thinking about the last point, what I did wrong, or the last match I lost. I don’t let it stay with me. I tell you, I don’t lose much now, but when I do, I don’t think about it. By the time I get back to the hotel, I’m OK with it. On to the next thing.” He pauses for a moment, then adds, “I think that I am now a very happy, very honest person.” Another pause. “I believe in my talent. I don’t fear anyone anymore.”

There’s nothing offhand or self-pleased in Federer’s tone when he says these things; he’s possessed of supreme confidence, but not conceit. (Conceit, after all, usually masks a lack of confidence, and Federer, who went 51-2 from the 2004 U.S. Open to Monte Carlo this year, proves the adage that it ain’t bragging if you can back it up.) When Federer talks about his happiness, he’s referring to the calm, clean feeling that comes to those rare individuals who have vast potential and tap it consistently. When a person is blissfully free of the could-haves and should-haves that haunt the rest of us, the kind of happiness Federer is crowing about is inevitable, and self-fulfilling. Some champs—Jimmy Connors, McEnroe, even Andre Agassi—have used their own complexity and inner conflict to fuel their motivation and intensity on the court.

Federer doesn’t truck in inner demons. Not anymore. He uses his psychic serenity to loosen his body and steel his will, which creates victory after victory, which in turn creates more happiness, until victory and happiness conflate in an upward spiral of utter dominance that daunts every other player on tour.

So it was that Federer kept his composure in the face of Nadal’s onslaught. That is, until he didn’t.

Four-all in the third. Nadal’s serve. Federer got a break point. He squandered it. Nadal battled back, held serve. And then Federer’s inner teen punk emerged, like some alien beast. There was a primal howl, both guttural and whiny. The right arm went up; Federer tomahawked his racquet onto the court. The frame rose in a high somersaulting arc, landing in the alley. Could it be? Had the young Nadal caused the great Federer to lose control?

Perhaps. Perhaps not. Look at what happened next. The two players held serve and went to a tiebreaker. But even as they did, and even as Nadal went up 5-3, a shift was taking place. One of those abstract psychological things that happen at the highest level of sport, a polarity shift, a momentum hemorrhage, whatever you want to call it. Though impossible to pinpoint, the effects were clear: The dreamlike bubble in which Nadal had been floating was ruptured, and it was Federer’s uncharacteristic outburst that had ruptured it. Even as Nadal was two points from winning the match, you could see that he had become consciously and unbearably aware of the enormity of what he was about to accomplish, and that he found this sudden knowledge crushing. The whole attitude of his body and his face changed. He looked skittish and tense, like a treed animal. The exact opposite happened to Federer. He knew exactly what was going on, and what it would lead to. And as soon as Federer brought the tiebreaker to 5-all, any fool could tell: He was going to win the tiebreaker and cruise through the next two sets. And that’s exactly what he did.

The match was a perfect illustration of what it takes, above and beyond physical skill, to be No. 1. Moreover, it was an illustration of the manifold nature of Federer’s talent, of the way his arsenal contains psychological weapons that other players don’t have. “I
Federer cuts an imposing figure on the court: He's 28-2 against Top 10 players since the start of 2004.Photo by Phil Cole/Getty Images.
resort to anger very seldomly,” Federer says. “Usually I stay very neutral, especially now that I’m playing with the confidence I have. But sometimes, in rare situations, it can carry me through.”

It became clear in retrospect: That primal howl and racquet spike were not impotent gestures of surrender; they were the means by which Federer wrestled control back from Nadal. He used his outburst to disrupt Nadal’s flow and to goose the crowd, then fed off the heightened energy. Eerie but true: He knew what he was doing.

How does Federer do it? How has this 23-year-old Swiss wonder, born and raised in Basel, come to dominate his sport to the degree that, as Marat Safin has put it, he seems to be toying with all the other players? Rod Laver and McEnroe have predicted he may become the best ever. Agassi has called him an “inspiration.” Pete Sampras has declared that Federer’s only competition from now on is the record book—in other words, Sampras himself.

It’s interesting to compare Federer to Sampras. Federer, like Sampras during the unprecedented six consecutive years he held the No. 1 ranking, is significantly elevated above his peers. But where the source of Sampras’ dominance was easy to identify—the rocket serve and forehand that ended most points before they began—Federer’s is more elusive.

He’s correct when he describes his technique as “beautiful.” The enormous, perfectly round Os drawn by his ground-strokes have a kind of sculptural perfection. The movement of both his racquet and his body is so cleanly efficient, so rhythmically deliberate, that the man seems to be playing in ever-so-slight slow motion. This can sometimes create the (false) impression of indifference, or of his having just woken up. The efficiency and fluidity of Federer’s movement is readily apparent when he plays against someone like Agassi, whom he’s now beaten seven times in a row. Both men are remarkably fast, but where Agassi’s is an agitated quickness, Federer never seems to scramble because he’s never out of place; he sees early where he needs to be and moves there so fluidly that his motions appear choreographed.

Federer says that one of his shortcomings as a teen player was his artistic inclination to seek the most “beautiful” shot, rather than the most effective. Even now, he speaks fondly of the “fluid” and “perfect” nature of his strokes, which may explain his disdain for the drop shot. He calls it a “panic shot” and a “copping out.” When asked if it’s the staccato of the drop shot that bugs him, the way it interrupts the lovely legato of his game, he says, “Yes! The drop shot—it is not me, you know? I feel like I am fooling around when I do it, and I am a person who doesn’t like to fool around.”

Federer is certainly a powerful player, but he rarely overwhelms his opponents by overpowering them. He simply outplays them. He will serve and volley if it suits him, but he’s also content to rally at the baseline and wait for the right opportunity to present itself.

Fact is, it’s difficult to pin down Federer’s game because Federer doesn’t really have a game. He has games. He’s the most whole player the sport has ever seen. Depending on his opponent and his mood, he might decide to play a strictly north-south power game,
Federer sometimes seems to float from shot to shot. Photo by Phil Cole/Getty Images.
or he might slow it down and play the angles. Indeed, we haven’t seen angles this perverse since McEnroe was carving them with his Dunlop Maxply. When Federer puts away a half-court half- volley that cuts across the north-south of the court at a 120-degree angle, a spectator has a complex, evolving response. One first thinks, How’d he do that? Then one replays the shot or two that preceded the putaway, the slow, sure advance Federer made to midcourt, and realizes, He was planning that putaway four or five strokes before he actually hit it. Then one comes full circle and thinks, once more: How’d he do that?

“I do sometimes feel that time is kind of altered when I play,” Federer says. “Like the other guy is slowed down and I can see what he’s going to do a long time before he does it. It’s a feeling that I can rely very much on my footwork, that I’m moving very smoothly. People, when they see my beautiful technique and talk about it, a lot of it has to do with the footwork.”

What they may not be talking about is the man’s uncanny vision, the way Federer can fix his eyes on the point of contact—regardless of whether he’s at the beginning, middle, or end of his stroke. “Believe it or not, it used to be even more extreme,” he says. “I would hit a slice and almost look backward. Somehow my head is always looking at the ball for a long, long time.”

Most tennis players, despite the advice drilled into their heads from the time they pick up a racquet, don’t truly keep their eyes on the ball, at least not in the way Federer can and does. With those deep-set peregrine eyes—on and off the court, the man has a habit of pinching the bridge of his nose two or three times every minute, as if to make sure the line of his vision is trued—he never stops looking, never loses his visual grip on that ball. Asked if he sees what happens at the instant he strikes the ball, he says, “Oh, yes.” Asked, incredulously, if he really sees what happens during the microsecond in which the blunt force trauma of his strings flattens the sphere into an ellipsoid, he says, again, “Oh, yes.”

I knew years ago that I was capable of playing as well as I am playing today,” Federer says. “But I thought that at best I could keep it up for maybe a week at a time. I did not know that I would be able to do it over the course of a season. I had no idea that I could be so consistent.”

If Sampras is right, and Federer’s only competition for the foreseeable future is the record book, consistency is the object. One would think that to stay in the zone in a consistent way, Federer would endeavor to turn his mind into a cool, antiseptic space, empty of worries, empty of what has happened in the past and what may happen in the future, empty of everything except the strategy for today’s match. One would be wrong. “There needs to be uncertainty,” he says. “I want to be nervous before a match. When I walk on the court, I want my hands to feel cold with sweat. And the most important thing for me is not to tune out the crowd. I may have my eyes on the ball, but I like to be very aware of my surroundings. I like playing in a big atmosphere. I always look around quite a bit between points. It helps me to see what’s going on, how many people are there, what they’re doing. If they cheer for me, I can feed off of that. And if they boo me, I can feed off of that, too.”

As stoic as Federer is on the court, the Nadal episode notwithstanding, he revels in the drama of his own performances. At the same time he sees the ball in microscopic detail, he sees himself as most of us see him—from afar, through the lens of the TV camera, as an otherworldly figure to be marveled at. This acute sensitivity to drama may explain the way he’s able to elevate his game on big points. You can see it in his body language, the same way you used to see Michael Jordan deciding, with six minutes left in the fourth quarter and the Bulls down by 10, OK, it’s time to take over now.

“I usually play best in the most important matches,” Federer says. “I play best in a big stadium, when I’m against the other best players in the world.” He continues. “Sometimes, I am able to step out of myself. I am in the moment, in my body playing the rally, but I’m also watching myself as I do it, thinking, That was great! How did I hit that shot?” Another pause. “A lot of people have been comparing me to the all-time greats. I love that. It’s proof that I’ve made it. But after a while I don’t necessarily like being compared to somebody else. I don’t want them saying, ‘He’s the next Rod Laver’ or ‘He’s the next Pete Sampras.’ I just want them saying, ‘Ah, he’s Federer!’ I am the first Federer. I want to be remembered only as Federer. I want to get to the place where I won’t be compared with anybody anymore.”

Fedex
07-05-2005, 07:47 AM
You're welcome :hug: It's Issue Number 100 anyway - glad you like my sweet Wilby :cat: Sometimes my cats make a more attractive alternative for an avatar than David :devil:
Thanks for the article, Rosie. :)

SUKTUEN
07-05-2005, 06:59 PM
there are more than 40 Chinese articles for Roger ~!

onewoman74
07-05-2005, 07:23 PM
Another good article on Fed...

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2094-1678512_2,00.html

The Sunday Times - Sport



July 03, 2005

Quiet please! Genius at work
NICK PITT
Roger Federer turns to an old master, who is enjoying the privilege but admits there is little he can teach the best player in the world



You can tell a lot about a champion by the friends he has and the people he employs. As a tennis player, Roger Federer is imperious, his superiority manifest. Ask Lleyton Hewitt, who is the No 2-ranked player in the world but cannot find a way to take a set off Federer. He has lost 15 in a row.
Federer never brags. He just knows he’s a class apart. When, for a trivial example, he takes his purple towel from his chair to the back of the court, he sweeps it across his shoulder as if he’s a Roman senator adjusting his toga, about to deliver an oration. It is sure to be acclaimed.



Yet Federer needs no fawning entourage. In private and in his professional life away from the arena, he is quiet and normal. When he first won the singles title in 2003, he stayed in a rented apartment in Wimbledon Village. His girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec, bought the groceries, cooked, washed up and did the washing and ironing. Two years on in their adventure, Federer is among the world’s leading sportsmen and a multi-millionaire. The house he has rented this time is rather grander and closer to the All England Club, and Mirka spends much more time fielding requests for Federer’s time and presence.

But does she still shop, cook and wash? “Yes, of course,” she said. “We’re just the same.” But why not use the official laundry service? “I like to use a particular washing powder.”

There is more than a nice-guy-at-home point in this. Most sporting champions whose careers are long and fulfilled are supported by stable private lives and a firm attachment between their feet and the ground. And if Federer’s career is to be so fruitful that the question of whether he might be the best player of them all becomes an aggregate of titles rather than opinion, he must remain as ordinary as possible.

The possibilities are breathtaking. Pancho Segura, who at 84 has progressed in status from master coach (having helped four Wimbledon singles winners) to oracle, put it thus: “Federer is the only complete player in the world. All the others are one-dimensional. Already he is one of the greats, and his potential is unlimited.”

Reaching that potential involves a law of inverse proportion: the more exciting and romantic the challenge, the more mundane and practical must be the approach. When Everest is the destination, you pack carefully and take everything you might need.

Federer’s expedition should interest every tennis coach in the world, and more than a few have applied to join him. Yet he spent every effort in persuading just about the most reluctant traveller, Tony Roche. What’s more, when you watch them working on court, Roche does not appear to be coaching. He hits, collects balls, offers the odd comment. But that is what Federer wants: the eye and calm judgment of a man who has been in top-class tennis for close to half a century.

In 1962, when Roche was an emerging player at 16 years of age — Andy Murray, take note — he played Rod Laver in the Victorian state championships. Laver won all four Grand Slam titles that year, yet Roche served for the match. “ ‘Rocket’ broke my service and went on to win,” Roche recalled. “And the next time I played him was five years later, in the Wimbledon final.”

Roche won the French Open singles and five Wimbledon doubles titles with John Newcombe. Later, he captained Australia’s Davis Cup team and he also coached Ivan Lendl and Pat Rafter. The Australian has no need to prove himself, and when he has nothing important to say, he generally says nothing.

“A lot of people say, ‘How can you coach him when he’s so good?’ ” Roche said. “To me, it’s just little things. I don’t tamper too much.“

Last season Federer played without a coach. He won 11 titles, including three of the Grand Slam tournaments. Perhaps he did not need a coach, although Federer himself insisted that in time, he would.

Roche agreed to help him on a limited basis, to begin at the Masters Cup in Houston last November. “But I said to Tony, ‘Shouldn’t we catch up before that, to see if we match up and like each other?’ ” Federer said. “It was very important for me to get to know the human Tony.”

They met in Dubai in October 2004 and worked out for four days in scorching heat, hitting hundreds of tennis balls on a hard court and sweating buckets in the process.

“Then I asked Tony about our plans for next year, if everything was all right. And he said that he didn’t think he could do it,” said Federer. “He felt tired and he hated the travelling and said that he couldn’t do it properly. I told him it didn’t matter, that I hadn’t expected him to hit with me for four days, and I was amazed by how well he did

Roche, true to type, told it straight. “The physical demands were a problem,” he recalled. “I’m a coach who likes to work and hit on court. Not to be on the sidelines. You get a better feel for how your player is hitting the ball. I just found, turning 60, it was too much, even with Roger hitting straight back to me. I was worried whether I would be able to do that with Roger, at a good level.” But Federer had already grown to admire Roche. “I decided to go to work with Tony for two weeks in December, before the season started. It was a huge effort for me to fly to Sydney, because I usually stay at home in December. Then, towards the end of all the sessions, my fitness trainer told me that Tony might be able to do a few weeks during the year. I asked Tony and he said, yeah, he could do a few weeks.
That was amazing. I could hardly believe it. Two weeks was okay for me, anything was okay. He was all relaxed, saying, ‘Come to the Aussie Open and we’ll take it from there’.”



