Roger news and articles [Archive] - Page 11 - MensTennisForums.com

Roger news and articles

Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Minnie
06-08-2005, 09:22 PM
It's from an article written by Jon Wertheim of CNN/SI.com(http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/jon_wertheim/06/07/post.french/index.html)


Thanks ever so!! :wavey:

ToanNguyen
06-08-2005, 09:25 PM
Greetings to everyone. Thanks for all the greetings. That's very sweet. :)
The article is as Soonha has posted. Thanks, Soonha.

Nathy
06-08-2005, 11:37 PM
Thank you Toan and welcome by the way :wavey: Enjoy posting here :)

lunahielo
06-09-2005, 12:22 AM
Thank you for the neat article...Toan!
It's about time someone in the media stood up for Roger on this.

Welcome~~~ :wavey:

Stevens Point
06-09-2005, 01:11 AM
Another award for Roger!!
From RF.com
MICHAEL-WESTPHAL-AWARD

Roger was awarded the "Michael-Westphal-Award" by the German "tennis magazin" at the "Gerry Weber Open" in Halle yesterday. It is given to personalities who have made a special effort for tennis within the last 12 months. It is the second time after 2003 that Roger has received the award.

A top-class jury including tennis celebrities such as Steffi Graf, Boris Becker and Michael Stich had nominated five candidates. It was then up to the readers of the magazine to decide - with 48% of the votes going to Roger. Tommy Haas came second with 21%, followed by Maria Sharapowa with 15%.

Thomas Kosinski, chief editor of "tennis magazin", said: "the readers did not only honour his success on court but also his social engagement for school children in South Africa."

Nocko
06-09-2005, 01:12 AM
Hi Toan :wavey: nice to see you!! and thank you for posting the good article. :worship:

Nathy
06-09-2005, 01:20 AM
Another award for Roger!!
From RF.com
MICHAEL-WESTPHAL-AWARD

Roger was awarded the "Michael-Westphal-Award" by the German "tennis magazin" at the "Gerry Weber Open" in Halle yesterday. It is given to personalities who have made a special effort for tennis within the last 12 months. It is the second time after 2003 that Roger has received the award.

A top-class jury including tennis celebrities such as Steffi Graf, Boris Becker and Michael Stich had nominated five candidates. It was then up to the readers of the magazine to decide - with 48% of the votes going to Roger. Tommy Haas came second with 21%, followed by Maria Sharapowa with 15%.

Thomas Kosinski, chief editor of "tennis magazin", said: "the readers did not only honour his success on court but also his social engagement for school children in South Africa."

Roger is the best EVERYWHERE :worship: Thanks Stevens for the article

Art&Soul
06-09-2005, 02:51 PM
Greetings to everyone. Thanks for all the greetings. That's very sweet. :)
The article is as Soonha has posted. Thanks, Soonha.

Hello Toan, thanks for posting such a great article :wavey: BTW Chao mung den voi forum, do you know? :p

ToanNguyen
06-09-2005, 03:15 PM
Hey Art& Sould
Thanks. And thanks again for the Vietnamese greetings. That's is so cool that you know. I am very impressed and happy. :) How did you know?
I am happy today since Roger won. Was depressed last week. I didn't even come into the forum to read for a couple of days after he lost. Now I am all calm down and relaxed.

RogiFan88
06-09-2005, 03:54 PM
Since nobody has started a Wimbledon thread yet:

Federer relishing first taste of real thing
By Sally Jones
(Filed: 30/03/2005)

World No 1 Roger Federer has revealed a novel element to his preparations for the defence of his Wimbledon title in June; a visit to Hampton Court for his first taste of real tennis, the royal, ancient and utterly dignified forerunner of that Johnny-come-lately game played amid huge hype and razzamatazz on the lawns of the All England Club each summer.

On June 15, just five days before the start of The Championships, while most of his rivals will be fine tuning their games on grass in Nottingham or Holland, Federer, with a little help from former world champion Chris Ronaldson, will be manhandling a heavy, asymmetric wooden racket, thrashing solid, handmade balls over a drooping net and off the walls and wooden porches called penthouses as he attempts to master the all-important cut stroke plus arcane specialities like the giraffe, the boomerang and the railroad serve.

Once he has absorbed the rudiments, the Swiss, partnering BBC sports presenter John Inverdale, will take on Ronaldson, the Hampton Court head professional and jeweller Neil Duckworth, both experienced players, in a doubles.

The session was originally designed as a promotional appearance for Federer's watch sponsor, Maurice Lacroix, the traditional Zurich-based firm which signed him as their brand ambassador last year.

Federer, whose defeat by Marat Safin in the semi-finals of the Australian Open in January ended an extraordinary 26-match winning streak, is adamant that his visit to Hampton Court is far more than just another corporate beano.

"I am fascinated by the history of tennis and learning about the old champions so I'm really looking forward to trying the historic game that gave us modern-day lawn tennis," he enthused. "I've always refused to play in the typical pro-am tennis events that many sponsors organise as I feel it's easy to lose your competitive edge if you're not playing seriously, but this is different. To play this subtle, challenging game at Hampton Court, the most famous real tennis court in the world, and learn from the most influential of all the modern-day players should be an amazing experience.''

Several former champions have also tried their hand at the ancient game, among them Stan Smith, the Woodies [Todd Woodbridge and Mark Woodforde], Martina Navratilova and even Gabriela Sabatini, in full Edwardian tennis gear.

The world real tennis champion, Robert Fahey, a charismatic Aussie, was once a junior international and Tasmanian Open lawn tennis champion who gave Pat Rafter a run for his money. Though unlike his counterparts in the modern game, for whom a million is just loose change, even on a good year he would be hard put to clear £100,000.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/

soonha
06-09-2005, 04:06 PM
Since nobody has started a Wimbledon thread yet:

Daniel has started the thread~~~> scroll down, you can find it around the middle of the list of threads.

Nathy
06-09-2005, 04:16 PM
Here it is ;) http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=40202

SUKTUEN
06-09-2005, 05:06 PM
why Roger do not post the new schedule of July to Dec?

Stevens Point
06-09-2005, 07:08 PM
Interview with Roger Federer
Donnerstag, 09.06.2005
*

Press-Conference with Roger Federer (SUI) after his win against Florian Mayer (GER).

?*Do you feel better on grass than after the Söderling-match on tuesdays?


!*Yes, definitely. I think I played a good first set, it was over in nearly no time. I made my way much easier. I was better mentally, I felt more secure even though I was broken twice. He took some big swings on the return, so there is no much you can do. I had to get in more first serve in these two games. But apart from this it was a good match played today from the baseline and the net without many errors.


?*What did you think about these many breaks in the second?


!*It was a bit frustrating, because I was broken, I broke back and was broken again. That’s not the usual thing that happens in a set, because when I serve I expect to win that game. Especially after these breaks I had to hang in there and had to play great to come back into the match.


?*Are you satisfied with your grass preparation until now?


!*Yes, I’m happy, I won two singles matches and one doubles match, the other doubles match was walk over – there I’m in the semis with one match, that’s not bad. Now I’m looking forward to the rest of the week. Especially my good footwork today showed me that I managed the transition from clay to grass. The week is getting a sort of interesting now. I don’t know my next opponent very well, I hit with him twice before. Another German, that’ll be interesting. I’m happy with the preparation, with my game. It’s been approving. Every day I get more match practice on the grass, the tournament is gonna help me for Wimbledon.


?*Comparing with your first win here in 2003, what is different?


!*The improvements in my game have been working for me especially over the last two years. I remember I came here two years ago and they told me, nobody has ever won Halle and then in Wimbledon. So you start wondering if this is the right choice. But the last two years I’ve proven that it also works for Wimbledon when you come to Halle before. So I’m happy for myself of course, but also for the tournament, because they can stand there with a larger chest and say “Look here, Halle is a good preparation tournament.


?*Was it hard to deal with the lost semi-final in Paris?


!*Not really, I get over such losses easier now because I win so much. It doesn’t ruin even my day. I recover therefore very quickly from the loss against Nadal. I know I didn’t play great that match, the whole tournament wasn’t fantastic, but it was solid and I worked through until the semis. That gives me confidence for next year going to the French. Losses are these days something I can really deal with without problems because with all the success I’ve had over the last two years a loss is sometimes very, very normal, especially in the knock-out-system in tennis.


?*Would you have liked to play against Nadal here?


!*Yes, of course. I was a little bit surprised that he lost. I still thought he would come through. I would have liked of course to play him here, especially after the French. It would have been just nice to play him on the grass to see how good he is. I don’t think we should overestimate his performance here. He obviously has his chance to get good results also in Wimbledon. Everyone in the top ten has the chance to win the title there.

Nathy
06-09-2005, 07:25 PM
ThanQ Stevens!!!! I was waiting for that!!! Roger looks stisfied and happy, that's good to know!! Go Ninja :banana:


?*Comparing with your first win here in 2003, what is different?

!*The improvements in my game have been working for me especially over the last two years. I remember I came here two years ago and they told me, nobody has ever won Halle and then in Wimbledon. So you start wondering if this is the right choice. But the last two years I’ve proven that it also works for Wimbledon when you come to Halle before. So I’m happy for myself of course, but also for the tournament, because they can stand there with a larger chest and say “Look here, Halle is a good preparation tournament.


:rolls: Always joking!! He is so nice :smooch:

Skyward
06-09-2005, 07:31 PM
Thanks Steven.

" I was better mentally, I felt more secure even though I was broken twice. "

Hopefully it's the truth and not just a brave face in front of the media. He should work on his serve. One break on grass can be crucial.

Shabazza
06-09-2005, 08:32 PM
thx stevens point (why this nick btw :confused: ) - nice interview, though I don't think everybody of the top 10 can win in wimbledon :angel:

Daniel
06-09-2005, 10:50 PM
HALLE, Germany (AFP) - Swiss world number one and top seed Roger Federer cruised into the quarter-finals of the 680,250-euro ATP grasscourt event.

ADVERTISEMENT

Federer, who has won the two previous editions of this event, scored an easy 6-2, 6-4 win over German Florian Mayer in just 58 minutes.

Federer will meet Philipp Kohlschreiber, also from Germany, in the quarter-finals.

Federer, in commanding form in the first set, suffered some jitters in the second, twice losing games on his serve.

"Despite these breaks, I felt an increasing confidence. I'm very happy with my form," said Federer, who goes on to Wimbledon, where he won in 2003 and 2004.

Argentinian fourth seed Guillermo Canas beat Serb qualifier Nenad Zimonjic in straight sets 6-3, 7-6 (7/3).

Juan-Carlos Ferrero of Spain overcame Germany's doubles specialist Alexander Waske, who had knocked out rising star Rafael Nadal in the first round, 7-6 (7/5), 6-7 (7/9), 6-3.

"2003 was really difficult for me. I was world number three but I was out for three months and then I broke my ribs and I lost points," said Ferrero. "I had to come back into competition and today I play better."

It wasn't all bad news for home fans, though, with veteran Rainer Schuttler going through 6-3, 6-3 against Dick Norman of Belgium. He will face Canas in the quarters.

Daniel
06-09-2005, 10:50 PM
Federer wins 26th straight on grass
Halle, Germany (Sports Network) - Roger Federer has won his last 26 matches on grass following Thursday's 6-2, 6-4 second-round handling of German crowd favorite Florian Mayer at the Gerry Weber Open -- a Wimbledon tune-up.

The top-seeded/world No. 1 Federer, who is closing in on his seventh ATP title of the year, is the two-time defending Halle champion, having beaten American Mardy Fish in last year's finale at Gerry Weber Stadium.

Federer is now an awesome 48-3 this year, but is still seeking his first Grand Slam title of 2005 after collecting three of the four major titles last season. The mighty Swiss lost to high-flying Spaniard Rafael Nadal in last week's French Open semifinals.

"I think I've made a good transition from clay to grass," Federer said.

Federer's quarterfinal opponent on Friday will be another German, Philipp Kohlschreiber.

Thursday's other seeded winner was No. 4 Argentine Guillermo Canas, who managed to get past Serbian qualifier Nenad Zimonjic 6-3, 7-6 (7-3).

In other second-round play, former world No. 1 Juan Carlos Ferrero snuck past German Alexander Waske 7-6 (9-7), 6-7 (9-11), 6-3 and German Rainer Schuettler shut down 6-foot-8 Belgian Dick Norman 6-3, 6-3. Waske stunned the world No. 3 French Open champion Nadal here on Wednesday.

Friday's other quarters will pit second-seeded Australian Open champion Marat Safin of Russia against Belgian Olivier Rochus, Canas versus Schuettler and seventh-seeded German Tommy Haas against the Spanish Ferrero.


06/09 13:59:28 ET

babsi
06-10-2005, 01:29 PM
Thank you,Steven and Daniel :) :)

Mrs. B
06-10-2005, 01:37 PM
*Was it hard to deal with the lost semi-final in Paris?


!*Not really, I get over such losses easier now because I win so much. It doesn’t ruin even my day. I recover therefore very quickly from the loss against Nadal. I know I didn’t play great that match, the whole tournament wasn’t fantastic, but it was solid and I worked through until the semis. That gives me confidence for next year going to the French. Losses are these days something I can really deal with without problems because with all the success I’ve had over the last two years a loss is sometimes very, very normal, especially in the knock-out-system in tennis.

:yeah: that's the right attitude, Roger!

SUKTUEN
06-10-2005, 02:40 PM
:worship: Thanks the articles~

OH MY GOD~~!!!!!!!!! :eek: :eek:
Daneil ~!!!! Why your avarat MORE and MORE SEXYYYYYYYY???? :hearts: :hearts: :lick:

RogiFan88
06-10-2005, 03:18 PM
Thanks Steven.

" I was better mentally, I felt more secure even though I was broken twice. "

Hopefully it's the truth and not just a brave face in front of the media. He should work on his serve. One break on grass can be crucial.
i agree but seems like he's already improved his serve [someone can verify for me] or sth else has improved in his QF match vs. Kohlschreiber. ;)

Nathy
06-10-2005, 03:26 PM
i agree but seems like he's already improved his serve [someone can verify for me] or sth else has improved in his QF match vs. Kohlschreiber. ;)

Yes he has

Haven't seen the whole match but of what I've seen (second set mostly) he had only one game without a good serve but anyway he didn't drop it... Otherwise he had a good serve ;)

SUKTUEN
06-10-2005, 03:31 PM
our King is become more good!!!

Stevens Point
06-11-2005, 12:10 AM
Today they were too lazy to make Roger's interview in English, so here you are. Very rough translation by Steven. :o

Press conference with Roger Federer (SUI) after his victory against Philipp Kohlschreiber(GER).

Q. Roger, did you feel comfortable on the Court?

A. Well, it was a very fast Match, I am happy with my game. It was the first time since long time that I didn't get broken, and that is of course always a good feeling. I saved some break oppotunities and I played with my service in one or other tricky situation. One would like to feel just like that, when you come out of such a match like today, especially on grass, if the service is so decisive. I have the feeling that I become a little better and better in each match that I play. Each time when I leave the court, I get better a little. Of course you feel good , if you won 3 matches in a row. My preparation was sure not the best, however, if you go this far in a tournament, you are of course very happy. Despite the short praparation time, which I had on grass this year, I am satisfied. My next opponent is Tommy Haas. I regard this hard test as joy instead.

Q. Is there anything what you must improve on grass?

A. Today I played good. I could have had to win one or another point. I had the feeling that I gave up some easy points, but that is quite normal. I can go with that. However, you have to be successful, if you face them. Each time when I had the danger of being broken, I was determined and played constantly good. Also when I had to serve well, I did so. I think it was a solid performance today. That is what I needed against a player like him.

Q. Did you get used to playing grass again after the long clay season?

A. Yes. The movements on grass are fully different from clay. But it is easier, because I am used to the conditions here in Halle. Add to this, a two set match is not so hard for the body. My fitness is much better than ever, that is also a reason that I played so constantly.

Q. Why do you always come back to the tournament in Halle?

A. I am happy to go away from big cities sometimes. I like Paris very much, I had a wonderful time there, but you feel somehow relieved when you come to Halle again. It is hier very quiet, it is a very small city, here you can't do many things. The tournament has a entirely special atmosphere. Let's take the hotel, which stands directly next to the center court. You can handle everything on foot, you will never find yourself in a traffic jam. You feel here like in a countryside and like a nature guy. Next week the world looks again totally different: 400 players in Wimbledon. Here in Halle, you ignore no player sometimes all day long. I like this atmosphere very much. This is the perfect mixture: one time the huge metropoles, and then a place like Halle where you can relax.

Q. How does your coach Tony Roche help you? Are you training everyday?

A. No, the first thing is to play matches everyday. I arrived late this year, that is why I practiced very intensively on grass on Monday before my first match. Since then, he has given me only some small tips. We will continue the training in the week after Halle, when we arrived in Wimbledon.

Q. Your next opponent is probably Tommy Haas, another German. Is this something special to play against German Players?

A. Yes, of course, I would like very much to play once again against Tommy, because our last duel was a long ago. The match was in 2002 in Paris-Berci before his long lasting injury, as long as I remember. It was a very important match for me, because I qualified for Shanghai Masters Cup with this win. Between now and then he made a comeback and plays very good again. That's why I am also looking forward to the match tomorrow. We know each other already for a long time. Earlier we were like young savage, but now we are established players. It will be really a interesting fight.

soonha
06-11-2005, 12:25 AM
Thank you, Stevens. Really appreciate what you've done for we poor souls who don't speak German :hug:

Nathy
06-11-2005, 12:31 AM
Well translated thank you Stevens :hug:

Roger seems relaxed and fine! Good to know :banana:

onm684
06-11-2005, 11:22 AM
Thanx, Stevens always.:worship:

It's fine to hear that Rogi relax on grass in Halle.:rocker: :dance:

SUKTUEN
06-11-2005, 04:30 PM
thanks~~

Stevens Point
06-11-2005, 08:28 PM
Good that they had the interview in English today so that no one had to sweat translating.

Interview with Roger Federer
Samstag, 11.06.2005

Press-Conference with Roger Federer (SUI) after his win against Thomas Haas (GER)

? Was your performance a perfect one on grass?
! Perhaps you can look at it this way, but I would say, that it was a good match. I played my best today, this is definitely how you want to feel just before Wimbledon. It’s good, I’m happy that I’m already on such a good level so early. I’m surprised about myself again, because I came here to Halle and after a few matches I’m already feeling great. I’ve a good feeling, also my movement is good, especially my service got much more consistent. I really served very consistent, I think I had no lapses today. The tie break in the second was unbelievably close, he had set points, I had match points – I’m very pleased to get through in two sets. I think I could have won the match easier, because I missed some chances early in the second. But in the end I still should be happy that I won it. I had fun today and I’m feeling quite convenient. Besides, it would be a little bit strange to say I don’t feel good, because I’m two times champion here and haven’t lost any grass court match for sometimes.

? Was that a kind of tie breaker that makes you even tougher?
! You’re absolutely tensed in such moments, because every point is so important, you’re not allowed to make one mistake anymore. Eventually one or the other will make a double fault at any time, because you played so many points and the pressure is so high. Unfortunately it was the match point and luckily it wasn’t me.

? Did you get nervous in such a tie break when Tommy had his set points?
! Yes, but let me explain why: In the beginning I played very solid, Tommy had no chance to come back in the match. Then I naturally became a little bit nervous when he was able to start serving in the second. Naturally you’re a bit frightened that he might be able to come back, because you played perfect until that point and still have in mind that you might be forced to play a third set. That would have been hard mentally for me.

? Are you the top favourite for Wimbledon?
! I would say so, perhaps together with Lleyton. We both are the toughest on the grass. But anyway you’ve got to take care, because there are also some other dangerous players around. I think the seeds are happy that it’s over five sets sometimes.

? Does it affect your game that the crowd supported Tommy that much?
! No, for sure not. The crowd is very fair and it’s normal that they support their people. In the end I can win this title 15 times, this will not change the support for the Germans. I would be concerned if it wouldn’t be this way. I was happy to see many more people today than yesterday. That was a little bit disappointing, because it was the quarter final day. For me this day is the most exciting one, because you are get to see enough great matches, so I’m happy to see more people here today although the weather wasn’t great. By the way the court is exactly the same even when the roof is closed, and it’s a good atmosphere there.

? Who would you prefer as your opponent tomorrow?
! I would prefer Canas, because he’s easier to fight, you can anticipate his game more easily, on the other hand with Marat you never know… Marat and me, we had some tough matches lately, so for the crowd and the tournament it’ll be of course more interesting, when he comes through today. Under this perspective Marat will be an exciting opponent tomorrow.

lunahielo
06-11-2005, 08:44 PM
It's good to see him saying this~~
I had fun today . :)

ytben
06-11-2005, 08:44 PM
Stevens Point san, again thank you for the interview! :kiss:

Nathy
06-11-2005, 11:53 PM
:bowdown: :smooch: Thank you so much Stevens :smooch: :bowdown:

Skyward
06-12-2005, 12:34 AM
Thanks for the interview, Stevens. :)

" I really served very consistent, I think I had no lapses today. "

This is very good. Now Roger, please, fix your fh.

" Did you get nervous in such a tie break when Tommy had his set points?
! Yes, but let me explain why: In the beginning I played very solid, Tommy had no chance to come back in the match. Then I naturally became a little bit nervous when he was able to start serving in the second. Naturally you’re a bit frightened that he might be able to come back, because you played perfect until that point and still have in mind that you might be forced to play a third set. That would have been hard mentally for me."

Don't think too much, Roger. And if you do, think positevely. When you win the first set, you are supposed to put even more pressure on your opponent and run away with the match. That's why we call you Federer Express. :)

Daniel
06-12-2005, 01:47 AM
HALLE, Germany (Reuters) - World number one Roger Federer eased through to the Halle Open final with a 6-4, 7-6 win over Germany's Tommy Haas Saturday.

ADVERTISEMENT

Explore homes by area, price range, bedrooms and bathrooms.

State
SelectAlaskaAlabamaArizonaArkansasCaliforniaColora doConnecticutWashington D.C.DelawareFloridaGeorgiaHawaiiIowaIdahoIllinoisI ndianaKansasKentuckyLouisianaMassachusettsMaryland MaineMichiganMinnesotaMissouriMississippiMontanaNo rth CarolinaNorth DakotaNebraskaNew HampshireNew JerseyNew MexicoNew YorkNevadaOhioOklahomaOregonPennsylvaniaRhode IslandSouth CarolinaSouth DakotaTennesseeTexasUtahVirginiaVermontWashingtonW est VirginiaWisconsinWyoming






Top seed Federer, going for a third successive title at the pre- Wimbledon grass-court tournament, will play Australian Open champion Marat Safin in Sunday's final after the burly Russian overpowered Guillermo Canas of Argentina 6-3, 4-6, 6-2.

Wimbledon champion Federer produced a superb display of serve and volley tennis to beat local favorite Haas, extending his three-year winning streak on grass to 28 matches.

"I played my best today of all the matches so far and that's exactly how you want to feel just before Wimbledon," said Federer, who only dropped three points on his serve in the first set and did not give Haas any break points.

"My movement is good, my serve has been much more consistent and mentally I'm feeling stronger," he added. "I've achieved how I wanted to feel and I hope I can keep the streak alive."

Federer said he was confident of winning the title again even though Safin beat the Swiss in their last match, a five-set thriller in the semi-finals in Australia earlier this year. They have never played each other on grass.

"On the grass you can't tell how good he is," Federer said. "He's always been struggling the last two years."

Safin, who has been complaining of a troublesome left knee since the Indian Wells Pacific Life Open in March, said he needed to be aggressive to have any chance.

"You have to be really focused and really confident with your game because otherwise you have no chance against Roger," Safin told a news conference.

"If I can hold my serve and put a little bit of pressure on his then I think I have a chance."

DOUBLE FAULT

Local favorite Haas, roared on by the crowd in the 12,500-seater Gerry Weber stadium, fought well to take the second set to a tie break against Federer, but double faulted at 9-10 to hand victory to the 23-year-old Swiss.

"It just shows again how calm he stays and it's very motivating as well to see how he does that," Haas said.

"He served tremendously today, always finding the line when he needed to and didn't give me many chances to break him."

Federer is also going for a third successive title at the All England Club tournament in London starting on June 20.

Daniel
06-12-2005, 01:47 AM
HALLE, Germany (AFP) - Wimbledon champion Roger Federer will face Australian Open winner Marat Safin in the final of the ATP grasscourt tournament here on Sunday with the Swiss world number one eyeing a third title in a row.

ADVERTISEMENT

Federer enjoyed a 6-4, 7-6 (11/9) win over Germany's Tommy Haas while Russian second seed Safin, who insists he does not have the game for grass, beat fourth-seeded Argentinian Guillermo Canas 6-3, 4-6, 6-2.

Federer eased through the first set in just 33 minutes before both men battled a nervy tiebreak.

The Swiss saved two set points while Haas fought off two match points but the German double-faulted to hand Federer the match.

"Match point, set point, match point, set point - it was as close as it gets," said a relieved Federer.

"I am happy I got through in two sets as Tommy played very well and I'm happy at the way I am hitting the ball. I was consistent and I didn't give him any chances."

Federer, building up to what he hopes will be a third successive Wimbledon title next month, now faces Safin who beat him in the semi-finals at the Australian Open in January.

The Russian has lost six of his eight career meetings with Federer but the two have never met on grass.

Daniel
06-12-2005, 01:48 AM
HALLE, Germany - Top-ranked Roger Federer beat Tommy Haas 6-4, 7-6 (9) in the semifinals Saturday to move within one victory of capturing his third straight Gerry Weber Open title. His opponent in the final will be Marat Safin, one of only three men to beat Federer this year.

ADVERTISEMENT

The second-seeded Russian beat fourth-seeded Guillermo Canas of Argentina 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 in the other semifinal.

By beating the seventh-seeded German, Federer extended his winning streak on grass to 28 matches, the second longest in the open era after Bjorn Borg's 41 in a row from 1976-81.

Federer is using the $800,000 Halle event to prepare for Wimbledon, where he will be seeking his third straight title.

"I played my best (match) of the week, and that's how you want to feel before Wimbledon," Federer said. "I served very consistently, I got off to a quick start and I won my service games comfortably."

The two-time defending champion fought off two set points in the tiebreaker and wasted two match points before overcoming Haas.

The dramatic tiebreaker ended on an anticlimactic note, with Haas double-faulting.

"You get a little tense in the tiebreaker, because there is so much pressure one every point," Federer said.

On his first match point, Federer hit a volley just long. On his second chance to clinch it, he hit a backhand into the net.

Federer fired an ace to gain his third match point and won after 1 hour, 37 minutes on Haas' double-fault.

The victory raised Federer's record this year to 50-3. His last loss was on clay in last week's French Open semifinals.

For the second straight match, Federer was not broken and Haas won only three points on the Swiss star's serve in the first set.

"He served tremendously, hitting the lines, great placement," Haas said. "He played the big points incredibly."

Safin had trouble closing out the match against Canas. He had to overcome three break points and squandered three match points before finally ending things with an ace.

"It's been a tough week for me," said Safin, who has been bothered by a sore knee. "But I am satisfied with my game."

Safin snapped Federer's 26-match winning streak earlier this year in the semifinals at the Australian Open, but that wasn't on grass.

"If I can put pressure on his serve, I'd have a chance," Safin said. "It's going to be very hard because he has been playing amazingly."

SUKTUEN
06-12-2005, 10:52 AM
thanks

Shabazza
06-12-2005, 12:26 PM
thx Daniel and Stevens Point :)

Stevens Point
06-12-2005, 10:40 PM
Congratulations, Roger!!! :D :worship:

Interview with Roger Federer
Sonntag, 12.06.2005

Press-Conference with Roger Federer (SUI) after his win against Marat Safin (RUS)

? Please comment this second defending of the title in Halle?
! I’m pretty happy about this title, it’s a wonderful feeling and a kind of relief. Having dealt with the defeat in Paris so well, this is surprising for me, too. It’s not normal to come here with less grass preparation and win the tournament in the end. Marat was really hard to fight against, and it’s not normal for me to win such a match. You saw it when he served how much pace he can get on it – he’s so dangerous. This makes him very hard to return. I really thought I did a good job today, keeping myself cool even though I lost the second set and was quite close to win that set and the match basically. So I’m very pleased now: It was a good performance all week long, it’s exactly the way I want to feel heading into Wimbledon.

? Did you fear to lose the match after the tie break in the second set?
! Yes, of course. There is always a kind of respect for these situations, the same against Tommy in the semis. Tiebreak is always a kind of roulette: The one who gets the better start has big chances to win. You always need a little bit of luck to win tie breaks. Fortunately I was able to come through in the third.

? Do you think you can play any better on grass?
! I always feel like I can improve, I think there were moments when I could have done better, for example I can serve and return better. Grass court tennis depends on a few points and if you miss those like me in the beginning of the match, when I had some opportunities but missed a few shots, it shows I can definitely play better.

? You won here three times in a row, will you come back next year?
! It depends on how it goes in Wimbledon. But if I keep on winning Wimbledon after I won Halle every year I obviously come back. And if you lose first round then you put more thoughts in it, of course. But I usually always come back to the places where I have to defend titles, and especially in Germany I have some incredibly records as well concerning the matches I won in a row in Hamburg, Munich and Halle. It’s really been quite a run in Germany.

? Where did the high quality of the match come from?
! I think the high quality was the serving from both guys. It was really tough to get into the games. When you missed the opportunity almost on the first or second point, the game was over. It was sort of what I expected I would say, but it was quite tougher than I really thought it would be against Marat on grass. Although we’ve had some good matches the last three we’ve played, so I’ve always knew how tough Marat is. But my record is good against him, and that is always good to know by heading into those sorts of matches. I’ve beaten him so much times in a row now, so that’s given me more confidence against him than maybe against others. I had my chance to win in two, but also winning in three was anyway a good performance.

? How will Marat’s chances in Wimbledon be?
! Better than the last few years, because the last few years haven’t been quite good for him. He always went into Wimbledon already quite pessimistic. When he lost he was always relieved, he forgot about Wimbledon and concentrated on the American summer. I think this final will fence his chances well doing well and doing a breakthrough over there, because he has really shown some good performances on grass this week.

? How do you go into Wimbledon? Feeling pressure or being confident?
! I feel confident, but there can always be a tough draw, there can always be a shock loss in the first round. I don’t really think about it, that’s what I was more concerned abaout last year defending my first time Wimbledon title. Now it’s easier for me to deal with the situation than last year.

Shabazza
06-12-2005, 11:13 PM
! I feel confident, but there can always be a tough draw, there can always be a shock loss in the first round. I don’t really think about it, that’s what I was more concerned abaout last year defending my first time Wimbledon title. Now it’s easier for me to deal with the situation than last year.
Saying that, he played pretty well last year despite the pressure ;)
If he can deal with it easier now...even better :)
nice interview thx stevens

Nathy
06-12-2005, 11:27 PM
Thanks Steven, one more time :hug:

I’ve beaten him so much times in a row now, so that’s given me more confidence against him than maybe against others.

:awww:

Roger, have you already forgotten that you lost against him in the AO SF :scratch: ?

Shabazza
06-12-2005, 11:39 PM
Thanks Steven, one more time :hug:



:awww:

Roger, have you already forgotten that you lost against him in the AO SF :scratch: ?

:lol: Maybe it's better this way, it was a nice match though! ;)

Nathy
06-12-2005, 11:54 PM
:lol: Maybe it's better this way, it was a nice match though! ;)

Yeah for sure but he didn't win :p

Dear Roger forget about what I've just said okay.. :o :p

Jimena
06-13-2005, 12:44 AM
Roger, have you already forgotten that you lost against him in the AO SF :scratch: ?

It's called denial.

Or, you know, it might just be a translation issue. :)

Lady Natalia
06-13-2005, 12:47 AM
Roger must be considering the two wins today as " much times in a row". Well, he's partly correct..he beat him in a row.

Nathy
06-13-2005, 01:00 AM
Roger must be considering the two wins today as " much times in a row". Well, he's partly correct..he beat him in a row.

Ohhhhh I didn't thought about that!! Yeah you're absolutely right!! Thanks and Roger, forgive me :worship:

Lady Natalia
06-13-2005, 02:35 AM
http://www.blogthings.com/acro/acronymquiz.php
This is a cool website. Tells you what your name means. Here is Roger.

ROGER
R is for Refined
O is for Orderly
G is for Goofy
E is for Emotional
R is for Revolutionary

Nathy
06-13-2005, 02:42 AM
http://www.blogthings.com/acro/acronymquiz.php
This is a cool website. Tells you what your name means. Here is Roger.

ROGER
R is for Refined
O is for Orderly
G is for Goofy
E is for Emotional
R is for Revolutionary

:worship:

RogiFan88
06-13-2005, 04:00 AM
On TTC [Mon. June 13 7.30pm ET]:

Keeping time with R Federer:

Swiss watchmaker Maurice Lacroix sponsors a question and answer session with Roger Federer, hosted by famed interviewer James Lipton. Lipton covers all topics with Federer, from how he started his career to questions such as “What is your most memorable win?” and “What is your favorite curse word?”
http://www.thetennischannel.com/programs/SpecialsDetail.aspx?id=1236

Next Showing
Current time zone is : Eastern . To change your time settings, click here .

View other episodes
6/13/2005 7:30 PM

6/14/2005 11:00 PM

6/15/2005 3:30 PM

6/18/2005 12:00 AM

6/18/2005 3:00 PM

Lady Natalia
06-13-2005, 04:07 AM
This interview was done right before the US or right after the US?

SUKTUEN
06-13-2005, 07:37 AM
thanks

babsi
06-13-2005, 03:13 PM
Thanks for posting :)

Puschkin
06-14-2005, 09:48 AM
Federer is high on fitness but low on patience
World No1 in fine fettle physically but uncharacteristically unsettled

Alan Pilkington in Halle
Saturday June 11, 2005
The Guardian

There are two ways of viewing Roger Federer's appearance in his fourth successive Halle semi-final. The obvious one is to suggest the world No1 is on the same springboard for Wimbledon that he used successfully in 2003 and 2004, and his 6-3, 6-4 win over Philipp Kohlschreiber yesterday did nothing to detract from that view.
The other is that he is a little less settled than in the past two years. Evidence for that came on Tuesday in his uncharacteristic insistence on seeing a supervisor over a dodgy line call in his three-set first-round victory over Robin Soderling, and his refusal yesterday to answer any questions in his native Swiss-German.

In mitigation this is one of tennis's most helpful men, who must be entitled to the occasional "no". But something about the Federer aura is a little uncomfortable this year and, if Tommy Haas can today reproduce his form of yesterday as he beat Juan Carlos Ferrero 6-2, 7-5, the Wimbledon champion will have a tough test.

Certainly the challenge posed by the 71st-ranked Kohlschreiber was not one to offer an accurate measure of Federer's form. The Swiss did what he had to, holding all his service games and breaking once in each set to cruise to victory in 62 minutes.

That short match suited Federer after his six long contests on the Paris clay. "Playing on grass for 45 minutes to 1 hours is easier on the body," he said. "Not only am I feeling fit but I am really fit. I've had no muscle pains, my body feels better than ever and that's one of the reasons I'm playing so consistently at the top."

Marat Safin moved into the semi-finals in the draw's bottom half by beating Olivier Rochus 6-4, 7-6. Safin walked out of Wimbledon last year after a first-round defeat by Dmitry Tursunov that left him saying he hated grass and never wanted to play on it again but he looked impressive on the Gerry Weber Open's second court, which plays closer to Wimbledon than the main stadium here.

The Russian still cares enough about his performance on grass to have smashed a racket when he missed a break-back chance in the second set and to have argued vehemently with the umpire after a call against him in the tie-break.

Later Safin complained about a condition known as jumper's knee but it did not stop him winning a late-afternoon doubles. Perhaps the knee is preventing him from admitting that, once he gets his head around grass, he rather likes it. A victory over Guillermo Cañas in today's semi-final and it could be the start of a beautiful friendship.

Source: http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1504101,00.html

Well, Mr. Pilkington, did Roger shut your moth on Sunday?

Puschkin
06-14-2005, 09:51 AM
More from Mr. Pilkington:

Federer full steam ahead as Safin finds state of grace
Alan Pilkington in Halle
Monday June 13, 2005
The Guardian

Much as Roger Federer's third successive Gerry Weber Open title, his 29th successive win on grass, and 20th consecutive win in a final are all admirable achievements, the most exciting revelation to come out of yesterday's Halle final was the emergence of Marat Safin as a genuine grasscourt player.
The mercurial Muscovite went to Wimbledon ill-prepared last year, and after losing in the first round said he never wanted to play on grass again. The wise counsel of his coach Peter Lundgren has brought him back with a more focused approach, and though he lost 6-4, 6-7, 6-4 yesterday, the fact that he could come so close has clearly told him something.

"It's my best performance on grass," he said. "I played against the best player in the world, and I was really close to winning. I knew it would only take two or three points to decide the whole match, and that's what happened. We were both playing well. I'm satisfied that I was so close."

It was a high-quality final, the two men not quite recreating the drama of their five-set Australian Open semi-final in January, but rediscovering much of the quality. On a grass court that does justice to its British groundsman Phil Thorn, both players hit sweetly struck groundstrokes from the worn baselines as a capacity 12,300 crowd purred its admiration.

But it was Federer's decision to come to the net at the crucial moments that made the difference. No longer the pure serve-volleyer he was when he first came to Halle six years ago, he went forward much more than in recent matches, especially once he had broken Safin in the third game of the final set. The most pleasing aspect for the champion was that the lapses that punctuated his first three matches here were largely absent.

"I really thought I did a good job by keeping my cool," said Federer, an unusual admission for one normally so unruffled. "Even though I lost the second set on the breaker, I felt I was very close to winning that set, so I'm very pleased. A good performance all week long, and that's what you want to feel heading into Wimbledon."

Federer did lose his cool at 3-3 in the second set, opting for a long discussion with the umpire after the trembler device that calls "lets" failed to register on a Federer serve. That game he faced two break points, but saved them, only to lose the set on an 8-6 tie-break.

Whether Safin can turn this into form at Wimbledon remains to be seen. He is due to play an exhibition match this week, but will today see a specialist in Milan for his "jumper's knee" inflammation. If he can recreate his Halle form next week, he could be one of Wimbledon's surprise packages.

Source: http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1505130,00.html

lunahielo
06-14-2005, 11:16 AM
Priginally posted by Lady Natalia
This interview was done right before the US or right after the US?

I thought this was when it was made, too.
I watched it last night, though, and it was another one~~made in Miami this year.
He talked a bit about the last set of the Safin match at the AO ~~2005.
(Said it was one of his most memorable sets...laughing when he said this)
Charming interview!!

Thanks for the articles, Puschkin.

babsi
06-14-2005, 12:31 PM
Thanks,Puschkin :)
The british press can be something else - but they are allways nice torwards Roger :)

RogiFan88
06-14-2005, 02:05 PM
As if Rogi is the ONLY player who questions lines or line calls or umpires... ahem...

SUKTUEN
06-14-2005, 03:02 PM
thanks~ Roger show his Strong by "Cup"~!!!

Puschkin
06-14-2005, 04:11 PM
As if Rogi is the ONLY player who questions lines or line calls or umpires... ahem...

Don't take it personal RogiFan88, ;) it is just a journalist.

Skyward
06-14-2005, 04:42 PM
As if Rogi is the ONLY player who questions lines or line calls or umpires... ahem...

But he's among very few players who do it once or twice per year. That's why a rare occasion of him questioning calls becomes a STORY. :rolleyes:

SUKTUEN
06-14-2005, 05:04 PM
Roger will Be a legend~!! :bounce: :bounce:

RogiFan88
06-14-2005, 06:31 PM
Don't take it personal RogiFan88, ;) it is just a journalist.

I'm not taking it personally... it's just a Skyward said... when Rogi does it [occasionally or less] it makes the headlines... and we all know that headlines sell papers, no more no less... I just hate when people read these headlines and believe every word of them. :p

1sun
06-15-2005, 03:53 PM
Federer remains untouchable
By Caroline Cheese


Clutching at straws it may be, but there is talk that Roger Federer could be vulnerable at Wimbledon this year.


The thinking goes that the 23-year-old heads to SW19 without a Grand Slam title this season, and with his world number one spot under threat from Spanish teenager Rafael Nadal.

Nadal it was that ended Federer's hopes of a maiden French Open title in the semi-finals, while Marat Safin stopped him at the same stage at the Australian Open.