Federer’s excitement, which is still evident as he relates the story, betrays his affection for Roche. “I consider him my coach now, not my part-time coach. He was supposed to travel with me just up to the French Open, but then he said that he could stay on longer, which is great.”

The arrangement could hardly be more casual. Roche can stay as long as he likes, leave whenever he wants. He is paid by the week. “Friendship is what’s important above everything else,” he said. “Ivan and Pat were the same. I’ve been lucky to work with three great players who are all great blokes. I have never had a contract with any of them because a shake of the hand is enough. If there’s a problem, we sit down and talk about it.”

It’s all amicable, but the task is deadly serious. Federer may be the best in the world by a street, but he believes that he must get better. “He works like Lendl,” Roche said. “Ivan was No 1 for so many consecutive weeks (157 in the mid-1980s), yet every day he got up, he felt he could be a better player and would work for that. With Roger, it’s the same. He’s dominating, but that’s no reason to stop there. The others are working hard to catch up with him, and that means he must improve. And there are areas where he can.

“We all know that he’s already in the company of the greatest of all time, and he reminds me a lot of Laver. He has that versatility. He can adapt to all surfaces and opponents, and has so many options. That is unique in today’s game, because the others are one- dimensional.

“And there’s another way in which I think he’s unique today. It’s the respect he has for the game. He loves to hear about the past, about Laver and Rosewall and the rest. And he cares about the future. The reason he plays is he loves it.”

Mrs. B
07-05-2005, 08:45 PM
good stuff. nice to hear Tony's thoughts on Roger. Thanks, ow74! :)
lol at Mirka. the typical Hausfrau! ;)

PaulieM
07-06-2005, 02:36 PM
sorry if this has been posted :)


Hope it rubs off: Australian cricketers Adam Gilchrist, Jason Gillespie and Glenn McGrath catch up with Roger Federer after his convincing win at Wimbledon.
Picture: Phil Hillyard


One-day wonders fire Federer
Leo Schlink
London
05jul05

TONY Roche used Australia's cricketers as a logistical masterstroke in Roger Federer's Wimbledon victory.

Aware of Federer's adoration of the Australian team, Roche spent the eve of the final with the Swiss maestro watching the tied Natwest one-dayer against England at Lord's on TV.
With Federer's anxiety levels soaring just before the final with Andy Roddick, Roche ushered Glenn McGrath, Adam Gilchrist and Jason Gillespie into the hallowed All England Club changerooms.

The ploy worked as Federer beat second seed Roddick 6-2 7-6 (7-2) 6-4.

"He loves the Aussies and the boys came into the dressingroom just before the match," Roche said.

"Five minutes before he went on, he was still talking to them. I guess for 10 minutes they were there.

"Which is good to take his mind a little bit off the match and he loves cricket. It was so good that those guys came in."

Federer's interest in cricket -- and the Australians in particular -- stems from his South African mother Lynette and his connection with the late South Australian coach Peter Carter.

The Federer family almost moved to Australia from Switzerland 12 years ago when his father, Robert, was offered a job in Sydney.

Carter, who was killed in August 2002, while holidaying in South Africa, secured a place for Federer in the South Australian training squads, but the family decided not to relocate.

But Federer, who chatted at length with the cricketers outside the players' restaurant after his win, continues to idolise Australia's world-beaters.

He proved as much to Roche as the pair sat watching a gripping one-day final. "He knows a lot about the game," Roche said. "And he's definitely behind the Aussies."

So much so, Roche considers Federer an honorary Australian. "This place (Wimbledon) is very special to the Australians and even though Roger is not Australian, he's as close as you can get to one," Roche said.

Federer was elated to have finally given Roche his first taste of Wimbledon success after six disappointments as both a player and coach.

"It's definitely special for him," Federer said. "I'm so happy for him, but really it has worked out for our partnership. I knew from the start that he might be a big help in my game.

"I'm happy I start to understand what he's trying to teach me."

Roche does not have a contract with Federer and will not be at the US Open.

Instead he will travel to Dubai next month for a two-week training period.

Roche, beaten in the 1968 final by Rod Laver, sat on the losing side at Wimbledon for finals involving Chris Lewis (1983), Ivan Lendl (1985-86) and Pat Rafter (2000-01).

SUKTUEN
07-06-2005, 04:45 PM
thanks

Minnie
07-07-2005, 12:09 AM
With Federer's anxiety levels soaring just before the final with Andy Roddick, Roche ushered Glenn McGrath, Adam Gilchrist and Jason Gillespie into the hallowed All England Club changerooms.

So that's why Roger was smiling so much just before him and Andy went on court! The BBC showed the 2 players waiting to walk out and Roger was smiling away to himself ... I couldn't believe how relaxed he looked! Poor old Andy by comparison looked uptight! What a masterstroke by Tony Roche!

Sjengster
07-07-2005, 12:13 AM
Rooting for the Aussie cricket team? Roger! :mad: He goes down several levels in my estimation now... ;)

Dirk
07-07-2005, 12:15 AM
Hey Roger loves Aussies. He plays and acts like one. He is an old fashion Aussie.

nobama
07-07-2005, 04:53 AM
So were these guys around to see Lleyton get his ass handed to him in the semis? :lol:

Daniel
07-07-2005, 05:00 AM
The legend of Federer continues to grow
By Scott Riley, Tennis Editor

Philadelphia, PA (Sports Network) - Once again I find myself writing about the incomparable Roger Federer.

The sublime Swiss did it again last week by capturing a third straight Wimbledon title, beating American Andy Roddick at the All England Club for a third straight year, including the last two finals on the storied lawns at SW19.

FYI, the former world No. 1 Roddick is an awesome 32-0 on grass over the last three years when he's not playing Federer. The big-serving American, however, is 0-3 versus the Fed on the surface over that span, with all three losses coming at Wimby. Federer beat Roddick in the semifinals there in 2003.

The sweet-swingin' Federer dropped only one set at the '05 fortnight, as German Nicolas Kiefer took one off him in the third round, and the Swiss dismissed three former world No. 1s en route to the coveted title, including Juan Carlos Ferrero in the fourth round and Lleyton Hewitt in the semis.

Federer has beaten the world No. 2 Hewitt eight straight times, including wins in their last 15 sets.

The 23-year-old Federer now has his Grand Slam tally up to five (and counting), having won five of the last nine majors, dating back to Wimbledon '03.

The mighty Swiss also currently holds the U.S. Open and Masters Cup crowns and continues to be included in conversations with the likes of Pete Sampras and Bjorn Borg.

On the incredible front, Federer, who's already piled up a whopping eight titles this year, has won his last 21 finals. That's a record! The previous- best mark for consecutive victories in finals was 12, shared by Borg and John McEnroe.

The Swiss superstar became the first three-peat champion at Wimbledon since Sampras nailed down four straight from 1997-2000. Sampras also won three in a row from 1993-95 before big Dutchman Richard Krajicek derailed him in 1996.

Only the seven-time champion Sampras, the five-time winner Borg and Federer have won three straight Wimbledon titles since 1936 (Fred Perry 1934-36).

Federer, like Sampras, owns five major titles at the age of 23, while the amazing Borg had already picked up nine Grand Slam championships at that age.

Both Sampras and Borg won at least one major title eight years in a row.

Federer carved up the 2003 U.S. Open champion Roddick in straight sets in a 1- versus-2 finale last week, as the Swiss moved to a dominant 9-1 lifetime against the slugging American, including wins in their last five matchups. It marked the first repeat men's final at Wimbledon since Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker played three consecutive finals from 1988-90.

Federer's latest performance was no less than special, as he glided across the rye grass while demonstrating his full arsenal of shots against a perplexed Roddick.

The three-time Wimbledon champion Becker said, "I can't believe the way he (Federer) played. We are watching greatness unfold."

McEnroe, also a three-time Wimbledon titlist, claimed that Federer is "the greatest talent of all-time."

No argument here.

Federer improved to 5-0 in his career Grand Slam finals, as he became the first man since Tony Trabert from 1953-55 to win his first five major finals.

Federer's all-around game is, of course, unrivaled on tour. Whether he needs to attack or play from the baseline, the elegant Swiss can shift gears in order to dominate.

On grass, Federer's won a remarkable 36 straight matches, as he closes in on Borg's record of 41. All of Borg's wins came on the lawns at Wimbledon, where the Fed's a sizzling 21-0 since 2003. The Swiss' last loss on grass came against Croat Mario Ancic at Wimbledon 2002.

Borg still holds the modern Wimbledon record with his five straight titles from 1976-80.

Federer is also chasing Sampras' record 14 Grand Slam titles. The legendary Sampras also corralled five U.S. Opens and two Aussie Opens.

The silky-smooth Federer finally secured his first major of 2005, after losing to Russian Marat Safin in the Aussie Open semis back in January and Rafael Nadal in the Roland Garros final four last month. Federer won three-fourths of last year's Slams, with only the French Open eluding the athletic star. The Swiss still needs Roland Garros to complete a career Grand Slam.

Arguably the best athlete in the world right now, Federer is a tour-best 58-3 overall this season and has piled up 132 wins against a mere nine losses over the last two years, including an eye-popping 19 titles. He owns an even 30 titles since joining the tour and his next championship will tie him with Dutchman Tom Okker for 20th place on the all-time titles list.

Federer's career prize money is now just under the $18 million mark, including a tour-best $3.7 million this season.

The world No. 1 (and, of course, ATP Race-leading) Federer will look to repeat at the U.S. Open in two months, and he'll certainly be the favorite in Flushing.




07/06 14:40:19 ET

Daniel
07-07-2005, 05:01 AM
Federer joins William Renshaw, the Doherty brothers: Reggie and Laurie, Anthony Wilding, Fred Perry, Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras to have won the singles title three years in a row.

"I really did play my best, it was easier than the second time," Federer explained during the trophy-presentation ceremony.

"I came here with huge expectations ... Sampras was one of my favourite players of all time, and Borg, to be in that group is very special. I hope it's not going to stop at three."

For Roddick, a second runner's-up shield will provide little consolation. The 22-year-old expressed his frustration by saying: "I'm in the mood for a beer right now."

"I put in the work and wanted it so badly but this guy is the best for a reason. He is such a complete player ... maybe I'll just punch him or something, I don't know."

Federer, top seed, captured his fifth major championship to make amends for his semi-final losses at the Australian and French Opens with victory over Roddick in one-hour 41 minutes.

DAZZLING START

While the weather was far from bright, the standard of tennis was dazzling in the opening five service games with only one point being conceded against the server.

Federer made his move in the sixth game, converting break point with a wristy forehand winner to seal a 4-2 lead. The Swiss then accelerated through the first set, clinching another break at 5-2 with a miss-hit backhand that landed plumb on the line.

Twenty-two minutes played and Roddick looked desperate.

Roddick's chance arrived at 1-1 in the second set with a single break point at 30-40. The 2003 U.S. Open champion ripped a forehand winner at Federer who dropped a backhand volley into the net.

While Roddick confirmed the break for a 3-1 lead to spark the final into life, the Nebraskan was pressurised once more into errors as Federer stalked the baseline with menacing efficiency.

Brilliance from behind the baseline helped spur the Federer fight back, while Roddick set alarm bells ringing loudly for the American at 4-5 when his trusty serve was needed to fend off two set points.

Roddick hung on grimly to force a tie-break, but that proved a one-sided affair as the Swiss fired off winners all over the court to take it 7-2.

TIME TO RE-GROUP

A light misty rain then gave the American a chance to re-group and come up with a game plan. Tournament referee Alan Mills, in his 23rd and final championships, decreed a 25-minute break with the green tarpaulin cover protecting the Centre Court grass.

As play resumed after a 25-minute delay, Roddick appeared capable of coming back but his aggressive game simply wasn't enough.

In the sixth game of the third set Federer reigned supreme with three returns of serve that broke Roddick's resistance once and for all.

With service holds for both players, Federer put the world number four out of his misery with an un-returnable first serve on his first match point at 40-15.

Mrs. B
07-07-2005, 08:43 AM
thanks for the articles, everyone!

lovely one, PaulieM! :)

babsi
07-07-2005, 11:00 AM
What a lot of articles - I guess I have to come back,to read them all :)

Thanks everyone :)

SUKTUEN
07-07-2005, 11:32 AM
very long articles ~thanks!!

mitalidas
07-07-2005, 04:54 PM
one more nice one

One Guy's Opinion
Federer - Greatest tennis player of all time?
by Matt Cauthron - Sports columnist
July 07, 2005

There are a few circumstances in sports that make watching them more interesting: Game seven of a championship series, for example. The stakes are higher, the drama is more intense; it’s just more entertaining. But the best, most enticing circumstance in all of sports is a championship event in which one of the game’s all-time greats is competing.

A “game 7” is great, but it’s even better if Michael Jordan is playing. A U.S. Open is exciting, but it’s downright riveting if Tiger Woods is in the hunt on Sunday. An Ali fight, a Magic/Bird championship series, an Elway/Favre Super Bowl; for one reason or another, these situations raise the level of championship drama to new heights.

So if you missed the Wimbledon final Sunday, you missed one of these rare situations. You missed one more opportunity to watch Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, the man who will one day be called the greatest tennis player of all time.

I know it seems a bit early to make such a claim, especially since Pete Sampras, who many would agree currently holds the title of “greatest of all time,” only recently retired.

Still, to watch Federer play, to see him dominate every facet of the game against the best players in the world - and do it with such style and grace - one can’t help but wonder what’s yet to come. After all, Federer is only 23 years old.

Believe me, I know how exaggerated sports talk can get these days. I realize that every feisty up-and-comer is always “the next” something or other. But I truly believe Federer is for real. He has positively owned men’s tennis for two straight years, and the gap only seems to widen. His closest rival in talent and potential is American Andy Roddick, and Federer’s record against him is 9-1.

And the Wimbledon final between them Sunday was the most one-sided yet. Roddick himself looked absolutely stunned after the match. He had that look you used to see on opponents’ faces during Tiger’s prime: a look of bewilderment and disgust, but with a trace of supreme respect. It’s a look that says, “I’ve tried, I’ve worked, I’ve done all I can do. I simply can’t compete with this guy.”

“But wait,” you may be thinking, “Sampras’ opponents had that same look ten years ago.” That’s true. So why do I think Federer will end up the greatest? It’s because I think Federer’s game is so complete, so devoid of weakness, that he’ll conquer the one obstacle Sampras never could - the clay courts of Roland Garros at the French Open.

The great equalizer of pro tennis, a clay court slows down the speed of the ball to the point that booming serves are no longer such a dominant tool. The surface makes for a game with more rallies, and one that rewards stamina, speed and shot-making rather than raw power.

Sampras, the quintessential serve-and-volley expert, only once reached the semi-finals of the French Open. Federer has had similar luck on clay thus far, but he’s getting there. He advanced to the semi-finals this year, and if the gap is truly widening between him and all the rest, there’s no reason to believe he won’t be able to get over the hump.