Both were celebrating their birthdays on the day they beat Federer.

But just in case anyone is starting to believe the fates might have abandoned Federer heading into Wimbledon, Thomas Johansson offers this stark reality check.

Johansson faced Federer at Wimbledon a year ago in the third round and the former Australian Open champion had good reason to feel confident.

A seasoned grass-court player, he had won the Nottingham Open for the second time in his career just a week before the tournament began.

FEDERER ON GRASS
Titles: 5
Career record:
Won 45 - Lost 11
Wimbledon record:
Won 18 - Lost 5

But the match, billed as an early test of Federer's title credentials, ended with the Swiss celebrating a routine 6-3 6-4 6-3 victory.

"I actually felt like I played a good match - but I didn't have a chance," Johansson told BBC Sport.

"That's pretty frustrating," he added, with typical Swedish understatement.

"You can play your best, you can do all the right things and you still feel like you don't have a chance."

And if Johansson, a Grand Slam winner and accomplished grass-court player, feels he has no chance, then what hope does anyone else have?

Johansson explained: "The way I felt last year is how most players feel when they face Roger Federer on grass.

"That is why he is by far the favourite to win Wimbledon this year."

It is hardly surprising that Federer holds such a mental stranglehold over his peers.

He is unbeaten on grass since 2002, winning 29 straight matches, the most recent a three-set defeat of Marat Safin that won him a third successive title in Halle, Germany.

Not surprisingly, Federer is feeling pretty good about his chances of making it a hat-trick of titles at the All England Club.


Roger Federer

"I feel confident about Wimbledon," he said.

"There can always be a shock loss in the first round, but I don't really think about it - I was more concerned about that last year when I was defending my Wimbledon title for the first time.

"Now it's easier for me to deal with the situation."

And there aren't many players Federer is worried about facing at SW19.

''I regard Hewitt, Roddick, Safin and now Nadal as the big dangers at Wimbledon,'' he said.

In Halle, Federer noted that he didn't find defeats too hard to bear because there are "so few of them".

Remarks such as those have seen Federer accused of arrogance - but given his record on grass, it is hard to argue.

Shabazza
06-15-2005, 04:38 PM
"I actually felt like I played a good match - but I didn't have a chance," Johansson told BBC Sport.
"That's pretty frustrating," he added, with typical Swedish understatement.
"You can play your best, you can do all the right things and you still feel like you don't have a chance."
Johansson explained: "The way I felt last year is how most players feel when they face Roger Federer on grass.

"That is why he is by far the favourite to win Wimbledon this year."

:yeah:
You say it ToJo :worship: - thx for the article sunny - can't wait Wimbledon to begin :)

Puschkin
06-15-2005, 05:02 PM
Federer remains untouchable
By Caroline Cheese

In Halle, Federer noted that he didn't find defeats too hard to bear because there are "so few of them".

Remarks such as those have seen Federer accused of arrogance - but given his record on grass, it is hard to argue.

OMG: stop this arrogance crap, sorry, this is not adressed to 1sun ;) , but to the journalist.

What do they expect him to say, that he spends sleepless nights fretting about three defeats in 6 months. :mad:

1sun
06-15-2005, 05:11 PM
OMG: stop this arrogance crap, sorry, this is not adressed to 1sun ;) , but to the journalist.

What do they expect him to say, that he spends sleepless nights fretting about three defeats in 6 months. :mad:
i know exactly wot u mean and also the part baout his no1 rankin under threat by nadal.first of al nadal is not even no2 hes no3 and plus federer is so far ahead of hewit its stupid to say tha nadal is a threat.i was abit disappointed about that and the point u made.but stil a good article.
but i dont like the idea of there being an article that sugests that other people suggest his losin his touch coz thats the most stupid, stupid comment ever and he clearly isnt.

1sun
06-15-2005, 05:17 PM
:yeah:
You say it ToJo :worship: - thx for the article sunny - can't wait Wimbledon to begin :)
no worries.

SUKTUEN
06-15-2005, 06:00 PM
thanks

*M*
06-16-2005, 01:18 AM
http://sport.independent.co.uk/tennis/story.jsp?story=647121

Countdown to the Wimbledon Championships: Federer, the timeless champion who can only get better
John Roberts finds the 23-year-old defending men's title holder proud of his remarkable achievements, but all too aware of his weaknesses
16 June 2005

I wish that I could fly Into the sky So very high Just like a dragonfly

Roger Federer not only hums Lenny Kravitz's opening line from "Fly Away", he lives it. The 23-year-old Swiss is the world's No 1 tennis player, the Wimbledon champion for the past two years, Laureus World Sportsman of the Year and United Nations Ambassador for the Year of Sport. He is also acknowledged, by peers and legends alike, as potentially the best player who ever lived.

Andre Agassi, one of only five men in history to have won all four Grand Slam singles titles, is unstinting in his praise: "There's probably not a department in Federer's game that he couldn't be considered the best in that department. The guy plays from the back of the court, from the front of the court.

"You watch him play [Lleyton] Hewitt, and everybody marvels at Hewitt's speed and you start to realise, 'Is it possible Federer moves even better?' Then you watch him play Andy [Roddick] and you go, 'Andy has a big forehand. Is it possible Federer's forehand is the best in the game?' You watch him at the net, you watch him serve-volley somebody that doesn't return so well, and you put him up there with the best in every department. You see him play from the ground against those that play from the ground for a living, and argue that he does it better than anybody."

Splendid fellow though he is, Federer must guard against an onset of hubris as he reaches for the garlands. So far, he has been able to sift through the compliments without showing many signs of letting them go to his head.

"I think the consistency I have shown over the last two years really has proven to everybody, also especially to myself, that I can do it," he says. "The important moments, like in finals and against the other top 10 players, are when I actually play my best. That's what usually the all-time greats do.

"Because I play the style I play, the one-handed backhand, and varying my game so much, I get a lot of attention from the former players. It's nice to hear, but we'll see maybe in 10 years how good I'm really going to be. The career I've had so far has been terrific."

Statistics are not the only measure of Federer's immense talent, but the fact is that he has been defeated only three times in his last 71 matches (see panel). He won three of the four Grand Slam singles titles last year, and is unbeaten in his last 20 finals, an ATP record. He has won 14 matches in a row at Wimbledon since falling to Mario Ancic, of Croatia, in the first round in 2002.

Losing his Australian Open title to Marat Safin in January hit Federer hard, but he worked the disappointment out of his system by winning in Rotterdam a fortnight later.

He took the loss to the 18-year-old Richard Gasquet in Monte Carlo in his stride, frustrated at failing to put away a match point but ready to rest his sore feet as the Tour moved on to Rome without him. In Paris, he was disappointed with his form after losing to the unrelenting Rafael Nadal in fading light.

The sport's most complete player does have weaknesses in his game. "Yes, of course," he says. "My forehand is better than my backhand, but it's also a problem if you have everything the same, which everybody says I have. But I know where I'm better and where I'm weaker, but that's very normal for every player.

"With me it's my backhand, and my return a little bit at times, and I don't get many aces. It totally depends. Otherwise it's the volley. Form on the day. Sometimes it could be that the court lets you down. Maybe you're tired, And sometimes you don't know why."

Jim Courier was a "blue collar" world No 1, who, lacking Federer's skills, literally worked his way to the top. "I look back more on the things that I did on the weeks off with wonder," Courier recalls, "because that's where the real work happened. Those weeks off were brutal. As I matured in my career, I recognised that rest was a very important part of my regime that I had omitted in the early stages."

Federer, who tended to overplay in the past, has learned to rest between engagements. "I need to have my rest," he says, having decided to miss Switzerland's Davis Cup tie against the Netherlands in March. "I could have continued practising [that week], but then I'm scared of a burn-out situation. So I have to take my time off, and I plan very carefully.

"I feel I work hard. Maybe other guys work harder. I believe that there are definitely guys out there [that do], but I have the feeling I'm giving all the time I have for condition training."

As he prepares for his attempt to add his name to those of Pete Sampras, Bjorn Borg and Fred Perry by winning a hat-trick of Wimbledon titles, Federer is aware of Tim Henman's misgivings about the way the lawns have been grown to play slower. "I still call it a quick court," he says. "Otherwise the Spaniards would be winning that, too. It's because the movement is so different and difficult at Wimbledon that makes it quicker."

After defeating Federer at the Australian Open, Safin said he thought he knew the secret of Federer's success. "He knows so many secrets, it's amazing," Federer says, smiling. "He knows everything. I'm just joking. He's a good guy. [Juan Carlos] Ferrero said he knows the secret, Hewitt knows the secret, they all know it, but I'm still on top."

What is the secret? Federer smiles again. "You'll have to ask them," he says, "because I have no clue how to beat myself - I'm such a good player, you know!"

There is no secret, of course. Federer just happens to be the best. "It depends obviously on the form on the day," he says, "and I had unbelievable form on the day against top players last year. Of course, I cannot expect every time I face a top 10 player that I'm going to beat him. And I think they know that."

Roger and out: How to beat the unbeatable

Only three players have defeated Roger Federer since the Czech Thomas Berdych beat him in the second round at the Olympic Games last August. Here they explain how they did it.

Marat Safin

Who beat Federer 5-7, 6-4, 5-7,

7-6, 9-7 in the semi-finals of the Australian Open on 27 January 2005

At the beginning, playing Roger, I was very nervous. I didn't feel comfortable at all. In the second set I started to find my game, and I knew already what he doesn't like and where to push him, and in the end it worked.

I was a little bit lucky [to save the match point]. I had no other choice but to lob him from the drop-shot, and the only chance he had was to play a shot between the legs...

With Roger [you always have to remember], when he is playing bad, he has such skills that it doesn't make a big difference. He can come up with some great shots and his lowest level of tennis is pretty decent.

Richard Gasquet

The French 18-year-old beat Federer 6-7, 6-2, 7-6 in the quarter-finals of the Monte Carlo Masters on 15 April - after also saving a match point

Roger played very well in the beginning, then he started becoming a bit nervous.

I was able to return well and to play cross-court, which bothered him. I was surprised that he was missing his returns on my second serve.

I was dominating in the rallies. I played very well at the end of the second set. I was returning well. I was confident.

At the end of the third set I became a bit tired and a bit tense, but I played a beautiful tie-break.

Rafael Nadal

The hard-hitting Spanish prodigy marked his 19th birthday by beating Federer 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 in the semi-finals of the French Open on 3 June

I started very well, with a good rhythm. That's what I wanted. It's very important to be able to break early. Then, with a second break, I could see that the first set was looking good for me.

He played very well in the second set. When he plays very well, I can do nothing. He has an unbelievable forehand, and when his forehand went to my backhand, it was very difficult for me.

In the third set, I improved in my game.

In the fourth set, the light was not the best. I thought we would try to finish the set, and if he won the set, go to sleep, and play tomorrow.

lunahielo
06-16-2005, 01:40 AM
Thank you, *M*~~
You always post such interesting articles.

(I hope your personal life is going better~) :hug:

Nocko
06-16-2005, 01:48 AM
:worship: Thanks *M* :worship:

Daniel
06-16-2005, 04:58 AM
thanks :)

Daniel
06-16-2005, 06:55 AM
Wimbledon seeds set

Federer could meet Roddick again in final

By KRYSTYNA RUDZKI



LONDON (AP) - Roger Federer and Andy Roddick were seeded 1-2 for Wimbledon on Wednesday, setting up a possible rematch of last year's final.

Federer, a two-time defending champion, got the top seeding in line with his world No. 1 ranking.

Roddick was seeded two spots above his ATP ranking, ahead of 2002 champion Lleyton Hewitt of Australia and French Open champion Rafael Nadal.

Hewitt was seeded No. 3, with Nadal - who has little experience on grass - at No. 4.

Federer beat Roddick 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 6-4 in last year's final. He has four Grand Slam titles. Roddick won the 2003 U.S. Open.

Among the women, Lindsay Davenport was seeded No. 1, followed by defending champion Maria Sharapova, Amelie Mauresmo and former two-time champion Serena Williams.

Last weekend, Federer won the Wimbledon grass-court tuneup at Halle, Germany, for the third straight year. He's won 29 straight matches on grass; his last loss on the surface was in June 2002 against Mario Ancic in the first round at Wimbledon.

Roddick won the Queen's Club title in London for the third consecutive year on Sunday. He said he thought Hewitt would get the No. 2 seeding.

"You know, either way, I don't think either one of us can be too upset," Roddick said a few days before the seedings were announced. "Common knowledge is that you're going to have to beat the best players somewhere along the way."

The Wimbledon draw, to be held Thursday, will determine whether Hewitt or Nadal will be in the top half and could face Federer in the semifinals. Roddick would be paired against the player drawn in the bottom half.

Andre Agassi, the 1992 Wimbledon champion, withdrew Tuesday because of an injury.

Roddick is the only American man seeded in the top 16, with Taylor Dent at No. 24. It's the first time since Wimbledon has had 16 or more seeds that at least two Americans didn't make the top 16.

Last year, even after Agassi's withdrawal, there were two Americans in the top 16 and five in the top 32. Wimbledon began seeding 16 players in 1968 and expanded to 32 seeds in 2001.

The All England Club followed the WTA Tour's ranking for the top eight women. There are seven Russians among the top 13 seeds.

Venus Williams, Wimbledon champion in 2000 and 2001, was seeded No. 14, two spots above her current world ranking. Serena Williams missed the French Open after struggling with an ankle strain since May. Venus lost to 15-year-old Bulgarian Sesil Karatantcheva in the third round at Roland Garros.

Neither Williams sister played a pre-Wimbledon grass-court tournament.

Wimbledon is the only Grand Slam tournament which doesn't strictly adhere to the world rankings to determine its seedings. The All England Club takes a player's grass-court experience and record into account.

The men's seedings offered some surprises.

Nadal, a 19-year-old Spanish clay-court expert, has played only one grass-court match since winning the French Open earlier this month for his first Grand Slam title. He lost in the first round in Halle to Alexander Waske. He pulled out of this week's Ordina Open in the Netherlands, saying he needed rest.

Nadal's only appearance at Wimbledon was in 2003 when he reached the third round.

Britain's Tim Henman, a four-time semifinalist, was seeded No. 6, three places above his ranking.

Sebastien Grosjean, a semifinalist the past two years, was the biggest beneficiary. The Frenchman, ranked No. 26, was bumped up 17 places to No. 9.

Ancic, a semifinalist last year and ranked 21st, was seeded 10th. Sweden's Thomas Johansson, who reached the third round last year and has never advanced past the fourth round in eight attempts at Wimbledon, was seeded 12th. He's ranked 18th.

Australia's Alicia Molik, ranked ninth by the WTA, withdrew from Wimbledon on Wednesday with an inner ear infection. Jennifer Capriati, who is ranked 27th, wasn't seeded. Capriati missed the French Open because of injury and was not included in the final entry list for Wimbledon.

Daniel
06-16-2005, 06:55 AM
LONDON - Roger Federer and Andy Roddick were seeded 1-2 for Wimbledon on Wednesday, setting up a possible rematch of last year's final.

ADVERTISEMENT




Federer, a two-time defending champion, got the top seeding in line with his world No. 1 ranking.

Roddick was seeded two spots above his ATP ranking, ahead of 2002 champion Lleyton Hewitt of Australia and French Open champion Rafael Nadal.

Hewitt was seeded No. 3, with Nadal — who has little experience on grass — at No. 4.

Federer beat Roddick 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (3), 6-4 in last year's final. He has four Grand Slam titles. Roddick won the 2003 U.S. Open.

Among the women, Lindsay Davenport was seeded No. 1, followed by defending champion Maria Sharapova, Amelie Mauresmo and former two-time champion Serena Williams.

Last weekend, Federer won the Wimbledon grass-court tuneup at Halle, Germany, for the third straight year. He's won 29 straight matches on grass; his last loss on the surface was in June 2002 against Mario Ancic in the first round at Wimbledon.

Roddick won the Queen's Club title in London for the third consecutive year on Sunday. He said he thought Hewitt would get the No. 2 seeding.

"You know, either way, I don't think either one of us can be too upset," Roddick said a few days before the seedings were announced. "Common knowledge is that you're going to have to beat the best players somewhere along the way."

The Wimbledon draw, to be held Thursday, will determine whether Hewitt or Nadal will be in the top half and could face Federer in the semifinals. Roddick would be paired against the player drawn in the bottom half.

Andre Agassi, the 1992 Wimbledon champion, withdrew Tuesday because of an injury.

Roddick is the only American man seeded in the top 16, with Taylor Dent at No. 24. It's the first time since Wimbledon has had 16 or more seeds that at least two Americans didn't make the top 16.

Last year, even after Agassi's withdrawal, there were two Americans in the top 16 and five in the top 32. Wimbledon began seeding 16 players in 1968 and expanded to 32 seeds in 2001.

The All England Club followed the WTA Tour's ranking for the top eight women. There are seven Russians among the top 13 seeds.

Venus Williams, Wimbledon champion in 2000 and 2001, was seeded No. 14, two spots above her current world ranking. Serena Williams missed the French Open after struggling with an ankle strain since May. Venus lost to 15-year-old Bulgarian Sesil Karatantcheva in the third round at Roland Garros.

Neither Williams sister played a pre-Wimbledon grass-court tournament.

Wimbledon is the only Grand Slam tournament which doesn't strictly adhere to the world rankings to determine its seedings. The All England Club takes a player's grass-court experience and record into account.

The men's seedings offered some surprises.

Nadal, a 19-year-old Spanish clay-court expert, has played only one grass-court match since winning the French Open earlier this month for his first Grand Slam title. He lost in the first round in Halle to Alexander Waske. He pulled out of this week's Ordina Open in the Netherlands, saying he needed rest.

Nadal's only appearance at Wimbledon was in 2003 when he reached the third round.

Britain's Tim Henman, a four-time semifinalist, was seeded No. 6, three places above his ranking.

Sebastien Grosjean, a semifinalist the past two years, was the biggest beneficiary. The Frenchman, ranked No. 26, was bumped up 17 places to No. 9.

Ancic, a semifinalist last year and ranked 21st, was seeded 10th. Sweden's Thomas Johansson, who reached the third round last year and has never advanced past the fourth round in eight attempts at Wimbledon, was seeded 12th. He's ranked 18th.

Australia's Alicia Molik, ranked ninth by the WTA, withdrew from Wimbledon on Wednesday with an inner ear infection. Jennifer Capriati, who is ranked 27th, wasn't seeded. Capriati missed the French Open because of injury and was not included in the final entry list for Wimbledon

Daniel
06-16-2005, 06:55 AM
Champion Federer on Henman alert
MEN'S TOP FIVE SEEDS

1. Roger Federer
2. Andy Roddick
3. Lleyton Hewitt
4. Rafael Nadal
5. Marat Safin
Men's profiles
Wimbledon champion Roger Federer hopes he does not have to face British number one Tim Henman too early at this year's All England Championships.
Ahead of Thursday's draw, the world number one said: "Tim's definitely a threat and I really hope he's not too close to me in the draw.

"I really respect his game, which is excellent for grass, and the home crowd really get behind him which is a bonus.

"He's definitely got the tools to win Wimbledon for sure."

Federer, who is again top seed, is also wary of several other top-ranked players.

They include Spanish sensation Rafael Nadal, who beat Federer in the French Open semi-finals before going on to capture the Grand Slam title for himself.

I'd be quite surprised if Nadal won this time around

Roger Federer

Federer added: "Obviously Nadal, Andy Roddick, Lleyton Hewitt and Marat Safin will all be the big contenders.

"Hewitt and Roddick with their big-hitting games definitely have the best chance to do well on grass, but I'd be quite surprised if Nadal won this time round.

"There's nothing wrong with his game. He beat me in the French of course but I saw his game in Halle where he lost to a tough opponent who kept coming into the net and he struggled a bit.

"Here at Wimbledon where it's slightly slower he could certainly be a threat, though I'd rather give Tim the edge to do much better than Nadal."

However, Federer was bullish about his own prospects of winnings his third Wimbledon crown in a row.

"I am very confident," he said.

"I feel good and I was slightly surprised that in spite of quite a short preparation on grass that I came though and won the singles and the doubles in Halle.

"So I've had a lot of play on grass already, which gave me great self belief."

Daniel
06-16-2005, 06:57 AM
LONDON: Roger Federer, having endured another French Open heartbreaker, returns to more friendly Grand Slam surroundings next week bidding to take another step closer to smashing Pete Sampras’ record of seven Wimbledon titles.
The world number one, the double defending champion at the All England Club, will start as overwhelming favourite to make it three-in-a-row with Sampras himself tipping the Swiss superstar.

"Roger is head and shoulders above the rest," said Sampras who won 14 Grand Slam titles before he quit three years ago.

The 23-year-old Federer has already claimed two Wimbledon titles as well as the Australian Open and US Open.

But he was denied a career Grand Slam by a shattering semi-final defeat at the French Open two weeks ago where Spanish teenager Rafael Nadal eased past him on his way to the title.

Federer is a lot more at home on grass and his third successive title at Halle at the weekend, where he defeated Marat Safin, gave him his 29th win-in-a-row on the surface, a run which has only served to boost his confidence even further as he chases a 30th career crown.

"I’m happy about the title in Halle, it’s a kind of relief. Having dealt with the defeat in Paris so well, this was surprising for me," said Federer.

"I feel confident about Wimbledon, but there can always be a tough draw, there can always be a shock loss in the first round. I don’t really think about it, that’s what I was more concerned about last year defending my first time Wimbledon title.

"Now it’s easier for me to deal with the situation."

Twelve months ago, Federer overcame a first set loss to see off Andy Roddick in the Wimbledon final but the American also warmed-up for the third Grand Slam of the season in style clinching a third successive Queen’s Club title.

"I think I’ve learned, it’s not every day you play your first Wimbledon final," said Roddick reflecting on the 2004 final.

"I hope I get back and get the opportunity to get another one.

"I think once you experience something, it takes away the fear of the unknown which is always there."

Safin, who inherited Federer’s Australian Open title in January knocking the Swiss out in the semi-finals, has made no secret of his dislike for grass but he was a quarter-finalist in 2001.

But the former world number one, and US Open winner, remains cautious about his chances especially after a first round loss to compatriot Dmitry Tursunov in 2004.





Australia’s Lleyton Hewitt, the champion in 2002, would normally be considered a threat but the former world number one has only just returned to the tour following a three-month absence due, first, to toe surgery and then broken ribs after a fall at home.

That ruled him out of the French Open which was won in memorable style by Nadal.

But the 19-year-old Spaniard, who made the third round on his only other Wimbledon visit in 2003, insists he will not be a threat.



That lack of confidence was illustrated by a first round exit at Halle.

As always, British nearly man Tim Henman, four-times a semi-finalist, will find his lone crusade to become the first home winner since Fred Perry in 1936, dominating hearts and minds.

Even approaching his 31st birthday, Henman refuses to accept his best chances are behind him.



One man who will not be worrying Henman is 1992 champion Andre Agassi after the 35-year-old joined claycourt specialists, and former French Open winners, Carlos Moya, Albert Costa and Gaston Gaudio on the injured list. — AFP

Minnie
06-16-2005, 07:43 AM
Nice to see Rog being kind about our Tim. They are good friends we are told. Poor Tim gets a terrible time from some of the Brit press so nice to see the World No 1 being kinder! I won't reprint what has already been posted here, but thought I'd add the last bit included by The Sporting Life here in the UK.

Federer was speaking at Hampton Court Palace, where he was trying his hand at Real Tennis - the royal and ancient forerunner of his own, more glitzy and celebrated sport.

Although it was a promotional appearance for his Swiss watch sponsor Maurice Lacroix, Federer was happy to swap his state-of-the-art lawn tennis racquet for a heavy, asymmetric wooden version.

He impressed the crowd with his performance and added: "It was good fun - it goes back such a long way but for me it felt great on the court."

Stevens Point
06-16-2005, 10:45 AM
Many articles about him and here is another one...

Federer's game perfect for grass
By Greg Garber
ESPN.com
http://espn-att.starwave.com/media/fp/120_federer_01.jpg

Two histories, inexorably intertwined, follow Roger Federer into the two-week festival that begins Monday at the All England Lawn Tennis Club.

At 23, the lithe Swiss player is the world's best, man or woman. Federer won three of four Grand Slam singles titles last year but, almost inexplicably, failed to win either of the first two Grand Slams of 2005 in Melbourne and Paris.

At the same time, he hasn't lost in nearly three years on the surface most conducive to his elegant game, the sanctuary of green grass. After winning the Gerry Weber Open last week in Halle, Germany, Federer has won a fairly amazing 29 straight matches on grass. His last loss on grass was a straight-set setback against teenager Mario Ancic in the first round of the 2002 Wimbledon.

Since then, he has been invincible. His 6-4, 6-7 (4), 6-4 victory over Marat Safin in Germany avenged his semifinal loss to the strapping Russian in the semifinals of the Australian Open. It was also Federer's 20th consecutive victory in a championship final – a phenomenal achievement, if you stop to think about it.

"I'm very pleased," Federer said. "It was a good performance all week long. It's exactly the way I want to feel heading into Wimbledon.

"I always feel like I can improve. I think there were moments when I could have done better. For example, I can serve and return better. Grass-court tennis depends on a few points, and if you miss those – like me in the beginning of the match, when I had some opportunities and missed a few shots – it shows I can definitely play better."

This, if you are Safin or Andy Roddick or Rafael Nadal, is a daunting thought.

Federer is attempting to win his third consecutive Wimbledon championship, a feat that would place him in the distinguished company of Pete Sampras (1997-2000, 1993-95), Bjorn Borg (1976-80) and Fred Perry (1934-36), the only men to do it in the last 75 years.

On Wednesday, Federer was named the top seed at Wimbledon. He could meet Roddick, the No. 2 seed, in the finals for the second consecutive year. British bookmaker Ladbrokes has installed Federer as a 1.53-1 favorite to win the tournament.

His 29 consecutive victories on the slippery surface that is grass place him within striking distance of history. Borg, during his five-title run at Wimbledon, won a record 41 straight matches on grass.

None of this should come as a surprise.

A game for grass

Federer grew up in Switzerland playing on clay, but as his game evolved, he grew more and more comfortable on grass. His idol, early on, was German Boris Becker, who won Wimbledon as a 17-year-old in 1985 and repeated the following year. His favorite player was Sampras, who won seven Wimbledon titles in eight years.

In 1998, when he was the world's No. 1-ranked junior, Federer won the Wimbledon junior singles and doubles titles. When he won the men's singles championship in 2003, he joined Stefan Edberg, Pat Cash and Borg as the only men to win the junior and men's titles at the All England Club.

Federer's peerless and diverse offensive game is what makes him unbeatable on grass. His serve doesn't sizzle at 150-plus mph like Roddick's, but it moves quickly enough, and like a crafty pitcher, Federer places it well. Balls don't bounce as high on grass as they do on clay, and the grass at Wimbledon, particularly during the first week, causes balls to skid and stay low. Federer's forehand, while not as overpowering as Roddick's, is the best in the game because he hits it from such a variety of angles.

The thing that separates Federer from the field is his ability to serve and volley almost at will. Britain's Tim Henman, who has reached the Wimbledon semifinals and quarterfinals four times each in the last nine years, has mined the same vein, albeit with fewer physical gifts. Roddick, despite a push from former coach Brad Gilbert, has shown little interest in mastering the volley.

In last year's Wimbledon final, Federer lost the first set to Roddick but won the last three with a masterful grass clinic. Gifted defensive players such as Nadal and Lleyton Hewitt have to hope for a dry run at Wimbledon, which would make for a harder court and slightly higher bounces.

One of tennis' hackneyed phrases is the "clay-court specialist." In point of fact, grass-court specialists are even fewer and farther between. Grass, the dinosaur of surfaces, is very nearly extinct.

When Rod Laver swept the four Grand Slams in 1962 and again in 1969, three of the four majors were played on grass. Thirty years ago, the U.S. Open at Forest Hills ditched grass in favor of clay. Now, the Australian Open and U.S. Open employ hard courts. There are 26 ATP tournaments contested on clay, and there are only six on grass, and those six are compressed into a 34-day window. Players coming off the clay-court season make the abrupt transition to grass by tuning up in England, Germany and the Netherlands -- and after Wimbledon, they play on the emerald courts at Newport Casino.

Some of the top grass players, Federer and Roddick among them, have lobbied for a Tennis Masters event on grass that would extend the grass season by a week, but that change isn't likely to occur.

Federer got in some extra work in the Gerry Weber by playing doubles with his good friend Yves Allegro, and they won the tournament. Federer has been practicing this week at Wimbledon, trying to summon the mind-set that brought him titles the last two years. Even though he is a sparkling 51-3, Federer still has memories of that 2002 flameout against Ancic. The following year, defending champion Hewitt was stunned by 6-foot-10 Ivo Karlovic in the first round.

"I feel confident, but there can always be a tough draw," Federer said. "There can always be a shocking loss in the first round. I don't really think about it, but that's what I was more concerned about last year defending my first Wimbledon title."

There is one positive note that might give Federer a psychological advantage at Wimbledon. His two Grand Slam semifinal losses came to players who were celebrating their birthdays. Nadal turned 19 the day of his triumph at Roland Garros, and Safin turned 25. The good news? None of the top players celebrates a birthday on July 3, the date of the Wimbledon final. Jared Palmer (July 2) and Dennis van Scheppingen (July 5) are the only ones even close.

Greg Garber is a senior writer for ESPN.com.

Shabazza
06-16-2005, 12:09 PM
nice articles thx *M*, Daniel and Stevens :yeah:

Puschkin
06-16-2005, 01:28 PM
quoting
Federer's game perfect for grass
By Greg Garber

The good news? None of the top players celebrates a birthday on July 3, the date of the Wimbledon final. Jared Palmer (July 2) and Dennis van Scheppingen (July 5) are the only ones even close.


And that's the end of all this superstitious talk :)

1sun
06-16-2005, 02:05 PM
And that's the end of all this superstitious talk :)
his forgetin pim pim.bday on semi finals day.but its al good coz their seeded to met in the quarters and i dont eve no if pimpim wil make it that far coz of his terrible form of late

RogiNie
06-16-2005, 02:59 PM
ROGER FEDERER
Odds: 4/6


Also known as - Fed Express.

Wimbledon high - Confirmed his genius by winning his first Grand Slam title at the All England Club in 2003.

Wimbledon low - He might want to forget crying like a girl during the subsequent on-court interview with the BBC's Sue Barker. :rolleyes: that was cute!!

In the players' box - Miroslava 'Mirka' Vavrinec - his agent and girlfriend of five years. Vavrinec was a professional tennis player ranked 76th in the world but her career was ended by a foot injury.

Tears or tantrums? - Unless Sue Barker gets to him again, Federer is far too cool.

Look out for - ... him losing. Federer has not been beaten on grass since 2002. He has only lost three times this year - spookily, both his Grand Slam conquerors (Safin at the Australian Open and Nadal at the French) were celebrating their birthdays on the day they played the world number one.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/4532349.stm

RogiNie
06-16-2005, 03:00 PM
1. Roger Federer

Born: 8/8/81
Nationality: Swiss
Seeded: 1
World ranking: 1
Wimbledon best:
Champion (2003/2004)
Recent record:
2004: Champion
2003: Champion
2002: 1st round

Roger Federer returns to Wimbledon looking to join the likes of Pete Sampras and Bjorn Borg as a winner of three successive titles.
And the Swiss star is an overwhelming favourite to do just that after cementing his position as the world's best player in the last 12 months.

Since winning Wimbledon last year, he has added the US Open title as well as five Masters Series events and the Masters Cup.

There have been occasional signs of hope for his rivals, however.

The first came with Marat Safin's epic win over the Swiss in the Australian Open semi-finals, and Rafael Nadal ended Federer's hopes of a first French Open title earlier this month.

But back on the grass of SW19 there is little to suggest anyone has the game to threaten Federer if he is anywhere near his best.

He can hit winners off both the forehand and backhand, control a match from the back of the court and mix up his game with an improving serve-and-volley style.

And, above all, he is highly motivated, saying that given the choice he would not swap a single French title for an eighth or ninth Wimbledon crown.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/4599007.stm

Puschkin
06-16-2005, 03:46 PM
Men's Singles Preview

Thursday, 16 June, 2005


If Roger Federer is to win Wimbledon for a third successive year he will be obliged to do it the hard way. The top seed and clear favourite has been offered a fairly undemanding start to the defence of his crown, with an opening match against Paul-Henri Mathieu, a 23-year old Frenchman who lives in Federer's homeland, Switzerland, but the route will rapidly become more difficult if form runs true.

Lying in Federer's path after a second round against a Czech, either Ivo Minar or Michal Tabara, are such experienced tour names as Nicolas Kiefer, followed by one of two Spaniards, Juan Carlos Ferrero or Tommy Robredo.

Fernando Gonzalez, the Chilean with a thunderous serve and booming forehand, could await the champion in the quarter-finals, with a semi-final to follow against either the third seed, Lleyton Hewitt, or the fifth seed, Marat Safin, who defeated Federer in the semi-finals of the Australian Open in January before going on to lift the title.

Safin, who threatened after a first round dismissal last year that he would never return to the grass of Wimbledon, has thought better of that comment, which is good news for the spectators and very likely bad news for his first round opponent, the popular Thai Paradorn Srichaphan.

If he comes through that test unscathed, Safin could next play an opponent with a giant reputation at The Championships, the Australian Mark Philippoussis, who is in the draw courtesy of a wild card. This was awarded in recognition of Philippoussis's appearance in the final two years ago, since when he has been plagued by injury and ill-fortune.

Short though he is of recent success, Philippoussis's power game could unsettle the Russian while the turf is still juicy in the early stages, and another grass specialist, Mario Ancic of Croatia, could be planning to derail Safin in the fourth round. Britain's Tim Henman can testify to the threat of the gangling Ancic, having been eliminated by him in the quarter-finals 12 months ago.

Hewitt, the champion in 2002, has benefited from a good draw which should pose few problems until Safin, or his conqueror, hoves into sight in the last eight. Hewitt will be grateful for that luck of the early draw, since last week's Stella Artois tournament at London's Queen's Club was his first since March, following toe and rib injuries.

Hewitt could have wished for a more extended run than he managed at the Stella, where he was blasted out in the quarter-finals by the giant Croatian, Ivo Karlovic, but at least he will be grateful that the tallest man in tennis (6ft 10in) is well away from him this time in the other half of the draw.

Instead, it is the second seed, Andy Roddick, who must take on the most dangerous floater at this year's Championships. Roddick, promoted to that second seeding because he was the 2004 runner-up and is in excellent grass form, defeated Karlovic in last Sunday's Stella tournament final, but it was a tight, grim affair of two tie breaks. However, that victory will boost Roddick's confidence, should the 22-year-old American be in need of it.

The gloomy news for Britain's only serious hope, Tim Henman, as he prepares for h is 12th challenge for the Wimbledon title, is that he could face France's Sebastien Grosjean, who eliminated him in the quarter-finals two years ago, and if he gets past that testing hurdle it will probably mean facing Roddick and his record serving prowess in the last eight. Things certainly get no easier for the British number one in his bid to become the first from the host country to win the men's singles title since Fred Perry 69 years ago.

As the only former champions in the men's draw, Federer and Hewitt will again be among the select few with realistic chances of hoisting the trophy in a fortnight's time. Since both are in the same half of the field, only one will get as far as the final and a repeat of last year's Federer-Roddick epic is very much on the cards.

Written by Ronald Atkin

Source: http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2005-06-16/200506161118906496197.html

RogiFan88
06-16-2005, 03:49 PM
that's not a Wimbledon low... losing to Ancic R1 in 2002 is a Wimbledon low... THE Wimbledon low for Rogi... or for that matter, Sue Barker is a Wimbledon low... for anyone... ;)

RogiFan88
06-16-2005, 03:50 PM
As the only former champions in the men's draw, Federer and Hewitt will again be among the select few with realistic chances of hoisting the trophy in a fortnight's time.

Hewitt? Really? I've yet to see good form fr him lately... after falling down his own stairs...

SUKTUEN
06-16-2005, 05:13 PM
thank for the article~

babsi
06-16-2005, 05:18 PM
Thanks everyone :)

Dana
06-16-2005, 10:18 PM
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/sport/wimbledon/articles/19328657?source=Evening%20Standard
Federer the unstoppable
16 June 2005

It has been three years and 29 matches since Roger Federer last tasted defeat on grass. And the Swiss star - rated by some as the greatest player ever -is now just seven wins from a third successive Wimbledon crown.

No-one, it seems, can lay a racket on him and nobody is more astonished than the four-time Grand Slam winner, who admitted: 'I spend my whole time being amazed. It's always a surprise to me. Sometimes I watch a replay of my matches and think "Jeez, how did I pull that shot out", or "How lucky did I get with that rally" but that's how tennis is.

'It's played on instinct, it's natural and all about reaction and making the right decision when you have only a fraction of a second to think about it.'

Federer clearly uses those fractions better than anyone else but also insists it is not getting any easier.

'I find it hard to stay professional all the time and would love to have more time for my friends and family but I know my career won't last 50 years so I might as well do it properly for ten,' he added.

'I try to enjoy it because I always dreamed of winning Wimbledon, being No.1 in the world and leading the rankings and I have to enjoy it.'

But although he now has Pete Sampras' four in a row and Bjorn Borg's five in a row in his sights, 23-year-old Federer does not want to be compared to the greats.

'It's wrong for people to think I have the chance to break this record or that record. I want to be remembered as Roger Federer, for what I've done,' he said.

Dana
06-16-2005, 10:23 PM
http://www.theage.com.au/news/Tennis/Roche-Federer-a-perfect-fit/2005/06/16/1118869045932.html
Roche, Federer a perfect fit
June 17, 2005

Tony Roche has not tasted Wimbledon singles glory, but Roger Federer may be about to change that, Richard Hinds reports.

As Tony Roche thwacks another razor-sharp volley back at the feet of his latest Wimbledon contender Roger Federer, you could be forgiven for believing he would not be disgraced himself in an early-round match against one of the grasscourt neophytes who will slip and slide their way reluctantly around the famous lawns this year.

In the hour he spends trading shots with Federer, only a creaky service action betrays the fact Roche turned 60 last month.

Otherwise, he looks as much at home on the practice courts of Aorangi Park that adjoin the All England club's famous stadium as you would expect of a man who has invested so much time and energy at the game's mecca.

The return on that investment has been substantial. Roche won five Wimbledon doubles titles with John Newcombe and reached the 1968 singles final, where he was beaten by Rod Laver.

Yet, for all that, he has never got the dividend he deserved. Not only did his own name fail to appear on the singles trophy, neither did those of the two champions, Ivan Lendl and Pat Rafter, whom he guided into a total of four finals.

Throw in the fact that he was in the New Zealander Chris Lewis' corner when he lost to John McEnroe in the 1983 final and you could be forgiven for thinking Wimbledon is a place of heartache and frustration for Roche.

Yet, publicly at least, Roche does not see it that way. "Not really," he says. "Getting to finals is not too shabby."

It is a measure of the respect in which Roche is held that Federer literally came knocking on his door in Sydney late last year asking Roche to improve the world No. 1's game.

The deal hammered out between the then holder of three grand slam titles and the coach - who is now known to enjoy his days on the golf course as much as he once relished the grinding work of the practice court - was mutually beneficial. Roche would not travel full-time, but the pair would work together before each of the year's four majors.

Even for a coach as widely respected as Roche, Federer presented a tough challenge. He had earned praise for guiding the driven Lendl to new levels of professionalism and, later, for his work in taking the late-blooming Rafter to two US Open titles.

But when Federer came calling, he was already considered a once-in-a-lifetime talent. "Just a few little things here and there," says Roche when asked what he has brought to Federer's game. "But he always feels he can improve, which I think is good. Just because you get to the top of the tree doesn't mean you can't improve. He is always looking for little things to work on and I've seen it come through in a couple of his matches."

Such are the high standards Federer has set that, despite his seven titles so far this year, his season is viewed as slightly disappointing. There was speculation at the start of the year about a grand slam. But he was beaten in the semi-finals of the Australian Open by Marat Safin and at the same stage in Paris by Rafael Nadal.

"He had match point at the Australian and didn't play as good as he can in Paris, yet still got to the semis. I think he can definitely win the French. But he has to play at his best," Roche said.

During a light warm-up, the strong rapport between coach and player is obvious. As Roche clips a neat groundstroke past Federer at the net, the Swiss even seems to greet the shot with a classical Aussie response: "Beauty!"