And if he does, I don’t think the “greatest tennis player ever” issue will even be debatable. After three straight Wimbledon titles, Federer already has his sights on Sampras’ record of seven. He’s won five major championships in all, and doesn’t seem to be slowing down. Even if he doesn’t match Sampras’ record 14 majors (although at this rate I don’t see why he wouldn’ t), if he wins just one French Open, the argument is over in my mind.

In the end, it’s all a game of “What if?” Federer could quit the game tomorrow and the entire argument would be moot. But whether or not he’ll someday be considered the greatest ever is inconsequential.

All I know is that he’s the best I’ve ever seen, and like the aforementioned few, he makes sports more fun to watch.



Matt Cauthron can be reached at mcauthron@thevistaonline

SUKTUEN
07-07-2005, 04:57 PM
THANKS

RogiFan88
07-07-2005, 05:40 PM
Would someone mind translating this article or just telling us what it says in general? That w be great! Thanks!

Papa Federer erstmals am Champions Schmaus

LONDON – Wie 2003 und 2004 ging auch 2005 der Finaltag für Roger Federer mit dem Champions Dinner zu Ende. In diesem Jahr erstmals auch mit Papa Robert.
BILD

Wie aus dem Ei gepellt: Roger Federer und Venus Williams präsentieren ihre Siegestrophäen beim traditionellen Champions Dinner.
AP
Bildzoom

Der frisch gebackene dreifache Wimbledon-Sieger genoss den Abend zusammen mit seinen Eltern und Freundin Mirka Vavrinec und an der Seite von Tim Phillips, dem Präsidenten des All England Lawn Tennis Club, im Londoner Savoy Hotel.

Erstmals Gast an dieser Gala war Roger Federers Vater Robert, ein Novum, das der Junior in seiner Ansprache entsprechend würdigte: «Ich freue mich über den 21. Finalsieg in Serie und über den dritten Wimbledon-Triumph. Doch ich freue mich auch sehr, dass mein Vater erstmals beim Champions Dinner dabei sein kann.»

BILD
Roger das Talent in die Wiege gelegt: Vater Robert und Mutter Lynette mit ihrem Stammhalter.
AP
Bildzoom

Aus dem Umfeld des Champions genossen auch Mutter Lynette, Coach Tony Roche, Trainingpartner Reto Staubli, Physiotherapeut Pavel Kovac und Rechtsanwalt Beat Christen den Abend. Als Vorspeise wurde der illustren Gästeschar Lachs mit Kartoffelsalat gereicht, als Hauptgang wurden Lamm und Kartoffelgratin aufgetischt. Vanille-Glacé mit Himbeeren bildeten den Abschluss.

FEDERER - RODDICK KEIN STRASSENFEGER

Mit 321´000 Zuschauern erreichte Roger Federer bei seinem dritten Wimbledon-Sieg eine respektable TV-Quote, aber ein Strassenfeger war die Übertragung nicht. Der Siegerehrung wohnten dann aber doch 461´000 Zuschauer per Live-Schaltung bei, was einem Marktanteil von 53,2 Prozent entsprach.

Federer speiste zwar am gleichen Tisch wie Frauen-Siegerin Venus Williams, «wegen des grossen Tisches konnte ich aber nicht viel mit ihr reden», sagte er. Williams erschien übrigens ohne Freund und Familie – dafür mit halbstündiger Verspätung.
Grosser Bahnhof in Basel

Gestern Abend ist Roger Federer also beim traditionellen Champions Dinner seinen Verpflichtungen gegenüber den Wimbledon-Veranstaltern nachgekommen, heute nimmt er sich Zeit für seine Schweizer Fans – um 18.30 Uhr beim Empfang auf dem Basler Marktplatz.
FEDERER ZEMENTIERT LEADERTHRON

Nach dem Wimbledon-Hattrick ist Roger Federer seiner Konkurrenz weiter entrückt: Gegenüber dem Juli 2004 hat er seinen Vorsprung auf den Nächstbesten verfünffacht! Mit 6980 Punkten liegt Federer um 3140 Zähler vor Lleyton Hewitt – was einem Gegenwert von drei Grand-Slam-Titeln entspricht! Rafael Nadal als Dritter hat 3635 Punkte auf seinem Guthaben, Andy Roddick, vor zwölf Monaten noch die Nummer zwei, deren 3590.

BILDER
Roger Federer und Freundin Mirka Vavrinec beim abendlichen Empfang des All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Clubs.
AP
Bildzoom

Spieglein, Spieglein an der Wand - Venus Williams kurz vor dem Champions Dinner.
AP
Bildzoom

AB AN DIE BEACH
Erstmals nach einem Wimbledon-Triumph lässt Roger Federer das Turnier von Gstaad aus und reist erst mal für einen Kurzurlaub ans Meer: «Ich werde zwei Wochen lang nichts anderes tun als am Strand liegen, gut essen und viel schlafen.» In fünf Wochen kehrt er in Montreal wieder auf die ATP-Tour zurück, um dann Ende August den Titel am US Open zu verteidigen: «Im letzten Jahr habe ich am US Open ein phantastisches Turnier und ein nahezu perfektes Final gespielt. Deshalb ist dieses Turnier mein zweites grosses Ziel in dieser Saison.»
http://www.blick.ch/sport/tennis/artikel22683

Shabazza
07-07-2005, 07:46 PM
RogiFan I'm quite sure you don't want to read this article. It's a plain simple and rather stupid article, mainly about the Champions Dinner, nothing new or interesting. Maybe it help you, if I say BILD is the german pendant to "The Sun" in england, but worse - "yellow press" ;)

babsi
07-07-2005, 07:56 PM
RogiFan,
the first part deals with the fact,that Rogers father Robert was there to see the Wim.finale for the first time.
Then it states that Rogers party was seated at the same table as Venus Willams,who arrived a lone, without any company (the table was too big for them to talk much,though).
The finale wasn´t excatly a blockbuster in Switzerland,but the trophy ceremonie was watch by 53% of the viewing public (apperently people think the cermonie is more exciting then the match - strange)
Short mention of the reseption that awaits him in Basel :)
On it goes with how Roger is far ahead of the competition
and finaly they tell about Rogers plans to go on vacation for two week - doning not much :)
It closes with the statment,that Roger will be back on the tour in 5 weeks time to play in Montreal :) and then will go on to defend his title at the USO (fingers croosed)

babsi
07-07-2005, 08:00 PM
RogiFan I'm quite sure you don't want to read this article. It's a plain simple and rather stupid article, mainly about the Champions Dinner, nothing new or interesting. Maybe it help you, if I say BILD is the german pendant to "The Sun" in england, but worse - "yellow press" ;)
Soooooooo,I wasted my time? - you are quite right - but curiostiy can itch like a mosquito bite :)

Shabazza
07-07-2005, 08:28 PM
Soooooooo,I wasted my time? - you are quite right - but curiostiy can itch like a mosquito bite :)
:lol: true - I really don't like BILD, so I'm biased, but if Rogifan has insisted I would have translated this article - so you saved me here ;)

RogiFan88
07-07-2005, 09:03 PM
Danke, Babsi! Yes, I know about BILD... always has trashy stuff on Boris Becker and blonde bimbos!!

;)

RogiFan88
07-07-2005, 09:59 PM
I love this:

"True, both Lance and Tiger may have new records up ahead and both can be winningly articulate when they wish. But there is also an unattractive jaggedness about Armstrong and an unappealing control-freakery in Woods which makes it hard to imagine either walking into a press conference as Federer did on Friday to modestly and wittily handle questions in English, French, German and Swiss/Deutch not even excluding the compulsory joke in each language about the cow Juliette, his hometown reward for Wimbledon 2003."

From this article:
Federer master of the beautiful game
By Brough Stott
(Filed: 03/07/2005)

There's something in his smile. It only comes after the match and there is nothing flashy in it. The teeth may barely show but a warm and blissful wonder grows through the down-turned Federer face. At last he can be happy with what has gone before.

On Friday, Roger had those three sets against Lleyton Hewitt to smile upon, the first two as dazzling in their power and beauty and invention as anything you will see in tennis. Poor Lleyton hardly got a sniff as Roger stretched and hit and surprised him. It was highly charged. It was one-on-one combat, and yet for Federer the histrionics were confined to that little double-footed jumping turn of frustration when a would-be winner had strayed. Hewitt was important, but the real test was to play to the Federer potential, to try and paint that masterpiece on to the court.

There should be arrogance here but Federer's genius has a purity about it which is uniquely appealing. The next few weeks will see two other men with claims to be the greatest performer their sport, or any other, has ever seen. But for all their astonishing respective achievements, neither Lance Armstrong nor Tiger Woods handle themselves in and out of competition with an open charm anything like that of Roger Federer.

True, both Lance and Tiger may have new records up ahead and both can be winningly articulate when they wish. But there is also an unattractive jaggedness about Armstrong and an unappealing control-freakery in Woods which makes it hard to imagine either walking into a press conference as Federer did on Friday to modestly and wittily handle questions in English, French, German and Swiss/Deutch not even excluding the compulsory joke in each language about the cow Juliette, his hometown reward for Wimbledon 2003.

Before the tournament started, BBC TV asked 10 leading players to film a preview for them. Every one bar Federer found a reason to decline. A day later a walking interview with Radio Wimbledon hit a technical snag as he entered the most famous gates in tennis. "Could we ever do it again," gulped the hack. "Of course," said Federer, "I have the time."

Yes, he has the time. That was the glory of it on Friday. We all know that Hewitt is a scrapper, the fastest man in tennis, but here he was being pushed around by a force that was just awesome to behold. In no other sport do you get a full two hours of close-up study of the athlete in extremis. In tennis on the Centre Court you seem to be looking not just at a player's shots but into his very soul.

With Federer, even the physique is something of a contradiction. At 6ft 1in and nearly 13st, he is a big, almost heavy-looking figure with a crumpled face that in concentration is hardly a thing of beauty. Yet the moment he picks up the racket he is transformed into an extraordinary creature with a lightness to match the power, a speed to equal the stealth, and, above all, the hawk-eyed intelligence to harness the skill.

He doesn't just trade shots from the baseline. He is always keen to move you about until either the angle has got sharp enough to make the return impossible, or to give him the chance to leap around the backhand and hammer away with the full force of the forehand.

"A lot of people say that his backhand is his best shot," said Frew McMillan on Friday, "but they are wrong. The forehand is something else."

Later in the day the rain came and the TV gave the one billionth showing of the Borg-McEnroe tie-break in the 1980 final. Once again you were gripped by the drama and by the skill and nerve of the participants. But for power and speed they were on a different planet to the big Swiss cat who had made the Centre Court his own that afternoon.

In their separate ways both Borg and McEnroe were driven by fires from deep within. So, too, is Federer and in his early days he was a shouter and a racket-thrower of almost Supermac dimensions. What's exceptional about Roger is that he has fuelled the force and can talk about it. "I had the feeling that I was wasting too much energy on getting upset," he explained in all those languages on Friday, "but it took me another year or so to actually get the fire back because I was getting too quiet, too calm."

Today we will see him in his pomp and yet he's not 24 until next month. As a man and as a performer he is at this moment so close to perfection that there is a wistful thought that history says it cannot last. Life is an unsparing partner and distractions come to the mind just as injuries slow the body.

So let's relish while we can the winning made beautiful. If Roger Federer plays like he has this past fortnight we, as well as he, will have plenty to smile about.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/

Stevens Point
07-07-2005, 10:01 PM
RogiFan I'm quite sure you don't want to read this article. It's a plain simple and rather stupid article, mainly about the Champions Dinner, nothing new or interesting. Maybe it help you, if I say BILD is the german pendant to "The Sun" in england, but worse - "yellow press" ;)
I think this article is from Blick. Well, BILD in Germany is Blick in German part of Switzerland. It is the same kind like The Sun in England.

Shabazza
07-07-2005, 10:27 PM
I think this article is from Blick. Well, BILD in Germany is Blick in German part of Switzerland. It is the same kind like The Sun in England.
ah thx for clearing it up, in fact I was quite surprised that BILD has an article about Roger, they usually don't care to write about something like that - not of interest for the average reader and their "target group" ;)

Nathy
07-08-2005, 12:23 AM
RogiFan, wonderful article you gave us, thanks :hug: In evidence, the sentences I truely LOVE :worship:


Federer master of the beautiful game
By Brough Stott
(Filed: 03/07/2005)

There's something in his smile. It only comes after the match and there is nothing flashy in it. The teeth may barely show but a warm and blissful wonder grows through the down-turned Federer face. At last he can be happy with what has gone before.

On Friday, Roger had those three sets against Lleyton Hewitt to smile upon, the first two as dazzling in their power and beauty and invention as anything you will see in tennis. Poor Lleyton hardly got a sniff as Roger stretched and hit and surprised him. It was highly charged. It was one-on-one combat, and yet for Federer the histrionics were confined to that little double-footed jumping turn of frustration when a would-be winner had strayed. Hewitt was important, but the real test was to play to the Federer potential, to try and paint that masterpiece on to the court.

There should be arrogance here but Federer's genius has a purity about it which is uniquely appealing. The next few weeks will see two other men with claims to be the greatest performer their sport, or any other, has ever seen. But for all their astonishing respective achievements, neither Lance Armstrong nor Tiger Woods handle themselves in and out of competition with an open charm anything like that of Roger Federer.

True, both Lance and Tiger may have new records up ahead and both can be winningly articulate when they wish. But there is also an unattractive jaggedness about Armstrong and an unappealing control-freakery in Woods which makes it hard to imagine either walking into a press conference as Federer did on Friday to modestly and wittily handle questions in English, French, German and Swiss/Deutch not even excluding the compulsory joke in each language about the cow Juliette, his hometown reward for Wimbledon 2003.

Before the tournament started, BBC TV asked 10 leading players to film a preview for them. Every one bar Federer found a reason to decline. A day later a walking interview with Radio Wimbledon hit a technical snag as he entered the most famous gates in tennis. "Could we ever do it again," gulped the hack. "Of course," said Federer, "I have the time."

Yes, he has the time. That was the glory of it on Friday. We all know that Hewitt is a scrapper, the fastest man in tennis, but here he was being pushed around by a force that was just awesome to behold. In no other sport do you get a full two hours of close-up study of the athlete in extremis. In tennis on the Centre Court you seem to be looking not just at a player's shots but into his very soul.

With Federer, even the physique is something of a contradiction. At 6ft 1in and nearly 13st, he is a big, almost heavy-looking figure with a crumpled face that in concentration is hardly a thing of beauty. Yet the moment he picks up the racket he is transformed into an extraordinary creature with a lightness to match the power, a speed to equal the stealth, and, above all, the hawk-eyed intelligence to harness the skill. ( :worship: )

He doesn't just trade shots from the baseline. He is always keen to move you about until either the angle has got sharp enough to make the return impossible, or to give him the chance to leap around the backhand and hammer away with the full force of the forehand.

"A lot of people say that his backhand is his best shot," said Frew McMillan on Friday, "but they are wrong. The forehand is something else."