"It's been good fun," says Roche of the past six months. "This trip will be eight weeks and I've enjoyed it. First of all, he is a really nice guy, apart from just being a very good tennis player. He's pretty relaxed and I think that's good in this game.

"There is enough pressure on when the tournament comes around. If you can have a relaxed attitude when you practice, so long as you put in the hard yards, it is a pretty good build-up."

So is this the best chance Roche has had to share the game's greatest glory, a Wimbledon singles crown? "I thought Pat was a pretty good chance but it wasn't to be for whatever reason," he says. "But he's got as good a chance as anyone, so let's hope we can do it this time."

Shabazza
06-16-2005, 10:30 PM
'It's wrong for people to think I have the chance to break this record or that record. I want to be remembered as Roger Federer, for what I've done,' he said.
You'll be remembered for what you've done for sure, Roger. :worship:
thx Dana

Minnie
06-16-2005, 11:39 PM
[QUOTE=Dana]http://www.theage.com.au/news/Tennis/Roche-Federer-a-perfect-fit/2005/06/16/1118869045932.html
Roche, Federer a perfect fit
June 17, 2005

Tony Roche has not tasted Wimbledon singles glory, but Roger Federer may be about to change that, Richard Hinds reports.

Thx Dana for this piece on Tony Roche - it will be great to see him back at Wimbledon again. After all his long years of coaching, it would be great for Tony to finally see "his" player lift that Wimbledon trophy!

RogiFan88
06-17-2005, 03:11 AM
June 17, 2005
Federer's winning mentality serves him well even in defeat
By Neil Harman, Tennis Correspondent

ALAN MILLS, conducting his final draw as the Wimbledon referee yesterday before retirement, was asked to slow down by the women operating the computers as the players’ names gushed out. Even though Mills has seen it all before, he cannot wait for Monday. The same is true for Roger Federer, though maybe not for Paul-Henri Mathieu, the Frenchman with the task of stepping on to Centre Court a deferential half a pace behind the champion on the first day.

Arrogance is not Federer’s style; he is more casually sure of his status in tennis and thus, when he walked into the All England Club for a chat yesterday before hitting on Court No 8, it was impossible to be anything but in awe of him.

The Swiss world No 1 would have been even more assured had he scanned the draw, which places him in the same half as Lleyton Hewitt and Marat Safin, his Australian Open semi-final conqueror, and gives him a path strewn with few terrors to a seeded rendezvous with either of them in the semi-finals. Federer exudes calmness, though he admits he will feel a trifle nervous when the bell sounds at 1pm three days from now.”

Federer has arrived here after winning the singles and doubles in Halle, Germany, last week, although he remembers that without one searing forehand at 5-5 in the final set against Robin Soderling, of Sweden, he may well have lost in the first round. It means that he takes nothing, not even 20 consecutive wins in tournament finals, for granted.

“Last year was my first as the defending champion and I was anxious before my match because I remember what happened to Hewitt against (Ivo) Karlovic the previous year on the first day,” Federer said. “I think to be nervous shows a respect for what the tournament stands for. Of course I have been disappointed with my losses this year but when I lose I have tended to get back on a winning streak again . Losses can be good because they give me time to practise more and work out what went wrong.”

Hewitt had reason to be less than satisfied with the way his week has worked out. He was miffed at having been leapfrogged by Andy Roddick to the No 2 spot in the seedings and although the All England Club underlined again that it was following a “transparent and objective” formula introduced with the acceptance of the ATP, it does throw up the occasional discrepancy.

Discretion could be used when a situation arises that a former Wimbledon champion, who has also won three times on grass at Queen’s Club, been the world No 1 and played on the surface in the Davis Cup with distinction, but who has had three months out injured, is handicapped by the formula. Whether Hewitt’s decision not to speak to the media before the event is down to his annoyance may be discovered later.

Tim Henman, while drawn in the opposite half to Federer and Hewitt, would still, if the seedings fall right, have to defeat Sébastien Grosjean in the fourth round, Roddick in the quarter-finals and Rafael Nadal in the semi-finals. He meets Jarkko Nieminen in the first round, his first meeting with the Finn.

Remarkably, Josh Goodall, 19, may have the best first-round draw of the British contenders. He meets Alessio Di Mauro, a left-handed Italian who has never been to Wimbledon. Goodall has been practising with Nadal, the French Open champion, so Di Mauro should pose little threat.

Arvind Parmar will miss Wimbledon for the first time in six years after he was beaten in the final qualifying round at Roehampton yesterday, losing 6-1, 3-6, 7-6, 6-0 to Gilles Elseneer, of Belgium. Jamie Delgado, who rallied from two sets down, returns today to play the final set of his match against Paul Goldstein, of the United States, the No 4 seed in qualifying.

WIMBLEDON MEN’S AND WOMEN’S FIRST-ROUND DRAWS

MEN: (1) R Federer (Switz) v P-H Mathieu (Fr); I Minar (Cz) v M Tabara (Cz); J Goodall (GB) v A Di Mauro (It); J Benneteau (Fr) v (25) N Kiefer (Ger); (23) J C Ferrero (Sp) v qualifier; T Enqvist (Swe) v Lee Hyung Taik (S Kor); F Mayer (Ger) v S Ventura (Sp); F Verdasco (Sp) v (13) T Robredo (Sp); (11) J Johansson (Swe) v A Montanes (Sp); A Martín (Sp) v G Rusedski (GB); J Acasuso (Arg) v T Zib (Cz); A Mackin (GB) v (21) F Gonzalez (Chile); (31) M Youzhny (Russ) v M Baghdatis (Cyp); O Hernandez (Sp) v J-R Lisnard (Fr); J Bjorkman (Swe) v qualifier; S Draper (Aus) v (8) N Davydenko (Russ); (3) L Hewitt (Aus) v C Rochus (Bel); J Hernych (Cz) v J Blake (US); qualifier v qualifier; S Sargsian (Arm) v (29) N Massu (Chile); (24) T Dent (US) v qualifier; K Kim (US) v A Bogdanovic (GB); qualifier v T Berdych (Cz); L Burgsmüller (Ger) v (16) M Puerta (Arg); (10) M Ancic (Cro) v qualifier; qualifier v S Koubek (Austria); G Monfils (Fr) v O Rochus (Bel); C Saulnier (Fr) v (22) D Hrbaty (Slovakia); (26) F López (Sp) v B Phau (Ger); D Sherwood (GB) v R Mello (Br); K Beck (Slovakia) v M Philippoussis (Aus); P Srichaphan (Thai) v (5) M Safin (Russ); (7) G Cañas (Arg) v qualifier; M Mirnyi (Bela) v R Schüttler (Ger); S Wawrinka (Switz) v F Santoro (Fr); P Wessels (Neth) v (28) J Novak (Cz); (19) T Haas (Ger) v J Tipsarevic (Serbia and M); qualifier v qualifier; A Pavel (Rom) v qualifier; B Ulihrach (Cz) v (12) T Johansson (Swe); (14) R Stepanek (Cz) v R Ginepri (US); A Murray (GB) v qualifier; K Kucera (Slovakia) v L Horna (Peru); R Sluiter (Neth) v (18) D Nalbandian (Arg); (27) R Gasquet (Fr) v P Kohlschreiber (Ger); S Schalken (Neth) v P Starace (It); F Mantilla (Sp) v G Muller (Lux); V Spadea (US) v (4) R Nadal (Sp); (6) T Henman (GB) v J Nieminen (Fin); N Almagro (Sp) v D Tursunov (Russ); A Popp (Ger) v J Haehnel (Fr); W Arthurs (Aus) v (32) F Volandri (It); (17) D Ferrer (Sp) v G Garcia-López (Sp); J Monaco (Arg) v qualifier; V Hanescu (Rom) v K Carlsen (Den); M Llodra (Fr) v (9) S Grosjean (Fr); (15) G Coria (Arg) v T Behrend (Ger); J Marray (GB) v X Malisse (Bel); A Calatrava (Sp) v qualifier; J Melzer (Austria) v (20) I Ljubicic (Cro); (30) R Soderling (Swe) v I Anreev (Russ); D Sanguinetti (It) v qualifier; qualifier v I Karlovic (Cro); J Vanek (Cz) v (2) A Roddick (US).

WOMEN: (1) L Davenport (US) v A Jidkova (Russ); M Marrero (Sp) v qualifier; B Strycova (Cz) v L Osterloh (US); S Mamic (Cro) v (30) D Safina (Russ); (23) A Sugiyama (Japan) v R Vinci (It); A Spears (US) v A Kremer (Lux); M Irvin (US) v qualifier; K O’Brien (GB) v (15) K Clijsters (Bel); (10) P Schnyder (Switz) v A Serra-Zanetti (It); T Perebiynis (Ukr) v qualifier; M Kirilenko (Russ) v qualifier; M Maleeva (Bul) v (24) S Asagoe (Japan); (27) N Vaidisova (Cz) v J Kostanic (Cro); S Stosur (Aus) v M Pastikova (Cz); A Morigami (Japan) v S Mirza (India); R Llewellyn (GB) v (5) S Kuznetsova (Russ); (3) A Mauresmo (Fr) v P Suárez (Arg); M A Sánchez-Lorenzo (Sp) v M Domachowska (Pol); S Borwell (GB) v S Perry (US); T Tanasugarn (Thai) v (25) K Sprem (Cro); (22) S Farina Elia (It) v M Sucha (Slovakia); M Vento-Kabchi (Ven) v M Sequera (Ven); M Shaughnessy (US) v J Schruff (Ger); A Smashnova-Pistolesi (Isr) v (13) E Likhovtseva (Russ); (9) A Myskina (Russ) v qualifier; E Dominikovic (Aus) v A Nakamura (Japan); M Diaz-Oliva (Arg) v A Keothavong (GB); A Chakvetadze (Russ) v (17) J Jankovic (Serbia and M); (28) A Frazier (US) v M Washington (US); S Sfar (Tun) v E Loit (Fr); E Baltacha (GB) v qualifier; I Benesova (Cz) v (6) E Dementieva (Russ); (7) J Henin-Hardenne (Bel) v E Daniilidou (Gr); K Koukalova (Cz) v L Granville (US); G Dulko (Arg) v Y Fedak (Ukr); E Gagliardi (Switz) v (26) F Pennetta (It); (19) A Ivanovic (Serbia and M) v V Douchevina (Russ); D Chladkova (Cz) v S Foretz (Fr); qualifier v T Garbin (It); L Safarova (Cz) v (12) M Pierce (Fr); (14) V Williams (US) v qualifier; N Pratt (Aus) v L Cervanova (Slovakia); qualifier v S Peer (Isr); E Linetskaya (Russ) v (20) D Hantuchova (Slovakia); (29) M Bartoli (Fr) v R Fujiwara (Japan); qualifier v J Craybas (US); qualifier v qualifier; A Haynes (US) v (4) S Williams (US); (8) N Petrova (Russ) v V Ruano Pascual (Sp); C Schaul (Lux) v M Krajicek (Neth); Z Ondraskova (Cz) v C Black (Zim); C Castano (Col) v (32) V Razzano (Fr); (21) F Schiavone (It) v K Brandi (P Rico); C Martínez (Sp) v qualifier; K Peschke (Cz) v D Randriantefy (Mad); M Weingartner (Ger) v (11) V Zvonareva (Russ); (16) N Dechy (Fr) v M E Camerin (It); J O’Donoghue (GB) v A-L Grönefeld (Ger); T Panova (Russ) v L Raymond (US); A Bondarenko (Ukr) v (18) T Golovin (Fr); (31) A Medina Garrigues (Sp) v K Srebotnik (Slovenia); Cho Yoon Jeong (S Kor) v A Parra Santonja (Sp); A Janes (GB) v S Karatancheva (Bul); N Llagostera Vives (Sp) v (2) M Sharapova (Russ).

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/

RogiFan88
06-17-2005, 03:13 AM
I think it's good for Rogi to lose once in a while if only to give him a reality check... so he won't become too complacent and to realize that other players can beat him and will -- he's the one who raised the bar so they are all trying to reach it! Ironic, wouldn't you say? ;)

Shabazza
06-17-2005, 11:42 AM
I think it's good for Rogi to lose once in a while if only to give him a reality check... so he won't become too complacent and to realize that other players can beat him and will -- he's the one who raised the bar so they are all trying to reach it! Ironic, wouldn't you say? ;)
Indeed! ;)

RogiFan88
06-17-2005, 02:51 PM
News
June 16, 2005
Roger Federer Plays 'Real Tennis'

Just a week before The Championships at Wimbledon, Roger Federer tried the classic form of his sport: “Real Tennis” is a centuries-old game using a heavy, asymmetric wooden racket to hit solid, handmade balls across the net in the oldest tennis court still in use.

“I can hardly wait to defend my Wimbledon title. I love the atmosphere and the tradition of this tournament. But to be able to play Real Tennis in Hampton Court Palace was also a unique moment and a great experience,” Federer said.

The World No. 1 tried Real Tennis for the first time before the packed galleries in London's Hampton Court Palace, where Henry VIII tested his skills in his preferred game almost 500 years ago. In a doubles match, Roger Federer teamed with passionate “Realers,” one of whom was the well-known BBC sports reporter, John Inverdale, and matched against Chris Ronaldson the Real Tennis world champion.

The event organized by Maurice Lacroix -- the Swiss watchmaker for which Federer has been an international ambassador since June 2004 -- was more than just another sponsoring appearance for Roger Federer and the invited guests. “The history of tennis has always fascinated me. And I was really excited to be able to play historic Real Tennis, the predecessor of modern tennis, with the real champions of this game.”

Roger Federer not only felt at home on the court because of the explosive style of today's Real Tennis, but also because of the formal etiquette and the courteous and, in part curious, customs, which have survived for centuries in this game.
http://www.atptennis.com/en/newsandscores/news/2005/federer_real_tennis.asp

http://www.atptennis.com/shared/photos/180X250/federer_real_tennis.jpg

Puschkin
06-17-2005, 03:12 PM
News
June 16, 2005

“I can hardly wait to defend my Wimbledon title.

Me, too, Roger ;) . Due to circumstances I missed Wimby on TV in 2003 and 2004, so I also can hardly wait seeing you playing there :) .

Nocko
06-17-2005, 03:28 PM
Thanks RogiFan for the nice article and pic. :inlove:
Yeah, I can't wait either! Good luck, Rogi. Have a great time whole two weeks! :angel:

1sun
06-17-2005, 03:36 PM
Federer is too nice - Becker
By Leo Spall, Evening Standard
17 June 2005
Boris Becker is convinced that Roger Federer would have a bigger following if he was nasty. The former Wimbledon champion believes the world No1 is being penalised for being nice and does not get the respect that he deserves.

Federer has won the Championships for the last two years and is unbeaten in 29 matches on grass going into his first round match against Frenchman Paul-Henri Mathieu when the tournament starts next week.

He has already entered tennis's hall of fame for winning three out of four Grand Slams and eight other titles last year.

But the undemonstrative Swiss does not have the fanatical support enjoyed by other top players such as Tim Henman or Lleyton Hewitt.

Becker said: "He is not an outgoing personality but he is a nice guy and people criticise him for that. Excuse me, what times are we living in?

"He is a big character. He stays in control on the court and that tells me he is a character. You don't have to be out of control.

"Federer is a very special player, a rare breed. I would almost call him a genius the way he plays and wins matches. He is an incredible shot-maker and plays tennis the way it ought to be played.

"Slowly people are realising that. He should get much more credit and respect than he does. Eventually people will realise he is an amazing player."

Becker won his first of three Wimbledon titles 20 years ago when he was aged just 17 and has worked as a BBC pundit at the Championships since retiring.

He will be there again next week and believes the generation of players to follow Federer has already started to come through.

Becker said: "His main challengers this year will be Hewitt, Henman and Andy Roddick.

"They are the establishment and you have another group coming, so it is an exciting time for tennis.

"Rafael Nadal is by far the best player of this generation. Looking back there have been other young players such as Stefan Edberg, John McEnroe, Federer, and I was not bad.

"Nadal is among that league and will eventually learn to play on grass. He is not there yet but he is not a pushover either."

Puschkin
06-17-2005, 03:48 PM
quoting Leo Spall, Evening Standard

But the undemonstrative Swiss does not have the fanatical support enjoyed by other top players such as Tim Henman or Lleyton Hewitt.



What are we supposed to do to convince Mr. Spall of the opposite? Scream and shout? ;)

RogiFan88
06-17-2005, 04:04 PM
Well, Boris WOULD say that Rogi is too nice... who isn't in his opinion? ;)

SUKTUEN
06-17-2005, 04:09 PM
thankyou~~

it is true~ Roger is a very nice guy~!!

Nocko
06-17-2005, 04:13 PM
:worship: Boris :worship:

Shabazza
06-17-2005, 04:17 PM
Becker said: "He is not an outgoing personality but he is a nice guy and people criticise him for that. Excuse me, what times are we living in? He is a big character. He stays in control on the court and that tells me he is a character.

It's the only thing Federer-haters can find to critizise him, pure envy, it's just ridiculous. :(
Most of us fans are nice people, too and we definitely are as supportive as other fans, maybe in a littleother way. :angel:
And Roger being a character is out of question. :)

SUKTUEN
06-17-2005, 04:53 PM
Boris and Becker is supper idol of Roger~~

Nocko
06-17-2005, 04:58 PM
Boris and Becker is supper idol of Roger~~
Boris and Becker ? :confused:

RogiFan88
06-17-2005, 05:00 PM
Unfortunately Fed-hatas don't need reasons to hate him... they make up excuses just to diss him... whatever... just cos Rogi doesn't act like Pandy or Lleyton doesn't mean he has no personality...

SUKTUEN
06-17-2005, 05:11 PM
Boris and Becker ? :confused:
Roger love Sampras too~~ :D :D

lisa.gastaldi
06-17-2005, 06:32 PM
Boris Becker is convinced that Roger Federer would have a bigger following if he was nasty. The former Wimbledon champion believes the world No1 is being penalised for being nice and does not get the respect that he deserves.

It' s the same old story.
I totally agree with Shabazza.
I also think that this controversy interests above all non European medias, because Roger is highly admired in Europe.
I read a lot of articles, from mags like "Espn" or "Sports illustrated", and they were all the time "he's not a household name in US", "he's not famous here" etc etc.
But I think that an athlete is not a marchandise mark.
An athlete has to gain respect with his sport goals.
Roger's greatness is above all his wonderful play.
If they don't understand that, they'll never see another player express that perfection...

SUKTUEN
06-17-2005, 06:35 PM
Roger also have many thing need to imrpove~~

GO Roger ~!!

PaulieM
06-17-2005, 08:39 PM
"Federer is a very special player, a rare breed. I would almost call him a genius the way he plays and wins matches. He is an incredible shot-maker and plays tennis the way it ought to be played.

:bigclap:
boris is also right about roger having plenty of personality, he's increadibly funny in his interviews, a subtle and smart sense of humor. :)

Mrs. B
06-17-2005, 08:58 PM
thanks to Kikko for sharing this cartoon. so this is what alfonsojose was talking about- Jesus Fed! :lol:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v610/Frau_Bernhard/Rogicartoon-small.bmp

1sun
06-17-2005, 09:22 PM
LONDON (AFP) - Roger Federer has promised to take a more aggressive approach to the defence of his Wimbledon title -- but don't expect any McEnroe-style tantrums from the world number one.


Having stood head and shoulders above the rest of the field in the last two All England Championships, the laid-back Swiss star is a short-odds favourite to complete a hat-trick of titles here on July 3.

And that is just the way he likes it.

"Nothing inspires me more than walking out at Wimbledon but this year after winning the title twice, the pressure is not on me as much," he insisted as he fine-tuned his peerless groundstrokes ahead of Monday's first round clash with French youngster Paul-Henri Mathieu.

Far from feeling burdened by expectation, Federer believes the confidence he has gained over the last two years will be liberating in terms of how he approaches matches this year.

"As champion, I am always looking to improve. I know I can attack more, I just go out on the court now and make it very apparent that the opponent has to beat me," he warned.

The objective of beating Federer would appear to be beyond Mathieu and the champion's path to the semi-finals, where he could come up against 2002 champion Lleyton Hewitt, looks free of potential pitfalls.

And if Federer does find himself in an early battle for survival, he is confident that he can keep the self-destructive temper that once hindered the realisation of his talent firmly under lock and key.

Recalling an incident back in 2001 when he smashed a racket on court during a tournament in Hamburg, Federer insists that, at 24, he has got such youthful petulance out of his system.

"It was something I needed to do to get it out of my system, but it didn't feel right so I stopped immediately," he recalled.

"I have calmed down, I had to - my family and coaches did not like what I did.

"There is no chance I will ever do it again. But I also knew I needed to get the fire back somehow, and that is why now all you will see is me pumping my fist to get myself psyched up."

1sun
06-17-2005, 09:28 PM
WIMBLEDON, England (AP) -- Roger Federer knows all about outsized expectations, particularly after he won three of the four majors last season.

In the past 12 months, the Swiss is 91-5 overall, capturing 14 of 19 tournaments he entered. More impressively, he's won his last 20 finals, and his 29-match winning streak on grass is the second-longest in the Open era, trailing only Bjorn Borg's 41.

He insists he feels no pressure as he tries to join Borg and Pete Sampras as the only men in the past 70 years to win three straight Wimbledons.

"I was more concerned last year, defending my first Wimbledon title," the top-ranked Federer said. "Now it's easier for me to deal with the situation."

He lost only three of 54 matches this year, but two were Slam semifinals: against Marat Safin in Australia, and Rafael Nadal in France.

"As champion, I am always looking to improve," Federer said. "I know I can attack more, I just go out on the court now and make it very apparent that the opponent has to beat me."

Second-seeded Andy Roddick, who won a third straight Queen's Club title last week, took a set off Federer in last year's final.

"Any time (Federer) loses, because it's so rare, it makes him seem a little more human," Roddick said.

Nadal announced his arrival as a star by winning the French Open, the first man since Mats Wilander in 1982 to take that title on his debut. But even Nadal concedes he's not ready to make a similar showing on grass.

"I'll be interested to see how Nadal plays on grass," said Roddick, who could face the 19-year-old Spaniard in the semifinals. "I don't know if it's going to be the surface that most suits his game, but he's made it very clear early on that you can't underestimate him."

And other potential contenders, such as two-time major champion Safin, 2002 Wimbledon winner Lleyton Hewitt, and British hope Tim Henman, all have physical or mental hurdles that could prove too tough to overcome.

So Roddick's record-breaking serves and success on grass make him a natural pick to meet Federer in the final again in two weeks. Even if the American has had, for him, a decent year, not a great one.

"What I have seen missing a little bit from Andy is that attitude. That in-your-face, sticking-it-to-you attitude," United States Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe said. "And I think it'll be back at Wimbledon."

Henman, who is trying to become the first British man to win Wimbledon since Fred Perry in 1936, faces Jarkko Nieminen in the first round. The Finn beat an injured Andre Agassi in the first round at the French Open.

"There's no doubt about the fact that he can be a very dangerous," Henman said of the 70th-ranked Nieminen. "His ranking isn't quite as high as it once was, but he has weapons -- and if he uses them well he can cause problems for anybody."

lisa.gastaldi
06-17-2005, 09:35 PM
Two histories, inexorably intertwined, follow Roger Federer into the two-week festival that begins Monday at the All England Lawn Tennis Club.

At 23, the lithe Swiss player is the world's best, man or woman. Federer won three of four Grand Slam singles titles last year but, almost inexplicably, failed to win either of the first two Grand Slams of 2005 in Melbourne and Paris.

At the same time, he hasn't lost in nearly three years on the surface most conducive to his elegant game, the sanctuary of green grass. After winning the Gerry Weber Open last week in Halle, Germany, Federer has won a fairly amazing 29 straight matches on grass. His last loss on grass was a straight-set setback against teenager Mario Ancic in the first round of the 2002 Wimbledon.

Since then, he has been invincible. His 6-4, 6-7 (4), 6-4 victory over Marat Safin in Germany avenged his semifinal loss to the strapping Russian in the semifinals of the Australian Open. It was also Federer's 20th consecutive victory in a championship final – a phenomenal achievement, if you stop to think about it.

"I'm very pleased," Federer said. "It was a good performance all week long. It's exactly the way I want to feel heading into Wimbledon.

"I always feel like I can improve. I think there were moments when I could have done better. For example, I can serve and return better. Grass-court tennis depends on a few points, and if you miss those – like me in the beginning of the match, when I had some opportunities and missed a few shots – it shows I can definitely play better."

This, if you are Safin or Andy Roddick or Rafael Nadal, is a daunting thought.

Federer is attempting to win his third consecutive Wimbledon championship, a feat that would place him in the distinguished company of Pete Sampras (1997-2000, 1993-95), Bjorn Borg (1976-80) and Fred Perry (1934-36), the only men to do it in the last 75 years.

On Wednesday, Federer was named the top seed at Wimbledon. He could meet Roddick, the No. 2 seed, in the finals for the second consecutive year. British bookmaker Ladbrokes has installed Federer as a 1.53-1 favorite to win the tournament.

His 29 consecutive victories on the slippery surface that is grass place him within striking distance of history. Borg, during his five-title run at Wimbledon, won a record 41 straight matches on grass.

None of this should come as a surprise.

A game for grass


Federer grew up in Switzerland playing on clay, but as his game evolved, he grew more and more comfortable on grass. His idol, early on, was German Boris Becker, who won Wimbledon as a 17-year-old in 1985 and repeated the following year. His favorite player was Sampras, who won seven Wimbledon titles in eight years.

In 1998, when he was the world's No. 1-ranked junior, Federer won the Wimbledon junior singles and doubles titles. When he won the men's singles championship in 2003, he joined Stefan Edberg, Pat Cash and Borg as the only men to win the junior and men's titles at the All England Club.

Federer's peerless and diverse offensive game is what makes him unbeatable on grass. His serve doesn't sizzle at 150-plus mph like Roddick's, but it moves quickly enough, and like a crafty pitcher, Federer places it well. Balls don't bounce as high on grass as they do on clay, and the grass at Wimbledon, particularly during the first week, causes balls to skid and stay low. Federer's forehand, while not as overpowering as Roddick's, is the best in the game because he hits it from such a variety of angles.

The thing that separates Federer from the field is his ability to serve and volley almost at will. Britain's Tim Henman, who has reached the Wimbledon semifinals and quarterfinals four times each in the last nine years, has mined the same vein, albeit with fewer physical gifts. Roddick, despite a push from former coach Brad Gilbert, has shown little interest in mastering the volley.

In last year's Wimbledon final, Federer lost the first set to Roddick but won the last three with a masterful grass clinic. Gifted defensive players such as Nadal and Lleyton Hewitt have to hope for a dry run at Wimbledon, which would make for a harder court and slightly higher bounces.

One of tennis' hackneyed phrases is the "clay-court specialist." In point of fact, grass-court specialists are even fewer and farther between. Grass, the dinosaur of surfaces, is very nearly extinct.

When Rod Laver swept the four Grand Slams in 1962 and again in 1969, three of the four majors were played on grass. Thirty years ago, the U.S. Open at Forest Hills ditched grass in favor of clay. Now, the Australian Open and U.S. Open employ hard courts. There are 26 ATP tournaments contested on clay, and there are only six on grass, and those six are compressed into a 34-day window. Players coming off the clay-court season make the abrupt transition to grass by tuning up in England, Germany and the Netherlands -- and after Wimbledon, they play on the emerald courts at Newport Casino.

Some of the top grass players, Federer and Roddick among them, have lobbied for a Tennis Masters event on grass that would extend the grass season by a week, but that change isn't likely to occur.

Federer got in some extra work in the Gerry Weber by playing doubles with his good friend Yves Allegro, and they won the tournament. Federer has been practicing this week at Wimbledon, trying to summon the mind-set that brought him titles the last two years. Even though he is a sparkling 51-3, Federer still has memories of that 2002 flameout against Ancic. The following year, defending champion Hewitt was stunned by 6-foot-10 Ivo Karlovic in the first round.

"I feel confident, but there can always be a tough draw," Federer said. "There can always be a shocking loss in the first round. I don't really think about it, but that's what I was more concerned about last year defending my first Wimbledon title."

Stevens Point
06-17-2005, 11:54 PM
The German Tennis magazine (June issue) had an interesting interview with Roger. It is worth spending long time translating this article into English, because it is really interesting, you all should know what Roger says. I hope you enjoy this. (Sorry, there might be some misunderstanding from my side..., and sorry for some awkward sentences.)

https://www.blinker.de/shop/tennistempimages/gross_TM-2005-06.jpg

Tips for the career

Roger, how do I become No.1?

"I cried a lot - also during the match."
"Talent alone isn't enough - you must prove it."

Roger Federer, two time Wimbledon champion and No.1 in the Champions Race, speaks about his youth time and the way to the top.

Roger, when did you start tennis?
Federer: It began when I was 2 or 3. First, against closet wall at home and against the garage shutter at my grandma. My mother belonged to a tennis club and took me with her, and I began to play tennis matches there.

And when did you have your first training lessons?
Federer: I was about 8 years old. First, twice a week, then 4, 5 times with tournaments in weekends. I was slowly getting into it. When I was 13, I was asked if wanted to play to be in the national special training center. First, I wanted to stay in Basel, but I was interested. With 14, I moved out of home and lived with a host family in Lausanne from Monday till Friday.

Was this a hard step for you?
Federer: Yes, I got home sick and was unhappy. Because of the pressure also the results weren't good at the beginning. Before, I was the oldest and the best, now I was suddenly the youngest and the worst.

Did you think about quitting at the time?
Federer: Almost, and I wanted to go back home. My parents supported me at the time and encouraged me to stay there.

How did you deal with losses?
Federer: I was always sad and cried - also during the matches. After I played a lot in tournaments, I became emotionally stronger. I learned to regard the wins no longer so gigantically and the losses no longer so extremely.

Did you chop (? zerhacken) the rackets?
Federer: Yes, but only during the matches, never after the matches. You chop the racket, after all, from anger. When I lost, I wasn't angry but sad and disappointed. I think I searched too early for the perfection at the time already. I was anyhow a very emotional boy.

How do you deal with wins and losses now?
Federer: I think positively from both. I don't fall anymore into a deep hole after a loss. I learned to accept the losses and also to analyse the wins without any illusion. I don't hide my head in the sand. If it doesn't go like that, there are after all other beautiful moments in the life: more time for training, more time for girlfriend or for family. There is always something beautiful, and when you come back on tour, you are fresh.

Which qualities made you strong and brought you to the top?
Federer: I had a lot of talent, it was already noticable at the time. But, you could reach still nothing with talent alone. Talent is only a starting condition, upon which you build the other things. You decide by yourself after all, whether your own talent reaches No.1: through training diligence, hard work, and mental strength. In addition, I had the expreriences of other kinds of sports. I played football(soccer) as a teamsport, and in free time basketball and tabletennis. All of these gave me some incentive to want to be better than others. I made a big step when I could turn around my mental weakness to positive.

How did you manage this mental change?
Federer: I noticed one day what was the best for me on the court. You have to find out by yourself. After all, each has to feel comfortable. You play before so many audiences. Later, I was seen on TV. I knew that each movement is recorded, then I could not hide myself. I had to learn to become the same person on the court just like outside. And I had to find this person once. This lasted a while. To be honest, it was 3 or 4 years ago. Before that, I was never satisfied with me and my behavior on the court. I just couldn't controle myself. All meant for me too much.

Did you always have fun with training?
Federer: No, I had to develope the fun in the training. But the fun is extremely important. You have to know why and for what you are training. If you just train, because you have to train, you are on the wrong way.

Earlier, did you go to bed timely before tournaments?
Federer: Oh, I am more like a night owl. I like to sleep long and go to bed late. Sleeping in without an alarm clock is a dream! In school time I overslept a lot - there I wasn't surely a model person.

Did you change your diet with an aim?
Federer: Not with an aim. I was careful not to drink and eat something sweet too much. I had once spoken with a nutrition expert, who explained to me that I could change myself. But he also said: You are the world No.12, if you keep doing so, you make it to the top. There I was really happy. I would like to be able to enjoy my life.

How long did you go to school?
Federer: With 16 I left school and concentrated fully on tennis. I wanted to take this risk for a couple of years. If it hadn't worked out well on the tour, I would have gone back to school.

Who supported you financially?
Federer: The association paid for the transportations and coaches. My parents paid for the clothes and private lessons - and sacrificed much much time. I got my first sponser contract with Nike with 15. From then I could afford by myself.

What would you have done differently in retrospect?
Federer: Not many. I would have checked earlier how one stabilizes oneself mentaly. All coaches said to me at the time: Change yourself, change yourself! I needed these outbreaks at the time. I have to say I would have liked to calm down earlier. Winning the Wimbledon title 2003 was decisive, which came just in the right moment for me. Everything, which could have come earlier at Grand Slams, would have come too early, to be honest with you. Now the successes are there, so I cannot have done many things differently.

What do you advise someone when he/she asks you: Roger, how do I become No.1?
Federer: The most important thing is not to forget to have fun on tennis. Only with joy on tennis, you can deal with highs and lows, which always come. And, you have to work hard. It isn't enough, if someone says to you: you have talent. You have to prove it.

lunahielo
06-18-2005, 01:32 AM
Thank you, Stevens Point..
This was a very interesting article......
and you translated it well. :)

*M*
06-18-2005, 02:12 AM
Thanks for the articles, everyone. I just love Roger's attitude and maturity. He is such a great role model. Thanks for the translation, Stevens Point.


thanks to Kikko for sharing this cartoon. so this is what alfonsojose was talking about- Jesus Fed! :lol:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v610/Frau_Bernhard/Rogicartoon-small.bmp:lol: :lol: :lol:

"Roger Federer vs Beavis and Butthead!"

Shy
06-18-2005, 03:17 AM
Unfortunately Fed-hatas don't need reasons to hate him... they make up excuses just to diss him... whatever... just cos Rogi doesn't act like Pandy or Lleyton doesn't mean he has no personality...

In the show business, Roger doesn"t have the it factor because he is a nice guy and is smart, the opposite of people like Paris Hilton.

nobama
06-18-2005, 03:36 AM
V. nice interview, except they can't quite get Mirka's name right. :lol:

http://www.sport.telegraph.co.uk/sport/graphics/2005/06/18/stmott180605.jpg

Saturday interview: Federer pulls all the strings in court of a king (http://www.sport.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml;jsessionid=GTHKJUIGAJGCRQFIQMFCM5OAVCBQ YJVC?xml=/sport/2005/06/18/stmott18.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/06/18/ixsport.html&_requestid=33106)

Monks used to do this. Big time. So much so, and with such enthusiasm, the ecclesiastical authorities in France tried to ban it during the 11th century. But obviously they were not successful because here was Roger Federer, the two-time Wimbledon champion, in a mystically darkened room, 10 centuries later, having precisely the same addictive fun.

"It's very nice," he said politely afterwards. "Although if you don't get it right, your whole body shakes with vibrations." He wobbled from head to foot in an action replay.

Real tennis is more complex than the EU Constitution. You need a degree in advanced mathematics and applied architecture

just to walk on the court. The racket weighs a ton and the balls are dangerous lumps of bandaged wine corks that refuse to bounce or attack you like sniper fire from the sloping roofs. There is a near-fatal hazard at every turn, not least the world's greatest tennis player on the other side of the net, bandana round his head and that predatory look in his eyes known only too well to Lleyton Hewitt.

Federer pretends to smile with his eyes on court, but he is really computing his favoured method of execution. Apt for someone playing at Hampton Court on the same site as Henry VIII.

They had said airily, "Just two minutes of doubles", and handed me the wooden racket with which to go to my doom. A crowd of

on-lookers sat behind the court in something called the dedans, veiled from the murderous action by what looked to be an old tennis net. Lucky them. Out on court, there was no hiding place, not from the impossibility of connecting with the ball nor the ignominy of failing to do so.

Now I know how Paul-Henri Mathieu, of France, will feel when he faces the defending champion in their first-round match at Wimbledon on Monday. Predominantly hopeless.

In the end, by underarming the serve in my direction at about one-hundredth of the speed it will rocket over the net next week, Federer induced a fluke forehand that returned spinning low to his backhand and rattled to a deadly conclusion somewhere near the foot of the 'winning gallery'. The celebrations were completely out of order and I was led away to be replaced by the editor of Ace magazine. Still, I now know how it feels to beat Roger Federer, albeit for one point in a strange game and because he let me. Upon such moments can you feast for the rest of your life.

Admittedly, the Federer smorgasbord is slightly better stocked. He has arrived in Britain to defend his title having won seven tournaments this year already, including Halle on grass last week, and more than $2.5 million (£1.37 million) in prize money.

He won three of the four grand slam titles last year and is hailed universally as the most gifted player of his generation. At his alarming rate of improvement, he is projected to be the greatest tennis player of all time.

The 23-year-old Swiss refuses to be bowled over by such flattery. He calls talk of this kind "a burden". If only Henry VIII had been so circumspect. But Federer, far from bloated with wild boar and self-importance, is anchored by reality. He acknowledges his four grand slam singles titles (two Wimbledon, one US, one Australian) rank more lowly than Rod Laver's 11, Bjorn Borg's 11, John McEnroe's seven and Pete Sampras's 14.

The pantheon door is ajar but Federer needs to lean his formidable weight against it for a few more years. He has the game, an all-round graceful game, sumptuous and inventive, defiant of gravity and the laws of physics, but he has yet to sustain his dominance.

However, at Wimbledon, at least, he is shading towards tyranny. "It is my second home, in a way. I've basically won here three times, if you include the junior title. I always look forward to it with a lot of hope, especially after the claycourt season. It's really special. On the grass courts, you can dive, you can

fool around. It is a very, very natural feeling. The smell of grass. Maybe it's because I used to play soccer.

"Last year I had the feeling of being on edge because I was the defending champion. I didn't know how that would feel. This year I have the experience. I have shown I can do it - and do it again. So my belief is very strong I can do it again - again." He bestows one of his megawatt smiles. "So I'm actually coming into this Wimbledon feeling maybe more calm and relaxed and serene than I have in the last few years. So many things make me be very serene and confident."

One of those things might have been his consummate performance on the real tennis court. For most, introduction to the mysterious, throwback sport with its myriad rules and minefield practices would have been a frightening experience. He played like a master, scooping half-volleys, playing off the penthouses, understanding almost at a

pre-conscious level how to coax the ball around the wooden court. For some of us, it was like playing golf in your living room. For Federer, it was as easy as breathing.

He is a student and a connoisseur of racket sports. No matter how arcane the language, he wanted to know more. When the expert advised us: "The best chase you can do is right in the nick," he looked suitably impressed. It sounded more like a Saturday night in Colchester to the rest of us. He is interested in history, psychology and trigonometry, which makes him a pretty devastating package as a tennis player.

Quaintly, he didn't want to go after the event put on for him by his watch sponsor, Maurice Lacroix. In the end, he persuaded his girlfriend and business partner, Mirka Vavrinec, a former tennis player herself, to sneak on court with him for one last hit. What Cardinal Wolsey would have made of a blonde woman in jeans and trainers hitting winners down the royal tramlines is hard to imagine. Henry VIII would probably have married her.

The marital state is, however, not in her immediate plans, despite the solidity of her relationship with her boyfriend. "It's not an issue right now," Federer added.

The issue, the dominant issue, is Wimbledon. Perhaps, for all his avowed serenity, the champion is intent on reasserting his authority on the grand slam events. Twice, this year, he has lost in the semi-finals. The first defeat was to Marat Safin, the Russian famous for his mood swings, in a compelling five sets in Melbourne. The second was to the new superstar, Rafael Nadal, in fading light at Roland Garros. An attitude of waspish frustration was definitely detectable in Paris.

"Oh, I don't remember," Federer said. "I thought I handled myself very good. I was just a little bit disappointed with some shot selections and the way the match ended. I was really starting to be in control of the match but, honestly, I could hardly see the ball at the end. I was fighting against time almost more than Nadal. That threw me off a little bit. I was playing an attacking game and I've got to see the ball well. It was a little bit easier for him."

Federer is not demonstrably fearful of the young gun trained upon him. But then he wouldn't be. He tries to eradicate all signs of human anguish, as Sampras was always careful to do. The American always thought that emoting betrayed weakness. Federer often has no reason to emote, being so splendid. He is certainly playing down his reaction to the charm of his teenage rival.

"I have no problems with him. We've spent time doing appearances together and I have heard he admires my game very much. We've had some good matches, especially in Miami when I came back from two sets down to win. He's a fighter. I have no problems with his attitude when he pumps himself up.

"I'm always happy for new challenges. He's not just another Spaniard. He's a completely different Spaniard. He's a lefty. Shy off court and very out there on court. I remember when I was younger how worried I was to play lefties. It's not a problem now."

Most of Federer's youthful problems have been overcome. Rackets, once tossed and smashed, are now preserved for their lawful purpose. But he has incorporated those old days of losses and trauma in the new, improved version of himself. "I didn't always feel very lucky. I had times when I was losing a lot of matches. It felt awful. You lose confidence. You feel so small.

"Now I have really started to play great. I look at life and tennis very different now. If I lose a match, no problem. I've had so much success already."

His Wimbledon record represents the peaks and troughs. After winning the junior title in 1998, he lost in the first round to Jiri Novak (1999), Yevgeny Kafelnikov (2000) and Mario Ancic (2002), with that dramatic fourth-round five-set Centre Court defeat of the mighty Sampras in between. There was the foretaste of genius, even if he did lose to Tim Henman in the next round.

"Ups and downs," he said, drawing the mountainous progress. Very aptly alpine for a Swiss. Yet he seems so level-headed, especially without the ponytail. When Andre Agassi had his ceremonially cut, it was put on display behind glass in a fashionable restaurant.

Federer didn't know that. "Really?" he said, amazed. Where did his go. "In the bin." But there was a story attached. Marik supplied the details. "Thing was," she said, "I had this very good appointment with a hairdresser, one of the best in America, while Roger had this event in New York. But then I said to him, 'Why don't you go to this lady?' I don't mind because I want him to look good because he is always so much in the press." Federer will not understand this yet, but greater love has no woman. This girl is a gem. :yeah: :

"Then, the next day," Marik added, "she cut the hair of Andy Roddick." You can see how it is on the men's tour. Where Roger Federer leads, the rest will follow.

The closeness between Federer and Marik is not an inconsiderable part of his success. His mother acts as his agent, along with a Swiss lawyer, but Marik is his travelling companion, permanently hooked to her mobile. "Sometimes I want to know what she thinks of my tennis, too. She sees a hundred of my matches a year. She knows something about the game because she was a player. I like her to criticise my game."

Criticise his game? You feel it necessary to point out that most men prefer their womenfolk not to criticise them. "Well, I'm different," Federer said.

"But I only do that if he asks me," added Marik, making the situation a little more explicable. "We have a lot of respect for each other." :couple:

Now he has another person to ask. After going coach-less during his wonder year, 2004, he has hired the wily Australian, Tony Roche, to work with him. It took much persuasion but the man who took Ivan Lendl and Pat Rafter to their respective heights has agreed to be at Wimbledon for the duration.

"It's an inspiration for me that he has got such a fire for the game," said Federer, whose own fiery passion is as ice-capped as an alpine peak but nonetheless present for that. He is burning to improve, to learn, to win, to become triple Wimbledon champion. Only seven opponents stand in his way and, trust me, you wouldn't want to be one of them.

Mrs. B
06-18-2005, 07:11 AM
thanks, mirkaland. Ms. Mott wrote this very well and gives a lot of credit to Mirka, but to mispell her name? :smash:

Stevens Point
06-18-2005, 12:30 PM
Another article about Roger before Wimbledon!!!!! from Foxsports. This reminds me of RonE's sig.

Wimbledon's greatest champions by decade

Elliott Kalb / Special to FOXSports.com
Posted: 15 hours ago

Can anyone topple Roger Federer on the grass of Wimbledon? It's doubtful, as the 23-year old top seed has a stranglehold on the place, like other great champions in the place they've held premiere tennis tournaments since 1877.

1. 2000s: Roger Federer

http://msn.foxsports.com/id/3697518_36_2.jpg
Roger Federer is looking for his third consecutive Wimbledon title. (Martin Meissner / Associated Press)

He showed up for the first time as a teenager in 1999. Since then, Federer is 18-4 at Wimbledon, with back-to-back Championships. He even defeated Pete Sampras in a fourth-round match in 2001. It's a little early to place him with Sampras, Borg, and Laver; but not much.

2. 1990s: Pete Sampras

This quiet assassin with the booming serve dominated Centre Court for over a decade. He won in 1993, 1994, and 1995. He won in 1997, 1998, 1999, and 2000. He compiled a 40-2 match record on Centre Court at Wimbledon and 63-7 overall at All England Club.

It's hard to pick his greatest Wimbledon conquest. It may have been in 1999, when he trounced Andre Agassi in straight sets. It may have been in 1995, when he defeated three-time champ Boris Becker. It may have been his epic, five-set match in the 1998 Final against Goran Ivanisevic.

3. 1980s: Martina Navratilova

On the gentlemen's side, John McEnroe won three singles championships in this era, as did Boris Becker, who showed up in 1985 to become the youngest player to win Wimbledon, doing it as an unseeded player. But the competition was too fierce (throw in Borg and Connors at the beginning of the 80s, and Edberg, Cash, and Lendl at the end) for any player to truly dominate. In the Ladies tournament, Ms. Navratilova won an incredible nine times in thirteen years. Here's the judgement call: Navratilova's reign is considered superior in this column to Steffi Graf's five titles in six years (1988-1993). Why? Navratilova, who was 8-0 in her first eight Wimbledon Finals, was miles above the rest of the field. Graf won three of her titles (1993, 1995, 1996) almost immediately after the world's number one player — Monica Seles — was stabbed by an obsessive fan of Steffi's.

4. 1970s: Bjorn Borg

Mr. Borg should have been prominently mentioned in two previous columns of mine. His streak of five consecutive Wimbledon championships (1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980) is worthy of inclusion in any list of great individual streaks. And his retirement in 1982 was certainly one of the great endings any athlete ever had.

He defeated Ilie Nastase in the 1976 Finals. He defeated Jimmy Connors in the Finals in both 1977 and 1978. The big-serving Roscoe Tanner went down to Borg in the 1979 Finals. And then, standing in the way of a fifth consecutive Lawn Tennis championship in 1980, was John McEnroe.

They battled a quarter-century ago on the famed Centre Court, the seemingly emotionless Swede and the brash kid from Queens, New York. They went at it for close to four hours. When it was over, Borg had come out on top, in five thrilling sets. McEnroe won by losing, by saving seven match points and showing the heart of a champion. The fourth-set tiebreak was unbelievable, the fabled "Battle of 18-16". Borg had five chances to win the match, but couldn't close the deal. McEnroe missed out six times to send the match into a fifth-set, before finally accomplishing the feat.

Every great champion needs a great challenge. Borg was a great champion, but needed McEnroe to show the world how truly great he was.

5. 1960s: Rod Laver

His left arm was twice as big as his right arm, and he used his southpaw advantage at Wimbledon many times. He was a Wimbledon finalist in 1959 and 1960. He won in 1961 and 1962. Then, in 1963, he joined a professional tour and could not enter the Grand Slam events. By the end of the decade, in a newly created Open era ("open" meaning both professionals and amateurs could enter), Laver again won back-to-back championships, in 1968 and 1969. If given the chance, he might have won nine consecutive Wimbledon titles.

6. 1950s: Maureen Connolly

Althea Gibson and Maria Bueno won consecutive Wimbledons in this era, but Connolly won three straight in 1952, 1953, and 1954. "Little Mo" is one of the great stories in sports history. She was a poor San Diego girl competing in a rich person's sport, and burst through to win Wimbledon by the age of 17. At 20, she was a three-time winner, but her career soon came to a crashing halt after her three-peat due to a freak riding accident (she was crushed against a cement truck while horseback riding) which tore up her leg. She never got a chance to win her fourth Wimbledon in a row. She died of cancer at the age of 34, in 1969.

7. 1940s: Jack Kramer

I could be funny, and claim that a player named Not Held is inscribed in the list of Wimbledon champions each year from 1940-1945. But, I'll choose the man whose racket I first played with as a youngster.

Jack Kramer was a tennis prodigy from Southern California. He became a wartime member of the U.S. Coast Guard, where he continued to play in tennis tournaments, until he was sent to the South Pacific, where he commanded a tank landing craft in five invasions. He was discharged in January of 1946, with the rank of lieutenant. It took him just a few months to regain his top tennis form. Painful blisters cost him the 1946 Wimbledon championship, but in 1947, he easily defeated American Tom Brown 6-1, 6-3, 6-2. He became the first Wimbledon champion to wear tennis shorts, by the way.

In November of 1947, he signed a $50,000 contract to tour with professional champion Bobby Riggs. He soon became the top professional player of all time, and the highest paid, but that wasn't enough for Kramer. He had ideas about staging professional players tours, and signed up the best amateur players beginning in the early 50s.

He won in '47, and was the best player in the decade. If professionals were allowed to compete, he would have been top seeded in '48 and '49.

8. 1930s: Fred Perry

Perry was a table-tennis champion before taking up tennis at the age of 18. An English champion (it was easier 75 years ago for Brits; the lack of accessible and affordable air travel made it nearly impossible for foreigners to enter Wimbledon), Perry was a great three-time champion. Among his quotes: "I was always a believer in stamping on my opponent if I got him down, at Wimbledon or anywhere else. I never wanted to give him the chance to get up. If I could have beaten him six-minus-one instead of six-love I would."

Perry won consecutive Wimbledons in 1934, 1935, and 1936. He didn't attempt to win a fourth straight, preferring to turn professional.

9. 1920s: Suzanne Lenglen

From 1919-1926, Suzanne Lenglen lost only one tennis match — and that was by default. She won six Wimbledon titles in 7 years beginning in 1919 — remember, due to World War I, there was no Wimbledon tournament from 1915-1918 — and was one of the biggest sports stars of the 20s. She turned back Helen Wills in 1926, and avoided Wills the rest of her career. Lenglen was the first major tennis star to turn pro. She died of leukemia at the age of 39.

10. The Early Years: Lottie Dod

What a great name! Lottie Dod won in '87, '88, '91, '92, and '93. Of course, that was in the 1800s.

lunahielo
06-18-2005, 03:59 PM
Another good one!, Stevens Point~ :)

Marik? Marik??? :sad: :eek:

SUKTUEN
06-18-2005, 04:02 PM
thankyou for article and pictures

nobama
06-18-2005, 06:32 PM
thanks, mirkaland. Ms. Mott wrote this very well and gives a lot of credit to Mirka, but to mispell her name? :smash:

And to do it several times! Doesn't she have an editor who proofs her stuff?

Daniel
06-18-2005, 10:58 PM
Thanks :)

Daniel
06-19-2005, 01:03 AM
Roger Federer Opens Wimbledon Tennis Defense Against Mathieu
June 16 (Bloomberg) -- Roger Federer begins his quest for a third straight Wimbledon tennis title against France's Paul-Henri Mathieu. Andy Roddick, the man he beat in last year's final, might face hard-serving Ivo Karlovic in the second round.

Lindsay Davenport, the 1999 champion and women's top seed, was today drawn to open against Russia's Alina Jidkova, ranked 78th. Serena Williams and sister Venus, each two-time winners of the grass- court Grand Slam, could battle in the fourth round, while champion Maria Sharapova starts her defense against Spain's Nuria Llagostera Vives, No. 36. The two-week tournament starts June 20.

Switzerland's Federer, a winner of 29 straight matches on grass, is in a quarter that includes Germany's Nicolas Kiefer, Spain's Juan Carlos Ferrero, Spain's Tommy Robredo and Chile's Fernando Gonzalez. Only Kiefer, in 1997, has ever reached the last eight. Third-seeded Lleyton Hewitt, the 2002 holder, looms in the semifinals.

Roddick beat Karlovic in straight sets in the final of the Stella Artois Championships in London four days ago. Both sets against the 6-foot-10 Croat went to tie-breaks.

Roddick also has challenging opponents if he can get past the second round. He could meet 30th-seeded Robin Soderling, whose best results have come on fast surfaces, in the third round, and 20th-seeded Ivan Ljubicic, who beat him as Croatia upset the U.S. in the first round of the Davis Cup in March, in the fourth.

Four-time Wimbledon semifinalist and local favorite Tim Henman or Sebastien Grosjean, a semifinalist the past two years, may await Roddick in the quarters.

Nadal Meets Spadea

French Open champion Rafael Nadal, the fourth seed in Roddick's half, starts against veteran Vincent Spadea, who reached the fourth round last year, then advanced to the quarterfinals of a grass-court event in Newport, Rhode Island.

Hewitt begins against Christophe Rochus, ranked 48th, with James Blake of the U.S. a possible opponent in the second round.

Hewitt has won all six matches against the 102nd-ranked Blake, although two of their three matches in Grand Slams have gone to five sets. Blake's ranking slipped last year after he broke his neck and suffered with shingles.

Mark Philippoussis, the 2003 finalist given a wild card as his ranking is so low, might face fifth-seeded Marat Safin in the second round. Safin, the Australian Open champion, has a first- round match against Thailand's Paradorn Srichaphan, a winner on grass in Nottingham, England, in 2004.

Davenport, seeking her first Grand Slam title in five years, could take on Kim Clijsters, a former No. 1, in the fourth round. Their half of the draw also includes third-seeded Amelie Mauresmo and U.S. Open champion Svetlana Kuznetsova.

Justine Henin-Hardenne could play the woman she beat for the French Open title this month, Mary Pierce, in the last 16 before meeting Serena or Venus Williams in the following round. Serena Williams skipped the French with an ankle injury, while Venus took the last of her four Grand Slam titles four years ago.

One of those four could meet Sharapova in the semifinals. Sharapova, who became the second-youngest player to win the women's singles at Wimbledon in the open era at 17 years, two months, has Nadia Petrova, a semifinalist at Roland Garros this month, in her quarter.



To contact the reporter on this story:
Ravi Ubha at Wimbledon through the London office at rubha@bloomberg.net
Last Updated: June 16, 2005 07:52 EDT

Daniel
06-19-2005, 01:04 AM
Federer sets his sights on Wimbledon hat-trick



Roger Federer knows all about outsized expectations, particularly after he won three of the four majors last season.

In the past 12 months, the Swiss is 91-5 overall, capturing 14 of 19 tournaments he entered. More impressively, he's won his last 20 finals, and his 29-match winning streak on grass is the second-longest in the Open era, trailing only Bjorn Borg's 41.

He insists he feels no pressure as he tries to join Borg and Pete Sampras as the only men in the past 70 years to win three straight Wimbledons.

``I was more concerned last year, defending my first Wimbledon title,'' the top-ranked Federer said. ``Now it's easier for me to deal with the situation.''

He lost only three of 54 matches this year, but two were Slam semifinals: against Marat Safin in Australia, and Rafael Nadal in France.

``As champion, I am always looking to improve,'' Federer said. ``I know I can attack more, I just go out on the court now and make it very apparent that the opponent has to beat me.''

Second-seeded Andy Roddick, who won a third straight Queen's Club title last week, took a set off Federer in last year's final.

``Any time (Federer) loses, because it's so rare, it makes him seem a little more human,'' Roddick said.

Nadal announced his arrival as a star by winning the French Open, the first man since Mats Wilander in 1982 to take that title on his debut. But even Nadal concedes he's not ready to make a similar showing on grass.

``I'll be interested to see how Nadal plays on grass,'' said Roddick, who could face the 19-year-old Spaniard in the semifinals. ``I don't know if it's going to be the surface that most suits his game, but he's made it very clear early on that you can't underestimate him.''

And other potential contenders, such as two-time major champion Safin, 2002 Wimbledon winner Lleyton Hewitt, and British hope Tim Henman, all have physical or mental hurdles that could prove too tough to overcome.

So Roddick's record-breaking serves and success on grass make him a natural pick to meet Federer in the final again in two weeks. Even if the American has had, for him, a decent year, not a great one.

``What I have seen missing a little bit from Andy is that attitude. That in-your-face, sticking-it-to-you attitude,'' United States Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe said. ``And I think it'll be back at Wimbledon.''

Henman, who is trying to become the first British man to win Wimbledon since Fred Perry in 1936, faces Jarkko Nieminen in the first round.

``There's no doubt about the fact that he can be a very dangerous,'' Henman said Nieminen. ``His ranking isn't quite as high as it once was, but he has weapons _ and if he uses them well he can cause problems for anybody.''

Daniel
06-19-2005, 01:06 AM
Roger Federer: At home on his holy lawns, the master of grass heads for court of the invincibles
This tennis icon is not for shattering as he lines up title No 3. Nick Townsend meets a relaxed champion who might be the best ever
19 June 2005


Thursday lunchtime and, with dabs of paint being applied, leaves being vacuumed and courts receiving their final manicure, the host is all dressed up and awaiting its guests. The All England Club is ready. So, too, there can be no doubt, is Roger Federer as he returns interviewing serves with a customary fluency which exudes a fundamentalist's faith in his own abilities, but without trespassing into the realms of disdain for his opponents.

As a squall of rain lashes these "holy lawns", as he has described them, the world No 1, top Wimbledon seed, and the man about whom such extravagant claims as "potentially the best ever" have been forth- coming from those who feature among the élite themselves - Rod Laver, John McEnroe and Federer's own schoolboy idol, Boris Becker - is clearly content to be back. Not just on grass, a surface on which he is ready to extend his undefeated sequence to 30 matches, but in his tennis haven.

This should not imply, as he is swift to remind you himself, that he has been a man cast adrift in recent months. Two Grand Slams may have passed him by since a 2004 in which he dominated tennis like no other player in the open era, but semi-final appearances in both the Australian and French Opens (the former an epic five-set contest before he yielded to Marat Safin) are testimony to his fortitude. Victory in both the singles and doubles at the Gerry Weber Open in Halle, Germany, a week ago reconfirmed his liking for getting back to nature, at least where surfaces are concerned.

Like the cow, named Juliette, with which the Swiss player was presented at his home tournament at Gstaad in 2003 in recognition of his first Wimbledon title, he is back on his preferred pasture. It is fortunate that he is not given a cow after every successful Wimbledon, or the man who confesses "I am no farmer" could well end up with a herd.

"I've lived through so much here," he says, after the draw has been made which pairs him on Centre Court in tomorrow's first round with the Frenchman Paul-Henri Mathieu. "I won as a junior. I beat [Pete] Sampras here, won the two championships. My idols, you know, Becker, Edberg, Sampras, they all played here. This is what I rem- ember watching on TV when I was young. This will always be the most special. But of course I've got other goals I'd like to achieve: in the Davis Cup, Olympics, and the French Open [which he is still to win]."

He adds: "I may have an edge over other players mentally because of the success I've had on grass and the way I've been winning Wimbledons without too much of a problem. It's definitely not so easy for your opponent."

Today, lest you were wondering, Juliette is grazing contentedly up in the hillsides after having given birth to her first calf. Her owner, who is viewed as being capable of overtaking Sampras's Wimbledon record of seven titles, is relaxing and chewing the cud as he prepares to challenge for a hat-trick here.

Federer concedes that, at this stage in his career two years ago, he was not so sanguine. "When I lost in the first round of the French Open against [Luis] Horna that year, I came here and was really under pressure to show what I can do," he recalls. "Like this year, I had won at Halle just before, and I remember I arrived with a horrible back. I got to the third or fourth round and I was close to throwing in the white towel because I could hardly move. From then on, my back started to get better. I came through in the end. The only fight I had was against myself, not against any opponent."

The player who first announced himself here with triumph in the 1998 junior tournament, continues: "What has happened since we all know, but Wimbledon saved me. It came at the right time. Everybody was starting to be on my case, saying, 'Is this guy going to be the talent he has promised to be? Is he going to show what he really can do?' "

How perceptions have altered. The BBC's surreal Wimbledon trailer, to a background of Nancy Sinatra's Bang Bang, portraying images of icons being shattered, scarcely applies to the 6ft 1in, 23-year-old, who began to perfect the adroitness and versatility necessary to counter the power lobby by striking tennis balls against the wall of his local club in Münchenstein, near Basle, where he was raised, the product of a South African mother and Swiss father.

It is three years since he was defeated on grass. Learned judges like McEnroe believe Federer can prevail on it even when not at his optimum. "It is true, the last few years have been quite incredible on grass," Federer agrees. "I've surprised myself. The last one I lost was against [Mario] Ancic. That one was a heartbreaker. But since then, every time I've won at Halle, I've won Wimbledon, so now I'm prepared. I'm confident. I'm feeling great."

And does he harbour a belief that Sampras's target is attainable? "I'm focused on the next couple of weeks, rather than the next five years," he states. "Of course, if I win again this year..." He hesitates, circumspection getting the better of bravado, before continuing: "You always have to set yourself higher standards."

He adds: "On the grass, you don't have many experts on this surface. You have some that play really well on the surface, others where it would be a big surprise if they play well. On clay, there are many outsiders who could actually win the tournament, while here you feel there's a bunch of guys who are really big favourites to win the tournament. But you do get surprises on the grass in the early rounds, so you have to make sure you're feeling good and you get through those matches."

Federer speaks with an assuredness and authority that belies his years. His talents, though intuitive, have been honed by a constant dissection, not just of his own flaws, but the areas in which he excels. "To me, it was very important to know my own game," he says. "There's a lot of players out there who play good, but they don't know why they play good. They can't really analyse their game. I got to really understand my game, especially at the time when I didn't have a coach [including, remarkably enough, last year]."

Last year, he concedes, the expectation was intense, because he was, for the first time, a defending champion. This time, Federer insists, "I feel less pressure, just because of all I've been through in the last year. There's been that US Open title, some good matches in the Australian and the French." He adds: "I didn't feel too disappointed about the French. It was still my best performance ever in Paris. Coming to this tournament, I'm more relaxed than I have been in the last couple of years. But I still make sure that I'm well prepared."

That means not just on court, but off it, maintaining a familiar schedule that has been so successful in the past. "I'm in an apartment, like I have been for the last two years," he says. "There I can enjoy the cooking of my girlfriend [Miroslava "Mirka" Vavrinec, the former Swiss player, who retired because of injury in 2002]. It's very relaxed. It's like being at home almost. Everything is walking distance unless you want to go downtown, but I hardly ever do that, because Wimbledon is just too important. I can come here for a sightseeing tour another time."

The promotion of Andy Roddick to second seed, two places above his world ranking, means that Federer cannot meet the American until the final, which would be a repeat of last year's denouement, after which the champion described their rivalry as "Mr Service against Mr Finesse".

While neither Roddick nor Lleyton Hewitt, the player whom Federer humiliated with a "double bagel" (two 6-0 sets) in the 2004 US Open, are likely to ask any new questions of Federer, the same cannot be said of the Spanish teenager Rafael Nadal, winner of the French Open earlier this month.

"It's something quite incredible to win the French, and he's still very young," says Federer. "You have to give respect to his personality, mentally, and also his game. He's a very different player to the rest we have, because he's a leftie. He also brings something else to the court, like great athleticism and great charisma, even though he's very shy."

He adds: "On hard courts, he'll be a huge threat for years to come. On the grass, we'll see what he can do. I don't consider that is his best surface. But it doesn't matter. Once you're in the top five, you should be able to play on any surface."

Certainly Federer has demonstrated the truth of that maxim, but it is here, where he is generally assured of a magic-carpet ride, that he reigns supreme. Already he is developing that invincibility we used to associate with Sampras. There can be no greater affirmation of his capacity for greatness than that.

Daniel
06-19-2005, 01:07 AM
LONDON (Reuters) - One hundred and twenty-seven of the world's finest men's tennis players will gather in a verdant corner of southwest London next week, their collective task to prove that Roger Federer is not invincible on grass.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Wimbledon champion has not lost for three years on tennis's fastest surface and will become only the third man in the professional era to complete a hat-trick of men's singles titles at the All England Club if he prevails again.

Since 1968 only Sweden's Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras of the United States have achieved three successive Wimbledon men's singles triumphs and Federer would sit comfortably in their company.

The world number one has 29 consecutive wins on grass and if he wins Wimbledon again he will move to 36, within sight of Borg's record of 41.

The 23-year-old Swiss need fear nobody on his favorite surface but, sadly for his rivals, there is no danger of him becoming complacent.

"I always think I can improve. You can always serve and return better. I can definitely play better," Federer said after warming up by completing a hat-trick of Halle titles on grass last weekend.

"You've always got to watch out. There are some big servers around and some dangerous players."

Federer enjoys a big psychological edge over his two closest rivals -- Australian Lleyton Hewitt and American Andy Roddick -- having beaten both of them in last year's tournament.

Federer ousted Hewitt in the quarter-finals and Roddick in the final, allowing each to take a set off him before turning on the style to ensure victory.

Both pretenders are hell-bent on revenge and looked close to peak form at the Queen's Club championships last week. But their best chance of winning may lie in Federer being ambushed early from an unexpected source.

"Obviously Roger's the favorite," said Hewitt, the 2002 champion. "I think there's only a maximum of a handful of guys who can actually hold up the trophy."

None of the leading trio are out-and-out serve-volleyers, which makes them, in theory at least, vulnerable to practitioners of two-shot tennis.

CROATIAN THREAT

One of those, Britain's Tim Henman, remains his country's best hope of a first men's champion since 1936, although the admirable aggression of lowly-ranked teen-ager Andrew Murray at Queen's Club last week suggested he could prick a few egos.

Two basketball-player-sized Croatians, Ivo Karlovic and last year's semi-finalist Mario Ancic, are capable of causing even Federer sleepless nights with their outstanding serves.

Ancic was the last player to beat Federer on a grass court -- in the Wimbledon first round in 2002.

Karlovic, a skyscraping 2.08m tall, generates deliveries of such trajectory and bounce that he has beaten Hewitt, one of the game's outstanding service returners, twice in succession on grass.

Impish Frenchman Sebastien Grosjean, a semi-finalist the past two years, and Argentina's rugged 2002 runner-up David Nalbandian will also have their say.

Fireworks are likely from this year's two grand slam winners, Australian Open champion Marat Safin and Spain's dynamic French Open winner Rafael Nadal, although the pyrotechnics may prove short-lived.

Neither likes playing on grass but such is their natural talent that neither can be discounted.

Nadal's dynamic court presence, with his flowing locks, bandana and pirate pants, is reminiscent of a younger Andre Agassi, the 1992 champion who has pulled out of this year's tournament due to injury.

Now 35, the father-of-two's fitness and motivation levels are on the wane and it seems likely the Las Vegan has made his last appearance at the All England Club.

Without him Wimbledon will be a poorer place, even with Federer as its three-time champion.

eleven11
06-19-2005, 02:14 AM
Thank you very very very much for all the Rogi's news and articles!!! :worship:

Daniel
06-19-2005, 03:35 AM
u nplacer :)

nobama
06-19-2005, 04:13 AM
Federer the philosopher finds plenty to cherish (http://sport.scotsman.com/tennis.cfm?id=673862005)

ALIX RAMSAY


PERFECTION can be a tiring business. No matter how many silver trophies line the mantelpiece, no matter how many millions lie in the bank, it can all get a bit wearing at times.

For the past two years, Roger Federer (he of the 29 trophies and the $16 million in the bank) has barely had time to draw breath. He has rushed around the world mopping up important titles, collecting prestigious awards - he is the Laureus Sportsman of the Year, amongst other things - and doing his bit to satisfy the needs of sponsors, promoters and media alike. The poor boy must be knackered.

And, sure enough, there are times when the best player on the planet looks longingly at holiday brochures and dreams of a few weeks off in a sun-soaked paradise, simply doing nothing. But do not imagine for one moment that Federer has had enough - far from it. The job is exhausting but the rewards are out of this world.

"The last two years have made me wonder sometimes whether it is all worth it," he says. "I've been so busy, so many things have been happening. Of course there are days when I wish I had more holiday or especially more time at home. But somehow I just tell myself I've got more time later, that - maybe - one day it all won't be working out so well.

"So I cherish every moment when I win a tournament because I know how much effort I put into it. The big moments in finals where you get nervous and you still end up winning the tournament and you are all happy, these are the moments I live for. These are the ones that motivate me."

There have been plenty of moments to cherish in the past six months. So far he has won seven singles titles, one doubles title, 51 matches and $2.5million in prize money - and he has lost just three times. While defeats are rare, they hurt all the same and anyone who saw the look of utter disbelief on his face when he lost to Marat Safin in the semi-finals of the Australian Open, or Rafael Nadal in the semi-finals of the French Open, will know that Federer does not take kindly to losing.

Yet Federer is a very philosophical soul. Losses, and even tight matches, do him good, or so he thinks. The fact that he went straight from Paris to Halle and won his fifth grass court trophy - and took the doubles title for good measure - proved his point. The final was his 29th consecutive win on a grass court, a record stretching back to 2002. "I showed that the reaction can be good after a tough loss," he says, without a hint of either arrogance or anger.

But sometimes Federer does get riled. When he lost in Melbourne, it was his first defeat in six months. During that time he had won the US Open, the Bangkok Open, the Tennis Masters Cup, the Doha Open and Kooyong, the annual exhibition warm-up tournament for the Australian Open. And even in defeat, he knew Safin had to play out of his skin to beat him at Melbourne Park. Not a bad little run, then.

"But what I didn't quite like was people saying I had a bad start to the season," he says, gently. "I made the semi-finals at the Australian Open, where I was one point away from the final and then playing Lleyton Hewitt, who I had beaten quite a few times before.

"I didn't like that because it was putting me as an unbelievably heavy, huge favourite. I knew that losing, when I was defending champion, was going to be a huge disappointment for everybody but somehow I walked away from the tournament and the match thinking, 'Well, I still feel like I really played a good tournament'. I was never really in doubt with my own game and I proved it and I went on."

Federer oozes self-confidence. Polite, quiet and extremely friendly, he gets away with saying things that would make others sound conceited. But Federer is not one for boasting - he is just very comfortable in his position as the best in the business. As he comes to Wimbledon this year, he is relaxed and self-assured. The Centre Court is his stage and he is well-rehearsed. The occasional loss may be good for him, but not here, not at his favourite event. The world No.1 and the defending champion is not supposed to lose. Then again, there are 127 other men who are gunning for his title.

"I can't just go there and think I'm going to win the tournament," he says. "I just think I'm going to make it very hard for my opponent to beat me because, as the No.1 in the world, I don't want to give away wins like this because they can talk about this, maybe, for the rest of their lives - 'I beat the No.1 player in the world'.

"I feel more relaxed coming into this year's Wimbledon than last year's. Last year was the first time I had to defend a Grand Slam title. Now I'm sort of used to it with all the tournaments I've won in a row and the streaks I've had against top 10 players. All those matches, they helped me a great deal looking ahead to such a big tournament."

Should Federer win in a fortnight's time (he begins his campaign tomorrow against Paul-Henri Mathieu), he will lift his third consecutive trophy in SW19. The comparisons with Sampras's record of seven Wimbledon titles will suddenly become overwhelming. Federer, though, will not let himself look that far ahead.

"I just want to play a good Wimbledon," he says. "I'm not thinking five years ahead, about not being beaten in five years, I'm just trying not to be beaten this year. That's already tough enough."

With Hewitt and Safin in Federer's half of the draw and Roddick lurking in the bottom half, there is much work to be done before Federer can cherish another moment of victory. At 23, Federer has seen it all and done it all and every experience has made him stronger and better.

"I have the very strange feeling that the first Wimbledon is already so long ago," he says. "I've played so many matches, I've been to so many places, achieved so much since then, I feel like I'm already so much more grown up than back then."

Perfection may be exhausting but Roger Federer is still awfully good at it.

nobama
06-19-2005, 04:17 AM
Federer to go back on the attack (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml;jsessionid=PDMC4YYNJXQV1QFIQMFCM5OAVCBQ YJVC?xml=/sport/2005/06/19/stfede19.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/06/19/ixtenn.html&_requestid=27037)

When all your peers keep telling you that you could become the greatest tennis player in history, it is bound to put a strain on things like human frailties. Inevitably, Roger Federer this year has suffered by comparison with the Roger Federer of 2004. When you have won three out of four grand slams, two successive semi-final appearances are no longer viewed as a terrific achievement by your critics but a disappointment; worse still a failure.

But now Federer is back where he feels most comfortable, most appreciated, at the tournament that first realised all his dreams and made him famous and wealthy to boot. Since winning junior Wimbledon as a 16-year-old, the Championships have always held a special place in the heart of the two-time champion. There is something about the sedate tradition and style of the place that appeals to his own understated Swiss values.

He didn't always love the grass, though; in fact, prior to his junior Wimbledon success he hated it... said he couldn't move on it. "Now I really enjoy the grass," says the man who is unbeaten in 29 matches on it. "The grass is soft, everything is smooth, you don't hear the shoes squeak like you do on hard court at the US Open where everything is loud. Wimbledon is so calm."

At this time of the year it's the same old routine. After the annual frustrations of Paris, Federer puts his clay-court shoes away for another year and heads for central Germany and the Gerry Weber Open in Halle - "where there is no city" - and then for his beloved Wimbledon where he stays in an apartment in the village and enjoys the homely cooking of his girlfriend and business manager, Mirca.

"It's very relaxed, it's like being at home almost," he says. Home being the pharmaceutical city of Basel, which has a population even smaller than Halle. "I think everything sort of starts in Halle," he says. He has won there the last two years prior to winning at Wimbledon and has just done so again, beating Marat Safin, the man who got his year off on the wrong foot in Australia.

At Halle, the world's No 1 determines his game-plan for the grass-court season. Two years ago he adopted an attacking style and won Wimbledon at the net. Last year he won it from the baseline. "When I came to Wimbledon last year I was feeling so great off the baseline I thought, 'What's the point of coming to the net?' I think this year I'll play a little bit more aggressive."

His former coach, Peter Lundgren, must smile when he hears that. "When he first started practising volleys he hated it, he wasn't good at it," says the Swede. "It was like there were sharks inside the service box, but we practised, and now the sharks are gone."

There is much about Federer that has changed since he left the junior ranks, not least his serenity and composure, even in the most nerve-racking of moments. He makes Bjorn Borg look positively neurotic.

But in the early days his behaviour on court would have shaken John McEnroe. "I had the feeling that I had to release my anger somehow and I always told myself that I play better when I do. Before, when I was young, I used to commentate on every point myself, I was like a TV commentator. Then I realised that it is better when I show less emotion, concentrate more on my game and lose less energy. I was very surprised when people started to compare me with Borg because I always had the feeling that I was opposite to him."

Few players have analysed their game to the degree that Federer has. He even used to watch the ball as it hit the strings and sometimes continued to look back at his racket while the ball zinged towards his opponent.

"For me it was very important to know my own game. A lot of players who play good don't know why they play good sometimes, they can't really analyse their game. I got to really understand mine, especially at times when I didn't have a coach, to actually know why am I missing this shot, why am I making that shot, why I don't like this shot, why I prefer the other shot, and those things all made me become a better player."

Most people's favourite Federer shot is his top-spin forehand. His first coach, Sven Groenveld, who used to coach Greg Rusedski, remembers helping him develop it and recalls the first time they worked on it, when they met at a coaching clinic in Lausanne in 1997. "When I got there, these guys played with a court so fast that they couldn't keep the ball in play for more than a couple of hits," he says.

"They were taking full swings, hitting the balls as hard and as low as possible, and missing. I decided to raise the net to make them put some height on their strokes. I forced Roger to hit a heavy spin and get some depth and he got upset because he liked to hit the shit out of it. He said, 'I don't want to play like this'. I asked him, 'Do you ever hit one of those heavy spins in a match?' and he said 'Yes'. So I said, 'OK then, that is the shot we are practising today'. And he accepted it.

"The funny thing is that it's now one of his best shots. He calls it the 'Cliffhanger' - he hits the shit out of it, but with so much spin it drops like a rock and goes in. It's kind of funny that he uses it now, and didn't then."

Lundgren adds: "He's an artist and, if his shots don't work, he gets irritated and loses his concentration. He can do whatever he wants with the ball but he also needs to play simple sometimes."

Now Federer is looking to Wimbledon to stop the supposed rot. It was ever thus. In 2003 the critics, weary of waiting for the arrival of this extraordinary talent - remember, he had ended the reign of the seven-time Wimbledon champion Pete Sampras two years earlier - expressed their reservations about whether it would ever arrive, just as they once had Sampras.

"I was getting really worried for a while after I lost to Luis Horna in the first round at the French Open [in 2002]. Everybody was getting on my case, saying, 'Is this guy going to be the talent who never really showed what he can do?' Then I came here and slowly started showing what I can do. What happened since we all know. So Wimbledon definitely saved me."

Daniel
06-19-2005, 04:30 AM
Danke Danke :D

Nocko
06-19-2005, 04:54 AM
:eek: Many articles here!! Thanks Daniel and mirkaland :worship: :worship:

Daniel
06-19-2005, 05:04 AM
Men's Singles Preview


Thursday, 16 June, 2005


If Roger Federer is to win Wimbledon for a third successive year he will be obliged to do it the hard way. The top seed and clear favourite has been offered a fairly undemanding start to the defence of his crown, with an opening match against Paul-Henri Mathieu, a 23-year old Frenchman who lives in Federer's homeland, Switzerland, but the route will rapidly become more difficult if form runs true.

Lying in Federer's path after a second round against a Czech, either Ivo Minar or Michal Tabara, are such experienced tour names as Nicolas Kiefer, followed by one of two Spaniards, Juan Carlos Ferrero or Tommy Robredo.

Fernando Gonzalez, the Chilean with a thunderous serve and booming forehand, could await the champion in the quarter-finals, with a semi-final to follow against either the third seed, Lleyton Hewitt, or the fifth seed, Marat Safin, who defeated Federer in the semi-finals of the Australian Open in January before going on to lift the title.

Safin, who threatened after a first round dismissal last year that he would never return to the grass of Wimbledon, has thought better of that comment, which is good news for the spectators and very likely bad news for his first round opponent, the popular Thai Paradorn Srichaphan.

If he comes through that test unscathed, Safin could next play an opponent with a giant reputation at The Championships, the Australian Mark Philippoussis, who is in the draw courtesy of a wild card. This was awarded in recognition of Philippoussis's appearance in the final two years ago, since when he has been plagued by injury and ill-fortune.

Short though he is of recent success, Philippoussis's power game could unsettle the Russian while the turf is still juicy in the early stages, and another grass specialist, Mario Ancic of Croatia, could be planning to derail Safin in the fourth round. Britain's Tim Henman can testify to the threat of the gangling Ancic, having been eliminated by him in the quarter-finals 12 months ago.

Hewitt, the champion in 2002, has benefited from a good draw which should pose few problems until Safin, or his conqueror, hoves into sight in the last eight. Hewitt will be grateful for that luck of the early draw, since last week's Stella Artois tournament at London's Queen's Club was his first since March, following toe and rib injuries.

Hewitt could have wished for a more extended run than he managed at the Stella, where he was blasted out in the quarter-finals by the giant Croatian, Ivo Karlovic, but at least he will be grateful that the tallest man in tennis (6ft 10in) is well away from him this time in the other half of the draw.

Instead, it is the second seed, Andy Roddick, who must take on the most dangerous floater at this year's Championships. Roddick, promoted to that second seeding because he was the 2004 runner-up and is in excellent grass form, defeated Karlovic in last Sunday's Stella tournament final, but it was a tight, grim affair of two tie breaks. However, that victory will boost Roddick's confidence, should the 22-year-old American be in need of it.

The gloomy news for Britain's only serious hope, Tim Henman, as he prepares for h is 12th challenge for the Wimbledon title, is that he could face France's Sebastien Grosjean, who eliminated him in the quarter-finals two years ago, and if he gets past that testing hurdle it will probably mean facing Roddick and his record serving prowess in the last eight. Things certainly get no easier for the British number one in his bid to become the first from the host country to win the men's singles title since Fred Perry 69 years ago.

As the only former champions in the men's draw, Federer and Hewitt will again be among the select few with realistic chances of hoisting the trophy in a fortnight's time. Since both are in the same half of the field, only one will get as far as the final and a repeat of last year's Federer-Roddick epic is very much on the cards.

Written by Ronald Atkin

Mrs. B
06-19-2005, 09:17 AM
Tell this to the haters at GM who never fail to quote Roger out of context and claim he's arrogant. :lol:

Federer oozes self-confidence. Polite, quiet and extremely friendly, he gets away with saying things that would make others sound conceited. But Federer is not one for boasting - he is just very comfortable in his position as the best in the business.

SUKTUEN
06-19-2005, 11:04 AM
THANKS

Minnie
06-19-2005, 04:30 PM
Article + video interview on BBC tennis website.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/4108632.stm#

PaulieM
06-19-2005, 05:13 PM
Article + video interview on BBC tennis website.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/4108632.stm#
"umm my girlfriend likes to cook and well i like to eat, so that's a good match"
:haha: :haha: oh roger you're just too funny sometimes!