Later in the day the rain came and the TV gave the one billionth showing of the Borg-McEnroe tie-break in the 1980 final. Once again you were gripped by the drama and by the skill and nerve of the participants. But for power and speed they were on a different planet to the big Swiss cat who had made the Centre Court his own that afternoon.

In their separate ways both Borg and McEnroe were driven by fires from deep within. So, too, is Federer and in his early days he was a shouter and a racket-thrower of almost Supermac dimensions. What's exceptional about Roger is that he has fuelled the force and can talk about it. "I had the feeling that I was wasting too much energy on getting upset," he explained in all those languages on Friday, "but it took me another year or so to actually get the fire back because I was getting too quiet, too calm."

Today we will see him in his pomp and yet he's not 24 until next month. As a man and as a performer he is at this moment so close to perfection that there is a wistful thought that history says it cannot last. Life is an unsparing partner and distractions come to the mind just as injuries slow the body.

So let's relish while we can the winning made beautiful. If Roger Federer plays like he has this past fortnight we, as well as he, will have plenty to smile about.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/

lunahielo
07-08-2005, 02:22 AM
Beautiful words.
Beautiful.

babsi
07-08-2005, 12:51 PM
Beautiful words.
Beautiful.
Thank you for posting RogiFan :)

Fedex
07-08-2005, 03:00 PM
Interesting articles, Thanks Rogifan and Nathy.

Lady Natalia
07-09-2005, 03:04 PM
Federer Clinches Tennis Masters Cup Spot

World No. 1 and current INDESIT ATP 2005 Race leader Roger Federer has clinched his place in the Tennis Masters Cup Shanghai, once again setting a new mark for the earliest announced qualification for the year-end championship.

It will be the two-time defending Tennis Masters Cup champion's fourth consecutive appearance in the year-end finale, which will be held at the Qi Zhong stadium in Shanghai on November 13-20, 2005. Federer went undefeated en route to back-to-back titles in Houston in 2003-04 and has a 13-1 record in the tournament. Federer's only loss came on his Tennis Masters Cup debut when the championships were last held in Shanghai in 2002, when he lost to Lleyton Hewitt in the semifinals.

"It's a great feeling to know that I have already qualified for Shanghai,” said Federer. “I want to defend my title, it's one of my goals this year. I remember playing the Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai in 2002; it was my debut in the tournament as part of the best eight players in the world. The crowds were fantastic, I love playing in Asia and I look forward to November."

The Swiss superstar set an unprecedented benchmark in 2004 after he became the earliest qualifier in the history of the tournament when it was announced on August 3 that he had qualified for the Tennis Masters Cup Houston. Federer then went on to successfully defend his title, defeating Lleyton Hewitt in the 2004 final and finish as the year-end World No. 1 with 11 titles. It was a season that led to Federer receiving a multitude of international awards, including the Laureus World Sportsman of the Year.

As a testament to his outstanding qualities, Federer has continued to set new standards in 2005. Just last week, Federer became only the third player in Open era history (since 1968) to win three consecutive Wimbledon championships. It also marked Federer's eighth title of the year, with three ATP Masters Series tournaments in Indian Wells, Miami and Hamburg among them, and record 21 st consecutive victory in a tournament final stretching back to October 2003.

The 23-year-old has a 228-point lead over Roland Garros champion Rafael Nadal at the top of the INDESIT ATP 2005 Race and an incredible 58-3 win-loss record for the season. The Swiss already has 910 Race points this year – more than the 887 he had going into last year's US Open – and is on course to overhaul his total in 2004, when he finished No. 1 with 1267.

“Federer continues to amaze us all,” said Tennis Masters Cup Tournament Director Brad Drewett. “Tennis fans throughout the world know that they are witnessing the progress of one of the greatest players of all time. He is the perfect global ambassador for our sport, admired throughout Asia where he has an immense fan following. He was recently voted the most popular tennis player in China so everyone is obviously looking forward to seeing him in Shanghai again.”



The Race for the remaining seven places at the Tennis Masters Cup will be hotly contested over the coming four months as the countdown to Shanghai continues. Spanish sensation Nadal, currently in second position in the INDESIT ATP 2005 Race, should qualify soon and will be hoping to continue his impressive form having won six titles so far this year. Andy Roddick (3 rd ), two-time Tennis Masters Cup champion Hewitt (4 th ) and Australian Open winner Marat Safin (5 th ) also are among the most likely to earn spots in Shanghai in the weeks and months ahead.

The Top seven players in the INDESIT ATP 2005 Race on November 7 will qualify for the year-end finale. The eighth place will go to the highest-placed Grand Slam champion who finishes between eighth and 20th. If no player fits this classification, the eighth place will go to the player who finishes eighth in the INDESIT ATP 2005 Race.

http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/federer_masters_berth.asp

TenHound
07-10-2005, 05:19 AM
What did the obnoxious Brit. Tabloids do w/Roger during Wimby? Or do they ignore him & look for juicier prey? Speaking of which does anyone know what they did w/Pete?

Tennis_Mad
07-10-2005, 09:37 AM
Fed gave loads of interviews on the BBC (even during the 2nd Thursday when it rained all day and he wasn't due on court) and believe me he's very popular with the papers...not for the looks but people admire his game.

Even got on some of the back and front pages last Monday!

Rodger has great respect with the British tennis fans/press.

SUKTUEN
07-10-2005, 05:48 PM
thanks

RogiFan88
07-10-2005, 09:15 PM
Punchline that says it allBy Andrew Baker
(Filed: 04/07/2005)

What do you give the man who has everything? A third successive Wimbledon men's singles title. Might as well gift Roger Federer the next three championships, too, since it is well-nigh impossible to envisage anyone else winning them.

According to the seeding committee, the player defeated in straight sets yesterday afternoon was the second best in the tournament. So what were Andy Roddick's thoughts on the best way to defeat Federer here in future? "Maybe I should just punch him," Roddick said.

That is the kind of hold that the Swiss master is starting to exert over his challengers at the All England Club. There is an aura about him here, a sense that he knows something that nobody else does, that he possesses a unique understanding of what it takes to win on the grass of SW19.

Two years ago, when Federer first lifted the AELTC Challenge Cup, it was still possible to discern chinks in his grasscourt armour: a serve that lacked killer power, a backhand still in development. But as Roddick generously observed yesterday, the champion just keeps getting better, and yesterday's performance was as close to faultless as you are likely to see.

The knowledgeable crowd here are aware of what a gem they have been watching. Under normal circumstances during the second week (i.e., with no British player to cheer) it is common for the Wimbledon crowd to give their allegiance to the underdog. So it was a little surprising to hear a greater volume of cheering for the defending champion as the players walked out to begin their match.

Wimbledon loves Federer, and the affection is reciprocated. It is not just that the fans adore his talent, they also appreciate his personality. He is not a showman, in the Becker/Connors/Agassi mould, but his self-deprecating, shy-smiling demeanour appeals to something in the British character. So if we cannot have our own winners, we are happy to adopt one from the Swiss.

Roddick is popular, too, since he is as useful with one-liners as he is with two-handed backhands. If we have to get used to watching him lose in the final here year after year, the compensation is that he is prepared to be funny about it in the aftermath. One suspects that Roddick would rather collect trophies than jokes, though, and he started yesterday's match as if determined to put an end to the hoodoo hold that Federer seems to have over him at present: Roddick has won only once in 10 meetings.

The Swiss was in an equally stubborn mood, though, with the result that only a solitary point went against serve in the first five games, which passed in only 10 minutes. This was Express Tennis, just as it used to be in the days of Boom-Boom Becker and Goran Ivanesevic.

But suddenly there was a hint, the merest suggestion of weakness in the Roddick serve, and Federer was all over him, raining down shots from all sides and forcing an overhit forehand and the break.

Just then, a helicopter trailing a banner that promoted an Australian airline droned close to the court. "Lleyton Hewitt," an onlooker murmured. "Take cover."

Federer refused to be distracted. Roddick managed a break early in the second set but never looked like hanging on to it, and he faded rapidly in the ensuing tie-break. In the third, the American was hanging on gamely until the seventh game, which was a microcosm of the whole match.

Roddick was serving consistently at more than 130 mph, but Federer was dominant. He passed, lobbed, volleyed, hit down the line. Roddick was reduced to comedy shots from beween his legs, exasperated lunges. He tried rushing the net, and found the ball rushing past him.

It was all too much. Roddick was playing fantastic tennis - he would later say that he had played far better than he did in last year's final, when he had won the first set - but Federer was playing better.

Afterwards, Roddick - who has a wonderful facility for maintaining his sense of humour under the most trying circumstances - offered his own summary of the match. "I did everything I could," he said. "I tried playing different ways. I tried playing to his forehand and coming in. He passed me. I tried going to his backhand and coming in. He passed me. I tried staying back, and he figured out a way to pass me, even though I was at the baseline."

We always wonder what players say to each other when they meet at the net at the conclusion of a final. This time Federer had spent so long on the ground drinking in the cheers that Roddick was able to walk around the net and embrace him in mid-court. "I just said 'Congratulations'," Roddick disclosed later. "There's not much else to say. I have loads of respect for him. I've told him before, 'I'd love to hate you but you're really nice'."
www.telegraph.co.uk/wimbledon

I had to post this article [again] and highlight my faves phrases! ;)

Brianna
07-11-2005, 12:18 AM
Thanks for posting Rogifan. I love this article as well.

Doris Loeffel
07-11-2005, 12:15 PM
Thanks, Merci, Danke

PaulieM
07-11-2005, 02:18 PM
Fed gave loads of interviews on the BBC (even during the 2nd Thursday when it rained all day and he wasn't due on court) and believe me he's very popular with the papers...not for the looks but people admire his game.

Even got on some of the back and front pages last Monday!

Rodger has great respect with the British tennis fans/press.
except for the stupid paper that i picked up last monday. jk. i picked up a paper at the tube station on my way somewhere hoping to find a lovely article about roger. well since i don't live here, and know nothing about british papers and was in a rush i just picked up the paper with a nice huge picture of him only to read the article later and find out that all it said was... yeah he won again but lets wait for the hardcourts to see what he's really made of because nadal will be around to make his life difficult :rolleyes: :( :(

Minnie
07-11-2005, 02:36 PM
except for the stupid paper that i picked up last monday. jk. i picked up a paper at the tube station on my way somewhere hoping to find a lovely article about roger. well since i don't live here, and know nothing about british papers and was in a rush i just picked up the paper with a nice huge picture of him only to read the article later and find out that all it said was... yeah he won again but lets wait for the hardcourts to see what he's really made of because nadal will be around to make his life difficult :rolleyes: :( :(

Disappointed to read this PaulieM because every single paper I read had nothing but praise for Roger, not just as a tennis player but as a person. Do u remember which paper you picked up? Anyway, I for one can't wait to see Roger put Nadal in his rightful place when the US hardcourt season starts!

PaulieM
07-11-2005, 03:09 PM
Disappointed to read this PaulieM because every single paper I read had nothing but praise for Roger, not just as a tennis player but as a person. Do u remember which paper you picked up? Anyway, I for one can't wait to see Roger put Nadal in his rightful place when the US hardcourt season starts!
not sure but i think it was the evening standard. that's one of my wishes for the rest of the year too, for rogi to just absolutely crush nadal once *begs*

SUKTUEN
07-11-2005, 06:29 PM
thankyou RogiFan~~~

Dirk
07-11-2005, 09:09 PM
That article is bullshit. Roger's serve and backhand were great in 03. There were never weaknesses that year. Minnie, when you are at the top you take all the arrows. If Nadal ever dominates close to what Roger does he will be hated too. Roger and Nadal won't meet till the Cup IMO.

Minnie
07-11-2005, 10:47 PM
That article is bullshit. Roger's serve and backhand were great in 03. There were never weaknesses that year. Minnie, when you are at the top you take all the arrows. If Nadal ever dominates close to what Roger does he will be hated too. Roger and Nadal won't meet till the Cup IMO.

I'm sure that Roger is secure enough in his game/life not to care much what hacks say about him anyway. But I suppose because I admire his tennis so much and think he seems such a nice guy, it makes me angry that others should pour out such bile about him - when they've never even met him. There's players I don't much care for, but I just ignore them! Nadal is one of them ... though difficult to ignore him with him keep winning on clay. Dirk, are you saying that Roger + Nadal won't meet until the Masters Cup in Shanghai - no possible matches in the US hardcourt season this year?

Daniel
07-12-2005, 03:50 AM
thanks

Daniel
07-12-2005, 04:57 AM
Federer, sunny side up
Published July 10, 2005


I loved Pete Sampras' guts and pure confidence on the court and am still not convinced that Roger Federer could beat him if both were at the top of their games at Wimbledon.

In fact, there wasn't much I didn't like about Pete, though there was one thing: He was an interview recluse, a man who was talkative enough in his postmatch news conferences but who wasn't available to reporters in a one-on-one situation unless you carried credentials from ESPN or Sports Illustrated.

Even if you knew more about tennis and could talk tennis more intelligently than anyone who worked for those two high-profile media giants, there was no entree to Sampras. He was, as his agent liked to tell reporters, unavailable.

But now Federer ... vive la difference. He's not going to cut short a beachfront vacation to take your call, but he is so natural, so genuine and so down to earth that it is impossible not to admire him in ways you couldn't admire Sampras.

A few days before the Wimbledon final, I ventured into the players' cafeteria, where Federer was at the salad bar, picking at strands of lettuce and plucking tomatoes into his bowl.

There ensued a short conversation about grazing. "I love salad. Any kind of salads," he said. I explained to him that in the United States, when we have salads, it's called grazing, as cows do in pastures. "Grazing," he repeated, amused. "OK." He filed that away in his list of American idioms, which might come in handy in the coming weeks, when he arrives in the United States to work up to the U.S. Open.

And then, the day after he won his third straight Wimbledon, Federer invited reporters to his rented home in Wimbledon for breakfast, and to sit and chat, about anything, much the same as he did the day after he won the 2004 U.S. Open. That never happened with Sampras. In fact, the idea of Sampras asking reporters to his rented home would have been laughable.

You come away from one of these tête-à-têtes with Federer not really thinking so much about his tennis, which we all know is fabulous, but the way he fits in so easily with ordinary people.

That's why he's a greater champion than Pete.

Roger and out

Chances are Federer won't reappear on court until the Canadian Open in Montreal, Aug. 8-14. That's where he won his eighth title of 2004. He won his eighth title this year at Wimbledon.

From there, he'll play Cincinnati, which also is a Masters Series event, take the week off before the U.S. Open, then arrive in New York to defend his crown.

He'll go through the Open without coach Tony Roche, who at 60 doesn't like traveling the world.

That's fine. Federer won without a coach last year. He'll be favored to repeat for his sixth Grand Slam title.

TheMightyFed
07-12-2005, 08:35 AM
Rhis is a beautiful article, and Roger just enjoys what he's doing in a simple way, which is great for the future and for the fans ;)

yanchr
07-12-2005, 12:47 PM
except for the stupid paper that i picked up last monday. jk. i picked up a paper at the tube station on my way somewhere hoping to find a lovely article about roger. well since i don't live here, and know nothing about british papers and was in a rush i just picked up the paper with a nice huge picture of him only to read the article later and find out that all it said was... yeah he won again but lets wait for the hardcourts to see what he's really made of because nadal will be around to make his life difficult :rolleyes: :( :(
I think you must really have got some luck on you to pick up a paper not praising Roger after this Wimbledon :lol: :p Hope you were enjoying your whole Wimbledon tour even without Roger :hug:

SUKTUEN
07-12-2005, 03:32 PM
thanks for the article~!
I miss Sampras too~!!

RogiFan88
07-15-2005, 01:09 AM
A bit of news:

Rafa said that depending on how well he does in Stuttgart, i.e., if he wins the title, he may opt out of Umag to prepare for Montreal and Cincy [his goal being #1 by the end of the year]... think about it... he has hardly any points to defend until the end of the year and Rogi has... Montreal, USO, Bangkok, TMC... [thank God he was too exhausted to make it past the first rd in Cincy... ] ;)

When Rafa puts his mind to sth, he usually achieves it no matter how big the challenge for he loves nothing better than a challenge, the bigger the better!

RogiFan88
07-15-2005, 01:55 AM
Sorry, can anyone translate this?

Interview: Roger Federer

"Die Deutschen haben mich ein bisschen adoptiert"

Der Schweizer Nummer eins wurde in Halle von tennis magazin der Michael Westphal Award für die Tennispersönlichkeit des Jahres verliehen. Anlässlich der Verleihung sprachen wir über sein Spiel, seinen Erfolg und über seine Vorbilder.

Roger Federer, herzlichen Glückwunsch zur Verleihung des Michael Westphal Awards.
Federer: Danke. Ich möchte mich auch bei allen tennis magazin-Lesern bedanken, die mich für diese Auszeichnung gewählt haben. Ich versuche immer, ein gutes Bild abzugeben - für Tennis, für die Schweiz und für den Sport allgemein. Die Rolle als Vorbild übernehme ich gern. Deshalb sind solche Auszeichnungen eine schöne Bestätigung für mich.
Sie sind 2003 auch zum "Schweizer des Jahres" gewählt worden. Welche Bedeutung haben solche Ehrungen für Sie?
Federer: Ich war sehr überrascht. Ich wollte gern Sportler des Jahres werden, und bin nicht nur das, sondern auch "Schweizer des Jahres". Das macht mich extrem stolz, da ja auch Personen aus Politik und Wirtschaft zur Wahl standen. Seit Wimbledon 2003 schwimme ich auf einer Welle des Glücks. Die möchte ich genießen. Aber ich möchte mich auch über den Sport hinaus engagieren. Ich habe deshalb kürzlich die Roger Federer-Foundation gegründet, eine Stiftung, die in Südafrika Jugendliche unterstützt, die aus finanziellen Gründen nicht zur Schule gehen können. Südafrika deshalb, weil meine Mutter dort geboren wurde. Ich verdiene sehr viel und ich möchte auf diese Weise etwas davon zurückgeben.
Sie sind so wohltuend normal. Kann man sich das im Tenniszirkus ohne weiteres bewahren oder muss man sich auf einer bestimmten Erfolgsstufe "unberührbar" machen?
Federer: Ich bin sicher nicht mehr der gleiche wie vor fünf Jahren. Durch die Reisen, durch die Kulturen, durch die vielen brenzligen Situationen auf dem Platz habe ich viel gelernt - auch über mich selbst. Nicht zuletzt wegen des Geldes und des großen Interesses an meiner Person musste ich mir einen kleinen Schutz aufbauen, damit das Private nicht gestört wird. Aber deshalb muss man nicht oberflächlich sein. Ich jedenfalls versuche, so glaubwürdig wie möglich zu sein - und merke, dass das auch gut ankommt.
Wann haben Sie zum ersten Mal gespürt, dass Ihr Weg ganz nach oben führen kann?
Federer: Ein großer Schritt war das Erreichen des Halbfinals bei den Olympischen Spielen 2000. Da habe ich gemerkt: Hey, ich kann oben mitspielen. Dann dauerte der Sprung in die Top 10 zwar, aber nach meinem Sieg 2001 in Hamburg wusste ich, dass es weiter nach oben geht.
Gab es bei Ihnen so etwas wie einen Entschluss: Ich will die Nummer 1 werden?
Federer: Als ich die Nummer zwölf war, wurde schon getuschelt, dass ich die nächste Nummer 1 sein würde. Aber da war ich noch weit davon entfernt. Selbst wenn man einen Grand Slam gewinnt, ist man vielleicht erst die Nummer vier oder fünf und noch immer weit weg von der Spitze. Der letzte Schritt ist enorm schwer, weil der Druck so hoch ist.

http://www.tennismagazin.de/tennis/personal/interviews/federer_01.html

RogiFan88
07-15-2005, 01:58 AM
this pic goes w the interview:

http://www.tennismagazin.de/de/tennis/images/interviews/federer_01.jpg
www.tennismagazin.de

Rogi saying sth about being adopted by the Germans?? He won the Westphal award...

is this a new interview?? from Halle?

Skyward
07-15-2005, 02:57 AM
A bit of news:

Rafa said that depending on how well he does in Stuttgart, i.e., if he wins the title, he may opt out of Umag to prepare for Montreal and Cincy [his goal being #1 by the end of the year]... think about it... he has hardly any points to defend until the end of the year and Rogi has... Montreal, USO, Bangkok, TMC... [thank God he was too exhausted to make it past the first rd in Cincy... ] ;)



If Nadal wins Stuttgart, his optional 5 tournaments will be filled out. Simply nothing to gain for him in Umag. That's why he's thinking about pulling out.
At this point Roger doesn't have to be concerned about defending titles, he has to gain enough points to stay in front of Nadal in the race. Defending the USO title would be great though.

lunahielo
07-15-2005, 03:11 AM
Originally posted by RogiFan~
When Rafa puts his mind to sth, he usually achieves it no matter how big the challenge for he loves nothing better than a challenge, the bigger the better!

Uh huh~~maybe so, (since I am really not an expert in any way~~& never will be~~on Nadal) but~~if I were putting money on either him or Roger...all of mine would go to Sir Federer!

Roger is a lovely, nice human being as we all know~~but he didn't get where he is
without a super tenacious personality.

His 2 goals for 2005 were to win Wimbledon again~and~~~~~~
Hold on to his #1 position.
Enough said. :)

Puschkin
07-15-2005, 07:28 AM
Rogi saying sth about being adopted by the Germans?? He won the Westphal award...
is this a new interview?? from Halle?

The interview is from Halle - but given the questions and answers - it is from 2004. One thing is new to me, though, Roger was asked for his favourite surface and he answered indoors :confused: .

Nathy
07-15-2005, 10:13 AM
he has to gain enough points to stay in front of Nadal in the race.

But, it doesn't matter if the Spaniard is ranked 1st in the Race at the end of the year, right? All that matters is that Roger is ranked 1st in the Entry List at the end of the year, isn't it? :confused:

jtipson
07-15-2005, 10:42 AM
But, it doesn't matter if the Spaniard is ranked 1st in the Race at the end of the year, right? All that matters is that Roger is ranked 1st in the Entry List at the end of the year, isn't it? :confused:

The rankings match at the end of the year (for those that don't play challengers, anyway). So if Rafa is number one in the race after the TMC, he'll be number one in the entry too.

Nathy
07-15-2005, 10:57 AM
The rankings match at the end of the year (for those that don't play challengers, anyway). So if Rafa is number one in the race after the TMC, he'll be number one in the entry too.

:eek: Didn't know that as I am not a rankings expert! Thanks J.Tipson for the lightening :worship:

Roger will for sure hole his first rank!

SUKTUEN
07-15-2005, 05:10 PM
thanks for the interview, although I do not know German

Stevens Point
07-16-2005, 05:38 PM
Sorry, can anyone translate this?

Interview: Roger Federer

"Die Deutschen haben mich ein bisschen adoptiert"

Der Schweizer Nummer eins wurde in Halle von tennis magazin der Michael Westphal Award für die Tennispersönlichkeit des Jahres verliehen. Anlässlich der Verleihung sprachen wir über sein Spiel, seinen Erfolg und über seine Vorbilder.

Roger Federer, herzlichen Glückwunsch zur Verleihung des Michael Westphal Awards.
Federer: Danke. Ich möchte mich auch bei allen tennis magazin-Lesern bedanken, die mich für diese Auszeichnung gewählt haben. Ich versuche immer, ein gutes Bild abzugeben - für Tennis, für die Schweiz und für den Sport allgemein. Die Rolle als Vorbild übernehme ich gern. Deshalb sind solche Auszeichnungen eine schöne Bestätigung für mich.
Sie sind 2003 auch zum "Schweizer des Jahres" gewählt worden. Welche Bedeutung haben solche Ehrungen für Sie?
Federer: Ich war sehr überrascht. Ich wollte gern Sportler des Jahres werden, und bin nicht nur das, sondern auch "Schweizer des Jahres". Das macht mich extrem stolz, da ja auch Personen aus Politik und Wirtschaft zur Wahl standen. Seit Wimbledon 2003 schwimme ich auf einer Welle des Glücks. Die möchte ich genießen. Aber ich möchte mich auch über den Sport hinaus engagieren. Ich habe deshalb kürzlich die Roger Federer-Foundation gegründet, eine Stiftung, die in Südafrika Jugendliche unterstützt, die aus finanziellen Gründen nicht zur Schule gehen können. Südafrika deshalb, weil meine Mutter dort geboren wurde. Ich verdiene sehr viel und ich möchte auf diese Weise etwas davon zurückgeben.
Sie sind so wohltuend normal. Kann man sich das im Tenniszirkus ohne weiteres bewahren oder muss man sich auf einer bestimmten Erfolgsstufe "unberührbar" machen?
Federer: Ich bin sicher nicht mehr der gleiche wie vor fünf Jahren. Durch die Reisen, durch die Kulturen, durch die vielen brenzligen Situationen auf dem Platz habe ich viel gelernt - auch über mich selbst. Nicht zuletzt wegen des Geldes und des großen Interesses an meiner Person musste ich mir einen kleinen Schutz aufbauen, damit das Private nicht gestört wird. Aber deshalb muss man nicht oberflächlich sein. Ich jedenfalls versuche, so glaubwürdig wie möglich zu sein - und merke, dass das auch gut ankommt.
Wann haben Sie zum ersten Mal gespürt, dass Ihr Weg ganz nach oben führen kann?
Federer: Ein großer Schritt war das Erreichen des Halbfinals bei den Olympischen Spielen 2000. Da habe ich gemerkt: Hey, ich kann oben mitspielen. Dann dauerte der Sprung in die Top 10 zwar, aber nach meinem Sieg 2001 in Hamburg wusste ich, dass es weiter nach oben geht.
Gab es bei Ihnen so etwas wie einen Entschluss: Ich will die Nummer 1 werden?
Federer: Als ich die Nummer zwölf war, wurde schon getuschelt, dass ich die nächste Nummer 1 sein würde. Aber da war ich noch weit davon entfernt. Selbst wenn man einen Grand Slam gewinnt, ist man vielleicht erst die Nummer vier oder fünf und noch immer weit weg von der Spitze. Der letzte Schritt ist enorm schwer, weil der Druck so hoch ist.

http://www.tennismagazin.de/tennis/personal/interviews/federer_01.html

I post here the translation of the article done by myself, hope it is not too late...

Interview with Roger Federer

"The Germans adopted me a little."

The Swiss No.1 received the Michael Westphal Award from the Tennis Magazine in Halle for the tennis personality of the year. On the occasion of the presentation, we spoke about his game, success, and idols.

Roger Federer, congratulations on Michael Westphal Award.

Federer: Thank you. I would like also to thank the readers of the Tennis Magazine, who chose me for this excellence. I always try to make a good image - for tennis, for Switzerland, and for sports in general. I like to take the role as idol. That's why such excellences are a good confirmation for me.

You were also chosen for "Swiss of the Year 2003." What kind of meaning do such honors have for you?

Federer: I was very surprised. I wanted to become the Athlete of the Year. Not only did I become that, but also "the Swiss of the Year." This makes me extremely proud, because there were people from politics and economy as candidates. Since Wimbledon 2003 I have been swimming on a wave of fortune. I would like to enjoy it. But, I would also like to be involved outside of the sports. That's why I established the Roger Federer Foundation, a donation, which supports the children in South Africa, who can't go to school because of financial reasons. South Africa, because my mother was born there. I earn very much, and this way I would like to give some back from that.

You are so normal. Can one keep it in the tennis circus without more, or does one have to make oneself "untouchable" on a definite successful stage? (I didn't understand this question so well... :confused: )

Federer: I am not the same anymore like 5 years ago for sure. I learned a lot through travels, through cultures, and through a lot of hot situations on the court - also about myself. Not in the end because of money and a huge interest in my character (person?) I had to build up a small protection for me, so that the privacy is not disturbed. But, for this reason you don't have to be superficial. I try in any case to be as reliable as possible - and notice that it comes also good.

When did you feel for the first time, that your way could go all the way to the top?

Federer: One huge step was that I reached the semi final at the Olympics in Sydney in 2000. Then I noticed: Hey, I can compete upthere. Then, the jump into the top 10 lasted, but I knew that I could go higher after winning Hamburg in 2001.

Was there in you something like a decision (determination): I want to become No.1?

Federer: When I was No.12, I was whispered that I would become the next No.1. But, I was still far from that. If you win a Grand Slam, you are maybe only the No.4 or 5 and still far from the top. The last step is enormously hard, because the pressure is so high.

SUKTUEN
07-16-2005, 05:41 PM
thankyou~~

Breeze
07-18-2005, 01:41 AM
Hey anyone knows about the new tennis game of Sega Unveils Tennis Champions For Virtua Tennis™: World Tour. :scratch:
This is only what I found:

SEGA® of America, Inc. and SEGA Europe Ltd. today announced a veritable who’s who list of licensed tennis stars to feature in SEGA’s upcoming Virtua Tennis™: World Tour for the PSP™ portable entertainment system. Grass court maestro and three times Wimbledon champion Roger Federer headlines the men’s line-up, with fellow finalist and world number four Andy Roddick also in-game. The women are headed by Wimbledon winner Venus Williams along with her fellow finalist and 1999 winner Lindsay Davenport.

A host of today’s tennis greats also join the Virtua Tennis™: World Tour roster, including Russian starlet Maria Sharapova and British Number 1, Tim Henman. Lleyton Hewitt, Juan Carlos Ferrero, Tommy Haas, Sebastien Grosjean, David Nalbandian, Daniela Hantuchova, Amelie Mauresmo, and Nicole Vaidisova conclude a truly awe inspiring line-up!