Stevens Point
06-19-2005, 05:46 PM
Good luck, Roger!!!

R Federer Interview
Sunday, June 19, 2005

An interview with: ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Good morning, again, Ladies and Gentlemen. Can I present the 2004 men's Wimbledon Champion, Roger Federer. Let me emphasize again how much we appreciate you coming today and all the things you've been doing.

ROGER FEDERER: Thank you.

THE MODERATOR: Who would like to ask the first question.

Q. Is it a relief now that you're actually here to get ready after all the hype and talking about it, a relief to actually be here?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think relief will be over once the first match is played. There will be tension, tension's all the way up there and through the match. I think that's sort of normal.

But I'm feeling pretty good. I had a great week in Halle and the preparation has been all right. So I'm really looking forward to this first match because it's going to be very important starting the whole two weeks.

Q. Anything special this time over, the third time?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I don't know, it's always special to come here, no matter how you play the year before. I've got high hopes of doing well again, of course. Everything's been going according to plan really. I have no real excuses so far, you know, in case something would happen.

I'm looking forward. The grass, I've always shown that I really enjoy it. Staying again at a house down in Wimbledon and everything's pretty normal.

Q. It's 29 in a row I think on grass. Do you feel invincible on this surface?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I don't. I should have lost last week in the first round, but sort of came through and won. It's always very, very tough on the grass because it's only a matter of a few points always. That's the difference I've been able to do last 29 matches. So hopefully I can keep it alive, you know, especially in the early rounds. I'm always going to be the heavy favorite. I hope I can keep the streak alive.

Q. One of the things they say about great champions at Wimbledon is they own Centre Court. Borg and Sampras had that. Do you feel you are building that sort of aura?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, if I keep playing as good as I have the last few years, yeah. I mean, it's definitely looking good, you know. But there's always other players around who want the same thing. So I have to make sure I get through this first round and then, you know, sort of get a feeling for The Championships again and hopefully to really try to defend it. But I can't really think too far.

But, of course, now I've gotten to really enjoy playing on Centre Court. You know, my first experience was fantastic, it was the win over Sampras. Ever since, it's always been a dream for me to be able to play on Centre again.

Q. Who do you see as your main threat, or is it just the usual suspects really?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I think, you know, Roddick, Hewitt and Henman are for me the main rivals.

Q. When you come here the week before the tournament, do you have a method for preparation? For example, do you like to start out with high‑intensity workouts and then gradually let go as you approach your first match? Do you stay on pretty much the same level with your practices?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, it depends a little bit on how I feel really.

Q. This week, for example.
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I came and I was quite tired, you know, you can imagine after the French and Hamburg and Halle. Yeah, took some energy out of me.

So I arrived, I was quite tired. You know, it rained in the beginning, so we had to adjust to the rain in the beginning. Still felt a little bit tired, so I just practiced like about one and a half hours to two hours a day, where maybe normally I practice a little more.

I mean, now I'm just trying to prepare as good as I can, save the energy I have, you know, for the up‑and‑coming two weeks.

But, you know, yesterday and today I'll probably just hit an hour, one and a half hours, just to make sure I'm ready.

Q. So you don't feel like you need at least one high‑intensity practice?
ROGER FEDERER: Oh, yeah. Practice is always intense. I'd rather do quality than quantity.

Q. Why do you put Henman at one of your rivals?
ROGER FEDERER: Why?

Q. Yes.
ROGER FEDERER: Why not (smiling)? For me, he is one of the guys that plays best on grass. He's very experienced on the surface. It really needs a very good player to beat him, I think, yeah, somebody to stop him.

Q. Speaking of another rival, Andy Roddick, finished No. 1 in 2003. He's now No. 4 in the rankings. You, Hewitt and Nadal are ahead of him. Do you think that his game has slipped some, or have you all just been able to improve more than he has the last year and a half?
ROGER FEDERER: I mean, I think he had some tough losses against Lleyton, you know, the last three, I would say: The Masters Cup, the Australian Open and Indian Wells. You know, some of them were quite close, like the Aussie Open and Indian Wells. Who knows if he would have come through one of those, he would have maybe won a tournament. But he hasn't been able to win the big ones, and that's why obviously his ranking's going to slip.

Yeah, he hasn't been able to really be a part of let's say the Masters Series or Grand Slam, you know, semifinals or finals, all the way up there. But I feel like on the grass, he showed it in Queen's, you know, he's ready to do it again. So for me I think he's the biggest threat of all.

Q. Do you think that's a mental or physical thing that he hasn't been able to break through?
ROGER FEDERER: It's just he's going maybe through a time where results are just not quite there like he would like to. I mean, he's struggling with a wrist injury at one of his favorite tournaments, in Miami.

It's not so easy also. Then you have maybe a bad day and right away you don't win the tournaments any more. But he's still ranked in the best of the world. It's shown also with maybe not playing great, he's still at the top.

Q. At the beginning you were saying at the start of the tournament that there's a bit of tension around. How does that tension manifest itself? Do you just go quiet? Do you get irritable? Do you want to be on your own?
ROGER FEDERER: What I do, just keep my routine really. Nothing really special, to be honest. I just try to be more calm and maybe in practice you get a little more quickly irritated. I think that is almost a good thing at times, you know, when you get a little nervous and you're not so happy with your game, because it's important that you feel well in the match situation, you know. We're sharing a house all together, so of course I can hide in my room. But I'd rather be with the group I'm here with and just have a good time and enjoy the tournament because it's not supposed to be like, "Oh, no, Wimbledon's coming along. All the pressure is here." You also have to be able to enjoy.

Q. When you walk on the court tomorrow, how much is there an opportunity to appreciate the moment?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, so‑so. I mean, you'll be really focused walking those first few steps. But I think I'll definitely take a look around and say, "Wow, here is where I lived some great moments already." Haven't hit a ball here since match point, you know, last year. It's definitely going to be special.

Q. How would you characterize historically what it would mean to win three Wimbledons?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I don't know how many players have achieved to win three in a row. Already to win two is fantastic, I feel, you know, because you really prove the first time wasn't just like that. You really proved it again. Obviously now I'm at a level where two or three almost doesn't play a big role. But that would definitely even show how much better I can be, you know, to actually win three in a row. That would be something really fantastic at my favorite event, you know.

Yeah, we'll see if that's going to happen.

Q. Are you feeling under any extra pressure because of the three in a row?
ROGER FEDERER: No. Two, three, five, 10 in a row, it doesn't really matter to me. It's about The Championships itself. I'm really excited to be back again healthy because you never know if you're going to miss it because of injury or anything. So I'm happy to be here and have again a great preparation. That is putting more pressure on me than having the opportunity to win three.

Q. That would put you in pretty heady company. How does that make you feel?
ROGER FEDERER: I've had this on a number of occasions now over the last couple of ‑‑ you know, let's say last year or so where I could go into another sort of league, you know, either by winning the Laureus Sports Award or adding more titles or winning more finals in a row or keeping more streaks going. So this is nothing really new for me.

Q. When you won 14 matches in a row at this tournament, it would be very easy to say don't change anything, don't tinker with anything. Now Tony is here. He has a great deal of expertise on grass. Has he offered any suggestions on how you might actually do more? Is his philosophy not to change anything?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, it's not so easy just to say don't change anything because you've played this amount of matches, you know, in between the years. So it's not ‑‑ you can't just come and just play like last year. This doesn't work. I tried this in 2002 when I came after I beat Sampras here. I said, "Play like when you played against Sampras." Then you come and I lose in straight sets. It just doesn't always work the way you want.

But Tony and myself, we have a sort of same understanding of how I think I should play. So that's good, you know, because I was a little bit worried that he's going to say serve and volley too much or stay too much at the back. So we got that right at least. Was the same for the clay court surface, which was important to me. Yeah, I'm happy he's here because he wasn't supposed to come to the grass court season. But his wife flew in. Gives us some more time together, so that's nice because I didn't expect that.

Q. You mentioned you're a little tired coming here. When you keep on winning and dominating the game like you recently were, is it hard to say, "I need to stop now, I need a rest," or you're just experimenting and say, "How far can I take this winning streak"?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's something quite difficult, you know, because I always try to make a plan where no matter if I win or lose I can stick to the plan. I find that very important. I hate to pull out of events, especially me being No. 1 in the world, you know, they build up a lot of me coming to their tournament or city. And then pulling out, you know, a few days before the event, it's not something I like doing because of tiredness or injury and so on.

I mean, after Wimbledon I've got holidays. I'm not going to play up until Montreal. I mean, I got time to recuperate after that. By now I already feel better than, you know, when I arrived on Tuesday, Wednesday because I had a couple of hectic days. So now I'm not worried to enter this tournament, you know, tired. It was just sort of a little couple days where I felt a little exhausted, where now I feel much better.

Q. Would Mathieu be a little tougher than you would expect for a first‑round opponent?
ROGER FEDERER: Mathieu, yeah, he's a good player. I've known him since junior times. I think we only played on maybe one or two occasions. Even though I think his favorite surface is the clay, you know, but the grass courts aren't that quick any more like they used to be. Maybe now with the warm weather also, that's not going to really make them much quicker either. Actually it's going to make them slower.

It's maybe going to be better for him, too. Like you said, you know, he's talented. So normally talents, they can explore especially the good shots on the grass, too. So definitely have to watch out.

Q. Are the courts slower than in Halle?
ROGER FEDERER: The courts feel slower here, yeah, than Halle.

Q. You were talking about the condition of the surface. Do you prefer a slower surface or a faster surface for your own natural game?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, the conditions here at Wimbledon are perfect for me (smiling). That's all I can say.

Q. The fact you said you're taking holidays after Wimbledon, does it mean you're not playing Gstaad?
ROGER FEDERER: Correct.

Q. That means you'll miss out on maybe winning a cow or something.
ROGER FEDERER: Thank God (smiling).

Q. You mentioned Henman as one of the threats for you.
ROGER FEDERER: Well, not for me, for the tournament, yeah. For me, I mean, I don't want to play him.

Q. You won here twice, and Tim hasn't reached a final yet. If we remove you from the equation for a moment, you have to give him advice to go that one step further, what would you say?
ROGER FEDERER: Through the camera and press (smiling)? I don't know that I'm good enough that I can tell him. Once I lose, I'll give him an advice. But as long as I'm in the draw, I won't do that.

He knows himself he's got the game to do well here and to maybe win. He's shown how consistent he can be over the years. I think you've got to give him a lot of credit for that, too. The players he's lost to here are not, you know, just some clay‑courters or anything. They all know how to play on this surface.

I think he's got quite a tough draw, but he's had that over the years I think on a few times. I think he can handle all that. He handled pressure great the last few years, so I expect him to go far again this year.

Q. When you talk about the courts being a little slower than they were a few years ago, yesterday both Nadal and Marat Safin gave themselves very little chance of doing well here . Do you think it's become a situation where it's more psychological than physical, the barriers for those sort of guys to come here and feel they can do well at Wimbledon?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I don't know if it's much slower than a few years ago. I've always felt like the conditions are pretty similar. I think it's got a lot to do how you approach the tournament because, of course, from Nadal, I would say the surface is quick because he can't slide. Already that changes a lot in the footwork. Right away the points are played differently, you know, where he has to go for more, he feels like the opponents are more dangerous, and he's more vulnerable. But every player feels this way. It's if you look at it positive or negative, I have the feeling.

Of course, you know, the ones who really enjoy the grass, they also have the feeling they're going to do better. The ones who don't really like it, well, the chances are slimmer for them. I just have the feeling it's a lot to do with if you believe you can do well, because for everybody the season's short. It's not so easy for everyone.

Q. Are you the type of person who dwells on disappointments, finds motivation from that? You've only lost three matches this year. Do those stand out for you or do you focus on the positive and put things like that behind you?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I remember more the wins, of course. I've had 10 times more wins, you know, than defeats. I always remember the good times, of course. But I think important is always to show reaction once you lose. I think that's what I've really been able to do very well. Every time I lost, I got back on a winning streak. Same after the French, right away I reacted and won a tournament. That right away puts ‑‑ you forget it much quicker, you know.

But I have to say I can cope with losses much easier than I used to. I used to cry very much and be very disappointed once I lost. But with all the success I've had over the last few years now, it's really become no problem for me to handle it and actually understand why I've lost and sort of explain it to myself and then move on from there.

Q. Was there something in particular that helped you change that?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, the many wins I had (smiling).

Q. What are your shoes made of?
ROGER FEDERER: They're gold (lifting his foot up).

Stevens Point
06-19-2005, 05:50 PM
Article, Wimbledon website.

Defending Gentlemen's Singles champion Roger Federer already knows what it's like to defend a Wimbledon title. But as the Swiss player guns for a hat-trick of Wimbledon titles, he too is keen to absorb Wimbledon's unique ambience.

"It's always special to come here, no matter how you play the year before," said the world No.1. "I've got high hopes of doing well again, of course. Everything's been going according to plan really. I had a great week in Halle and my preparation has been all right." He admitted to some first-match nerves as he prepares to take on Frenchman Paul-Henri Mathieu in the opening match on Centre Court on Monday. "I think tension is sort of normal. It will be a relief once the first match is played."

"I think I'll definitely take a look around and say, 'Wow, here is where I lived some great moments already.' I haven't hit a ball here since match point, you know, last year. It's definitely going to be special."

Federer arrived at Wimbledon on a 29-match winning streak on grass, but that doesn't mean he feels invincible on the surface. "I should have lost last week in the first round (at Halle), but sort of came through and won. It's always very, very tough on the grass because it's only a matter of a few points. That's been the difference for those last 29 matches. Hopefully I can keep it alive, especially in the early rounds."

Federer cited No.2 seed Andy Roddick, world No.2 Lleyton Hewitt, and local favourite Tim Henman as the main challengers to the title. Of Henman, he said: "He's got the game to do well here and to maybe win. He's shown how consistent he can be over the years. I think you've got to give him a lot of credit for that, too. He's lost to players who know how to play on this surface. I think he's got quite a tough draw, but he's had that over the years a few times. He handled the pressure very well, so I expect him to go far."

Asked what advice he would give to Henman to help him go further, Federer demurred: "Once I lose, I'll give him an advice. But as long as I'm in the draw, I won't do that."

In his own camp, Federer can call upon the wisdom of Australian great Tony Roche, who has been his part-time coach this year. Roche worked with Federer in Paris and while he didn't plan to stay in Europe for the grasscourt season, he has changed his plans.

"We have the same sort of understanding of how I think I should play," Federer said. "That's good, because I was a little bit worried that he was going to say 'serve and volley' too much or 'stay back' too much. We got that right at least. I'm happy he's here and that we have more time to work together."

Federer has lost just three matches this year - though two of them, perhaps worryingly by his stellar standards, have been at Grand Slams. He admits to being a little tired when he arrived in London, and looking forward to a holiday after the Championships. But the Wimbledon magic promises to keep his winning streak alive a little longer yet. Asked what his shoes are made of, he lifted his foot: "Gold."

It's hard to argue with that.

MissMoJo
06-19-2005, 08:49 PM
Q. That means you'll miss out on maybe winning a cow or something.
ROGER FEDERER: Thank God (smiling).
:haha: :haha: hey, juliette might want some company ;)

RogiFan88
06-19-2005, 09:58 PM
"umm my girlfriend likes to cook and well i like to eat, so that's a good match"
:haha: :haha: oh roger you're just too funny sometimes!

Rogi such a cutie! He better eat healthy stuff altho he did mention that he sometimes helps by making a salad or setting the table... :angel: [he is like Rafa who loves to eat! I love a man w an appetite! ;) ]

RogiFan88
06-19-2005, 09:59 PM
anyone seen the ESPN mag yet w Rogi in it? [sharapova on cover... ]

lunahielo
06-19-2005, 10:11 PM
Asked what his shoes are made of, he lifted his foot: "Gold."

:haha:

Thanks Stevens Point~~

RogersGirl
06-19-2005, 10:23 PM
there's an article on espn by pat mcenroe and its titled something to the effec that federer has a sense of urgency. can anyone find it or get it? does anyone have an espn membership?

Minnie
06-20-2005, 12:11 AM
"umm my girlfriend likes to cook and well i like to eat, so that's a good match"
:haha: :haha: oh roger you're just too funny sometimes!

Yeah, Paulie, that made me laugh too - I repeated it to my husband and said "does this sound familiar" - as he says the same thing!!

Here I am sitting in the garden at 12.10 am and in 12 hours time I will be switching on the TV for the run-up to Wimbledon, waiting for Rog to come on Centre Court at 1 pm!

RogiFan88
06-20-2005, 01:25 AM
June 20, 2005

Champion moment: Federer takes in the applause of the Centre Court crowd after he won his first final at Wimbledon in 2003 against Mark Philippoussis, of Australia. He repeated the feat a year later against Roddick
(MARC ASPLAND)

Federer's art of deception
By Simon Barnes
How the world No 1 is able to make the ugly appear beautiful

HERE’S A SUGGESTION FOR LIVENING up your Wimbledon. Watch it on television and every time someone says that Roger Federer is an artist, pour yourself a glass of Pimm’s. You’ll be as boiled as an owl before teatime every day. The sober truth of the matter is that Federer is not an artist. He is a businessman, a mercenary, a man whose task is dispatching the opposition. He is no more of an artist than anyone else who plays sport for a living.
No one will call Andy Roddick an artist, with his colossal serve. No one will call Lleyton Hewitt an artist, with his insane baseline persistence. No one will call Tim Henman an artist, with his sumptuously athletic volleying. But Federer will be mistaken for an artist so many times that you will pluck the mint-bed bare long before the final if you play the Pimm’s game.

Don’t ask the commentators. Ask Federer. He never claims to be an artist — and he should know. All he is trying to do is to win tennis matches. He is not trying to paint his masterpiece, he is trying to put a furry ball in places where his opponent cannot reach it, and that, so far as he is concerned, is the beginning and end of the matter. Federer is charming and modest and soft-spoken. He also has a will of iron, but that can be hard to spot behind the self-effacing press conferences, the genuine decency, the genuine beauty of his shot-making. And he uses that will not to create art but to dispatch opponents.

Take last year’s Wimbledon final against Roddick. It was not a very good final: that was what was so good about it. Federer did not play very well, not by his own standards. And Roddick really did play pretty well, by anybody’s standards. But Federer won. He did not win by means of his artistry. His art, if you care to call it that, had rather deserted him. It was a stuttering, uncertain performance. But Federer won because his will was stronger. If his plan A involved something people like to call art, plan B was to keep buggering on and be damned if he was going to come second.

It was this, rather than his long moments of perfection earlier in the tournament, that made me think that Federer really may develop into one of the greatest men to have lifted a tennis racket. Anyone can win when everything goes his way. Federer won when an awful lot went against him. He won the sordid way, the philistine way. He went slumming, and he won — well, not precisely ugly, because Federer is incapable of ugliness, but he won in a manner that was a little common, a little vulgar, a little coarse. He won the way a lesser player might win and by doing so, showed that he might be on the way to becoming a great one. He revealed the will behind the poetry — and it was enough to do for Roddick.

If I were Federer’s coach, and he were to come up to me and say: “Patron, I see myself as un artiste,” I would say: “Merde, my old son. I resign. If you claim to be an artist, then you destroy the art in yourself. And with it, the tennis.” Federer does not create art. He creates the illusion of art. It is a joy to watch, but it is not art. It is not supposed to be — any more than a cruise missile is supposed to be art. Art is not Federer’s purpose: art is, if you like, his method.

Why do we confuse Federer’s tennis with art? First there is the virtuosity: the control, the movement, the shot-making ability. Then there is something to do with angles. Federer, because of his eye and his control, can play shots at angles that do not seem physically possible. He constantly makes us see the possibilities of tennis, and for that matter of physics, in a different way. “Make it new,” as Ezra Pound was always saying as standard instructions to anyone trying to create art.

But more than anything, the idea of Federer as an artist comes from the illusion that his opponent is co-operating with him. At times, watching Federer, it seems that tennis is not a duel but an exquisitely choreographed pas de deux. You can see that same illusion in other forms of sport: the thrown judo-fighter apparently co-operating with the thrower: the full back’s apparent desire to enhance George Best’s ability, Malcolm Nash apparently conspiring with Gary Sobers to allow him his six sixes.

Tennis is a prolonged and uniquely theatrical form of sport and there are sustained periods of time when it seems that the opponent is slowly hypnotised into becoming Federer’s straight man, his gofer, his roadie. And this is deeply pleasing to watch, almost literally spell-binding. There is an aesthetic dimension to sport, which is at least part of the reason why we watch it. But the point is that sport’s aesthetics are inadvertent. We have goal of the month competitions but if one goal is better than another — more pleasing to the senses — that is purely an aesthetic judgment, one that has no effect on the scoreboard.

Federer plays the shot of the tournament half a dozen times a set. He is a shot-of-the-tournament player, but not because he is seeking to impress or seeking to create beauty. He is seeking to win. Beauty just happens to be the most potent weapon in his arsenal. In sport, no winning method is superior to any other kind. Athletes are not seeking to please you and me, they are seeking to win. To Roddick the bomb, to Hewitt, the back-court gunfire, to Henman the rapier-volley, to Federer, beauty. It’s all about trying to win, and as for method — it’s all in the way these things take you.

Federer is not an artist, no. But he can create beauty all right. And that’s when he is most dangerous.

At the court of King Roger

Roger Federer has one of the most effective serves, winning 90 per cent of his service games this year. Only Andy Roddick has won a higher percentage on serve.

As well as having a powerful first serve - Federer has won 76 per cent of his first service points - no one has a better record on winning second-serve points than his 60 per cent

His serve has enabled hime to save two thirds of the break points he has faced

Federer has sent down 347 aces in 54 matches this year, the sixth highest but some way behind Roddick's 460 aces in 36 matches

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/section/0,,2641,00.html

RogiFan88
06-20-2005, 01:27 AM
For you Brits:

June 20, 2005
Who has a sporting chance?

Shane Warne

My mum and dad were both keen tennis players so Wimbledon was always a special event. My best memories are of sitting in the front row of Centre Court a few years ago with my wife and daughter, cheering on another Aussie, Pat Rafter, in the final. This year? I don’t mind who wins, as long as they’re Australian.

Michael Owen

I really like the look of Andrew Murray. He is young and hungry — a winner. I know it is expecting a lot to ask someone of his age to win the tournament, but I’ve got high hopes that he can go a few rounds. If I’m honest, tennis is not my biggest summer passion. I prefer golf or a day at the races.

Jonny Wilkinson

I would love the winner of Wimbledon to be English, which means obviously that I hope that Greg Rusedski and Tim Henman do well. But my favourite is Roger Federer — I have such admiration for his work ethic and his desire to be the best. He goes out and fights for every point. I like that.

Matthew Pinsent

Call it blind optimism, but it could just be Tim Henman’s year in SW19. I reckon the stars may just be aligned the right way for Britain’s leading man. And how about Justine Henin-Hardenne to continue her remarkable comeback in the women’s singles after that extraordinary win in Paris this month?

Frank Dettori

It would be good to see Tim Henman win it after all these years, but that’s a big ask. It’s horses for courses at Wimbledon, so I’m hoping Maria Sharapova will do it again. And I’ve got to go for Roger Federer to complete the hat-trick. Mind you, he’s still got a long way to go to match my Magnificent Seven.

Tony Cascarino

No contest — Federer will win comfortably, it’s almost a certainty. If he loses more than three sets in the whole tournament, I’ll be shocked. Sharapova’s got the game to take the women’s title: the Williams sisters have gone off the boil and some of the veterans aren’t the players they were.


http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2641-1659598,00.html

RogiFan88
06-20-2005, 01:33 AM
Defending champions will retain their titles
By John McEnroe
(Filed: 19/06/2005)

One of the drawbacks to achieving greatness is that people expect you to be great all the time, every match, every game, every point. But Roger Federer is only human - for his rivals it's probably his most redeeming feature. Far from being below-par this year, I don't think he was very far away from having an even better start to the year than last year, which was an incredible 12 months for him.

Don't forget he had match-point against Marat Safin in the semi-finals of the Australian Open and, with all due respect to Lleyton Hewitt, I think Federer would have beaten him had he reached the final. And in the French Open he did much better than last year by reaching the semi-finals and was a break-point up in the fourth set against the wonderful Rafael Nadal. Who knows what might have happened in that set but for the fading light? Again, had he reached the final, against Mariano Puerta, I'm sure he would have won that, too.

I understand he is going to play a little more aggressively at Wimbledon which I think is a wise move: it will make life a little easier for himself. Had he done that against Nadal and attacked the young Spaniard's second serve, we would definitely have had a different outcome at Roland Garros. We would now be talking about how Federer was the master of all surfaces instead of his vulnerability on clay. I think an attacking game will suit him better at the US Open, too.

I'm surprised, though, that he says he finds himself under less pressure than last year, when he had to defend his title. Having failed to win the Australian Open, as he did last year, he will know that his No 1 ranking could be at risk if he fails to win Wimbledon. And winning three on the trot at anything isn't easy.

Having said that, I think Federer will retain his title, even if he isn't playing at his best: he is that comfortable on grass. And just before I leave Federer, could someone please tell me why I wasn't invited to wear 24-carat gold trainers when I was lording it at Wimbledon? If the makers are reading I'll be happy to wear them in the men's 45-and-over doubles.

Talking about comfort on grass, what's all this negative talk I hear from Tim Henman about struggling to transfer his improvements on other courts to grass? He knows grass-court tennis probably better than anyone playing today. I want to see him serve and volley on every first serve and occasionally on the second, just to keep his opponents guessing.

Last year he didn't do that for some reason. In the early rounds he stayed back too much and when he played Mario Ancic in the quarter-finals he was coming in behind almost every serve and was getting passed at will because the big Croatian likes a target. I still think the fact that he played that match only 30 to 36 hours after playing Mark Philippoussis was a factor. Physically, he hadn't recovered.

The height of an opponent is something that has to be taken into serious consideration in tennis. What I want Henman to do against guys like Ancic is on the second serve spin it more into his body. His 'kicker' sits up too much for them and on grass you want something that shoots through a bit, rather like some bowlers get the ball to do in cricket.

I played Goran Ivanisevic, a guy I think Henman knows quite well, on his home patch in Croatia last Thursday and if I had started playing kickers against him - he's about 6ft 4in - I'd have been putting them straight into his wheelbarrow. The Croatian mob got to me - Tim will understand - and I lost 11-9 in a tiebreaker. Even a pair of Nadal's pirate pants didn't help me.

Henman just has to believe that he's going to place his second serve well and throw good spins into them because he's got the serve to do that. I still give him a chance at this Wimbledon although it's going to take an extraordinary set of circumstances for that to happen, like Andy Roddick losing to another Croatian Ivo Karlovic - which would not be so extraordinary after their close-run thing at Queen's last week - and then for Karlovic to lose to someone else or maybe even Henman in the quarter-finals.

But before then it's not exactly going to be a walk in the park for the British No 1. His first-round opponent, Jarkko Nieminen, is a guy who can play on all surfaces and if he beats him he could have Wayne Arthurs, who knows how to play on grass, waiting for him in the third round. And then Sebastien Grosjean, who has given him plenty of problems on grass in the past, is a likely opponent in the round of 16.

I can fully understand Henman wanting to try to take a little pressure off himself - God knows he deserves to at Wimbledon - but opponents can take a little heart from some of this kind of talk. Of course, if these reservations he has been expressing about the speed of the grass these days turn out to be a bluff, that would be really interesting. But if he means it and he is low on confidence it will be tough for him even to reach the quarters.

The third quarter of the draw is wide open and it contains Britain's No 2, Greg Rusedski. If there was ever a year for him to make serious progress in this tournament it's this year because he could find himself up against guys who are even more hit-and-miss than he is: Joachim Johansson and Fernando Gonzalez. However, if Johansson is free of injury then the power of his serve could make him the dark horse. Very dark given his recent form on clay.

Andrew Murray is the Briton I will be watching with particular interest - as will, I'm sure, Henman. I do feel Murray's performances at Queen's might have been responsible indirectly for Henman's ultimate poor showing there. Henman had my sympathy. I could just imagine what he must have been going through when Murray began to get on top in his match against Thomas Johansson and a meeting against the up-and-comer was looming. That would have been a match in which Henman had nothing to win and everything to lose.

He probably got himself a bit agitated over that, although when Murray started cramping he must have hoped the young Scot would win. When it transpired that Johansson, not Murray, was to be his opponent in the next round, he couldn't lift himself for it and played sort of flat.

I was fascinated by The Sunday Telegraph story about Murray's mother, Judy, videoing his opponents. I think more coaches should do that kind of preparation. I was surprised to hear that a top-30 player like Taylor Dent was that predictable. Maybe it was because he was still feeling his way on the grass. Unfortunately for Murray, if he wins his opening-round match he will be up against Radek Stepanek, the runner-up at Queen's. Apart from being in confident mood and experienced on grass, the Czech is a tricky sort of player. Judy's camcorder could be going into overdrive trying to work out what he's going to do next because he doesn't even know himself.

One word of advice to Murray, if he hasn't already been given it: tape your ankles. I was pleased to see he withdrew from the Nottingham Open because he needs to recover properly from a sprain like that. I can tell him that Federer, Roddick and Hewitt all wear either ankle braces or tape their ankles before matches.

As for the women, I don't think anyone will be surprised to hear that I think the winner will come from the bottom half of the draw, although world No 1 Lindsay Davenport looks like having a clear run through to the final from the top half, notwithstanding something special from Kim Clijsters. It will be one from three: Maria Sharapova, Serena Williams or Justine Henin-Hardenne. It's difficult to choose but I'll go for the Russian to retain her title, just like Federer.

Interesting to see that Serena could meet Venus in the round of 16. The sisters haven't met that early since they played each other for the first time at tour level in the 1998 Australian Open. It has nothing to do with either of them being lesser players, just that Serena's attention has moved from tennis to television. Fully focused, she would still be the one to beat at Wimbledon.

© John McEnroe / The Sunday Telegraph
18 June 2005: Federer pulls all the strings in court of a king

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/

nobama
06-20-2005, 02:44 AM
there's an article on espn by pat mcenroe and its titled something to the effec that federer has a sense of urgency. can anyone find it or get it? does anyone have an espn membership?
I read the article. It wasn't anything special. I think what PMac meant by "urgency" is that Roger hasn't won a slam this year and by his (Roger's) standards he has to win at least one slam per year. What people seem to forget is Roger's goals as he stated them at the beginning of the year were to remain #1 and retain his Wimbledon title. Both of those things are still possible. It's everyone else that was talking about this grand slam nonsense. Also, I sometimes wonder if people have forgotten about Miami and Indian Wells. Those two tournaments are considered to be the 5th and 6th grand slams. Both men and women play and the draw is 96 meaning the best of the best are playing. Roger won both of those tournaments this year. Yeah, only the final is best of five. But still I wouldn't consider winning either of those tournaments easy.

Puschkin
06-20-2005, 06:27 AM
Quoting

Federer's art of deception
By Simon Barnes

He also has a will of iron, but that can be hard to spot behind the self-effacing press conferences.

Anyone can win when everything goes his way. Federer won when an awful lot went against him.

He revealed the will behind the poetry — and it was enough to do for Roddick.

Art is not Federer’s purpose: art is, if you like, his method.

Why do we confuse Federer’s tennis with art? First there is the virtuosity: the control, the movement, the shot-making ability.

Tennis is a prolonged and uniquely theatrical form of sport and there are sustained periods of time when it seems that the opponent is slowly hypnotised into becoming Federer’s straight man.

Federer is not an artist, no. But he can create beauty all right. And that’s when he is most dangerous.


Thanks so much RogiFan 88 for all the articles. I particularly liked that one, probably because I see Roger in a similar light. Behind the easy-going surface, there is a highly competitive tennisplayer with a unique way to play the game. Good luck, Roger, today!

SUKTUEN
06-20-2005, 11:34 AM
thanks~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

JustmeUK
06-20-2005, 02:42 PM
The making of a champion
By Mark Hodgkinson
(Filed: 20/06/2005)

It was at the Old Boys Tennis Club in Basle that Roger Federer first received proper instruction on how to apply pace and spin to a tennis ball. And it was also on the club's red clay courts, and not on Wimbledon's Centre Court two years ago, that the Swiss first cried over the result of a tennis match.

"It was so funny when Roger won Wimbledon for the first time and then started crying," recalls Madeleine Barlocher, one of his first coaches. "I remember when he was little and lost a match, and he would try to hide behind the umpire's chair and would not stop crying for more than 10 minutes. The next time I saw Roger after that I said to him, 'You used to cry when you lost a match, and now you cry when you have won a match.' Roger laughed when I reminded him of that."

It may be strange to recall now, given his calm and measured exterior, but, as a pre-teen and young teenager, Federer found it difficult to control his emotions. There were more to his tantrums than sniffles and games of hide-and-seek behind the umpire's chair. He often threw and kicked his racket around the court, yelped like an alley cat, and occasionally swore.

Federer has said that there were times when his parents would watch from the balcony of the Old Boys club, calling out for him to be quiet, and he would respond by shouting at them to, "Go and have a drink, leave me alone". Federer said that the family would then drive home "in a quiet car, with no one speaking". "I would carry on like an idiot," he has admitted.

"This stage was part of his growing up," his mother, Lynette, said. "But when his behaviour was bad, we told him that it was bad and that it upset us. We used to say, 'Come on, Roger, get control of yourself, pull yourself together'. He says that he can't remember crying when he played tennis, but he also cried when he played football. I remember saying to him once, 'Is it such a catastrophe if you lose a match?' But the tears just showed how ambitious Roger was, how determined he was to succeed."

A couple of days spent in Basle, his home city, provided plenty of insight into the making of Roger Federer. His balanced and well-mannered outlook on life is said to be typical of Switzerland's second city, which is polite, overly-ordered and introduced to tourists as the place where a local scientist became the first man ever to take an LSD 'trip'.

Federer, who was born on Aug 8 1981, spent his childhood in the suburb of Munchenstein, with the family home just a short walk from the football and tennis stadiums. His early life was dominated by sport and he was four when he first picked up a tennis racket, having watched his parents on the local courts. The earliest surviving photograph of Federer playing tennis, borrowed from the family's private album, shows him swinging at a forehand with great enthusiasm and no little skill. "We would go to play tennis, and Roger just picked up the racket and started playing. He loved the sport from the beginning," his mother said.

His first strokes were played at the Ciba Tennis Club, a private venue for the employees of a chemical company, where his parents were both working at the time (Robert and Lynette met on a business trip to South Africa for Ciba). Both are avid social players, and his father still plays regularly at the club, but his mother is said to have been the more accomplished of the two, with a smoother and more stylish game.

The club is suburban, friendly and unassuming. The courts are surrounded by greenery, with tree branches overhanging the red clay, ferocious games of volleyball on the lawns, and men drinking beer at the tables on the terrace. The club has apparently not changed much, but Federer's first racket, given to a friend but never returned, has vanished.

Federer, whose boyhood hero was Boris Becker, spent countless hours at home walloping the ball against the garage door, determined in his pursuit of perfection. "I remember always loving to play against the garage door, or against the cupboard doors inside, with any kind of ball. My mum got fed up because it was bang, bang, bang all day," he said.

His parents quickly saw how gifted Federer was with a racket in hand, and when he was eight he started playing at the Old Boys club, surrounded by blossoms and suburbia. Barlocher was then running the junior programme, as she still does now in her sixties. She remembers Federer as one of the more talented players in his age group, as a fast learner on the club's seven clay courts, but she would never have predicted what her pupil would go on to achieve in the sport.

Federer's first individual lessons were with Seppli Kacovsky, a Czech coach who also still works at the club. They trained on Court Five, the furthest from the wooden-slatted clubhouse. "Roger didn't always concentrate during the sessions - sometimes he would hit some shots and then shout, 'Whack! Pow! With this shot I win Wimbledon!' Some of those shots would hit the back fence on the full. Roger remembers those times, and we still speak about it," Kacovsky said.

"Roger always had dreams of being a professional tennis player. He would tell me that he was going to become the world No 1. A lot of other kids would say that, but it was like Roger was born with a racket in his hand. He had such natural talent. I've coached for over 40 years and never seen such a gifted player. I would tell him how to hit a shot and he would get it straight away. Other kids might take several hours. Roger was exceptional even then."

Federer had a natural eye for a ball, and as well as his precocious skill as a tennis player, he won skiing trophies, impressed on the basketball court, and fancied himself as a striker on the football field. At the age of 12, he had to decide between tennis and football. "He enjoyed all sports at that time, and probably liked football as much as he liked tennis. Roger was into anything that was outdoors and sporty," his mother said.

Barlocher said that Federer was impeccably behaved off the court at the Old Boys club. Only once did he cause any trouble, when she was waiting for him to play a club match and he had seemingly gone missing. The future world No 1 found the confusion and panic beneath him absolutely hilarious: he had climbed a tree and was sitting proudly on one of the branches. "Roger was laughing so much. That was one of his favourite jokes," Barlocher said.

Federer was well liked, both at the tennis club and his primary school, the Schulhaus Neue Welt (the New World School). One of his teachers, Theresa Fischbacher, recalls: "The only problem was that he was in a classroom with a good view, so it was tempting just to look out of the window and start daydreaming."

He would often work as a ball-boy at the club. One of the coaches produced a fading and crumpled photograph which showed him on duty during a girls' singles match, fetching the stray balls and folding the towels for Martina Hingis. She would go on to become the youngest women's world No 1 in history, reaching the top of the rankings at the age of 16.

At 14, Federer's parents were shocked to discover through a tennis magazine article that he might be prepared to leave home and join the Swiss national centre at Ecublens, near Lausanne. They were surprised because they knew that Federer did not like being away from his family, and sensed that he would be homesick in Ecublens, which is in the French-speaking part of Switzerland and a long drive from his German-speaking friends and family in Basle.

His mother emphasised that she and Federer's father did not force the decision on him. "We are a close family, but Roger took the decision at a very early age that he wanted to play tennis away from home. We never forced him to do anything, we let him develop on his own," said his mother. "He made a lot of important decisions himself when he was younger and that was key to his success because he had to learn how to do things for himself. He learned to be very independent."

As his parents had predicted, Federer was not always happy in Ecublens. He struggled with his broken French and has recalled other pupils being "mean" to him. His frustration would often manifest itself in bad behaviour, such as more racket-hurling, and it has been said that when they installed a new backdrop on one of the courts, Federer was the first to put a hole in it. He was punished by being made to sweep the courts at 7am.

But Federer's mother said that he quickly matured at Ecublens. "It was a great lesson in life for him - that things don't always go your own way, and that you don't get anywhere in life with talent alone. You have to work at things," she said. "I know that that it wasn't always fun and games for Roger there, and that many days he wasn't that happy. But those struggles were good for him. Overcoming those ups and downs was a challenge for him, and it helped him to develop as a person."

Federer, who combined tennis and schoolwork, spent two years at Ecublens and also at Biel when the Swiss national centre moved there. He was starting to form a close working relationship with Peter Carter, an Australian coach whom he had originally met at the Old Boys Tennis Club. Carter taught Federer to use his emotional energies more wisely, and to think through exactly what he was doing on court. He was ranked the world's top junior in 1998, winning Junior Wimbledon in the same year, though sadly Carter would never witness his protege's Wimbledon singles triumphs, as he died in a car accident in 2002.

The only visible sign of teenage rebellion for Federer was the peroxide stage he went through. He turned his hair an unflattering yellow-white, which amused Barlocher. "He came back to see us once at the Old Boys Tennis Club and at first refused to take his hat off to show me his hair. But we have the photos of it, so he will not be able to forget that particular hairstyle," she said.

Federer has not forgotten his early years, and still lives in Basle, in the suburb of Oberwil, occasionally training at the Ciba Tennis Club. He is usually left alone in a city that does not have a fawning obsession with celebrities, and he feels able to mingle with the amateur players in between training sessions at the club.

He still visits the Old Boys club and has been known to return to the small bar, which has a colour painting of him hanging on the wall, to play cards with his friends. He is still in contact with Barlocher and Kacovsky, sending them text messages with updates of his progress around the tennis globe. "Roger used to send me a telegram whenever he won a title," Barlocher said. "It was a real pity when they stopped doing telegrams."

A few weeks ago Federer returned to the club for a fund-raising exhibition match. He was delighted when, just before the match started, a sign was unveiled showing that the old Court One had been renamed 'Roger Federer Centre Court', a tribute to his two Wimbledon titles. "It was a lovely surprise for Roger," Barlocher said. "It is our little joke at the club, that there is now a Centre Court where it all started for Roger."