“Announcing the inclusion of the sports' greatest talent into Virtua Tennis™: World Tour takes us another step closer to the release of this superb game,” commented Matt Woodley, Creative Director of SEGA. “I genuinely think that this is a must have PSP title, even more so now with this level of talent included - each new revision puts me back another few hours on my to do list at work!”

This latest instalment in the critically-acclaimed franchise serves up a variety of game options including Exhibition mode where you can become your favourite of these prodigious players and take advantage of their real-life strengths on the court. If you want to be your own champion, create your world number one challenger in World Tour Mode. Added to this you will find four new mini-games to hone your skills – Blockbuster, Fruit Dash, Blocker and Balloon Smash, all exclusive to the PSP version. Also included are all the key court surfaces from around the world and the fantastically addictive two to four players Wireless LAN mode!

Virtua Tennis™: World Tour has received several accolades for its visual excellence and addictive gameplay including the E3 Game Critics Award for Best Sports Game, and the IGN award for Best PSP Sports Game. Developed by the UK-based development team, SUMO Digital, Virtua Tennis™: World Tour is challenging fun to play for minutes or hours, and a great fit on the PSP system.

And in another page I knew that Federer and Sharapova were going to be in the cover of the game.

SUKTUEN
07-18-2005, 05:09 AM
thanks

nobama
07-18-2005, 11:48 AM
http://www.sundaylife.co.uk/sport/story.jsp?story=652851

A Sporting Life: Roger won't get Fed up...
World No1 still full of ambition

By Frank Brownlow

17 July 2005
THE World Cup Finals and Wimbledon will combine to make next June a sporting spectacular.

But while the bookies can't decide who will lift the World Cup, they've no doubt about who will win the men's singles title at SW19.

Roger Federer recently picked up his third successive Wimbledon crown and is odds on - 1/2 - to make it four in a row.

And the man himself shows no signs of giving his beleaguered opponents a look in for some time to come.

"I've got many dreams left which I would like to chase," he told Sunday Life.

"Well, I mean, I always have goals I set myself at the beginning of each year.

"Last year I definitely played much better than I ever expected because the year before was already fantastic in itself."

And Federer admits that, despite being world number one, he still gets nervous during matches.

"Always. Break point for or against me, the pulse goes higher. On a break point, you're not allowed to miss any more. So I definitely feel the pressure in those moments," he reveals.

But when you're winning tournaments for fun, you're bound to be happy with your game.

"I'm serving really consistently at the moment. My first serve is pretty good. I'm really happy with how I'm serving.

"My movement around court is pretty good but I'm always looking to serve and volley a little bit more. But as long as I keep on winning from the baseline, that's okay. Although obviously I would like to come to the net a little bit more.

"I've got to use my strength, which is very much my game. I've got to use that, but use it right.

"I try to improve little things - on the serve, on the volley, on the baseline," he says.

And Federer accepts that the more matches and tournaments he wins, the more he will acquire an air of invincibility.

"Over the last couple of years with the few matches I have lost, you start to feel that.

"It's like when you see other players, like Andy Roddick there for a while on the American hard court circuit where he hardly lost a set or a match. So if you're up to play him, you expect an incredibly tough match.

"Rafael Nadal on clay is similar. When you see how much he has won, when you're playing him you get the feeling that you will have to do something special.

"I think I definitely created the same thing around me for a while - indoor or hard court, but especially grass too.

"Once you are number one in the world, you have to believe in your chances," he adds.

But Federer claims he refuses to allow opponents' respect for him to dictate his own game.

"I don't like to think too much this way - that everything's going to fall into place anyway - because I'm the person who perhaps has to come up with the ace on the break point or the good shot at some other time. It's not just going to be handed over to me.

"So I always take every match from zero. Once I'm in a tough position, I always try to prove it to myself and to the people that I can do it over and over again. And sometimes, of course, it's impossible. It's difficult, you know.

"But I'm really happ with the way I've handled all the pressure and situations over the last few years."

And just how do you become probably the world's best ever tennis player?

"Players don't work on their volleys enough these days any more. It's as simple as that.

"It's got a lot to do with circumstances and the way tennis has progressed.

"But if you are brought up as a youngster to improve your volleys and become a better volley player, then you definitely can win Wimbledon."

That 6-2, 7-6, 6-4 victory over Roddick in the Wimbledon final earlier this month was Federer's third successive men's singles title at SW19, further evidence that the Swiss could be the world's greatest ever player.

"That was probably the best match I have ever played," he confesses.

"I was playing flawless tennis. Everything was working well. It will take a while for me to realise what I have achieved. It didn't really feel like I was playing - it was a strange feeling on the court.

"Those who knew me as a youngster realised I had potential.

"But I don't think anybody thought it would be this extreme, dominating the game and winning three Wimbledon titles in a row.

"After one title you think 'Wow, this is fantastic'. When you win three in a row you really start to wonder 'What have I done right in my career that this has happened to me?'

"I'm very proud as this is the most important tournament," said Federer, who first picked up a racket as a three-year-old in Basle at a club where his father Robert and South African-born mother Lynette played socially.

Federer joined Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras as the only Wimbledon three-in-a-row stars in the open era. Borg took five titles in total, but Federer - total three - has already equalled legends John McEnroe and Boris Becker.

That falls some way short of Sampras' record seven Wimbledons - but at 24, time is still just about on Federer's side to overtake Pistol Pete.

Would you bet against him?

SUKTUEN
07-18-2005, 04:18 PM
"It's like when you see other players, like Andy Roddick there for a while on the American hard court circuit where he hardly lost a set or a match. So if you're up to play him, you expect an incredibly tough match. :devil:

That falls some way short of Sampras' record seven Wimbledons - but at 24, time is still just about on Federer's side to overtake Pistol Pete. :D :D

Would you bet against him?( No one) :devil: :devil: :devil: :worship:

Whistleway
07-18-2005, 05:47 PM
A Classic!

Saturday Diary: Pick up a racket and feel, momentarily, like Roger Federer

Saturday, July 16, 2005
By Torsten Ove, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

I recently spent a couple of hours in front of the TV and found myself saying over and over, "How can anyone do that?"

Reality show? Yes, indeed. It was the Wimbledon men's final.

Roger Federer of Switzerland dismantled Andy Roddick, the good-natured American star with the 150-mph serve and bullwhip forehand.

Federer took Roddick apart surgically, like Muhammad Ali dazzling a club fighter or Tiger Woods carving up a Saturday foursome.

The American sports culture is such that tennis is only a blip on the radar, I know. I even heard a Pittsburgh sports announcer pronounce Roddick's name as "Roderick," as if he'd never heard of him.

And Federer? This polite, 23-year-old Swiss who speaks four languages (his English is better than most Americans') is just another foreigner to most people.

That's a shame, because the majority of sports fans don't understand what he represents.

Those who play know he may be the greatest in history.

He's certainly the most aesthetic, a silent assassin gliding around the green rectangle like a wraith, conjuring up winners under pressure with such grace he almost looks casual.

OK, he seems to say: Maybe now would be a good time to whip a topspin backhand crosscourt passing shot two inches from my opponent's racket and an inch inside the sideline. He did that to Roddick.

What, he almost appears to shrug, the rest of you can't hit those shots?

No. No one can.


I've been playing for many years -- usually not too well -- and I study the top players to learn from them. (It doesn't help much.)

But I've never seen this caliber of stuff before. I've even taken to breaking down Federer's strokes frame-by-frame on my VCR in the quest to understand. I suspect I'm not alone.

Even top-flight pros realize this fellow is special. Mats Wilander, himself a former Grand Slam champ, said he would like to be able to play like Federer for one day, to see how it feels.

Where does that leave us lesser mortals?

I'll tell you: Awed but inspired.

To me, tennis is the purest sport -- and the most difficult.

It's just you and the other guy. No coaching. You have to figure out what to do, when and how. You have to attack your opponent's weaknesses and protect your own. You have to control lots of variables, from spin and pace to the weather and court surface and your own nerves. And you have to be in shape to be any good at all.

All of which explains why tennis is no longer popular, at least in America (it's huge in other parts of the world).

Public tennis courts are disappearing, and I often see the ones that still exist in a state of disrepair. Sometimes on beautiful afternoons, whole batches of courts are empty.

Frankly, I think America has grown too fat to play the game anymore. We'd apparently rather watch poker on TV. Poker! It says volumes about our society that a card game is now considered a sport.

I think what happened is that during the tennis boom of the 1970s, people watched Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe and the game looked easy.

But when fans went out and tried to play, they realized it was hard. There's a lot of running and sweating, and it's damned difficult to get that ball over the net and in the court.

Eventually they gave up.

Tennis has its niche today, but it's shrunk considerably. It pains me, because the game is one of the few in which almost all the fans are also players. To me, that's how sports should be: participatory.

I've never understood, for example, how 300-pound couch slugs who couldn't run 10 yards get off criticizing an athlete for botching a play. They don't play, and can't, so where's their frame of reference?

In tennis, players always have one. I'm not particularly good, but I think I can understand how hard it must be to, say, battle fatigue through five sets at the French Open, perhaps the most grueling sports event in the world.

I can imagine trying to return Roddick's howitzer serve or grinding out a baseline duel with Andre Agassi, the fittest man on earth.

A friend of mine used to say when he missed a shot: "Those guys are gods." He meant the pros who can hit that shot 100 times in a row while we couldn't do it twice.

But we had something to strive for.

Years later, I'm still striving.


Tennis pundits often bemoan the power game, saying big boomers are ruining what should be a battle of wits and style as much as brute force. There's truth in that.

Yet here in the age of ballistics comes Federer, who plays a sleek all-court game like one of the greats in the days of wood rackets. He's not big -- just 6-foot-1, 177 pounds -- and he doesn't have the monster shots of some.

But this man is one of those rare talents, like Tiger Woods, who can transcend his own sport and elevate it. If he doesn't get hurt or bored, he will go down as the best ever. Plus, he's a genuine nice guy.

I'm hoping casual fans take notice the next time he's on TV. Maybe a few people will even dig out their old rackets and head for the courts.

Just don't get discouraged if you can't do it like he can. I sure can't, but I'll always be out there trying.

(Torsten Ove is a Post-Gazette staff writer, tove@post-gazette.com.)


http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05197/538768.stm

SUKTUEN
07-18-2005, 05:52 PM
THANKS

nobama
07-18-2005, 07:15 PM
Nice article, and so true. I don't think people really appreciate how difficult it is to play professional tennis, and how fit these guys/gals really are. These guys/gals are some of the best athletes in the world but don't get the credit they deserve. And the ones that do get all the attention, it's usually because of their looks or their on-court behavior. It's a shame really.

Mrs. B
07-18-2005, 09:09 PM
lovely article! :cool:

Shabazza
07-18-2005, 09:47 PM
lovely article! :cool:
Indeed!! :)

RogiFan88
07-19-2005, 01:32 AM
StevensPoint, danke!!! ;)

lsy
07-19-2005, 03:51 PM
OH WOW! This is the second time I'm online, working and then *ding*....

"You'd received a mail from Roger Federer"!!!

:woohoo: :woohoo: :woohoo:

yes! Rogi writes to his fans again...(well, we sort of expected that, don't we? He always write when he had the time off).

It's king of long and I haven't had time to read all of them, but just thought some of you will like to (I'm only posting the English portion) :

===================================

Dear tennis fans

Some incredible days and weeks lie behind me; my first Grand Slam victory of this year, my third Wimbledon title in a row, entering the list with the great Björn Borg and Pete Sampras - all this has become reality! I take pride in these efforts, and it is very satisfying to see the hard work pay off. I want to thank all those who have helped and supported me, including you, my dear fans!

My diary
The last time I wrote about my experiences I had just returned from the Australian Open. Shortly thereafter I was on my way to the Netherlands. Rotterdam awakens many fine memories of earlier years, which is why I enjoy playing there. I was satisfied with my performance at the tournament and it was a great sign for me to win all the initial rounds all the way up to the semi-final in only two sets. The final against Ivan Ljubicic would prove to be considerably harder. It turned out to be a narrow victory which was important to me - after my defeat in the semi-finals in Melbourne.

The start of the tournament in Dubai was rather hard for me this year. Unfortunately, I don't exactly know why. I only made it through the first two rounds with a lot of effort and I'm glad to have made it through them at all. Luckily, after these early troubles, I successfully made my way into the tournament and played some excellent tennis. The semi-final against Andre Agassi was a highlight which still remains vibrant in my memory. After all, I was able to play on an extraordinary tennis court with Andre, the helicopter landing pad of the hotel Burj el Arab. The surface of the pad was covered in a green carpet, converting it into a tennis court. We were playing at a dazzling altitude of 211m (!) above sea level. It was also great to spend my time in Dubai in this hotel, the only seven-star hotel of the world.
Taking home the title in Dubai was a special experience. It was the very first tournament where I was able to win my third consecutive title.

During a short time off, I engaged in something entirely different than tennis. I visited the project of my Foundation in South Africa. We had the visit planned some time ahead, though only a small group of people knew of the trip I was taking. In any case, it was important to me to get a better picture of the situation of the children there, and to see the effort the people are making to help.
Thanks to the local organisers, as well as the Swiss project management, it turned out to be an unforgettable experience for Mirka, my parents and myself. We gained insight into the three schools that accommodate about 2,200 pupils in the Township of New Brighton (near Port Elizabeth). Ahead of our visit, we had asked the kids to create a slogan related to education. We then selected the winning slogan from the numerous, creative ideas: "I'm tomorrow's future". This was then printed onto T-shirts by Nike and distributed to all the children and teachers of the schools, who proudly wore their motto. Other good ideas for the contest were "Only you can make the impossible possible", "Learning is the first step of life" and "Tomorrow is ours".
I was allowed to plant a tree on the grounds of the "Mvisiswano Primary School" in remembrance of my visit and my connection to the place and the organisation. This primary school was the first school to profit from the project "IMBEWU" (which is Xhosa and means "seed").
After enjoying a traditional Xhosa meal (samp with beans) together with the children, we were surprised by a number of performances. There were dances and songs in delightful and colourful clothes in typical African style (of course the South African national hymn "Nkosi Sikelel'Afrika" wasn't to be missed); 200 balloons in the colours of the South African flag conjured a magical, colourful bouquet in the sky.

After the celebration, we visited the home of a girl to get an impression of the housing situation of the children. In spite of the precarious situation of the families there we were welcomed with great warmth. At the end of the long, interesting day we also stopped at the "Empilweni" hospital, where we shared some nice moments with many children with AIDS or TB.

The whole visit was an important, personal experience for me. I could see for myself the importance of this project for the kids. The efforts of the people working there were most impressive and the reactions of the children to my visit were touching.

After visiting IMBEWU, we all treated ourselves to a little break on the South African coast and enjoyed observing African animals in their natural habitat. One day we went on safari in an open jeep with a guide and observed a nearby elephant. He strolled in our direction peacefully until he actually reached the jeep and even swayed his trunk between us, taking a sniff here and there. That was quite spectacular! But it would get even better than that. We spotted a pride of lions and were able to drive up to them as close as 3 meters. It was fascinating; we were able to see their every movement and even heard the noises they made. Believe me, none of us dared to move! It was great to be able to observe my favourite animal in the wild - not speaking of getting up so close. It was Mirka's first visit to my mom's home-country, and she also enjoyed the time we had a lot.