Federer's friends and old coaches watched the 2003 Wimbledon final on the clubhouse television. "I was so nervous that I could hardly watch that match, so nervous that I popped the champagne cork too early," Kacovsky said. "It was his first match point, and suddenly there was champagne everywhere, and then Roger didn't win the point. Everyone was laughing at me. Luckily Roger finished the match a little later. That was a great day at the club. We were so proud. We drank champagne and we cried."

More tears may be expected over the next fortnight, from both Federer and the city of Basle.

Daily Telegraph - UK

lsy
06-20-2005, 03:44 PM
Only once did he cause any trouble, when she was waiting for him to play a club match and he had seemingly gone missing. The future world No 1 found the confusion and panic beneath him absolutely hilarious: he had climbed a tree and was sitting proudly on one of the branches. "Roger was laughing so much. That was one of his favourite jokes," Barlocher said.


Federer was well liked, both at the tennis club and his primary school, the Schulhaus Neue Welt (the New World School). One of his teachers, Theresa Fischbacher, recalls: "The only problem was that he was in a classroom with a good view, so it was tempting just to look out of the window and start daydreaming."

:haha: just like he mentioned before his mind can go wandering when his friends talk to him


He would often work as a ball-boy at the club. One of the coaches produced a fading and crumpled photograph which showed him on duty during a girls' singles match, fetching the stray balls and folding the towels for Martina Hingis. She would go on to become the youngest women's world No 1 in history, reaching the top of the rankings at the age of 16.


:lol: fetching towel for Hingins...that's sth new


Federer's friends and old coaches watched the 2003 Wimbledon final on the clubhouse television. "I was so nervous that I could hardly watch that match, so nervous that I popped the champagne cork too early," Kacovsky said. "It was his first match point, and suddenly there was champagne everywhere, and then Roger didn't win the point. Everyone was laughing at me. Luckily Roger finished the match a little later. That was a great day at the club. We were so proud. We drank champagne and we cried."


How nice...of course they would be so proud.

Thanks for the great article, justmeuk and also Rogifan! :yeah:

Shabazza
06-20-2005, 04:25 PM
thx for the articles Rogifan and justmeUK they're great :)

lsy
06-20-2005, 05:05 PM
http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/interviews/2005-06-20/200506201119280720869.html

R.Federer - Day 1
Monday, June 20, 2005


Q. Happy? That was the one you feared most.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah, it's definitely a good start to the tournament. I think there's always something special, you know, when you come back and defend - try to defend the Wimbledon championship. So I'm definitely very happy to have done that. Very important first step.

Q. Has the tension you said you'd feel gone now or will it come back at the start of your next match?

ROGER FEDERER: I definitely got more pressure off my back now. Luckily I've played my next opponent, as well. I played him in Dubai this year. Looking forward, you know, to play him again.

But definitely feel sort of relieved, you know, after this start. Looking forward to the rest. Now it's sort of getting interesting. You're into the tournament, you've seen the fans, you don't have to leave right away, so that's nice (smiling).

Q. Was it nice coming on? You got a good cheer as you walked out. Gave them a little wave as you walked on.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I thought it was a great applause I got, you know, from the fans and from the crowd. That was definitely a nice welcome. Also nice walking off, which I said yesterday was going to be nicer, you know, especially in case I win.

Q. How did the court play? Was it slow‑ish, soft‑ish? Was it what you expected?

ROGER FEDERER: Uhm, yeah, I think it's very similar to the outside courts. I didn't have to adjust that much. Obviously, in a match situation ‑‑ matches are always different than practice. Right away you feel different.

But I really thought the grass was beautiful. When I started to warm up, everything was just perfect. Once the match went on, you saw little holes coming. But I thought it was a beautiful court because ‑‑ honestly I don't quite remember my match too much against Bogdanovic last year. I just remember being really focused and trying to get the match over and done with. Didn't really maybe enjoy the moment so much, where I thought this year I could do it much more.

Q. You played five minutes before anybody made a volley. I kept thinking, "Maybe they've forgotten they're on grass."

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, well, I didn't want to storm too much to the net too quickly. I also wanted to definitely get my rhythm first. Yeah, I think I came in on a return, wasn't it?

Q. Yes.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, we didn't play much serve and volley ‑ especially him. I had the feeling on first serves he wasn't making many returns, you know. When I was serve and volleying, I wasn't even getting the volley. But you're right, I think we definitely could have played more serve and volley, but I won the way playing from the back. Who knows, maybe next match. It's a different opponent and I'll play totally different.

Q. Do you sort of feel loved here now when you come? People give you a good reception when you're wandering around? Anything unusual at all?

ROGER FEDERER: I warmed up this morning at 11 on the outside courts. Everybody just came into the gates, into the grounds. Everyone you meet was, "Good luck, good luck, good luck." It was a lot of fun. I was really surprised how many gave me ‑‑ you know, they cheered for me. But I guess, you know, in England they are very friendly and very nice to you. Really definitely enjoyed that.

Q. You used the word "relief" to win this match. I remember when Arthur used to say he wondered when he went out there if he could hit the ball over the net. He found out, of course.

ROGER FEDERER: Of course.

Q. Even you, do you have moments of uncertainty?

ROGER FEDERER: I always hope for a good start, you know. So I always hope that I can make those serves. I don't get as nervous any more like when I played Sampras, for instance, where I remember I came on court and, like you said with Ashe, at least you hope you're going to win a few points. You enter the match - now I enter the matches knowing hopefully my opponents are going to feel this way where I can take advantage of that.

I had a feeling at the beginning he was quite nervous. He missed a few shots. He had trouble reading my serve in the first game where I served four aces. That shows also maybe how nervous he was.

But I definitely get tense, too, especially here at Wimbledon.

Q. Any special plan of attack because it was a brand‑new court?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, because of the rain this morning, it definitely maybe played a little quicker than the last few days where it was extremely hot and there was quite a high bounce, where I even thought you could even kick serve, which I was quite surprised to see the last few days.

But I had the feeling this was playing like the years before.

Q. Your serve, you seem to be right back on the Wimbledon pattern, hitting the lines, hitting the corners ‑ what you didn't do against Nadal, did you? It just seemed that you're such a different player here today.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, I think you always serve different on different surfaces, especially clay and grass are so different. You use the slice serve much more than you use the kick, where on clay you're not going to try to kick the ball up high or it's going to be carried out of the court. On grass you have to use different techniques. Maybe the technique with the slice favors my serve more than the kicking serve. But definitely the serve let me down in the Nadal match. I'm happy it's back for now.

Q. Does the Nadal loss stay with you at all or is it gone a day later?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I didn't think of the match at all today during the match. I'm happy about that. I guess because I know how different, you know, clay and grass is, it's not even worth it, you know, thinking about that. But maybe when I come back on clay next year or for Davis Cup against the Brits, then I'll maybe think about it quickly. But not for now.

Q. How would you compare the burden of defending the title and being the big favorite with the confidence that it gives you? Which is stronger in your mind?

ROGER FEDERER: I think in the beginning it's the pressure which you feel more. And then once you get underway, I think it's the confidence which totally dominates. So I think that's how it goes.

Q. Did you watch a tape of the Nadal match from Roland Garros?

ROGER FEDERER: No time (smiling).

Q. Would you be able to at some point in the future?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, maybe I would, if I would have time. But, I mean, Tony saw the match. We sort of analyzed it. It's definitely a point to take things out of that match, too, because I haven't played many, many matches where I thought I played all right the last few matches, and normally if I play all right I've won them. But that day, an okay performance wasn't good enough to beat Nadal.

Maybe I would have to look into it, even though right away I knew what went wrong, what went right in that match. So don't feel the need to actually watch it, that match.

Shabazza
06-20-2005, 05:16 PM
thx Isy :)

SUKTUEN
06-20-2005, 05:21 PM
thankyou

Stevens Point
06-20-2005, 05:31 PM
It's good to hear that he is looking forward to playing Minar, and he still remembers the match in Dubei, so I think it is a good sign from him!!

Thank you lsy!! (lsy or Isy??)

lsy
06-20-2005, 05:35 PM
It's good to hear that he is looking forward to playing Minar, and he still remembers the match in Dubei, so I think it is a good sign from him!!

Thank you lsy!! (lsy or Isy??)

It's "l"...but then I'm very used to being called "I"sy anyway...so I basically gave up :o ;)

But thanks for asking :lol:

SUKTUEN
06-20-2005, 05:37 PM
Is Roger will play in Wedesday ?

Stevens Point
06-20-2005, 05:38 PM
Is Roger will play in Wedesday ?
If the weather is not the matter, yep! :)

SUKTUEN
06-20-2005, 05:41 PM
GOD please give London good weather~!! :worship: :worship: :worship:

Minnie
06-20-2005, 06:04 PM
GOD please give London good weather~!! :worship: :worship: :worship:

The weather here in London is set fair for all this week - so we are told by the weathermen! Summer is here at last!!

SUKTUEN
06-20-2005, 06:07 PM
MY GOD~~ Is it will rain in Wedsday ?

Nathy
06-20-2005, 06:49 PM
Suk, Minnie said that the weather was forcasted to be good... so don't worry ;)

RogiFan88
06-20-2005, 09:39 PM
You're welcome, guys! And thanks to everyone for the articles -- there are SO many!

"Tennis is a prolonged and uniquely theatrical form of sport"

No wonder I love Rogi's tennis so much, I adore theatre also!

RogersGirl
06-21-2005, 02:48 AM
I read the article. It wasn't anything special. I think what PMac meant by "urgency" is that Roger hasn't won a slam this year and by his (Roger's) standards he has to win at least one slam per year. What people seem to forget is Roger's goals as he stated them at the beginning of the year were to remain #1 and retain his Wimbledon title. Both of those things are still possible. It's everyone else that was talking about this grand slam nonsense. Also, I sometimes wonder if people have forgotten about Miami and Indian Wells. Those two tournaments are considered to be the 5th and 6th grand slams. Both men and women play and the draw is 96 meaning the best of the best are playing. Roger won both of those tournaments this year. Yeah, only the final is best of five. But still I wouldn't consider winning either of those tournaments easy.

thank you so much mirkaland. i've been trying to get my hands on the article but could only find an older issue of ESPN magazine at my local bookstore, so this sort of puts my mind at rest. thanks again :D

SUKTUEN
06-21-2005, 04:27 PM
:worship: Suk, Minnie said that the weather was forcasted to be good... so don't worry ;)


That Great~!!! Thankyou GOD~!!! :worship: :worship: :worship: :D

Minnie
06-21-2005, 07:54 PM
Not sure if this is the right thread but thought you all might like the little piece that was in one of the tabloids here this morning:

"Game, Set and Catch

Tennis ace Roger Federer is obviously as assiduous with his domestic responsibilities as he is with his preparations to defend his Wimbledon title.

For the 23 year old millionaire ended up spending a large chunk of his off-court time last year irrigating the flowers at the house he rented near the championship for up to0 £4,000.

"As the owner handed over the keys, she said, "Here you are and make sure you water all my plants each day. It took me half an hour every day - it nearly
gave me tennis elbow" he says at a Maurice Lacroix sponsored Real Tennis tournament at Hampton Court. This year, the Swiss player and his Slovakian girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec, 27, have moved to another house. So what domestic chores await him there. He adds: "We don't go out to restaurants much. We mostly stay in. I usualy make the salad and lay the table". What a guy!"

Would someone really ask the World No 1 tennis player to water their plants? Well, knowing how kind Roger is, he'd do it!!

Shabazza
06-21-2005, 08:27 PM
They know how kind Roger is ;) , I wouldn't have asked though :o

RogiFan88
06-21-2005, 10:20 PM
Not sure if this is the right thread but thought you all might like the little piece that was in one of the tabloids here this morning:

"Game, Set and Catch

Tennis ace Roger Federer is obviously as assiduous with his domestic responsibilities as he is with his preparations to defend his Wimbledon title.

For the 23 year old millionaire ended up spending a large chunk of his off-court time last year irrigating the flowers at the house he rented near the championship for up to0 £4,000.

"As the owner handed over the keys, she said, "Here you are and make sure you water all my plants each day. It took me half an hour every day - it nearly
gave me tennis elbow" he says at a Maurice Lacroix sponsored Real Tennis tournament at Hampton Court. This year, the Swiss player and his Slovakian girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec, 27, have moved to another house. So what domestic chores await him there. He adds: "We don't go out to restaurants much. We mostly stay in. I usualy make the salad and lay the table". What a guy!"

Would someone really ask the World No 1 tennis player to water their plants? Well, knowing how kind Roger is, he'd do it!!

That is SO cute... see, Rogi's not too "big" to water the plants, make the salad and lay the table! :angel: Thanks, Minnie!

Minnie
06-21-2005, 10:48 PM
That is SO cute... see, Rogi's not too "big" to water the plants, make the salad and lay the table! :angel: Thanks, Minnie!

You're welcome RogiFan. My first thought was why this lady who makes a nice amount from renting her v expensive house couldn't afford a gardener to do her chores! Hope she didn't ask Rogi to mow the lawn as well!!! :haha:

babsi
06-22-2005, 09:22 AM
Roger - can you please come and water my plants? :)

Thanks for posting - great job,everyone :)

ToanNguyen
06-22-2005, 04:53 PM
Hi all,
I am not sure if anyone has posted this article but I found this quite an interesting read.

Roger Federer resumes climb up Mount Impossible

Nirmal Shekar

"I have got high hopes of doing well again. I hope I can keep the streak alive,'' says Federer

London: Roger Federer has a problem. It might be a problem of plenty, something that thousands of tennis pros might be willing to sacrifice their racquet arm to face, but a problem nevertheless.

There is no room for surprises in Federer's life, in his career. Free will is a myth. Everything about his career has already been determined. In a way, at age 23, after winning four Grand Slam titles, the world No.1 Swiss has been fast tracked into history.

He will do this, he will do that, he will do everything that any man has ever done — and something more — with a tennis racquet in hand since Spencer Gore, playing in front of 200 spectators who paid a shilling each, won the first Wimbledon title here in 1877, taking home 12 guineas for his labour.

As for Federer's titles, don't bother counting, forget crystal balls, and if you are not a tennis fan, do a Rip Van Winkle if you wish, ahead of the Wimbledon championships that begin here on Monday. Just `google search' Federer's name five or six years from now and check the records. Then again, maybe you don't even need to go to all that trouble. Be assured that the gifted magician from Basel would have become the most successful Grand Slam champion in history sometime in the 2010s!

In an age when the urge to create instant legends in sport is at once irresistible and is fuelled copiously by enormous commercial pressures, it may hardly seem ridiculous that someone as outrageously gifted as Federer should find himself facing a script that the most steely-willed and courageous of men might find daunting.

But, then, if a definitive history of Federer's present and future has already been written, and he simply has to play his part staying in the straight and narrow, then, in a way, it is the Swiss magician's fault. For, he has made the climb up Mount Impossible — surpassing Sampras's record of 14 Grand Slam titles and ascending a peak of his own — seem like a jog in the park.

He may have a long way to go to the peak but irrespective of whether he gets to the summit or not, the value of Federer's contribution to fuelling our aesthetic passion is already immense. Seldom have we seen such a ravenous competitor showcase a game of such intoxicating beauty.

Yet, both seasoned tennis watchers and Federer — on a 29-match winning streak on grass — himself would know that there are bound to be many pitfalls between unreasonable expectations and their possible realisation. And, the first two Grand Slam championships of the year, in Melbourne and Paris, crowned men who beat the Swiss master in the semifinals.

The Quixotic Russian Marat Safin, who lost a close three set final to Federer at Halle last week, and the muscular, teenaged Spaniard Rafael Nadal — who can get a job easily in any Las Vegas casino without even sending in his CV — may not pose a serious challenge to Federer's dominance on grass over the two weeks here. Yet, Safin and Nadal proved that Federer has to do more than merely wake up from his hotel bed in time to win Grand Slam titles.

But, having won here the last two years, Federer is bound to begin his defence with the sense of belonging of a house owner returning to his cherished property after a holiday and getting ready to tidy up the front lawn. The signboard — Private property, stay away. Trespassers will be prosecuted — will certainly be repainted.

"It is always special to come here. I am always going to be a heavy favourite,'' Federer said on Sunday. "I have got high hopes of doing well again. I hope I can keep the streak alive.''

Another day, another time, another great champion did not even need signboards. Pete Sampras's opponents merely ventured up to the main gate, stood there in jaw-dropping awe, and retreated reverentially.

The handful that dared to knock on the doors looked like Don Quixote at the windmills.

Federer, surely, is not in the Sampras league yet but the his main challengers here, Andy Roddick — who started well in last year's final and comes into this championship after having won his third straight title at Queen's — Marat Safin, Lleyton Hewitt, and the dangerous Croatian Mario Ancic, will know that it will take a lot to halt Federer's march down the legendary Sampras track.

The defending women's champion, Maria Sharapova, may not inspire quite the awe that her male counterpart does. But the willowy Russian has managed to divert attention from her face and legs to the excellent quality of her tennis, which is no mean achievement in a sport where the Kournikova phenomenon — Wow, what a stunner! Who cares if she wins or loses — is the norm rather than the exception.

Shabazza
06-22-2005, 05:02 PM
nice article Nguyen - he's on his way to Sampras league at Wimbledon :)

SUKTUEN
06-22-2005, 05:09 PM
thankyou so much`!!!

I love Sampras and Roger very much~!! :kiss: :kiss:

ToanNguyen
06-22-2005, 07:01 PM
Interview with Roger after today's match.

R. Federer - Day 3
Wednesday, June 22, 2005


Q. How would you describe that match today?

ROGER FEDERER: Uhm, I think consistent. Didn't get any breaks, so that was good. Thought, you know, I played all right. Just hang in there to wait for my chance, and it came always at the end of the ‑‑ the end of the set, when he was serving against the set, so that was obviously a good time. Then I broke him straight early in the third. So the breaks were definitely at the right time.

From the baseline was tough. He was hitting hard and was tough to stay ‑‑ get the rallies going.

Q. Were you surprised to see those dropshots at the end of the first set?

ROGER FEDERER: He didn't make them. There were no dropshots, so...

Well, his choice of shot, you know, definitely the wrong one. He missed them all. I guess he was a little confused and felt the pressure a little bit. You come up with some weird stuff.

But was definitely bad shot selection.

Q. Were there one or two moments of slight frustration from you today?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, he didn't give me much chance early, you know, in the first and the second set. When I had a little opening, you know, I thought I could have done better. Once, he also came up with some good shots as well, obviously. But still I would have wished to maybe have had more chances. I mean, I'm used to it, you know, to wait for my occasion. But I wish I would have had one earlier. But then, you know, to get it still at 5‑4 is still a good one.

Q. You had a tough match against him in Dubai. Going into the match, were you aware you wanted to kind of avoid that situation again?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, in Dubai was obviously different setting. I didn't know him at all then. I was really struggling. Even though I came with a lot of confidence just from winning Rotterdam, I came there, was really strong with the rhythm from the baseline, also making just a simple second‑serve return. So I really start to ‑‑ I remember chip and charge a lot, come to the net, try to shorten the rallies. From the baseline, I was hopeless.

Obviously I knew today it was going to be different, I was going to get more chances off the baseline, because I feel better here. I know what it's like. I've been here for a long time.

But still, you know, I was waiting for a tough match because I knew he was serving pretty good from Dubai, because I had my difficulties of breaking him. I knew that if I just stayed tough, you know, he's going to make maybe some shots he shouldn't do, like the dropshot, you know. So I was just hang in there and hoping for those moments really.

Q. As two‑time defending champion, long‑time No. 1, being in a dominant position in the game, how does that play in a match‑to‑match situation? How does that benefit you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think it helps at occasions. But really you've got to ask the other players, you know, what it does. I've only played against a few No. 1's in the world. You always sort of feel the pressure. You always feel like, well, the other guy, if you give him a chance, he'll take it, or eventually he's going to lift up his game and make it hard for me to either hold my serve or, once he's in front, he's not going to give it away.

Sort of these moments I think make it ‑‑ make the best players, you know, to be up there. So that's my feeling.

Q. Do you look at your opponent's body language or his expressions on a point‑to‑point basis or during the match?

ROGER FEDERER: I have the feeling I think a lot during the match, try to understand what has been going on and what I think ‑‑ how I should continue to play. Obviously, I check out my opponent a little bit. But, honestly, I'm a guy who turns around quite quickly, you know, and focuses on my own game than checking out my opponent too much.

Q. Today we saw Marat Safin beat Philippoussis in three straight sets in a high‑quality match on Centre Court. Are we seeing the emergence of a new contender here?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I had a tough match against him, you know, in Halle in the final. You know, he showed how good he can play on grass. That obviously, now that he's beaten two really good players on the grass, definitely puts him in a good position. I think he's got a really tough draw from the first round on. But he's shown he beat them both in three sets. He can definitely keep it up.

He's got a big game. I think on the grass he just hasn't showed enough what he can do yet. Maybe it's a good year for him.

Q. Can he be a bit of a joker in the pack, given that people haven't given him much on grass, but he has that massive game?

ROGER FEDERER: I think he's more relaxed because of his knee. That's the thing I felt in Halle, because he just played. If he loses, I guess it's because of the knee. If he wins, you know, it's sort of like sort of a surprise. So he's playing pretty relaxed, I have the feeling. That maybe helps him, especially on the grass, not to get too frustrated.

But no matter what, you have to come up on big points. I think that's what he was able to do today, because he was down I think a break in the second set, should have almost lost the first. So, you know, he could have been also down two sets to love.

His reactions were good. In big matches, you know, he's also a guy who can raise his game, like all the other top players.

Q. Did you see much of Henman? I know you think he's one of the main rivals for the tournament. Did you think he might have been on his way out?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I was a little worried for him for a second (laughter). But sort of knew that once he gets back, maybe just gets the third set, you know, that obviously it's going to be tough also for the opponent, you know, to close it out because always he has to start the set from zero. He should have taken the momentum, you know, from the second set over to the third, and he couldn't.

And Tim, obviously, turned the tide and started to play really good after. But for a second there, I was worried, too (smiling).

Q. If you end up playing Lleyton Hewitt, how confident would you be?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, we played in Indian Wells, but I hardly count that because he wasn't ‑‑ far from his best. We haven't played in a while since basically the Masters. He hasn't played many tournaments. Obviously, if he gets through and I get through, it means we're both in good shape. We will have to beat good players. This reason I would feel confident going into that match knowing I've beaten him the last few times. I expect a tough match.

Q. Are you at an advantage if he hasn't played so much recently?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, once he's into the semis, it doesn't really matter how much he played before.

Q. What has Tony Roche brought to your game?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think more experience, just a little bit different angles to the game, where I have the feeling, you know, he sees the game is different, you know, from the outside a little bit. And that helps me. I really enjoy the time practicing with him on the court, when he's drilling me like real good old school, I would say. I think just by playing with him, I've just improved.

Q. Is your father still over here watching you?

ROGER FEDERER: Who?

Q. Your father.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, but he's leaving.

Q. He said he's thinking of taking up the game himself. Are you going to maybe coach him a bit?

ROGER FEDERER: He said he wants to play?

Q. Yes.

ROGER FEDERER: I'm surprised. He wants to play golf. Yeah, his physique doesn't allow it any more. Too much running in tennis.

Q. Are you saying that Safin is using the knee as sort of a psychological crutch?

ROGER FEDERER: Could be. I'm not saying he is. I haven't spoken to him when he said, you know. But I had the feeling he was very relaxed in Halle. Played ‑‑ you know, also his attitude, of course, he still gets irritated and he throws his racquet. But still I feel like he was more relaxed just overall in a match than maybe I've seen him. But maybe I'm mistaken. I'm looking at Marat maybe very wrongly.

Q. How much do you watch during a tournament, other matches? Will you look at people on your side of the draw, for example, potential next opponents?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, honestly, I look more at tennis from the other side of the draw, because it's a day when I'm not playing and I have more time. Because the days I'm playing, I'm either sitting here or playing myself and I don't get to see much.

I mean, I love this time because you get to see many, many matches ‑ many great matches. The best‑of‑five are always the best. Honestly, I look a lot of tennis. Maybe too much, you know, for the taste of my girlfriend.

Q. When was the last time you lost your temper on or off the court?

ROGER FEDERER: Off the court, I don't remember. On court, maybe Miami finals. I don't know. I remember there that I threw a racquet.

Stevens Point
06-22-2005, 07:02 PM
Thanks for the articles!!!

ToanNguyen
06-22-2005, 07:37 PM
You are welcome. :hatoff: :hatoff:

Shabazza
06-22-2005, 08:09 PM
thx again Nguyen :)

Daniel
06-23-2005, 02:16 AM
thanks

Puschkin
06-23-2005, 10:24 AM
For Roger, it's Victory or Bust

Wednesday, 22 June, 2005

For a gentle, quietly spoken and extremely polite man, Roger Federer can be quite hard. Stern even. As the champion of the past two years - and the darling of the Centre Court - he is simply not going to be beaten here. And that's final.

Not that Federer put it quite like that. He is far too nice. But as he moved past Ivo Minar in three sets, he made his intentions very clear.

Minar had never played in a Grand Slam before; his only experience of grass court tennis had come in two doomed attempts to qualify for the Bristol Challenger two years ago and for Wimbledon last year. With that sort of record, his straight sets victory over Michael Tabara on Monday was rather impressive.

But this has been a year of breakthroughs for the Czech. In January he qualified in Sydney and then made his way through to the final, stepping over such supposedly bigger, better and more experienced names as Nikolay Davydenko and Radek Stepanek. Even when he got to the final, he made Lleyton Hewitt run for a while before the Australian sized him up and cut him down.

Federer did much the same to the young hopeful but, even so, he did not find it quite as straightforward as he had hoped. "I just had to hang in there and wait for my chance," he said. "He didn't give me much chance early on. From the baseline he was tough. He was hitting hard and it was tough to get the rallies going."

But Federer had seen Minar before. They played in Dubai earlier this year and Federer, less than fresh from his win in Rotterdam the week before, had an almighty struggle to win in three long sets. Here, though he knew it would be different.

"Today, obviously, I knew it was going to be different," Federer said. "I knew that I was going to get more chances from the baseline because I feel better here. I know what it's like. I've been here for a long time."

And that's what real champions are like. They know their place, they know their worth and they have utter confidence in what they can do. Losing is not one of Federer's favourite pursuits but it goes with the job - and yet losing here is not an option. Federer does not 'do' losing in SW19.

Looking around his rivals, he was feeling rather confident. Yes, Marat Safin was doing well but the Swiss had beaten him just a matter of days ago in Halle. If Lleyton Hewitt reaches the semi-finals, he will have played himself into form but, never forget, Federer beat Hewitt six times last year and he has not succumbed to the Australian firebrand since 2003. Federer is awfully good. He knows it and he knows that the other players know it, too.

"I think it helps sometimes," he said. "But you've got to ask the other players what it does. I've only played against a few No.1s in the world and you always feel the pressure. You always feel that if you give the other guy a chance, he'll take it. Once he's in front, he's not going to give it away. These are the moments that make the best players stay up there."

Written by Alix Ramsey

Source: http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2005-06-22/200506221119458136539.html

Shabazza
06-23-2005, 11:04 AM
thx Puschkin :) Wimbledon is Roger's second home, gaining confidence and feeling comfortable here - a Roger like that is nearly unbeatable :angel:

PaulieM
06-23-2005, 11:25 AM
The making of a champion
By Mark Hodgkinson
(Filed: 20/06/2005)

It was at the Old Boys Tennis Club in Basle that Roger Federer first received proper instruction on how to apply pace and spin to a tennis ball. And it was also on the club's red clay courts, and not on Wimbledon's Centre Court two years ago, that the Swiss first cried over the result of a tennis match.

"It was so funny when Roger won Wimbledon for the first time and then started crying," recalls Madeleine Barlocher, one of his first coaches. "I remember when he was little and lost a match, and he would try to hide behind the umpire's chair and would not stop crying for more than 10 minutes. The next time I saw Roger after that I said to him, 'You used to cry when you lost a match, and now you cry when you have won a match.' Roger laughed when I reminded him of that."

It may be strange to recall now, given his calm and measured exterior, but, as a pre-teen and young teenager, Federer found it difficult to control his emotions. There were more to his tantrums than sniffles and games of hide-and-seek behind the umpire's chair. He often threw and kicked his racket around the court, yelped like an alley cat, and occasionally swore.

Federer has said that there were times when his parents would watch from the balcony of the Old Boys club, calling out for him to be quiet, and he would respond by shouting at them to, "Go and have a drink, leave me alone". Federer said that the family would then drive home "in a quiet car, with no one speaking". "I would carry on like an idiot," he has admitted.

"This stage was part of his growing up," his mother, Lynette, said. "But when his behaviour was bad, we told him that it was bad and that it upset us. We used to say, 'Come on, Roger, get control of yourself, pull yourself together'. He says that he can't remember crying when he played tennis, but he also cried when he played football. I remember saying to him once, 'Is it such a catastrophe if you lose a match?' But the tears just showed how ambitious Roger was, how determined he was to succeed."

A couple of days spent in Basle, his home city, provided plenty of insight into the making of Roger Federer. His balanced and well-mannered outlook on life is said to be typical of Switzerland's second city, which is polite, overly-ordered and introduced to tourists as the place where a local scientist became the first man ever to take an LSD 'trip'.

Federer, who was born on Aug 8 1981, spent his childhood in the suburb of Munchenstein, with the family home just a short walk from the football and tennis stadiums. His early life was dominated by sport and he was four when he first picked up a tennis racket, having watched his parents on the local courts. The earliest surviving photograph of Federer playing tennis, borrowed from the family's private album, shows him swinging at a forehand with great enthusiasm and no little skill. "We would go to play tennis, and Roger just picked up the racket and started playing. He loved the sport from the beginning," his mother said.

His first strokes were played at the Ciba Tennis Club, a private venue for the employees of a chemical company, where his parents were both working at the time (Robert and Lynette met on a business trip to South Africa for Ciba). Both are avid social players, and his father still plays regularly at the club, but his mother is said to have been the more accomplished of the two, with a smoother and more stylish game.

The club is suburban, friendly and unassuming. The courts are surrounded by greenery, with tree branches overhanging the red clay, ferocious games of volleyball on the lawns, and men drinking beer at the tables on the terrace. The club has apparently not changed much, but Federer's first racket, given to a friend but never returned, has vanished.

Federer, whose boyhood hero was Boris Becker, spent countless hours at home walloping the ball against the garage door, determined in his pursuit of perfection. "I remember always loving to play against the garage door, or against the cupboard doors inside, with any kind of ball. My mum got fed up because it was bang, bang, bang all day," he said.

His parents quickly saw how gifted Federer was with a racket in hand, and when he was eight he started playing at the Old Boys club, surrounded by blossoms and suburbia. Barlocher was then running the junior programme, as she still does now in her sixties. She remembers Federer as one of the more talented players in his age group, as a fast learner on the club's seven clay courts, but she would never have predicted what her pupil would go on to achieve in the sport.

Federer's first individual lessons were with Seppli Kacovsky, a Czech coach who also still works at the club. They trained on Court Five, the furthest from the wooden-slatted clubhouse. "Roger didn't always concentrate during the sessions - sometimes he would hit some shots and then shout, 'Whack! Pow! With this shot I win Wimbledon!' Some of those shots would hit the back fence on the full. Roger remembers those times, and we still speak about it," Kacovsky said.

"Roger always had dreams of being a professional tennis player. He would tell me that he was going to become the world No 1. A lot of other kids would say that, but it was like Roger was born with a racket in his hand. He had such natural talent. I've coached for over 40 years and never seen such a gifted player. I would tell him how to hit a shot and he would get it straight away. Other kids might take several hours. Roger was exceptional even then."

Federer had a natural eye for a ball, and as well as his precocious skill as a tennis player, he won skiing trophies, impressed on the basketball court, and fancied himself as a striker on the football field. At the age of 12, he had to decide between tennis and football. "He enjoyed all sports at that time, and probably liked football as much as he liked tennis. Roger was into anything that was outdoors and sporty," his mother said.

Barlocher said that Federer was impeccably behaved off the court at the Old Boys club. Only once did he cause any trouble, when she was waiting for him to play a club match and he had seemingly gone missing. The future world No 1 found the confusion and panic beneath him absolutely hilarious: he had climbed a tree and was sitting proudly on one of the branches. "Roger was laughing so much. That was one of his favourite jokes," Barlocher said.

Federer was well liked, both at the tennis club and his primary school, the Schulhaus Neue Welt (the New World School). One of his teachers, Theresa Fischbacher, recalls: "The only problem was that he was in a classroom with a good view, so it was tempting just to look out of the window and start daydreaming."

He would often work as a ball-boy at the club. One of the coaches produced a fading and crumpled photograph which showed him on duty during a girls' singles match, fetching the stray balls and folding the towels for Martina Hingis. She would go on to become the youngest women's world No 1 in history, reaching the top of the rankings at the age of 16.

At 14, Federer's parents were shocked to discover through a tennis magazine article that he might be prepared to leave home and join the Swiss national centre at Ecublens, near Lausanne. They were surprised because they knew that Federer did not like being away from his family, and sensed that he would be homesick in Ecublens, which is in the French-speaking part of Switzerland and a long drive from his German-speaking friends and family in Basle.

His mother emphasised that she and Federer's father did not force the decision on him. "We are a close family, but Roger took the decision at a very early age that he wanted to play tennis away from home. We never forced him to do anything, we let him develop on his own," said his mother. "He made a lot of important decisions himself when he was younger and that was key to his success because he had to learn how to do things for himself. He learned to be very independent."

As his parents had predicted, Federer was not always happy in Ecublens. He struggled with his broken French and has recalled other pupils being "mean" to him. His frustration would often manifest itself in bad behaviour, such as more racket-hurling, and it has been said that when they installed a new backdrop on one of the courts, Federer was the first to put a hole in it. He was punished by being made to sweep the courts at 7am.

But Federer's mother said that he quickly matured at Ecublens. "It was a great lesson in life for him - that things don't always go your own way, and that you don't get anywhere in life with talent alone. You have to work at things," she said. "I know that that it wasn't always fun and games for Roger there, and that many days he wasn't that happy. But those struggles were good for him. Overcoming those ups and downs was a challenge for him, and it helped him to develop as a person."

Federer, who combined tennis and schoolwork, spent two years at Ecublens and also at Biel when the Swiss national centre moved there. He was starting to form a close working relationship with Peter Carter, an Australian coach whom he had originally met at the Old Boys Tennis Club. Carter taught Federer to use his emotional energies more wisely, and to think through exactly what he was doing on court. He was ranked the world's top junior in 1998, winning Junior Wimbledon in the same year, though sadly Carter would never witness his protege's Wimbledon singles triumphs, as he died in a car accident in 2002.

The only visible sign of teenage rebellion for Federer was the peroxide stage he went through. He turned his hair an unflattering yellow-white, which amused Barlocher. "He came back to see us once at the Old Boys Tennis Club and at first refused to take his hat off to show me his hair. But we have the photos of it, so he will not be able to forget that particular hairstyle," she said.

Federer has not forgotten his early years, and still lives in Basle, in the suburb of Oberwil, occasionally training at the Ciba Tennis Club. He is usually left alone in a city that does not have a fawning obsession with celebrities, and he feels able to mingle with the amateur players in between training sessions at the club.

He still visits the Old Boys club and has been known to return to the small bar, which has a colour painting of him hanging on the wall, to play cards with his friends. He is still in contact with Barlocher and Kacovsky, sending them text messages with updates of his progress around the tennis globe. "Roger used to send me a telegram whenever he won a title," Barlocher said. "It was a real pity when they stopped doing telegrams."

A few weeks ago Federer returned to the club for a fund-raising exhibition match. He was delighted when, just before the match started, a sign was unveiled showing that the old Court One had been renamed 'Roger Federer Centre Court', a tribute to his two Wimbledon titles. "It was a lovely surprise for Roger," Barlocher said. "It is our little joke at the club, that there is now a Centre Court where it all started for Roger."

Federer's friends and old coaches watched the 2003 Wimbledon final on the clubhouse television. "I was so nervous that I could hardly watch that match, so nervous that I popped the champagne cork too early," Kacovsky said. "It was his first match point, and suddenly there was champagne everywhere, and then Roger didn't win the point. Everyone was laughing at me. Luckily Roger finished the match a little later. That was a great day at the club. We were so proud. We drank champagne and we cried."

More tears may be expected over the next fortnight, from both Federer and the city of Basle.

Daily Telegraph - UK
I laughed so hard reading this article, roger seems like he was such a cute little kid. :hug:

SUKTUEN
06-23-2005, 05:24 PM
thanks

ToanNguyen
06-23-2005, 07:22 PM
Another article. Very true

Calculating Federer masters art of illusion
Simon Barnes
June 24, 2005
HERE'S a suggestion for livening up your Wimbledon. Watch it on television and every time someone says that Roger Federer is an artist, pour yourself a drink. You'll be sloshed before you know it.

The sober truth of the matter is that Federer is not an artist. He is a businessman, a mercenary, a man whose task is dispatching the opposition. He is no more of an artist than anyone else who plays sport for a living.

No one will call Andy Roddick an artist, with his colossal serve. No one will call Lleyton Hewitt an artist, with his insane baseline persistence. No one will call Tim Henman an artist, with his sumptuously athletic volleying. But Federer will be mistaken for an artist so many times that you will have emptied the bar fridge long before the final if you play this drinking game.

Don't ask the commentators. Ask Federer, who early yesterday marched into the third round with a 6-4 6-4 6-1 win over Czech Ivo Minar. He never claims to be an artist -- and he should know. All he is trying to do is to win tennis matches. He is not trying to paint his masterpiece, he is trying to put a furry ball in places where his opponent cannot reach it, and that is the beginning and end of the matter.

Federer is charming and modest and soft-spoken. He also has a will of iron, but that can be hard to spot behind the self-effacing press conferences, the genuine decency, the genuine beauty of his shot-making. And he uses that will not to create art but to dispatch opponents.


Take last year's Wimbledon final against Roddick. It was not a very good final: that was what was so good about it. Federer did not play very well, not by his own standards. And Roddick really did play pretty well, by anybody's standards. But Federer won. He did not win by means of his artistry. His art, if you care to call it that, had rather deserted him. It was a stuttering, uncertain performance. But Federer won because his will was stronger. If his plan A involved something people like to call art, plan B was to keep fighting and be damned if he was going to come second.

It was this, rather than his long moments of perfection earlier in the tournament, that made me think that Federer really may develop into one of the greatest men to have lifted a tennis racquet.

Anyone can win when everything goes his way. Federer won when an awful lot went against him. He won the sordid way, the philistine way. He went slumming, and he won -- well, not precisely ugly, because Federer is incapable of ugliness, but he won in a manner that was a little common, a little vulgar, a little coarse. He won the way a lesser player might win and by doing so, showed that he might be on the way to becoming a great one.

He revealed the will behind the poetry - and it was enough to do for Roddick.

If I were Federer's coach, and he were to come up to me and say: 'Patron, I see myself as un artiste', I would say: 'Merde, my old son. I resign. If you claim to be an artist, then you destroy the art in yourself. And with it, the tennis.'

Federer does not create art. He creates the illusion of art. It is a joy to watch, but it is not art. It is not supposed to be any more than a cruise missile is supposed to be art. Art is not Federer's purpose: art is, if you like, his method.

Why do we confuse Federer's tennis with art? First there is the virtuosity: the control, the movement, the shot-making ability. Then there is something do with angles. Federer, because of his eye and his control, can play shots at angles that do not seem physically possible. He constantly makes us see the possibilities of tennis, and for that matter of physics, in a different way. Make it new, as Ezra Pound was always saying as standard instructions to anyone trying to create art.

But more than anything, the idea of Federer as an artist comes from the illusion that his opponent is co-operating with him. At times, watching Federer, it seems that tennis is not a duel but an exquisitely choreographed pas de deux.

You can see that same illusion in other forms of sport: the thrown judo-fighter apparently co-operating with the thrower: the fullback's apparent desire to enhance George Best's ability, Malcolm Nash apparently conspiring with Garry Sobers to allow him his six sixes.

Tennis is a prolonged and uniquely theatrical form of sport and there are sustained periods of time when it seems that the opponent is slowly hypnotised into becoming Federer's straight man, his gopher, his roadie. And this is deeply pleasing to watch, almost literally spellbinding.

There is an aesthetic dimension to sport, which is at least part of the reason why we watch it. But the point is that sport's aesthetics are inadvertent. We have goal of the year competitions but if one goal is better than another -- more pleasing to the senses -- that is purely an aesthetic judgment, one that has no effect on the scoreboard.

Federer plays the shot of the tournament half a dozen times a set. He is a shot-of-the-tournament player, but not because he is seeking to impress or seeking to create beauty. He is seeking to win. Beauty just happens to be the most potent weapon in his arsenal.

In sport, no winning method is superior to any other kind. Athletes are not seeking to please you and me, they are seeking to win.

To Roddick the bomb, to Hewitt the back-court gunfire, to Henman the rapier volley, to Federer beauty. It's all about trying to win, and as for method, it's all in the way these things take you.

Federer is not an artist, no. But he can create beauty all right. And that's when he is most dangerous.

The Times


ROGI IS THE MAN. :worship: :worship: :worship:

Doris Loeffel
06-23-2005, 08:52 PM
Thanks for keeping us informed guys and gals

babsi
06-23-2005, 09:17 PM
Thanks for posting :)

Yoda
06-23-2005, 11:15 PM
If a ballet\tap\salsa dancer can be called artists, then so can Federer.
Good article otherwise

ToanNguyen
06-24-2005, 03:16 AM
I think an artist is someone who sets out to create beatiful things.
However, I think Roger just does things beatifully. As the article stated, he doesn't set out to play beatiful tennis. He just does it effortlessly. That is why I love to watch him play. It's natural. It's not forced. And that makes Roger who he is.

RogiNie
06-24-2005, 10:00 AM
exactly :) thanks for the article!

SUKTUEN
06-24-2005, 04:48 PM
thanyou~!!!!!!!!!!

ToanNguyen
06-25-2005, 07:10 PM
Post match interview today:

*Federer Interview - Day 6




R. Federer - Day 6
Saturday, June 25, 2005


Q. Tough match.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah (smiling). It was tough. Like I expected really. We've played on several occasions. He beat me also a few times ? once on grass, once we played in the finals of Halle as well on grass. We know each other's game pretty well. I think at times you could see that because we took advantage of each other's game, even though I thought we didn't play bad.

I have the feeling I should have won in three, but in the end I'm happy to have won in four really.

Q. There's obviously a fine line between getting a good workout at this stage of the tournament and really going into a tough match. Was the fine line that tenth game of the fourth set when you were a break down?

ROGER FEDERER: In the end, you know, if I win in five, five hours on court, or in one hour, you know, it doesn't matter as long as I keep on winning, you know. I think I have to keep that in mind.

This was definitely a test today, absolutely. I think I had to survive some tough moments. Tiebreakers are always tough. I should have never lost that one. But he stayed in it, you know. In the fourth I had to really turn it around. I just started to play better in time.

I'm happy, you know, in the fourth set how I played, and I'm also happy how I played at the end of the second. The other two sets, you know, the score showed what happened.

Q. Two points from the end of the match, you hit a running backhand short angle shot. For all of us who only dream of hitting that shot, could you explain how we could do it also?

ROGER FEDERER: Got to work on your forearm, work on your footwork, and work on your mental part (smiling).

No, it's a beautiful shot. I hit it, and once I looked it was already on the other side of the net. As I keep my head quite down quite long. It was an important shot, you know.

Q. Are there any shots that you actually amaze yourself by playing?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, occasionally. That one was a good one ? at the right time.

Q. Overall on the circuit, who do you consider your toughest rivals?

ROGER FEDERER: The ones at the top right now.

Q. And of them?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, they're the same. I mean, I've beaten them all. I've lost to them all. Yeah, I have the feeling that they're very consistent, you know, even though maybe the one or the other has lost here. I think the guy just behind me in the ranking, they've proven that they are the most consistent player on tour. Those are in my eyes the most dangerous.

Q. Can you talk about the difference of your mentality in the first week versus what's going to be happening next week.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I had to wait all day yesterday, you know. I was back at the apartment, so it was not too bad. I was last match on, which actually in the beginning of the day, I don't want to say I planned on playing today, but sort of, you know, was just waiting.

So today I'm happy we got this match over. You know, of course I'm happy to be through to the second week because that was definitely my goal at the beginning of the tournament.

Now that I'm in the second week, you know, it's just four matches left, you know, once again. I hope to get the second week. You know, it was a good performance (indiscernible). I don't know who I'm playing actually.

Is the match over?

Q. Ferrero.

ROGER FEDERER: So that's a nice match because we haven't played much over the last few years.

Q. Within yourself, is there more pressure or less going for three in a row?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, the pressure's there anyway if you're going for your first or 10th, you know. No, I feel definitely it's a special year, you know, trying to make it three in a row. But, I don't know. I stay focused on what I have to do. I mean, the opponents are not getting easier from here.

First I have to make sure I get the chance for three. For this I have to make the finals first.

Q. You gave some attention to your feet during that match. Are you having problems there? Not too much gold in the shoes?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not too heavy. No, it's just the tape was bothering me once again. I just preferred to take it off than it moving in the wrong place.

Yeah, my foot couldn't really move in the shoe like I wanted it to move. Maybe the tape was too thick or anything. I already spoke to the physio. He didn't make a bad job. It was just bad luck, I think. I'd rather take it off than having a problem with (indiscernible) during the match, and maybe after the match especially.

That's what I did. I have no problems with my feet right now.

Q. Do you always tape up like that, rather like a boxer going into the ring?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, all the time.

Q. Why especially?

ROGER FEDERER: Why not (smiling)? I don't know. I do it ? I mean, I don't do it every single match on tour. I do it mostly during Grand Slams and best?of?five matches, occasionally when I play on a surface which I consider quite dangerous, maybe a wet clay or, I don't know, a tough hard court, then I do it. Otherwise, practice I never tape up. It's just more for maybe mental part of my game.

Q. Late in the fourth set, I believe it was when he was serving for the fourth set, there was a shot, sort of a lob, he kind of raised his hands almost perhaps to distract you. Did you notice that at all?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, I hit an overhead winner?

Q. Yes.

ROGER FEDERER: I saw he was doing something, but I thought he was going to throw the racquet already, not happy with that lob. That's the feeling I got. It didn't bother me. I was wondering what he was doing.

Q. With all his gestures, Lleyton Hewitt, his calling out, he's generally considered to be the most intense, in?your?face type of competitor on the circuit these days. After Lleyton, who would you say would be the most intense or in?your?face competitors on the circuit?

ROGER FEDERER: Where are we going here (smiling)? I don't know. Do you want me to say names?

I mean, the guy who gets pumped up is definitely Nadal. In your face, it's Stepanek. I feel he's a little in your face. Depends if you like it or not. I turn around rather quickly. Don't really pay too much attention. But from what I remember of playing him...

Q. Do you like Hewitt? Does it bother you with Hewitt?>

ROGER FEDERER: Not any more. Used to.

Q. You just block it out?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, started to play him so many times. I know him by now. Doesn't bother me any more, so it's good.

Q. Like most players, you probably, as they say, take them one round at a time. That doesn't mean you can't look in on other players that you're interested in. Have you been looking in on Andy Roddick, for example, even on television, particularly this last match against Bracciali?

ROGER FEDERER: I saw the last two sets yesterday. Yeah, I mean, he was supposed to win and he did well in the end to come through because it's a similar match to what I played against Agassi at the US Open. You know, you play the first three matches, then you come back and you have to just win one of the two, but it's not so easy. The conditions are again different. The player might have realized how to play you. So he did a good job.

Definitely I keep an eye on him. He's so far away in the draw that I think once he gets, let's say, to the quarterfinals stage, and me too, this is when I'm really going to start watching him than the earlier rounds.

Q. Any comment about his volleying last night?

ROGER FEDERER: The dive volley?

Q. Just his volleying in general.

ROGER FEDERER: I didn't really ? didn't really stick out to me. But I think that dive volley saved his life there on that occasion.

Q. Would anything less than winning this title be satisfactory to you? Could you reach the finals, play a great match against another player, a thrilling five?setter, lose, walk off the court and say, "It's okay"?

ROGER FEDERER: No, probably not. I wouldn't be satisfied.

Q. Because?

ROGER FEDERER: For me only the win would be satisfying this year, the way I've been playing, with the misses I've had at the French and Australian Open. But, of course, you know, I could walk away easier if I played all right or my opponent played out of his head. But I'd still be very disappointed.

Q. With the conditions that you had today, being colder, how does that change the way the game feels out there?

ROGER FEDERER: Not too different actually. I was surprised. I had the feeling ? I was thinking maybe it's going to play quicker because maybe there's more moist on the grass, and the grass then gets a little softer, then the ball doesn't bounce as high. That's sort of my explanation. But this didn't happen today. I guess it was quite dry. Like you say, it was quite cool, you know.

But I didn't feel a big difference of playing, honestly.

Q. Didn't make it any more difficult to find your rhythm and play?
ROGER FEDERER: No. Now that the baseline starts to get worn out a little bit, if you play right down the middle, you can get bad bounces, or if you play it down long, it's tough for the opponent always to hit a half volley. I think that is the main difference, I mean, to grass.

Let's make it THREE, Rogi. You are the KING :worship: :worship: :worship:

SUKTUEN
06-25-2005, 07:15 PM
Roger You can Do it!!!!! :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

Doris Loeffel
06-25-2005, 07:17 PM
thanks for the great articles

Daniel
06-26-2005, 04:48 AM
LONDON (AFP) - Roger Federer is desperate to clinch a third successive Wimbledon title to erase the misery of his 2005 Grand Slam flops at the Australian and French Opens.

The top seed has captured seven titles this year and has lost just three times in 57 matches. But still the 23-year-old is not satisfied.

His semi-final defeat to Marat Safin in the semi-final at the Australian Open, where he had been defending champion, and his French Open semi-final defeat to Spanish teenager Rafael Nadal are setbacks which burn deep.

Victory in next Sunday's final at the Swiss star's favourite Grand Slam tournament will wipe away the disappointments of Melbourne and Paris.

"For me only a win here would be satisfying this year with the misses I have had at the French and Australian Opens," said Federer.

"I could walk away easier if I played well or my opponent played out of his head, but I would still be disappointed."

Federer squandered a match point in his loss to Safin while Nadal brilliantly denied him the only Grand Slam title to have so far eluded him in Paris.

"I'm happy to be in the second week here, that was definitely my goal at the beginning of the tournament. Now there are just four matches left.

"The pressure's there but I feel it's a special year going for three in a row. I'll stay focused on what I have to do but the opponents are not getting any easier."

Next in line for Federer is the hugely experienced Spaniard Juan Carlos Ferrero over whom he has a 5-3 career record.

If he gets through that, it will be a quarter-final clash against either Fernando Gonzalez or Mikhail Youzhny with the possibilty of an epic semi-final confrontation against Australian third seed Lleyton Hewitt, the 2002 champion.

He's seeded to face America's Andy Roddick in the final, the man he beat 12 months ago to win his second title.

Federer is on a 32-match winning streak on grass with his last defeat on the surface coming in the first round here in 2002 at the hands of Mario Ancic, a potential alternative semi-final opponent this time round should Hewitt fluff his lines.

Federer insists whoever blocks his path to the final has to be respected if not feared. "I have beaten them all, I've lost to them all," he said. "They are all very consistent."

Federer needed four sets to see off Germany's Nicolas Kiefer in the third round while Roddick struggled to see off Italian qualifier Daniele Bracciali in the second round before a more convincing straight sets win over Igor Andreev gave him a place in the last 16.

"I'm playing this year for this year," said Roddick who took the first set off Federer in the 2004 final before the Swiss ace stormed to glory in four.

"It's always good if you have experienced something before so if you get back in that situation it's not a total suprise for you. You know what to expect a little more."

Roddick faces Guillermo Coria for a place in the last eight; the American will be favourite holding a 4-0 career record over the Argentinian.

Daniel
06-26-2005, 04:49 AM
WIMBLEDON, England - Accustomed to hitting improbable winners at Wimbledon, Roger Federer came up with a shot on the run that amazed even him. The two-time defending champion pulled a feathery backhand crosscourt in the final game Saturday and beat Nicolas Kiefer in the third round, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 6-1, 7-5.

"A beautiful shot," Federer said. "I hit it, and once I looked it was already on the other side of the net. It was an important shot, you know."

Eager to avoid a fifth set, Federer rallied twice from a service break down in the last set. He hit three aces in the final game to go with the picturesque backhand, completing his 32nd consecutive victory on grass and 17th in a row at the All England Club.

Daniel
06-26-2005, 04:50 AM
LONDON (AFP) - Double defending champion Roger Federer made Nicolas Kiefer pay for a bizarre and ill-timed impression of Liverpool's European Cup winning goalkeeper Jerzy Dudek to reach the Wimbledon last 16.

The top seed struggled to subdue the German 25th seed 6-2, 6-7 (5/7), 6-1, 7-5 on Saturday and now faces Spanish 23rd seed Juan Carlos Ferrero for a place in the quarter-finals.

But the crucial point of the tie came when Kiefer led 5-3 in the fourth set, was 30-15 and just two points from taking the world number one into a final set.

As Federer approached the net to put away a forehand, the 27-year-old Kiefer leapt in the air with his arms outstretched in an effort to put his opponent off his stroke in the manner of Dudek.

The Liverpool goalkeeper had hopped from side to side, with his arms outstretched, to distract AC Milan's players in the European Cup final penalty shoot-out in Istanbul last month.

It worked for the Polish footballer but it backfired on Kiefer as Federer clinched the next four games of the fourth set to take the tie.

Federer played down the incident after the tie.

"I saw him doing it. I thought he was going to throw his racket," he said. "I was wondering what was going on but it didn't bother me."

Federer, unbeaten on grass since losing in the first round here in 2002, eased through the first set in only 28 minutes with breaks in the third and seventh games.

The 27-year-old Kiefer, once the world number four, grabbed just six points off the Federer serve before the Swiss star clinched the set with a breathtaking backhand, hit from just behind him but timed to perfection to drop out of the range of the German.

It was a regal show although the Centre Court royal box voted with its feet.

Packed with British Olympians such as Colin Jackson, Audley Harrison and Jonathan Edwards as well as injured British Lions rugby star Lawrence Dallaglio, lunch was called.

As a result, the box was mostly empty as the second set was played out and the VIPs missed out on an impressive Kiefer fightback overturning a 2-5 deficit in the tiebreak to level the match when Federer netted a return after 77 minutes.

However, the misfiring Federer was soon back on top grabbing a break in the second game with a running forehand as he moved into a 3-0 lead and then broke again in the sixth before taking the set 6-1 when Kiefer sent a lob long.

The German, who had won three of his seven career meetings with the Swiss going into Saturday's clash, refused to go quietly and carved out his break of the match to lead 2-0.

Federer hit back immediately but he was to serve up two successive double faults in the eighth game to hand Kiefer the advantage again as the German led 5-3.

Kiefer failed to make it count as he too served up a double fault to hand the break back and the top seed made the most of his chance by holding for 5-5 and unleashing his full artillery to break to go 6-5.

He then took the match with his 14th ace after 2hr 35min of thrilling action, a win which also gave him a 32nd successive win on grass.

Daniel
06-26-2005, 04:51 AM
LONDON, England -- World number one Roger Federer lost a set for the first time at this year's Wimbledon before stumbling through to the last 16 with a 6-2 6-7 6-1 7-5 win over German Nicolas Kiefer.

The Swiss top seed took the match after 2hr 35min of thrilling action, sealing victory with a court-splitting ace.

Federer will play Spanish former French Open champion Juan Carlos Ferrero in the fourth round on Monday.

The aberration occurred when he tossed away a 4-1 lead to lose the second set tiebreak 7-5 to Kiefer, who beat Federer on grass at Halle three years ago.

Kiefer then led 5-3 in the fourth set before the champion raised his game decisively.

Almost unthinkably, Federer had double-faulted twice in succession to lose his serve but he broke back immediately and held to level the score at 5-5.

Federer immediately broke again and then produced a dazzling backhand crosscourt winner to set up match point on his own serve.

"That was definitely a test today. I had the feeling I should've won in three sets but in the end I am happy to have won in four."

The Swiss was especially pleased with the backhand, one of the shots he has made his own.

"It's a beautiful shot and when I look up it's already on the other side of the net as I keep my head down quite a long time when I hit it," he said.

Federer was nonetheless mildly disconcerted at his patchy performance, which included throwing away a 4-1 lead in the second set tiebreak.

"Tiebreakers are always tough but I should never have lost that one," he admitted.

"In the end if I win in five hours on court or in one hour it doesn't matter as long as I keep on winning. I think I have to keep that in mind."

He has now won 32 matches in a row on grass, nine fewer than Bjorn Borg's professional era record and he will expect to extend that to 33 against Spanish claycourter Juan Carlos Ferrero in the last 16 on Monday.

babsi
06-26-2005, 09:31 AM
Thanks guys for posting :)

Nocko
06-26-2005, 12:41 PM
Thanks for intervews and many nice articles! :worship:

lunahielo
06-26-2005, 01:38 PM
Thank you for all the nice articles~~~~~~~and the interview. :yeah:

RogiFan88
06-26-2005, 02:13 PM
Ferrero the dangerous floater no longer in a sea of mediocrity
James Corrigan at Wimbledon
26 June 2005
Of all the dangerous floaters left in the men's draw none bears fins as sharp or as noticeable as those of Juan Carlos Ferrero. They will have to be, mind you, for tomorrow he plays Roger Federer in the fourth round. And nature's greatest predators don't get any more great or any more whiter than white than that. Ferrero, however, rather than tiptoe warily into the nerve-infested environs of Centre Court, will fairly skip in there, splashing around in the joy of it all. Because the depths to which this Spanish 25-year-old has sunk, only too recently, has things that can bite 10 times more fiercely: namely desperation, frustration, and, most painful of all, self-doubt.

Actually, in the true sense of the word, thanks to a system here that now all but hands seedings out free with a glass of lemon barley, Ferrero is not a floater at all. But when you've been No 1 in the world not even two years ago, then being down at 23 sure feels like it. Especially when in the time it takes to contract chickenpox, shake it off and then suffer back, rib, knee and wrist injuries after falling over, some young upstart has come and nicked your status as "finest Spanish player".

Witnessing the rise of Rafael Nadal in the last year or so has been one of many bad times to have blighted Ferrero since September 2003, when the then French Open champion acceded to the pinnacle of the men's game. As he sat then, atop the world, he wasn't to know what about to befall him in 2004 when his world, not to mention his ranking, was to turn upside down.

First came shooting pains up his legs, followed swiftly by the debilitating viral infection and then the injuries that spiralled him down all the way to No 90 in the world. "The difficult moments were when I knew that I had the chickenpox and that it would take two or three months to recover," he said. "I had to start again physically because the virus left me at zero per cent. When I started to come back I broke a few things when I fell on court and that was another two months out. Those five months were pretty difficult for me. I have a lot of confidence in me that I will be the same Juan Carlos as I was before."

He certainly looked like the old Juan Carlos to Florian Mayer on No 1 Court yesterday, although not when the match began. Indeed, the unfortunate German must have believed he was on the brink of a big scalp when racing through the first set in 23 minutes, but he was then left tearing his own hair out when his opponent reeled off the next three in 86 minutes flat. On his day - and this was his day - Ferrero is control and elegance personified; this long-limbed, elegant individual covers the court in the blink of an eye, reaching balls that should really be unreachable with humbling ease.

Well, Mayer felt humble anyway as he was dragged into a fight from the baseline that was only ever going to have one victor. After having the tactics dictated to him in the first set, Ferrero suddenly remembered who he was - or at least who he had once been - by coming into the net just twice in the second and third (two winners) as he completely altered the shape of the match with the force of giddying groundstrokes that found the back of the court with unerring accuracy and impressive depth.

To say Mayer, who reached last year's quarter-finals here, was at a loss to find a way out of this trap was an understatement. Florian was utterly flummoxed. "Gawwwwd," he said at one (lost) point in the fourth set as the game slipped away from him.

"I was good today - eventually," said Ferrero, after giving yet more weight to the ever-burgeoning theory that the Wimbledon of the new century is nowhere as near as unfriendly as it once was to slow-court specialists. "But I came here with a lot of confidence because for the first time I had the opportunity to play a tournament on grass before Wimbledon. At Halle I won two important matches against specialist players on grass. That brought me here on a high."

And he is certain to stay there, despite the imposing figure of Federer bearing down on him. "Well, Roger is playing so good on this surface and he's winning almost everything that he's entering. But I'm playing well here and I go in with a lot of motivation. The last time I played him on a hard court [in Dubai] I had two match points against him. So, you know, if I play good I have a chance to put up a good fight."

The resulting first Wimbledon quarter-final would not only eclipse his previous best finish here - the fourth round two years ago - but also hurtle his ranking towards his hardly surprising mission. "Do I expect to return to No 1 one day?" he asked. "Yeah, why not? I've done it once, I can do it again. This year, I expect to get into the top 10 or top 12, something like that. Once there, well..."

Federer is in Ferrero's sights, both short-term and long-term.
http://sport.independent.co.uk/tennis/story.jsp?story=649706

RogiFan88
06-26-2005, 02:14 PM
Ancic rises out of shadowland to stalk Federer
By Nick Townsend
26 June 2005

At the conclusion of a week in which rather too many of the élite have been slipping into oblivion, withering rather than thriving on the vine, the form of Mario Ancic has, almost unnoticed, been ripening in their shadows.

You gain a clue to any player's status in the British public consciousness by the numbers at his post-match press conference in the first week. Victorious Brits will mean a fairly congested main inter-view room, which is the size of a small cinema. So, too, will tournament favourite Roger Federer. Lleyton Hewitt and Andy Roddick rather less so. On Friday, after Ancic had crept under the met-eorological bar on No 1 Court, the French teenager Gaël Monfils, last year's Wimbledon junior champion, capitulating obligingly in the final set before the heavens opened for the first time in the week, the 21-year-old Croatian was reduced to conducting a review of his week in a small ante-chamber, occupied by this observer and around eight of his compatriots. After some interminable questioning in Ancic's native tongue, delivered with what appeared to be some gravitas and a good deal of humour, a member of the Croatian fraternity was asked to reveal what the No 10 seed's most telling comment had been. "This week, on a scale of one to 10 he gives himself seven for his performances," was the reply. "Now that week is over and he is ready for the next."

Which confirms what had not been difficult to discern already, that the Split-born but now Monte Carlo-resident player prefers circumspection to any brash promises as to his championship potential. It does also suggest, though, that, in his own mind, there is much to come from the player, who is equipped with a slingshot of a serve and a quiver-ful of sublime volleys. He is scheduled to meet Marat Safin's conqueror, the Spaniard Feliciano Lopez, tomorrow.

When asked whether he could emulate his countryman Goran Ivanisevic this year, he smiled embarrassedly but refused to reflect on such a fantastic prospect, confining himself to: "I think it's still too early in the tournament [to say that]."

He added: "I mean, I'm playing against a guy who is top 25 [actually 26], who beat Marat, who has been playing his best on grass. He [Lopez] had to play a good match to win that. He [Lopez] likes grass. He made the fourth round last year [third, in fact], you know. And he's a lefty, with a big serve, which is a pretty nice advantage here on grass."

Lopez, from the land of red clay, has prospered on the lawns here where his fellow-countryman Rafael Nadal suffered (though scarcely in silence). That precocious teenager, for whom so much had been predicted, had been less than convincing on the surface against Luxembourg's Gilles Muller, and his glowering antipathy for grass on Thursday suggested that he viewed it as something better suited to locations such as Glastonbury (though not necessarily the kind of stuff they are sitting on there at the moment).

While Ancic prefers to dwell on his opponents' prowess, plenty of other learned judges are prepared to press the claims of the former Wimbledon junior finalist, despite his tender years. Michael Stich, the 1991 champion turned BBC analyst and interviewer, is among those advocates who maintain that the 6ft 5in protégé of Ivanisevic, with whom Ancic has practised since the age of 10, can ascend to the same rarified heights as the 2001 champion. The reason is that Ancic is that rarity, a man capable of defeating Federer on a surface which can be other performers' best friend in one match, only to produce a serious falling-out the next.

Ancic may have been a semi-finalist last year, having defeated Tim Henman in the quarters, but he arrived here relatively content that he is regarded as an appendix in the career of other players - most notably as the man against whom Federer last experienced defeat on grass way back, in lawn tennis terms, in 2002.

He does, though, bristle if you suggest that, despite his achievements, he has yet to create a true impact on the British psyche. "I'm not worried about whether I'm recognised, but I feel there are a lot of people behind me here," he says. "When I hear them all cheering for me and wanting me to win, it's a great feeling."

In this kindergarten - eight teenagers, including Andy Murray, had participated at the start of the tournament - Ancic has almost attained the status of senior citizen. He may not have been around the block that many times, but he has certainly put a few miles on the clock. In 2002, Federer, then the No 9 seed, was defeated by Ancic in the first round, and on Centre Court, no less. It earned him the distinction of being the first teenager to win on his Wimbledon debut on Centre Court since Bjorn Borg in 1973.

His dispatch of the 18-year-old Monfils, last year's No 1 junior, was savage - and relatively brief, ensuring that Ancic can luxuriate in a two-day break. The young Frenchman, accorded after the denouement an ovation by the No 1 Court crowd, displayed sufficient variation of shot to commend him as a player of genuine promise, but was simply overpowered on a day when the Czech Thomas Berdych, another teenager in the top half of the draw, also failed to progress. Last year here, Ancic progressed to his first Grand Slam semi-final, defeating Tim Henman on the way, before colliding to his cost with Roddick, but this season claimed his first career title at the Ordina Open, on grass, in Den Bosch.

Unlike a Henman, or a Murray, the Croatian can continue his emergence at his own pace, not exactly amid a blackout but, for the moment, with the spotlights dimmed. Defeat of Lopez could result in a quarter-final against Hewitt, who with a first child and marriage impending, appears relaxed and on excellent terms with himself, never mind that the All England Club's computer has realigned the world No 2 and 2002 Wimbledon champion as No 3 seed and confronted him with some daunting opponents in the top half of the draw.

Among them, Ancic lies in wait...
26 June 2005 08:34
http://sport.independent.co.uk/tennis/story.jsp?story=649674

RogiFan88
06-26-2005, 02:15 PM
Only three will do for focused Federer
Champion overcomes familiar foe in quest for hat-trick
Ronald Atkin at Wimbledon
26 June 2005

They are old adversaries, if not necessarily in years, so Roger Federer admitted that he expected a hard time in his third round Centre Court match against Nicolas Kiefer. The German certainly obliged the defending champion, pilfering a set from the Swiss before falling 6-2 6-7 6-1 7-5.

That tie-break loss was the first set Federer has conceded in an opening week in which he has proceeded with the assurance of a battleship on a millpond, moving towards that modern-era rarity at Wimbledon, a hat-trick of titles. Fred Perry did it in 1934-36, Bjorn Borg won five in a row, and Pete Sampras twice did the hat-trick, so Federer will be in august company if he goes the distance in the second week.

The prospect appeals, of course. "This is definitely a special year, trying to make it three in a row. But I need to stay focused on what I have to do. I mean, the opponents are not getting easier from here. But first I have to make sure I get the chance for three. For this, I have to make the final first."

Making the final is something which comes easy to the Swiss Alp on grass. Yesterday's victory was his 32nd in succession on the surface, encompassing two Wimbledons and three victories in the German tournament held in Halle. The feeling of invincibility, although modestly presented, sits well with the 23-year-old.

The 27-year-old Kiefer, who five years ago was inside the world's top five, has struggled in recent seasons with wrist and heel injuries but he remains a dangerous opponent. He won three of their first four matches, but in the last two years the balance has swung firmly to Federer with three straight wins.

Neither man had been helped by having this second-round match postponed by rain from Friday afternoon until a noon start under heavy cloud and far chillier conditions than Wimbledon had hitherto been offering in its first, glorious week. With only a single day's rest now available until the fourth round is played out tomorrow. Federer was keen to get out there and get off again with the least possible delay or inconvenience.

It seemed his wish would be granted when he sailed through the opening set in less than half an hour. Two captures of the German serve were more than enough to set him comfortably in the driver's seat. But the bearded Kiefer, one of the back-to-front cap brigade, is a dogged opponent.

So the Wimbledon champion was not surprised to be required to labour through a long second set in which neither man managed a break point until the onset of the tie-break. Here Federer jumped into a three points to love lead and was 5-2 ahead until Kiefer embarked on a thrilling, and loudly applauded, surge of five straight points which ended with Federer projecting a tame backhand into the netting. If Federer is ever nettled, it never shows. But the severity of the champion's reaction was indication enough. Kiefer was bombarded, fell 3-0 behind and found himself a set in arrears once more. It had been a quick set, too, just 29 minutes of Federer ferocity in which the Swiss was cranking up the serves to 136 miles an hour.

Cheekily, Kiefer snatched the Federer serve to go 2-0 ahead in the fourth set, only for Federer to claw back the break at once. Still the man from Sievershausen was not finished, breaking Federer for a 5-3 lead. Visions of a fifth set and an even heavier delay to the anxiously-awaited Centre Court enthronement of Andy Murray were washed away as Federer changed gear. Now we were seeing champion tennis from the champion.

Three straight games left him serving for the win and the way he moved to match point with perhaps the most glorious shot even he has ever played, a full stretch, running cross-court backhand which seared past Kiefer's outstretched racket. Even Federer was moved to call it "a beautiful shot." So pleased was he that he indulged in celebration at putting this potentially hazardous match behind him by hurling wristbands into the crowd. Though not a classic, it had been a highly entertaining match and a valiant effort by Kiefer. As John McEnroe observed on television: "It will give Federer something to think about during the weekend" as he prepares for his fourth round contest with Spaniard, Juan Carlos Ferrero.

Afterwards, Federer paid tribute to Kiefer. "We know each other's game pretty well, and I think at times you could see that today. I have the feeling I should have won in three but in the end I'm happy to have won in four.

"In the end, if I win in three or four sets, or in one or five hours, it doesn't matter, as long as I keep on winning. I have to keep that in mind, too. But this was definitely a test today, absolutely. I had to survive some tough moments. Tie-breakers are always tough, and I never should have lost that one, so in the third set I really had to turn it around. I started to play better just in time.

"After having to wait all day yesterday, I'm happy to have got this match over and of course I'm happy to be through to the second week. Now that I'm in the second week there are just four matches left. And it gets harder now."

As for who will constitute the biggest threat, Federer pointed out quietly that the rankings showed clearly enough who those people are. He promised to keep a special eye on last year's runner-up, Andy Roddick.

"When we get to the quarter-final stage, that's when I'm really going to start watching him." Roddick, too, is comfortably through to the fourth round after a straight-sets win over the Russian, Igor Andreev 6-2 6-2 7-6 in just under two hours. The second seed revealed that he also is watching Federer's progress and is happy with his form.

"I'm still alive. That's the goal. That's as well as I've hit the ball so far this tournament," said the 22-year-old American. "Mission accomplished for the first week. Now it's time to get down to business. It's always a big relief to get through the first few rounds. A lot of it is about survival."

As for Federer, nothing less than a third success would really satisfy him this time, he said. "For me only winning Wimbledon would be satisfying this year with the misses I've had at the French and Australian Opens.

"I could walk away from here easier if I played all right or my opponent played out of his head. But I'd still be very disappointed." He would not be alone.
http://sport.independent.co.uk/

RogiFan88
06-26-2005, 02:15 PM
a bit of a kooky article:

June 26, 2005
Formula that says Federer will win
Roger Dobson

WHEN Roger Federer is asked to name the most important factors in winning Wimbledon, he lists concentration, focus, preparation and total engagement.
Scientists have devised a different formula: fij = ft + (fi - fav) - (gj - gav). It is their equation to explain why they think the Swiss player will become the men’s singles champion for a third successive year.

Mathematicians at Swinburne University in Australia believe they can forecast results by studying the serve and return statistics for each player.

Their research is already being used by bookmakers to prepare spread bet odds.

In the equation, fij is the combined percentage of points won on serve for player i against j, his opponent.

The gj stands for the percentage of points won on return for j while the t and av represent tournament and tour averages.

Tristan Barnett, head of a research team that reports its findings in the latest edition of the Journal of Management Mathematics, said: “What we have been able to do is to combine player statistics to predict the outcome of tennis matches.

“Published tennis statistics can be combined to predict the serving statistics when two given players meet. These are then used to predict further match outcomes, such as the length of the match and chance of either player winning.”

With men’s tennis dominated by serves, the researchers combined statistics about serve and return for each of the world’s top 200 male players.

They then worked out the chances of winning a point on serve, on first service, and on return of serve.

“While we expect a good server to win a higher proportion of serves than average, this proportion would be reduced somewhat if his opponent is a good receiver,” added Barnett.

The results also backed the belief that serve-and-volleyers perform best on grass surfaces.

At the Australian Open, which is played on hard courts, 61.7% of points are won on service. But on the grass of Wimbledon this rises to 63.8%.

The researchers successfully tested their formula on a match between Andy Roddick and Younes El Aynaoui in the 2003 Australian Open, and found that it could accurately predict events, including the length of the match.

Latest Wimbledon data suggested that Federer’s chances of winning worked out at 49.5%, compared with 28.5% for Andy Roddick and 5.6% for Lleyton Hewitt.

WHEN Roger Federer is asked to name the most important factors in winning Wimbledon, he lists concentration, focus, preparation and total engagement.

Scientists have devised a different formula: fij = ft + (fi - fav) - (gj - gav). It is their equation to explain why they think the Swiss player will become the men’s singles champion for a third successive year.

Mathematicians at Swinburne University in Australia believe they can forecast results by studying the serve and return statistics for each player.

Their research is already being used by bookmakers to prepare spread bet odds.

In the equation, fij is the combined percentage of points won on serve for player i against j, his opponent.

The gj stands for the percentage of points won on return for j while the t and av represent tournament and tour averages.

Tristan Barnett, head of a research team that reports its findings in the latest edition of the Journal of Management Mathematics, said: “What we have been able to do is to combine player statistics to predict the outcome of tennis matches.

“Published tennis statistics can be combined to predict the serving statistics when two given players meet. These are then used to predict further match outcomes, such as the length of the match and chance of either player winning.”

With men’s tennis dominated by serves, the researchers combined statistics about serve and return for each of the world’s top 200 male players.

They then worked out the chances of winning a point on serve, on first service, and on return of serve.

“While we expect a good server to win a higher proportion of serves than average, this proportion would be reduced somewhat if his opponent is a good receiver,” added Barnett.

The results also backed the belief that serve-and-volleyers perform best on grass surfaces.

At the Australian Open, which is played on hard courts, 61.7% of points are won on service. But on the grass of Wimbledon this rises to 63.8%.
The researchers successfully tested their formula on a match between Andy Roddick and Younes El Aynaoui in the 2003 Australian Open, and found that it could accurately predict events, including the length of the match.

Latest Wimbledon data suggested that Federer’s chances of winning worked out at 49.5%, compared with 28.5% for Andy Roddick and 5.6% for Lleyton Hewitt.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/

RogiFan88
06-26-2005, 02:16 PM
June 26, 2005
Masterly Federer chases hat-trick
Barry Flatman
The top seed eases to victory with a show of class that looks ominous for the pretenders to his crown

Like a ruling lion in the middle of his pride, Roger Federer suddenly decided the time was right to assert his dominance with a roar and a show of teeth.Centre Court is the champion’s habitat, and something regal was required to avert a threat to his dominance.
After being pushed wide to the left-handed corner by a determined Nicolas Kiefer, the top seed came up with a piece of brilliance to show why he is revered as one of the finest players ever to grace this historic patch of turf.

Federer unleashed a backhand from such an acute angle that the very concept of success was difficult to comprehend, but the ball flew cross-court, cleared the net by a couple of centimetres and bounced just inside the sideline veering out of his opponent’s reach. Kiefer could only look in amazement. Even Federer seemed surprised that so outlandish an attempt had won the point. An ace later, the champion was through to the fourth round, victorious 6-2 6-7 6-1 7-5.

The consensus is that Federer is not only destined to collect a third title, but is also rapidly gaining the credentials to be spoken of in the same breath as the great Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras. What could mere mortals do in an attempt to emulate such a shot? “Maybe work on the forearm and the footwork, sharpen up the mental side,” Federer said with a smile as he struggled to describe such a wondrous blow. “But no, it was a beautiful shot and there is occasionally times when I even amaze myself at what I do. That one was good, and it came just at the right time.”

Federer’s unbeaten run on the lawns of Wimbledon and Westphalia now stands at 32 matches, and should his third successive All England Club title follow closely behind a hat-trick of triumphs at the German warm-up event in Halle, nobody will be surprised. Certainly not Kiefer, who extended the Swiss just about as far as he would be happy going so soon into the tournament. There is a fine line for great players between getting the sort of on-court workout that is a step up from mere practice sessions, and a confrontation so strenuous that it might expend energy best reserved for the later stages.

For a few minutes it seemed Federer would be put to a five- set examination by the 27-year-old German. Trailing to a break of serve for the second time in the fourth, it looked as though the Federer was about to be pushed all the way. Yet the mark of great players is an ability to play the crucial shots well, and that is exactly what Federer achieved. Kiefer’s two most recent visits to Wimbledon ended at the first hurdle and he lived extremely dangerously in his five-set opener against Frenchman Julien Benneteau this year.

But the world No 1 accepted that his passage towards the last 16 would not be without stress. “It was tough,” acknowledged Federer, who now faces the No 23 seed, Spain’s Juan Carlos Ferrero. “Like I expected, really. We know each other’s game pretty well and at times you could see that. I have a feeling I should have won in three sets but I’m happy to have won in four.”

Kiefer marched on to court aware that he was a member of an elite band of four still left in the competition. Only Lleyton Hewitt, Mario Ancic and Jiri Novak could share the German’s memory of a grass-court win over the world No 1, although the No 25 seed required good powers of recall to think back to that semi-final in Halle more than three years ago. There were times when he performed like somebody who felt the player on the other side of the net was nothing more than a routine opponent, perhaps buoyed by the knowledge that he had won three of their previous seven encounters.

A selection of backhand passes, played with both pace and spin, left Federer swinging at clean air. Once Kiefer even forced the Swiss into taking, for him, the ultimate evasive action and resorting to a double-fisted backhand, but as ever with Federer, there was an air of the inevitable about his performance.

Centre Court was barely a quarter full and the Royal Box dusted with only a few sporting celebrities as Federer opened up impressively and moved a service break to the good at only the second opportunity. Once the lunch bell sounded, even those few invited medallists and winners from other arenas headed off for their opening course, but the All England Club chairman, Tim Phillips, is a confirmed fan of his men’s champion. With his guests seated, Phillips was immediately back in his front row seat, not wanting to miss a stroke of what many believe will be Federer’s path to a third successive title.

What he witnessed was affirmation of not only how inventive the top seed can be but also an ability to provoke memories of past greats. One overhead smash, struck with both feet 12 inches above the turf, was reminiscent of Sampras in his pomp.

Thankfully, most seats were occupied when Federer cranked into his highest gear for the spectacular finale, but this was only an appetiser for what is to come. After falling at the semi-final stage in both the Australian and French Opens, Federer has discovered new levels of determination as he strives to retain his title. “The only thing that would satisfy me this year is winning the title,” he said. “Of course I could walk away easier if I had played all right or my opponent had played out of his head. But I’d still be disappointed.”
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/

RogiFan88
06-26-2005, 02:16 PM
June 25, 2005
Federer continues grass-court dominance
By Times Online and PA Sport

Roger Federer, the defending champion, dropped his first set of the week but stayed on course to complete a hat-trick of Wimbledon titles when he overcame stubborn resistance from Nicolas Kiefer.

The world No 1 and top seed lost a tie-break and twice dropped his serve in the fourth set but they were only minor hiccups as he gained a 6-2, 6-7, 6-1, 7-5 victory in two hours and 35 minutes to extend his winning run on grass to 32 matches.

Federer, who has not lost on grass since Wimbledon in 2003, will now meet Juan Carlos Ferrero, the former French Open champion, who today came from a set down to beat another German, Florian Mayer, 3-6, 6-2, 6-1, 6-1.

Federer, forced to give up a weekend off after his third-round match was held over from Friday because of rain, looked to be making up for lost time when he breezed through the first set in just 28 minutes. But Kiefer, the 25th-seeded German, is one of the few men to beat Federer on grass and his serve-and-volley game asked plenty of questions of the champion.