Shortly after my visit to Southern Africa I was on my way to the United States. Defending my title in Indian Wells was the clear aim. I was glad to make a good start into the tournament. I guess it was also due to the fact that I approached the matches in a rather relaxed way. It was not clear to still be in such good shape after all the exhausting matches in Rotterdam and Dubai. I was happy about how smoothly things came along throughout the entire tournament. To perform well at the first Tennis Masters Series tournament of the year is important. And what more could you possibly ask for than capturing the title?

I still felt the positive energy from Indian Wells upon my start in Miami and played well in the first couple of rounds. What was most important, though, was that I was trying to take good care of my health - and to stay away from the sun if possible. I absolutely had to avoid sunstroke like last year. Making it to the final round was going to be quite a task. The match against Rafael Nadal proved to be a downright tennis thriller and an extreme piece of hard work for both of us. At the beginning things didn't quite work out too well for me and the gusty conditions made it even more difficult. After losing the first two sets (2-6, 6-7) and trailing by 1-4, things did not look too good. But I knew I had to put all my effort into winning a couple of games and make the match just a bit tougher for Rafael. This moment of reconsideration showed its effect and I managed to make my way back into the match. The moment I won the tie-break in the third set I knew that I had to seize the moment; I also noticed that Rafael was slowly getting tired. I told myself repeatedly that I was strong enough, both mentally and physically, to fight back. Going all the way and actually winning the tournament in the end in spite of all the difficulties was simply incredible.

It was, of course, amazing to win the two first Tennis Masters Series tournaments of the year! I had never won two in a row before and now I even managed to do so to start off with. It was a relief to begin the Masters Series - season with these victories after my defeat at the Australian Open. After all, Miami is the most prestigious tournament of the Masters Series - the most important tournament on the Tour after the Grand Slams and the Tennis Masters. I knew for sure that I was in good shape.

Back in Europe I decided to travel in a different way for a change. It was my favourite car that safely brought Mirka and me to Monte Carlo. I enjoyed the drive and was looking forward to the beginning of the clay season. I played a good tournament and am happy with my performance in Monaco. Richard Gasquet played impressively and deserved to win. On the way back home we made a stopover in Milan. I always enjoy spending time in Italy very much as I adore the people, the food, the fashion and simply the atmosphere. We enjoyed having two days off and spending them in a different way for a change.

Finally the holidays I had longed for had come. I needed some time off to relax and also to give my feet a break. Unfortunately the two weeks before Rome weren't quite enough to fully get rid of the pain and I decided not to compete in Italy. It is important to be physically fit before getting onto the court again - I'm sure you all understand that.

I now fully concentrated on preparing the second consecutive defence of my title in Hamburg. It was here that Tony Roche rejoined us. He had decided to accompany me all the way up to Wimbledon. At Rothenbaum, I did not drop a single set throughout the entire tournament. This level of play continued into the final match, where I once again met Richard Gasquet, however I gave the better performance this time. It was a good feeling to win in Germany again. Furthermore it was already my third Masters Series victory this season! Boris Becker was also present during the prize giving ceremony and he congratulated me on my victory. It was a special gesture, especially since the event took place in Germany.

I took a whole week's time to prepare for the French Open. It was great to train on the centre court every day from Tuesday until Sunday. This allowed for an ideal adjustment to the local conditions. Aside from training, we enjoyed the time before the start of the tournament with tasty food in various restaurants, small shopping tours as well as the celebration of Tony Roche's 60th birthday!

Looking back I must say that I am satisfied with my overall performance in Paris. It is, after all, the best result I've shown in Roland Garros so far. But I must admit that I was a bit disappointed about the semi-final. It wasn't my best day and I found it difficult to deal with the conditions of light as it was slowly getting dark. Rafael Nadal is nevertheless a worthy winner. He showed a strong performance and his qualities as a fighter were convincing. I am happy for Rafael that he went on to take the title. Being able to celebrate a Grand Slam victory at such a young age is great. I knew the grass court season was up next and had something to look forward to; that made the defeat in Paris less of a disappointment.

Settling into the small, village-like atmosphere of Halle after the bustling city of Paris was relaxing. I like the tournament; it possesses a certain pleasant charm because of its simplicity. We had travelled there again by car since it is only a short drive from Switzerland. It was pretty hectic, though, as we had only returned home on Saturday and were off again on Sunday ('we' - that's Mirka, Tony and me). Luckily I didn't have much time for preparation: after all, it meant that I had played better at Roland Garros than ever before! I tried to make the most of the time available to adjust to the new surface. On Monday, for example, I had a total of three hours of training. In addition to the singles, I had also decided to compete in the doubles with Yves Allegro.

I only narrowly escaped a defeat in the first round against Robin Soderling. The following matches went pretty well and making the final both in the singles as well as the doubles was great. And playing against Marat Safin in both encounters within only a few hours was rather special. I was most happy to seize both titles; it was the first time after Vienna 2003 that I had managed a double. The success in Austria had also been with Yves Allegro by my side.

Travelling home from Germany with a second trophy in my luggage certainly was special. I have performed very successfully on German ground in the last couple of years, winning my last 27 matches - 15 of which were on grass. I have taken home all seven finals which I've played so far (Hamburg 02/04/05, Halle 03/04/05, Munich 05) and my last defeat was over two years ago (R16 in Hamburg 2003 against Mark Philippoussis). All these are surely reasons for the great support I encounter in Germany - giving me even greater pleasure in competing there.

In previous years I had always captured the title in Wimbledon after my victories in Halle; it had been a kind of an omen. Now another title in Halle figured on my account, so my hopes were high. At the beginning of the week before Wimbledon the weather was rather unpleasant. I had to prepare indoors on carpet at first, luckily the weather cleared up towards the middle of the week, allowing me to train on grass. We rented a different apartment this year, in walking distance to the tennis courts. Tony Roche, Pavel Kovac, Mirka and I all stayed there. I was happy to be so close to the event location and to be able to welcome people there. As defending champion my agenda was filled with numerous events and meetings with sponsors and the media. Mirka and I were able to enjoy the Player's Party. The event hadn't been held for 20 or so years and had its revival this year at the Hard Rock Café.

It was a particular feeling to play on the very first day of Wimbledon. After all, if you're the title holder, this is the only tournament where you already know about a year in advance when you'll be playing. I was a bit tense at first and I knew that I had to be careful. Paul-Henri Mathieu is a gifted player, making him a dangerous opponent on grass. Thus, I was relieved to start into the tournament well. Later during the week I played a good match against Nicolas Kiefer. I could have won the encounter in the third set but I was happy to be able to finish it in four in the end.

Competing against Juan Carlos Ferrero in the second week was great. After all, he had been the one Andy Roddick and I chased in 2003 in pursuit of the title as world number one. It was rather surprising to encounter Fernando Gonzalez in the quarter-finals; he is more comfortable on clay after all. With a solid performance on defence, I showed a good game of tennis against Fernando, moving another step towards the final. The fact of finding myself in the semi-final of a Grand Slam the fifth time in a row really meant a lot to me.
The match against Lleyton Hewitt was special. It was strange to meet the world's number two tennis player in the semi-final. He was seeded as the tournament's number three player and I would like to add that I support the system the way it is. Naturally I am more than satisfied with the match against Lleyton. The victory was my ticket to a very important final: my series of wins on grass as well as my series of victories in the finals were at stake; furthermore, it was an exact rematch of last year. Being able to play so well against a strong competitor and under the enormous pressure was fantastic. I'm very proud of that sensational match I played and it was almost as if I was observing myself from high above, commenting: "There's that guy Federer in the final again, and he's winning it - again!"
After the match point I was once again overwhelmed by these immense emotions, just like after my first victory in Wimbledon 2003. It is important and nice for me to know how moments like these can still mean so much. At first, I just wanted to lie down on the ground; the relief of all the pressure that had weighed on my shoulders, as well as the exhaustion, seized me completely. It seemed to me as if I lay there on the grass forever; in reality, it had just been a couple of seconds. My third victory was surely a very special and important one, where I had to beat the players who are the closest to me in the rankings.

The overwhelming reception which I encountered upon my return to Switzerland was a very special gesture that means a lot to me. It was an indescribable moment to stand on the balcony of the city hall of Basel, enjoying the enthusiastic cheering of the crowd on the market square. I think it was the perfect time for such an event and it was an enormous experience that is very rare, especially for a single athlete. I also value the way the media made an effort to support the celebration and I would like to thank everyone who participated in the realisation of this unique event.



Laureus World Sportsman of the Year
It was now time for a special, short trip to a country that I had only visited once before in 1999 for a challenger tournament: Portugal. The sixth annual Laureus World Sports Awards, which honour the world's best sportsmen and women, were held in Estoril. It was great to have been nominated along with Lance Armstrong, Hicham El Guerrouj, Michael Phelps, Valentino Rossi and Michael Schumacher. It was clear to me that even the nomination meant a lot for my status as an athlete. I now had the chance of entering a very prestigious hall of fame, including all sports and not only tennis. As a tremendous year lay behind me I knew I had my chances of winning the award. As the moment came and I was announced World Sportsman of the Year, I was simply overwhelmed. It means a lot to me to have received the sports "Oscar", the most important award athletes can receive since 2000. Becoming World Sportsman of the Year and rising onto the same level as Tiger Woods, Lance Armstrong and Michael Schumacher is indescribable. It was also a special experience to be handed over the award by Cuba Gooding Jnr and Martina Navratilova. After all, Martina is the most successful tennis player the sport has seen (among both men and women!).


Roger Federer Fan Club
Since no official Roger Federer fan club had been founded so far, the Swiss radio-station "DRS 3" started working on changing that. They called for volunteers to found a club. Many interested people applied, whereupon a president was promptly chosen. His name is Leonhard Sprecher, he'll be turning 36 this year and works as a marketing manager for Swiss Post. "This task is a great honour to me and brings me a lot of joy already. It is a great challenge to build up this fan club with a clear structure and involving all the different interest groups", Leonhard said about his new job. He is already investing around 15 hours a week to get everything set up. The legal formation of the fan club is scheduled for the end of September, while the actual launch is planned for the Davidoff Swiss Indoors in Basel. Leonhard is busy assembling the board with people who had applied to the radio request (the departments are international affairs, communications, back-office, actuary, finances and controlling, events and activities). It is important to him that fans who have already been organising and coordinating activities for some time being included in the organisation. He will try to converse with different fan groups and nationalities to gather the best ideas for the concept of the club. The appearance of the fan gathering at the celebration on the market square in Basel for example, was organised by a group of long-standing fans, who had written and held a welcome speech. Roger's team would like to see the fan club emerge in as many countries as possible. "After all, it's about setting up the worldwide support that Roger deserves." Thank you and good luck!
PS: We will keep you updated on the activities planned by the fan club and how you can become a part of it all. If you would like to receive information by email please visit www.fans4roger.ch (the official site of the fan club) and enter you email address.


European Juniors Klosters
From July 18 until 24, the European Juniors take place in Klosters (Switzerland). The international youth tournament, which is being held for the 12th time this year, hosts the best European junior tennis players. Roger himself took part in 1998 and made it to the semi-final, where he was defeated by Feliciano Lopez 6-4, 2-6, 4-6. For three years now, he's been supporting the European Juniors Klosters by sponsoring one of the two Swiss teams. With his contribution, he finances the accommodation and boarding of 6 young players during their stay in Klosters. "It's great to have Roger support events like this in Switzerland and to see him showing so much gratitude towards them. We rely on help like that, and we're especially delighted that Roger is lending a hand to the future Swiss stars", says Sandra Hermenjat-Haensli, tournament director of Klosters.
It would certainly be great if other individuals (Yves Allegro also supports a team) - not just athletes - could support the event; you could help the team from your country, for example. Costs for this are at CHF 2'500.- for a team, please take a look at www.europeanjuniors.com for more information.




Dear tennis fans,

I will remain on vacation for a while longer before taking up my training again. My focus for the remainder of the season lies on the US Open, the Davis Cup, my home tournament in Basel and the Masters in Shanghai. I'm looking forward to all of these future milestones!

Take care, bis bald, à bientôt

Yours sincerely,
Roger

SUKTUEN
07-19-2005, 04:30 PM
I me not give it yet~

nobama
07-19-2005, 07:18 PM
What a thoughtful and articulate newsletter. How cool that he continues to do this on a regular basis. Shows he really does care about his fans.

I'm always impressed when I read stuff he's written. During the French Open on NBC Mary Carillo was talking about Roger and how bright he was and what a thoughtful "kid" he was. Of course at the time they were discussing the replay system for tennis which she is against (and Roger is too). But her comments were very sincere. John McEnroe has said similar nice things too. You do get the sense that within the tennis establishment Roger is really respected as a person not just because of his great tennis playingn, but for the way he acts, the way he conducts himself. Kim Klijsters (sp?) recently said that "Roger was the best thing that could've happened to mens tennis". She's right.

Shabazza
07-19-2005, 07:34 PM
What a thoughtful and articulate newsletter. How cool that he continues to do this on a regular basis. Shows he really does care about his fans.

I'm always impressed when I read stuff he's written. During the French Open on NBC Mary Carillo was talking about Roger and how bright he was and what a thoughtful "kid" he was. Of course at the time they were discussing the replay system for tennis which she is against (and Roger is too). But her comments were very sincere. John McEnroe has said similar nice things too. You do get the sense that within the tennis establishment Roger is really respected as a person not just because of his great tennis playingn, but for the way he acts, the way he conducts himself. Kim Klijsters (sp?) recently said that "Roger was the best thing that could've happened to mens tennis". She's right.
True :)

soonha
07-20-2005, 03:35 AM
A Classic!



http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05197/538768.stm
Thank you for a great article! :worship:

Finally, An American sport journalist did show some insight here.

As this journalist pointed out, I've got the feeling that American people seem not to enjoy a sport like tennis which is difficult and complicated to learn. Also it seems to me they don't ever like a kind of games during which they can't cheer their favorite player or team out loud. They just love the testosterone-outpouring, fist-pumping, sweat-smelling, C'mon-yelling(swearing?) so-called "manly" sports like American football, NBA, MLB or NHL.

I don't have any idea on this unpopularity of tennis in America is about a cultural/social preference or a dark secret of their xenophobia. But I just wonder if they will be able to recognize Rogi's elegant and beautiful tennis in a near future. If they won't, how unfortunate they are.

soonha
07-20-2005, 03:35 AM
Greg Cote of the Miami Herald, on what tennis star Roger Federer has in his pocket: "Money clip, comb, lint, breath mints, Andy Roddick.". ;)

Dirk
07-20-2005, 04:25 AM
That is a great article. I love how Ninja is finally getting his great due here.

SwissMister1
07-20-2005, 03:33 PM
I just got the email from Roger, its pretty nice how he details out all of his trips around the world.