The 27-year-old Kiefer, who has beaten Federer in three of their previous seven meetings, made an impressive start to the second set, holding his opening service game to love, and that gave him the confidence he needed and he made the two-time champion fight for every point.

Kiefer came up with a 136mph ace to remind the title holder of his threat and the set went with serve until the tie-break. A crashing return from Federer earned him a mini-break and he then produced a wonderful array of winners to surge into a 5-2 lead. But Kiefer hung on and seized his opportunity when Federer put a forehand into the tramlines. The German then won five points in a row to take the tie-break 7-5 and level the match.

Stung by the loss of his first set of the tournament and only the eighth out of 86 during his 31-match winning streak, Federer roared back in emphatic fashion. Kiefer had no answer to the champion's power and precision as he dropped his serve at the start of the third set.

Federer opened up a 3-0 lead and, although Kiefer gained his first break point - after almost two hours - the world No 1 served out to take the set 6-1 in just 29 minutes.

But, if the Centre Court crowd thought the one-sided third set would herald a quick finish to the match, the Kiefer made them think again when he broke Federer for the first time. The world No 26 served for a 3-0 lead but the champion bounced back decisively to level matters, breaking his opponent to love in the process.

The unthinkable happened in the eighth game when Federer doubled-faulted twice, doubling his tally for the match, to drop his serve for the third time this week. That gave Kiefer the opportunity to serve for the set and level the match but he was unable to capitalise, double-faulting on break point.

It proved to be his last chance, with Federer achieving a crucial break in the 11th game and serving out for the match.

Federer was happy to get the better of a long-standing rival and avoid a potential banana skin. "It was tough but I expected it really," he said. "We've played on several occasions and he beat me a few times. We know each other's game pretty well and at times you could see that.

"I had to survive some tough moments. I had the feeling I should have won in three but, in the end, I'm happy to win in four."
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/

RogiFan88
06-26-2005, 02:18 PM
Third Round
Master craftsman Federer marches into last 16 with ruthless precision
Jon Henderson, tennis correspondent
Sunday June 26, 2005
The Observer

Pete Sampras did it and now Roger Federer has done it - turned Centre Court into a place not so much of combat as of ritual slaughter.
His 6-2 6-7 (5-7) 6-1 7-5 victory against the German Nicolas Kiefer, which put him into the last 16, had its awkward passages, partly because Kiefer knows Federer's grass-court game as well as anyone. But this was, overwhelmingly, another fine demonstration of the master craftsman at work.

The champion has now won 17 successive matches at Wimbledon, most of them on Centre Court, which, with its tightly packed stands encircling the grass stage, can create a more charged atmosphere than any other arena in the game. On this occasion, with sullen skies defying too much excitement, it became charged only sporadically as the 23-year-old Federer, seeking to win Wimbledon for the third year in a row, dismantled Kiefer's challenge with the expertise of a master butcher dissecting a carcass.
The greatest excitement came during a medical break Kiefer called in the fourth set, when even the smartly attired folk in the royal box joined in a Mexican wave.

You sense that one of the reasons Federer ever gets into trouble is because he likes to test himself by attempting the difficult shot rather than the obvious one.

Time and again against Kiefer, you expected him to do one thing and he did the other. He went down the line and behind the German instead of hitting across court or slowed down his swing in order to make time to create a difficult angle. He hit some stupendous half-volleys, two in particular: the first a cross-court backhand to clinch the first set and the second that prompted John McEnroe to remark: 'That's impossible - for a human being.'

Asked how he did it, Federer said, smiling: 'You've got to work on your forearm, work on your footwork and work on the mental part. It's a beautiful shot.'

Federer may also have felt obliged to mix things up because he knows only too well his game is as familiar to Kiefer as anyone on the tour.

It has become a routine that the pair practise together when the circuit moves on to grass after the French Open, although those who have seen these sessions say Kiefer is so exasperated by Federer's deft shot-making that playing so much against him may be no more than a mixed blessing.

Whenever Federer was in trouble against Kiefer yesterday he played himself out of it with a champion's poise. He managed to fritter away a 3-0 lead in the second-set tie-break, but bounced back by overpowering the German in the third set. And when Kiefer opened a 5-3 lead in the fourth set, after breaking the champion for the first time in the match in the eighth game, Federer won the next four games to seal his win.

Federer's next opponent will be Juan Carlos Ferrero, the 2003 French Open champion and one of his predecessors as world number one, whose previously expressed dislike of grass courts was not evident in an impressive four-set defeat of the dangerous, if unorthodox, German, Florian Mayer. Ferrero arrived at Wimbledon ranked down at 31 and seeded only 23rd, the result of a year disrupted by illness and injury, with chicken pox followed by wrist and rib problems. However, while it contributed to a shortened clay-court season, it meant he was allowed a longer period of preparation on grass than he had managed before.

Ferrero started hesitantly against Mayer, a Wimbledon quarter-finalist last year, and it looked early on as if Court 2 might add to its reputation as the graveyard of the seeds.

However, once he had adjusted to the pace of the court and found his rhythm and timing, Ferrero's superior groundstrokes overwhelmed Mayer for a 3-6 6-2 6-1 6-1 win in just one hour 49 minutes.

'It's a very important match for me,' Ferrero said of his fourth-round meeting with Federer. 'He is the biggest player on grass right now. He's number one in the world. He's won Wimbledon two times in a row. You know, he's Roger Federer.

'But I'm playing good tennis here, I've got a lot of motivation and the last time I played against him, I had two match points on a hard court in Dubai this year before losing.

'Grass is different to everything else, but I arrived here in very good physical shape and mentally really high. If I play good then I think I have a chance.'

Despite these days of 32 seeds, a figure that in theory reduces the possibility of upsets, the first week produced a number of unexpected results, including the defeats of seeds four, five and six: Rafael Nadal, Marat Safin and Tim Henman. Safin's defeat was probably the most surprising given that he has won two grand slams, including this year's Australian Open, and has a robust, mobile game that ought to flourish on grass.

Safin's problem is that he has yet to convince himself that he can be as effective a grass-court player as most other people believe he can. It is the sort of uncertainty that a player such as the elegant Spaniard Feliciano Lopez has just the game to exploit.

Accurate and adventurous, Lopez was as welcome company for Safin as a swarm of bees at a picnic as he drove the Russian to distraction in one of the few matches to beat Friday's rain.

Lopez has now travelled to at least the last 16 in three of his four visits to Wimbledon and his fourth-round match this week against Mario Ancic of Croatia, the last player to beat Federer at Wimbledon - in the first round three years ago - will be an intriguing match-up between two men who fancy their chances on grass.

The winner of that match will play either the 2002 champion, Lleyton Hewitt, who is seeded third, or Taylor Dent, seeded 24.

Hewitt should win, but may not. The Aussie has been looking like a surfer who keeps missing the big wave and may be vulnerable against Dent, whose heavy serving can ask questions of even the best-informed rival.

Henman and Nadal, beaten by Luxembourg's most successful sportsman, Gilles Muller, disappeared from the bottom half of the draw, which is now looking the likelier half to produce a surprise finalist.
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/

Skyward
06-26-2005, 03:14 PM
Thanks for the articles Rogifan. :)

SUKTUEN
06-26-2005, 03:36 PM
thankyou so much

ToanNguyen
06-26-2005, 03:41 PM
Wow, there are a lot of articles posted. A lot of reads which is good. Thanks everyone for posting. Another read for you guys.

Nirmal Shekar





London: In sport, beauty is mostly an illusion. And Roger Federer is the single most gifted active illusionist. He makes you believe that he is an artistic genius lost on his canvas, one with his art, oblivious to the surroundings, creating exquisite beauty while, in actual fact, he engages himself in the business of destruction, taking apart the opponent's game, destroying his will, turning his nerves into jelly and forcing him to throw his arms up in absolute surrender.

You come away from a Federer show wonderfully satiated, feeling light and almost flying, as if you have just walked out of a performance of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. On the other hand, the truth is, you have just witnessed a ruthless demolition, one where a man has taken his opponent apart mercilessly, almost humiliating the victim with his own superior powers.

Of course, in the day-to-day business of professional tennis, the degree of humiliation differs. On Saturday, the German Nicholas Kiefer, determined not the crawl when forced to bend, managed to retrieve a few tiny, broken pieces of his honour and self-esteem from the centre court at Wimbledon before Federer marched through to the fourth round with a 6-2, 6-7(5), 6-1, 7-5 victory in two hours and 35 minutes.

And that was because, on a dank afternoon, Federer seemed to adopt a Humphrey Bogart-like brooding posture, unsure of his own appetite for the kill, uncertain, on occasion, about the efficacy of his weapons. But, that, again, was an illusion. For, when the prey seemed set to escape from his sights — Kiefer was up 5-3 in the fourth set — the champion gathered speed and soon got his teeth in.

To be sure, there wasn't a hint of smouldering intensity, no rapid-fire urgency; simply, the odd did-he-really-hit-that-shot crosscourt backhand or the running forehand that creates the illusion that gravity itself is an illusion. Soon Kiefer was bleeding to death, although, surely, the German must have thanked Federer on the way back to the dressing room for making it quick in those last four games.

But, then, Federer, for all his ruthlessness, does not put his victims through slow torture. "I have a feeling I should have won in three, but in the end I am happy to have won in four, really,'' said the gifted Swiss after a match in which the shifting moods of conflict kept a star-packed Royal Box in good cheer.

In fact, as Federer threw away the golden gloves and stepped down from his pedestal to engage in a spot of bare-knuckle boxing on losing the second set tiebreak from a seemingly winning position, the occupants of the Royal Box — among them Sean Connery and Sir Cliff Richard — saw it fit to join in the Mexican waves.

"We have played each other several times. He has beaten me a few times, once on grass. I knew it was going to to tough,'' said the champion who has not lost a grass court match in three years.

Federer appeared to be coasting, taking the first set after breaking early and then leading 5-2 in the second set tiebreak. But the champion's backhand temporarily took leave of him and Kiefer, all pumped up, won five points in a row to close out the second set.

Promptly came the response. With breaks in the second and sixth games, Federer pocketed the third set in under half an hour but trouble loomed when he hit two double faults to go 3-5 down in the fourth.

Enter the sorcerer. Suddenly doubts were planted in Kiefer's mind. "Hey, I am not supposed to be doing this, I am not supposed to be in this position,'' the German seemed to think. The set was back on serve and, before long, Kiefer had lost a second service game in a row.

In Federer's game, the beauty lies in the illusion of beauty. That is what makes for aesthetic appeal. The truth of the beauty, on the other hand, is pure murder.

And, this is precisely where Federer's greatness lies. He magically brings about a union of opposites: beauty and mayhem, athletic creation and athletic annihilation. But don't ask him how he does it. He doesn't know that; for, if he did, he wouldn't be doing it half as well. It is an act independent of thought, untouched by thought's dirty hands.

Playing beautifully may be rewarding in itself for an amateur. But Federer is a pro. He plays to win. If, in the process, an illusion is created, all very well.

The following are the fourth round pairings in the top half of the men's draw: Roger Federer vs Juan Carlos Ferrero; Fernando Gonzalez vs Mikhail Youzhny; Lleyton Hewitt vs Taylor Dent and Mario Ancic vs Feliciano Lopez.

SUKTUEN
06-26-2005, 03:42 PM
And, this is precisely where Federer's greatness lies. He magically brings about a union of opposites: beauty and mayhem, athletic creation and athletic annihilation. But don't ask him how he does it. He doesn't know that; for, if he did, he wouldn't be doing it half as well. It is an act independent of thought, untouched by thought's dirty hands.

Playing beautifully may be rewarding in itself for an amateur. But Federer is a pro. He plays to win. If, in the process, an illusion is created, all very well.


Thankyou My dear~!!! :wavey: :worship: :worship:

GO Roger~! :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

Shabazza
06-26-2005, 07:39 PM
In Federer's game, the beauty lies in the illusion of beauty. That is what makes for aesthetic appeal. The truth of the beauty, on the other hand, is pure murder.

And, this is precisely where Federer's greatness lies. He magically brings about a union of opposites: beauty and mayhem, athletic creation and athletic annihilation. But don't ask him how he does it. He doesn't know that; for, if he did, he wouldn't be doing it half as well. It is an act independent of thought, untouched by thought's dirty hands.

Playing beautifully may be rewarding in itself for an amateur. But Federer is a pro. He plays to win. If, in the process, an illusion is created, all very well.

I love this illusion :worship:

Fedex
06-27-2005, 06:20 AM
Not sure if this article has been posted already or not, but I'll post it anyway.

Federer: The man who would be king
By Barry Lorge
Special to ESPN.com

WIMBLEDON, England -- In assessing Roger Federer's chances of winning a third consecutive Wimbledon singles title, even though his recent form has been far from his best, remember something vitally important about the nature of champions. Most of the great ones have a kind of sixth sense that is both physical and mental: an ability to lift their games at critical times, to kick into a higher gear when necessary, not so much at will as by force of will.

It is an instinct for survival when they are not playing their best. It is a knack of knowing their environment, and making the arena their own when it matters the most. It is plucking a rose out of a weed patch -- coming up with a shot mere good athletes can barely imagine just when you seem uncertain and vulnerable. Those things bring an upset-minded opponent back to earth, quickly.

When Bill Bradley was a basketball star, first at Princeton and then with the New York Knicks, he talked about "a sense of where you are." He was referring mostly to a heightened spatial awareness, knowing precisely your position on the court and your relationship to the basket.

The most outstanding tennis players have something similar. It is a sense of where you are on the court, and what you can do from that position. On another plane, it is a sense of where you are in a match, and what you have to do to get through it successfully.

Federer -- who has won 32 consecutive grass-court matches, including 17 at Wimbledon -- was not at the top of his lofty game on Saturday against Nicolas Kiefer of Germany, ranked No. 26 in the world. But he fought his way through to Monday's fourth round, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 6-1, 7-5, and that match may well help him sharpen up for the push to the championship next Sunday.

Jimmy Connors, the champion of 1974 and 1987, had just finished commenting for the BBC on David Nalbandian's revival from two sets down to dash the spirited run of 18-year-old Andrew Murray, the last Briton left in singles. Connors was signing autographs and posing for photos with fans when I caught up with him outside the broadcast center to see what he thought of the theory that Federer could actually benefit from a generally lackluster performance dotted with occasional spectacular shots.

"That's what it's all about -- winning when you're only 70 percent. Figuring it out on that kind of day," Connors said. "Federer has got the game that can figure it out. That's the most important thing about him. He's young enough (23), and he's in good enough shape, that a four-setter at this stage won't bother him, and might help him. Kiefer is not a bad player. He's a good player, and he came up with one of the best matches he's played, and caught Federer on an off-day, and still lost, so what does that tell you about Federer?

"It's fun to watch these guys play -- especially the guys who are able to mix it up, come up with the power game, and have a little bit of old school in their game, too," Connors added. "The way they can change the pace and work the ball around. Nalbandian is a little like that, too. He doesn't get into the net quite enough, but he has a little bit of the old school in him, too. Federer's game I really like."
A glorious arsenal of shots. And a keen sense of where you are.

On the middle Saturday of Wimbledon, the Chairman of the All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club invites luminaries from the sports and entertainment world to sit in the Royal Box on Centre Court. There was quite a galaxy of stars on hand when Federer and Kiefer took the court. The convocation included past tennis champions Billie Jean King and Tony Trabert, British Open golf contender Ernie Els, and in honor of London's 2012 Olympic bid, a host of British gold medalists and world record holders spanning several Olympiads. Actor Sir Sean Connery was also present, and introduced during the ceremonies with unaccustomed levity for Wimbledon: "a man who, as 007, deserved a fistful of medals for nocturnal sports."

Brits may remember Connery most for his portrayal of the suave James Bond, but he also co-starred with Michael Caine in a film titled "The Man Who Would Be King." At Wimbledon, that would be Federer -- again. And though the Royal Box guests departed from typical decorum and joined happily with other Centre Court spectators in doing "the wave" during a break in the action, they also paid close attention to Federer. This was a high-achieving group that knows what champions are made of, and it must have been impressed with Federer's sense of where he was, and what he had to do, when he was not at his regal best.

Customarily tough in tiebreakers, Federer played a loose one to lose the second set. Twice Kiefer broke his serve in the fourth set, for 2-0 and 5-3 leads, and both times Federer stepped it up and broke right back.

Champions elevate their level at crunch time. Amid the uncharacteristically tight or untidy shots, Federer produced a few that were breathtaking -- defying gravity, geometry, physics and belief. Seemingly caught in no man's land, he flicked an off-balance half-volley with something on it that landed an inch inside the line. Two points from the end of the match, he came up with a running backhand short-angle winner that most folks couldn't conjure up in a dream.

"He always does make some beautiful shots," said John Lloyd, former British Davis Cup player. "For any of the guys who have won Grand Slam tournaments, they'll say that in seven matches, they'll always have one or two that they aren't playing great. Roger was up and down. I'm sure he thought it was kind of an ugly match. But he just kicked in mentally and got through it. That could help him later on, absolutely. He got four sets in, won the match, didn't play great, but knows he's got that extra gear to step up to. He'll be getting in his groove, playing better next week. He is not playing as well as I would have thought he would be by now, I must say, but good enough to win. I'm sure of that." For his own part, Federer said: "In the end, if I win in five, five hours on the court, or in one hour, it doesn't matter as long as I keep on winning. I think I have to keep that in mind. This was definitely a test today. I think I had to survive some tough moments."

But his real concept of who he is -- that champion's sense of where you are -- was evident when he was asked if anything less than winning a third straight Wimbledon title would be satisfactory. If he made the final and lost a five-set thriller ablaze with great shotmaking, would he walk off the court feeling fine?

"No, probably not," said The Man Who Would Be King Again. "I wouldn't be satisfied."

Most champions never are.

Fedex
06-27-2005, 06:22 AM
Excellent article Rogifan. :)

Puschkin
06-27-2005, 07:48 AM
quoting
Federer: The man who would be king
By Barry Lorge
Special to ESPN.com

"That's what it's all about -- winning when you're only 70 percent. Figuring it out on that kind of day," Connors said. "Federer has got the game that can figure it out. That's the most important thing about him. He's young enough (23), and he's in good enough shape, that a four-setter at this stage won't bother him, and might help him. Kiefer is not a bad player. He's a good player, and he came up with one of the best matches he's played, and caught Federer on an off-day, and still lost, so what does that tell you about Federer?


:mad: this was no off-day :mad:

Shabazza
06-27-2005, 08:18 AM
:mad: this was no off-day :mad:
no definitly not, but it was no best-day performance either ;). Playing 50% sometimes during the match, would be considered an off-day by many people (for Federer standards) even if he plays 90-100% when it matters. Would it be an off-day for him, he would have gone through 5 sets!
Despite that, it is a nice article and all-in-all what I'm thinking about this match, too. :)

nobama
06-27-2005, 11:56 AM
I know "what if's" are kinda pointless, but I keep thinking if Roger hadn't double faulted twice at 3-4, 30-30, won that game and then won the set 6-4 instead of 7-5 would people be saying it was an off day? Aside from a couple sloppy points in the tb and 4th set I think it was a pretty clean match from Roger. His winners were double his ue's his first serve % was good (although not as good as the previous match). It was just a couple patches of sloppy play. But I guess everyone but Roger is allowed to have a brainfart now and then.

lunahielo
06-27-2005, 12:15 PM
Good article.
Thanks.

Looking forward to today's match....Hopp, Rogi~~~~~~~~~~~

Shabazza
06-27-2005, 01:22 PM
It was just a couple patches of sloppy play. But I guess everyone but Roger is allowed to have a brainfart now and then.
That's the way it is, I suppose. Nothing you can do about it. As I said some time ago, if they want a perfect, emotionless player - take a robot! :angel:
Roger knows how to handle the pressure and expectations from the press. :)

SUKTUEN
06-27-2005, 05:38 PM
thanks!!

Seleshfan
06-27-2005, 05:56 PM
Damn Davenport didn't finish off Clijsters in the 2nd, now we have to wait through a 3rd. I hope Davenport loses now for her inefficiency.

Gosh, I'm so nervous about today's match, can I get some reassurance from you guys that Roger will win? :)

SUKTUEN
06-27-2005, 06:06 PM
wHOSE ass in your avarat ?

Seleshfan
06-27-2005, 06:11 PM
Andy Roddick's.

SUKTUEN
06-27-2005, 06:16 PM
Andy Roddick's.

I love His ass~!!!!!!!!! :eek:

Seleshfan
06-27-2005, 06:17 PM
So do I :)

SUKTUEN
06-27-2005, 06:21 PM
Andy's Ass is very popular in China ~!!

PaulieM
06-27-2005, 06:50 PM
Roger's ass is better :drool:

SUKTUEN
06-27-2005, 06:50 PM
Roger's ass is better :drool:

YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS~!! :devil:

nobama
06-27-2005, 07:10 PM
That's the way it is, I suppose. Nothing you can do about it. As I said some time ago, if they want a perfect, emotionless player - take a robot! :angel:
Roger knows how to handle the pressure and expectations from the press. :)
I hate though when the media builds people up just to tear them down. One minute Roger's the greatest thing ever, then he doesn't play a perfectly flawless match and they question if his dominance is over (I know that MSN article wasn't just about the Kiefer match, but after that is when they decided to publish it). I mean good grief the man is human. The mark of a champion is they're able to win even when they don't have their best. They're able to step it up when they have to to get the job done. And Roger is able to do that.

SUKTUEN
06-27-2005, 07:13 PM
Roger can do what he want

Mrs. B
06-27-2005, 09:46 PM
Federer Moves Closer to Title


©EPA/ F.Coffrini

Monday, June 27, 2005


Four down and three to go. Roger Federer's 6-3, 6-4 7-6 win over Juan Carlos Ferrero pushed him into the quarter-finals, just three more matches away from the title. But it does not get any easier from here.

Next up is Fernando Gonzalez. Lleyton Hewitt or Feliciano Lopez are waiting for him after that - and we have not even started on the bottom half of the draw. All this and Federer has not even got out of third gear yet.

Ferrero was once the world's best player, a feat he achieved by winning the French Open and then roaring through the summer hard court season to reach the semi-finals of the US Open. There he beat Andre Agassi and claimed his place at the top of the hill. After fulfilling his lifelong goal, he had nothing left to give in the final against Andy Roddick.

But from there, Ferrero thought he was firmly cemented into the top 10. With a powerful forehand, he was ready to batter the biggest and the best into submission and, for a while, he was able to do just that.

It all started to go wrong at the start of last year when a bout of chickenpox left him sitting at home, covered in calamine lotion, kicking his heels. After that, a succession of injuries, including a broken rib, sidelined him.

His ranking plummeted and, from being in with a shout of ending the year as the world No.1 in 2003, he was lurking in the 30s by the end of 2004. Now on his way back, Ferrero can be a dangerous customer - but nowhere near as dangerous as Federer in pursuit of his third successive title.

The trouble with Federer is that better he gets, the nearer to perfection we expect him to be and he is only human, after all. That said, he is that rare human who seems able to play stupendous tennis whenever he feels like it. He makes it look so easy, disguising the years of mind-bogglingly hard work that have gone into making him what he is now. But, by being so good, the occasional error, the odd missed backhand, fluffed volley or - heaven forfend - double fault (not that there were many yesterday), brings gasps of horror from the crowd.

If Ferrero tried to play with Federer from the back of the court, he was forced to play so well that often overcooked the shot and made the error. Best to keep the ball away from the Federer forehand, then. But if he did not keep Federer pinned back and allowed to him to lope towards the net, Ferrero was toast. So, stay away from the Federer volley, too. There was not a lot left to play with, really.

Ferrero roars when he is winning, Federer roars when he is frustrated. All in all, it was quite a quiet match. Only in the third set did Federer start to grumble and growl. The chances were as rare as hen's teeth and when, finally, the Swiss found himself with the hint of a chance and he missed it, he was not happy. No matter, when the opportunity presented itself again, he broke Ferrero.

That just left the small matter of serving out the match - and that is when it all got slightly messy. Ferrero broke back, Federer took the early lead in the tie-break, Ferrero came back and then, at last, the champion exerted his authority to win it 8-6. That's what champions do.

Written by Alix Ramsay

from the official Wimbledon website

Shabazza
06-27-2005, 10:31 PM
I hate though when the media builds people up just to tear them down. One minute Roger's the greatest thing ever, then he doesn't play a perfectly flawless match and they question if his dominance is over (I know that MSN article wasn't just about the Kiefer match, but after that is when they decided to publish it). I mean good grief the man is human. The mark of a champion is they're able to win even when they don't have their best. They're able to step it up when they have to to get the job done. And Roger is able to do that.
The press do that all the time, in every sport. It's all about the headlines, either you're unbeatable or your reign is over :rolleyes: - extrems sells ;)
Most of them don't get that real greatness shows, if you're able to pull through and win, even if you don't play near your best and Roger definatley has this ability. :)

Shabazza
06-27-2005, 10:35 PM
wow quite fast - thx bebop :)

Stevens Point
06-27-2005, 10:55 PM
Good luck in the next round, Roger!!

R.Federer - Day 7
Monday, June 27, 2005

Q. You feel motivated by some kind of words that Juan Carlos said in the newspaper this morning, like say, "I can stop the champ"?

ROGER FEDERER: Didn't see it. Didn't see the news, no.

Well, I mean, he's right. He has to be motivated and believe in his chance. I think once you've been No. 1 in the world, your whole career you believe in a chance. I think it's a fantastic player. Maybe grass, of course, is not his favorite surface. But he showed on occasions that he can play really well. I think I had to play a really solid match.

I'm not sure if he's happy with his performance. But it's always interesting to play him, any surface.

Q. How did you feel about your performance tonight?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I thought it was pretty good. You know, was tough in the beginning with the sun, to be honest. On the one side, it was almost impossible to see the serve. But I got the early break and actually served all the way through solid except maybe the last game, you know, where maybe I missed a volley, double‑faulted, gave him an opportunity there. That was a pity.

But all in all, I'm quite happy. He played tough off the baseline, especially in the third I thought. Was getting tough to break him. I'm pretty happy with my performance.

Q. Pete Sampras would say later in his career that he would admit openly, "I choked in the situation." Did you feel nervous at all? Do you get nervous in those situations?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, always. Breakpoint for me or against me, the pulse goes higher. You're a little worried, you know, because you've just played long rallies. On a breakpoint, you're not allowed to miss any more. So I definitely feel the pressure then, too, in those moments.

I thought I didn't play that bad of a game. I just think he played a real consistent, solid game.

Q. How would you compare today's weather conditions on Centre Court with Saturday conditions?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, today I thought it was extremely slow somehow. That was my feeling. Maybe it's because of him. He was not missing. He was making me ‑‑ playing me left to right, as well. Never really had the ‑‑ it was very hard to overpower him, I thought, where normally this is really my strength. I really had the feeling I really had to go for an outright winner to finish the point or take chances.

He was very good I thought also off the defensive side. Where I came to the net on dodgey balls or pretty okay balls, and he passed me it seemed without a problem.

I had the feeling the conditions were slow, so maybe it's going to be different again next time.

Q. Gonzalez is your next opponent. He hasn't lost a set. He seemed to be surprised about that. What about you, are you surprised, too, or not?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, looking at the players he beat, in a way yes, in a way no. He is a good player. You know, with his serve and forehand, you know, he can be a danger for anybody, but that he puts it together consistently for four matches, it's a good result for him.

I thought Youzhny could be a problem for him. But, then again, I'm not surprised he beat him. Maybe straight sets is quite solid. But I think he had two breakers in that match today.

But, you know, I was close of losing a set to him at the French. But grass should favor me. I'm looking forward to play him. He's always got good shots for the crowd. I think we'll see some good tennis.

Q. What has been the best part of your game through the tournament? Has there been different aspects in each match?

ROGER FEDERER: I think I'm serving really consistent. You know, if I look to serve, first serve percentage, I think that's pretty good. Just a little hiccup in the match against Kiefer where I served two double‑faults at 30‑All which I didn't like to see. But other than that I'm really happy with my serving so far.

Movement has been pretty good, as well. I wished I could have served and volleyed a little bit more. But as long as I keep on winning also from the baseline, that's okay. Obviously, I would wish I could come to the net a little more.

Q. You're very much the dominant force in the modern game. What career targets do you set yourself?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I always have goals I set myself for beginning of the year. Last year I definitely played much better than I ever expected because the year before that was already fantastic itself.

My goal for this year is, you know, Wimbledon, No. 1 in the world. I'm right in it now. I have to prove it ‑ to myself especially. Other than that, I've got many dreams left which I would like to chase.

Q. It was often said that Sampras had a kind of aura or presence, intimidation factor. You may not want to answer this, but would you like to get that quality stronger than you have it now? Do you sense you have a little bit of that now?

ROGER FEDERER: I think now over the last two years with the little matches I've lost, right away you start to feel that. It's like when you see other players, like Roddick there for a while on the American hard court circuit, where he hardly lost a set, or he doesn't lose a match, you see that from far away. If you're up to play him, you expect an incredibly tough match. Maybe it makes you go for more.

Maybe as Nadal on clay. When you see as much as he won, when you're going to play him, you have the feeling you have to do something special.

I think I definitely created the same thing around me also for a while, say if it's indoor or hard court, especially the grass, too. I think it's all about getting it done on the clay, but it's sort of difficult because I hardly play any tournaments.

Q. It affects your point, but also gives you more confidence, would you say?

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, definitely.

Q. When you do have that sense about yourself, during a match do you have the sense that an opponent thinks there's going to be very few chances against you? Do you get that feeling?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't like to think too much this way, that anyway everything's going to fall in place sort of thinking, because I got to come up with maybe the ace on the breakpoint or I've got to come up with the good shot in the breaker. So it's not just going to be handed over to me either. So I always take every match from zero. Once I'm in a tough position, I always try to prove it to myself and to the people that I can do it over and over again. And sometimes, of course, it's impossible. It's hard, you know.

But I'm really happy the way I've handled all the pressure and situations over the last few years.

Q. How hard does Gonzalez hit that forehand compared to other players? How difficult is it to read?

ROGER FEDERER: I mean, reading...

I mean, he definitely gets in play quite quickly. He gives himself time to set up. He goes for broke on every forehand, so it doesn't really matter. I can also go for broke on every shot, but it's just not my philosophy from the game, you know.

But he's quite consistent of it, too. I mean, you can sometimes see where it goes. But even if you're the right way, it's so quick that you can't really handle it. That's his dangerous part of the game, that he just goes for outright winners.

I think his serve has improved over the years. Sets himself up nicely for the forehand. Other than that, I think maybe mentally he's become stronger. I don't know. I haven't played him enough.

Q. When was the last question you didn't expect and what was the question and what did you answer and when? Do you remember?

ROGER FEDERER: Don't know. Maybe one of yours. I don't know.

Q. There's been a lot of talk about the slow conditions here. You're obviously not coming in behind your serve as much as you did two years ago. Henman says a serve‑volleyer is not ever going to win here again. Do you think it's impossible for a pure serve and volleyer to win here at Wimbledon?

ROGER FEDERER: I think the players don't work on their volleys enough these days any more. It's as simple as that. When you have an hour of practice, I think we play 40 minutes from the baseline and 10 minutes at the net and serve 10 minutes. That's how the practices are now. Especially being with Tony now, they would only be the net. I think that makes a big difference because we're half good as they used to be. If I still hit with Tony, I can see why they came to the net and why we cannot. One is because we don't volley that well and we don't cover that well, plus the conditions have slowed down.

I think it's got a lot to do with circumstances and the way tennis has progressed. But I think if you are brought up, especially as a youngster, to improve your volleys and become a better volley player, then you definitely can win Wimbledon again.

The way kids are brought up these days, it's just almost impossible.

Q. What has been the key thing that Tony has conveyed to you about grass court player?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's the same almost for the hard court or for the clay. Just got to, you know, use my strength, which is my game in a hole. How should I say? I've got many options. I've got to use that, but use it right. I think it's just been trying to improve little things, if it's on the serve, on the volley, also on the baseline, you know, the way of playing. It's very important to play right.

Minnie
06-27-2005, 10:56 PM
Taken from the BBC Wimbledon blog 27/6:

Annabel Croft, Radio Five Live tennis pundit
My daughter was sitting behind Roger Federer's girlfriend the other day in the players' seats and she was leafing through a Hello magazine and then looking up when there was a lot of clapping.

Is Mirka THAT confident of Roger's victories??

Shabazza
06-27-2005, 11:33 PM
Taken from the BBC Wimbledon blog 27/6:

Annabel Croft, Radio Five Live tennis pundit
My daughter was sitting behind Roger Federer's girlfriend the other day in the players' seats and she was leafing through a Hello magazine and then looking up when there was a lot of clapping.

Is Mirka THAT confident of Roger's victories??
hm maybe, I saw her biting her nails during the TB though ;)

nobama
06-27-2005, 11:55 PM
Taken from the BBC Wimbledon blog 27/6:

Annabel Croft, Radio Five Live tennis pundit
My daughter was sitting behind Roger Federer's girlfriend the other day in the players' seats and she was leafing through a Hello magazine and then looking up when there was a lot of clapping.

Is Mirka THAT confident of Roger's victories??

Either that or she just gets bored sometimes. I mean how many matches does Roger play every year? And Mirka's sitting through every one of them. I think Roger said she sees like 100 matches of his every year or something. I imagine that could get boring sometimes. But I don't know if I'd be leafing through a magazine during Wimbledon where people could see me. :scratch:

babsi
06-28-2005, 08:01 AM
Thanks,Eva and Steven :) :)

ToanNguyen
06-28-2005, 02:43 PM
Hi guys,
Another article on Roger.

Federer courts true greatness in near silence
By Greg Stoda

Palm Beach Post Columnist

Tuesday, June 28, 2005

WIMBLEDON, England — There is so much excellent about Roger Federer it's difficult to decide what is most elegant about him.

Excellent.

Elegant.

Those are such quiet words, and precisely appropriate in regard to Federer and his greatness. Because the eerie quiet about Federer — his demeanor and his skill blending in remarkable concert — is what best defines him.

He is the top-seeded and two-time defending Wimbledon men's champion at the All England Club just more than a month shy of his 24th birthday. He is the top-ranked player in the world.

And so silently.

Federer moved into the quarterfinals in the Monday evening shadows of Centre Court with a 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (6) dispatch of Juan Carlos Ferrero most noteworthy for its neatness.

Federer is the immaculate champion. He is unrelenting in purpose and attention to task, which is as much as anything his source of power. It's as though an opponent knows there never is previous time to do anything with Federer, so the glimpses of opportunity blink away much more often than not when they do present themselves.

The captivating beauty of a Federer work is how completely it fills his canvas.

"How should I say?" Federer asks. "I have many options."

The words were spoken without a hint of bravado. Federer spoke them at all only in answer to a question regarding how well he performs almost any stroke... how well he meets almost any challenge... how well he controls almost any emotion.

It is not that Federer is incapable of failure. He loses from rare time to rare time. Well, of course, he does. He's 55-3 this year, for example.

Nor is it that Federer is incapable of displays of temperament. He was racquet-throwing angry, in fact, in this year's final at Key Biscayne before subduing Rafael Nadal in five sets for that title.

Mostly, though, Federer leaves the histrionics to those he confounds. The two men he has believed to be his main competition since the beginning of this Wimbledon fortnight and who remain in the draw — strutting American Andy Roddick and bombastic Aussie Lleyton Hewitt — are much more likely than Federer to pout and posture.

Here, let Ferrero, fresh from defeat, explain about Federer's equanimity: "He holds the concentrate all the time."

Federer, too, has such an assortment of punishing shots that it's difficult to dent him whether he's playing offense or defense. He suggests his serve is what has been most reliable through four Wimbledon matches this year, but also likes his "movement" and how he has played along the base line.

A full canvas, that.

Federer simply offers little opportunity to be defeated, though he did suggest, "I don't like to think too much this way that anyway everything's going to fall into place."

Better that he steels himself for the worst possibilities.

"I always take every match from zero," Federer said. "Once I'm in a tough position, I always try to prove to myself and the people I can do it over and over again. And sometimes, of course, it's impossible. It's hard, you know?"

On grass, however, Federer has become almost invincible. He has won the consecutive Wimbledon titles and at the moment carries a 33-match winning streak anywhere on the surface.

Ferrero, again: "On grass, it is difficult to see a tactic."

Fernando Gonzalez will be next to try in a Wednesday quarterfinal. Federer, despite warnings he gives himself, understands the dynamic of his stature.

"I think over the last two years with the little matches I've lost (he was 74-6 in 2004), right away you start to feel (intimidating)," Federer said. "Maybe it makes (an opponent) go for more."

He quickly named a recent run by Boca Raton's Roddick on hard courts and Nadal on clay in winning this year's French Open as other examples of dominant play.

"I think I definitely created the same thing around me, especially the grass," Federer said.

But his, more than anyone's, is an elegant excellence.


Three more match to go, Roger. You can do it. You are the King. :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:

Nocko
06-28-2005, 02:55 PM
Thanks, It's beautiful. :worship:

clin
06-28-2005, 03:22 PM
Use your mentality, wake up to reality, and start volleying

Martina Navratilova
Tuesday June 28, 2005
The Guardian

It is time to develop the volley again. People are losing that skill in tennis because kids have not been taught how to play points, how to think about what to do next. They should be taught about moving into the court. The players today are great at moving from side to side but they're not coming forward. Tennis academies in the US have been focusing for years on teaching great ground strokes but they're not teaching the variety of shot or the structure of a point. It means that not many players volley nowadays so the contrasting styles is what I feel is missing from the game today.

Roger Federer is the ideal player. He plays beautifully from the baseline, he can serve and volley when he feels like it or the situation calls for it, he can chip and charge or sneak in during a rally when he sees the opponent in trouble - in other words he can do it all. Mind you there used to be a bunch of players who could do it all, but they didn't do it as well as Federer.
Twenty years ago at least 10 of the top 20 women would serve and volley, and even more on the men's side. Now there are no women doing that while among the men only Tim Henman, Taylor Dent, Max Mirnyi and Jonas Bjorkman are true serve-and-volleyers - and none of them is in the quarter-finals.

Everyone on the circuit can return better. The rackets have improved and they help with the ground strokes. People can hit passing shots from 10 feet behind the baseline now. It used to be that if you played a very good sliced approach down the line you would win the point nine times out of 10. Now it's maybe 50-50. It's much easier to keep the ball down with a lot of top-spin, so you need to volley really well to be effective at the net.

That's something the next generation needs. They need to experiment more. Everyone hits great groundstrokes now, they've pushed that as far as they can, so you have to wonder where does the extra edge come from?

It's easier to put the ball away from the net than it is from the baseline but if you don't hit a good volley you're a sitting duck. Coming to the net is a calculated risk: the quality of your approach shot, the location of your opponent and how well you can volley decides how much of a risk it is.

I remember when I played Zina Garrison in the semi-finals at Eastbourne in 1983 and I was coming in on everything, real "banzai!" stuff. She was hitting spectacular passing shots from impossible angles, but I won 6-2, 6-3. I was taking calculated risks, and it worked.

Baseliners have a different mentality: if they come to the net and get passed they get all embarrassed and don't come in again. People have said tennis is a mental game and they are right, because you need the confidence and the ability to think on your feet about tactics as well as making technical adjustments. That is why it's easier to be confident if you've done things 100 times on the practice courts and you know you can hit the ball in a certain way in a certain situation.

Technically and tactically the top players are superior and that is one reason why they hold up better under pressure. But overall the playing field has levelled - when you take out Federer.

Slowing down the court at Wimbledon has affected that, because the ball sits up a lot more, bouncing slower and higher than it used to. They changed the courts because there were no rallies in men's tennis. Suddenly the women's game was getting better TV ratings, and we can't have that when we pay more prize money to the men's champion. But the change has definitely made the tennis better.

But what is the point of the prize money difference? Are they making a statement? It seems to me we might never have parity no matter how many superstars there are in the women's game.

With the Williams sisters around there is always drama. Apparently there was an uproar when Venus Williams said that Serena will not come back to Wimbledon, but she only meant this year. I think Venus is relieved about not having to play her sister -that's hell - but yesterday she was all business.

Even though Serena has missed out here, they're both too young for anyone to be calling this the end of an era. Maybe they don't bring the fear into their opponents that they used to.

Players used to turn up to play them hoping not to be embarrassed, and now they think they have a real chance of winning. Maybe Venus and Serena haven't lived up to the high standards they set earlier in their careers. It is certainly much more difficult to get that aura of invincibility than it is