SUKTUEN
07-20-2005, 03:53 PM
thanks

oneandonlyhsn
07-20-2005, 04:07 PM
:worship: Thanks for the article, nice to see Federer getting his dues in North America. The writer is spot on North Americans need to get more involved in tennis, we have too many couch potatoes in this part of the world. I just wrote the journalist an e-mail thanking him for his article.

Federer :hug: so sweet, I love this man

yanchr
07-20-2005, 05:39 PM
A Classic!
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05197/538768.stm
What a beautiful article! Really a Classic! Thanks a lot :wavey:

I love the purity of tennis and love the purity of Roger's tennis.

SUKTUEN
07-20-2005, 06:19 PM
[QUOTE=oneandonlyhsnFederer :hug: so sweet, I love this man[/QUOTE]

I love him too~ :devil:

Brianna
07-20-2005, 11:54 PM
A Classic!



http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05197/538768.stm

Fantastic article, thanks for posting.

SUKTUEN
07-21-2005, 09:18 AM
thanks

RogiFan88
07-21-2005, 04:18 PM
BAD NEWS for ROGER [and me]:

MONTREAL
Dear fans

Regrettably, I have to inform you that I will not participate in the Rogers Cup, the ATP Masters Series in Montreal. As you know I have been suffering from pain in my feet for the past six months. An MRI was performed after Wimbledon and the doctors advised me to rest for 4 full weeks. As this period collides with the preparation for Montreal and the tournament itself, I had to take this decision in order to ensure full recovery.

Not being able to compete and trying to defend my title from Toronto does hurt. After all, it is my birthday the first day of the tournament and I also like the province of Quebec a lot. But I am certainly looking forward to playing in Toronto next year.

See you all very soon!

PS: Cincinnati is still on the plan and I’ll most certainly keep you updated as soon as there are news.

Brianna
07-21-2005, 04:25 PM
BAD NEWS for ROGER [and me]:

MONTREAL
Dear fans

Regrettably, I have to inform you that I will not participate in the Rogers Cup, the ATP Masters Series in Montreal. As you know I have been suffering from pain in my feet for the past six months. An MRI was performed after Wimbledon and the doctors advised me to rest for 4 full weeks. As this period collides with the preparation for Montreal and the tournament itself, I had to take this decision in order to ensure full recovery.

Not being able to compete and trying to defend my title from Toronto does hurt. After all, it is my birthday the first day of the tournament and I also like the province of Quebec a lot. But I am certainly looking forward to playing in Toronto next year.

See you all very soon!

PS: Cincinnati is still on the plan and I’ll most certainly keep you updated as soon as there are news.

:sad: Take the time needed to make a full recovery Roger.

Stevens Point
07-21-2005, 04:31 PM
Was it still a continuing problem for Roger?? Rest well and come back in a good form in Cincy!!

Fergie
07-21-2005, 04:42 PM
Get well soon Rogi! :hug:

yanchr
07-21-2005, 05:30 PM
I hope the decision was made under the forebode that he is aiming at winning Cincinatti this year which he never did before. But from his tone, I highly doubt he will actually show up in Cincinatti.

As long as he is fine for USOpen, get as much rest as you'd like, Roger, and rebounce back strongly as you always do.

RogiFan88
07-21-2005, 05:54 PM
This is not good since he has so many pts to defend at Montreal and USO... Rafa has next to none at all... and he's ready to win his 8th title this week and who knows how many more? He is definitely aiming at the #2 spot first, then who knows?

All the other top players will fancy their chances at this title now...

nobama
07-21-2005, 07:04 PM
I think staying healthy is more important than whether he's #1 at the end of the year or not. But, since that was one of his goals and he's defending champ at the Roger's Cup, I don't think he made this decision lightly. If he loses his #1 ranking then that's the way it goes. I'm not yet prepared to say that Nadal is going to tear up the summer hard courts. So he'll win another mickey mouse tournament on clay. Not a lot of points there, and not really proving anything as everyone already knows how good he is on clay. And there's no way he'll be #1 with only clay court titles.

Maybe I'm in the minority, but I don't think Roger needs a lot of practice on HC to defend the USO. Last year he won the Roger's Cup but lost first round in Cincy. If he plays Cincy and goes deeper than last year or wins it he'll have almost the same amount of practice as last year. So I'm not that concerned...except that his injury might be more serious than we think. If he pulls out of Cincy we'll know for sure that it is.

Rest your feet and get well soon Rog! :hug:

a girl 13
07-21-2005, 07:20 PM
Hopefully he is fit for the US open end august.....

soonha
07-21-2005, 07:41 PM
I agree with mirkaland.

Depending points for Rogers cup are huge but as far as Rogi'll be able to come out in a fresh mode and defend his USO title, there's nothing to worry about the ranking. Even assuming he won't win the USO, I think it's highly improbable that Nadal(or whoever else) surpasses Rogi in the year-end ranking.

The most important thing is his health(his feet in this case) for him and for me, a poor helpless soul who has been missing him after Wimbledon, living in a miserable life without his tennis and now will have to wait for another 3 weeks until Cinnci :bigcry: .

Get well soon, Rogi. Your health is our happiness! :hug:

Minnie
07-21-2005, 08:18 PM
While its sad that Roger can't defend his title at the Rogers Cup (appropriately named!), I was more upset to learn that this problem with his feet is such a persistent one. I assume its the plantar fasciitis problem. He was asked during Wimbledon if his feet were ok - he said they were fine (well he would, wouldn't he?!). I agree with Mirkaland too that he's such a class act that missing one tournament before the US Open won't have that much of an adverse effect. If he can win in Cincy that will give him all the boost he needs to go into the US Open which is obviously the most important tourny. He was out for some weeks last year (with a thigh injury I think) and came back to sweep all before him!

RogiFan88
07-21-2005, 08:42 PM
Actually, it's a good thing Rogi was so exhausted fr winning back-to-back-to-back titles on different surfaces [Halle/Wimby/Gstaad/TO] last year that he crashed out in R1 at Cincy! A blessing in disguise... so if he can play Cincy this year, hopefully he can gain some pts.

Yes, I am concerned too about Rogi's recurring feet probs but I'm sure he knows what he's doing and is following his doctor's advice. He knows not to push himself too much, which is vital to his longevity.

BTW, I was going to give Rogi some messages in Montreal but I shall find another way to get them to him so if anyone w like to PM me their messages of support and "get well, Rogi", etc., pls do! My deadline: Mon. Aug. 1!

;)

Tennis_Mad
07-21-2005, 08:45 PM
This injury is a worry as the foot problem seem to be ongoing and Roger won't want to miss too many tournaments.

oneandonlyhsn
07-21-2005, 09:48 PM
:sad: You guys I am so worried about Rogi, I hope this problem just goes away. I was reading on cures, and they say no walking on hard surfaces so basically Roger wont even be working on his fitness. Roger :sad: I really hope he gets better, I dont care about Motreal now, it wont be the same without him around. Hope he comes back stronger and hungrier than ever and kicks everyones asses and wins the US Open and the TMC. Please God let this problem go away.

Shabazza
07-21-2005, 09:58 PM
I don't like it, this feet problem scares me :( - hope he'll be able to play in Cinci and USO. I really wanted to see him in Montreal though :sad: , but resting his feet is, of course, his main priority now. I really hope he'll be fit and healthy to defend his USO title. Wish him all the best. Rest well! :)

soonha
07-21-2005, 10:34 PM
Look on the bright side. I think this can be a kind of an opportunity for Rogi to set his career up to another level.

As much as I want to see him winning all the tournaments he involves, I hope him to concentrate on more important ones like GS or TMC which count the most in a long-term perspective.

Now it's clear that his feet problem is on-going and will not disappear, because the plantar fasciitis(which is an exact medical term of the problem he's got) has no cure but a rest. So he needs/has to compromise his schedule to his physical condition if he wants to stay as a #1 as long as he can. I think this feet thing provides a real opportunity for him to rethink and cut down his schedule of this year and, more importantly, in coming years to focus on GSs. He is smart enough to consider it.

Only a real wise man can turn a risk into an opportunity. I believe he is. So don't worry about him too much, guys.

nobama
07-21-2005, 11:48 PM
While its sad that Roger can't defend his title at the Rogers Cup (appropriately named!), I was more upset to learn that this problem with his feet is such a persistent one. I assume its the plantar fasciitis problem. He was asked during Wimbledon if his feet were ok - he said they were fine (well he would, wouldn't he?!). I agree with Mirkaland too that he's such a class act that missing one tournament before the US Open won't have that much of an adverse effect. If he can win in Cincy that will give him all the boost he needs to go into the US Open which is obviously the most important tourny. He was out for some weeks last year (with a thigh injury I think) and came back to sweep all before him!
Yes remember he was very "ify" for the Masters Cup in Houston but of course he was there and he won the thing. I'm not concerned about the practice on HC - I don't think he needs a lot of it. And with the rankings, well Nadal would have to go deep in all the summer HC tournies left to make a real dent. Who knows if he'll do that. There certainly is more competition for him on HC than clay right now. And he's playing a lot of tennis so Roger will be fresher by USO time. Knowing of this foot problem makes me even more in awe of his Wimbledon win. Who knows how he was really feeling, because he never would say. Even with the AO, it wasn't until Miami that he mentioned problems with his feet (blisters) and that his feet were bothering him at AO. He could've blamed his loss there on his feet but he didn't.

I just hope it's nothing too serious that will have a major effect on his career. Didn't Mirka have to give up tennis because of persistant foot problems? It doesn't sound *that* serious, hopefully it's not. :sad:

nobama
07-21-2005, 11:52 PM
I want him to defend USO too, but his stated goals were to remain #1 and defend Wimbledon, so if he doesn't win it I won't be too dissapointed. Of course to remain #1 he has to defend titles. But I think he can still remain #1 if he doesn win USO. I don't see Nadal winning it - maybe Hewitt, Roddick or Safin, but it's not enough to catch Roger - esp for Lleyton because he made it to the finals last year, so not a lot of points to pick up.

lunahielo
07-22-2005, 02:24 AM
Get well, Rogi
That is the most important thing...for you
and I am sure~~for your fans~~~

I only heard this about an hour ago...poor baby.

yanchr
07-22-2005, 04:58 AM
I think staying healthy is more important than whether he's #1 at the end of the year or not. But, since that was one of his goals and he's defending champ at the Roger's Cup, I don't think he made this decision lightly. If he loses his #1 ranking then that's the way it goes. I'm not yet prepared to say that Nadal is going to tear up the summer hard courts. So he'll win another mickey mouse tournament on clay. Not a lot of points there, and not really proving anything as everyone already knows how good he is on clay. And there's no way he'll be #1 with only clay court titles.
Ya, thinking Nadal is going to catch up and even surpass Roger in the ranking is immature I think. Nadal still has done nothing big on a fast hard court, on which both Montreal and Cincinatti are played. So I don't believe he will actually win the titles there, maybe he will go deep but no way he will win them. Roger has maintaining the No.1 ranking one of his two goals this year, so he won't let it go easily. It's good to see him put his health always ahead of everything else. That means we are probably blessed to have him around at this level for longer than we might expect. Though it also means I have to wait for another THREE weeks (or even longer) to see him again :bigcry: I miss him already :bigcry: I hope it's nothing serious, bearing in mind this problem has been plagued him for half a year. Damn it :(

tennischick
07-22-2005, 05:01 AM
Nadal is spending too much of his time practicing on clay and chasing easy $$. i'm not worried about him catching up to my sweetie Fed ;)

does anyone know if TTC plans to re-broadcast the Wimbledon finals? i'm still trying to see the first 2 sets.

Daniel
07-22-2005, 06:31 AM
Get well Roger :D

TenHound
07-22-2005, 07:37 AM
I quit posting after getting trashed for being so freaked about his feet. This is zero surprise to me. If you watched his statistics, at least @the Majors, you could see how badly his feet were bothering him. He has said - might even be buried on a thread here - that his game starts w/his legs, to his serve, to the rest.

Thus, it should be no surprise that problems w/his feet & the consequent loss of feeling grounded, would throw off his serve as an immediate effect. Last yr. his 1st serve % was ~2/3. This yr., it started out low in first match, as he started playing his way into the Major. Then it peaked, and declined after ~3rd match. Things not as bad @Wimby as Paris. Did anyone notice his 1st serve % @Paris?? I don't think it got higher than ~60% & then it really went in the toilet.

Problems could be worse on hardcourts if he's wearing those contemporary shoes from hell have this new super grippy stuff on the bottom that causes the foot to adhere to a stop when the body has too much momentum to stop. Grass courts have their own shoes w/out that problem. (That's also why AA had to default match (IW?) for the first time in his career 'cuz his toe was so swollen.) Wonder if it's new this yr. - I read about it on another board. I suspect that's why he got it, as it could cause the plantar fascii to be overtaxed as his body had to stop so suddenly.

Surgery can take care of it - it did for LDav, if the shoes don't continually aggravate it. Racquets from heaven, shoes from hell!!

I don't see where people are saying he'll play Cincy when his fan mail just mentioned NYC.

Thank god he feels confident enough now to rest. I was hoping he'd sit out the clay court season to rest them when it first came up. If he wasn't advised to do more than take an extra week off then, it sounds like it's getting worse, which I expected/feared. Probably have to figure out now if rest will take care of it, or if surgery is necessary.

I'll really miss him & just pray that they get him fully restored between now & Australia. In the interim it doesn't matter much about Thugs. If Roger takes his time to do it right, he'll chew him up like a rototiller when he returns.

Would it help if we all lifted a glass of wine in toast & prayer to the Tennis Gods - to your feet, Roger. Years of magnificent returns!!

Dirk
07-22-2005, 09:44 AM
Roger doesn't have the same problem as Mirka and he could play Cincy. Let's just wait and see. Roger is just probably taking some precautions just like he did with the clay season. I am sure Roger is having his feet treated and he will be fine. I do think he will cut back on his hardcourt events in the future or until he gets his feet back to the point where he can play a lot. Let's not jump to conclusions. Roger will be very motivated to win Cincy.

Stevens Point
07-22-2005, 09:57 AM
Has anyone found any media article about his pulling out?? I feel it's weird because other media sources reported immediately when he'd pulled out of Rome this year due to the feet problem. I don't know why they are quiet this time... (Even Swiss media hasn't reported yet...) He hasn't told any media about it but only the fans through his website, and the media hasn't noticed yet?? :confused:

nobama
07-22-2005, 10:04 AM
I hope he's able to play cincy, but I also hope he's not too rusty. I don't think he needs a lot of practice on HC, but 6 weeks is a long time to be off. Hopefully he'll be able to get some practice time in with Rochey.

Mrs. B
07-22-2005, 10:25 AM
he's smart to be cautious about his feet, not overplaying and stuff, esp. on hardcourt.
i just want him to peak where it matters, and kick ass again at the USO. if not, i'm still one happy fan with the Wimbledon hattrick! :)

Gute Besserung, Roja! :bounce: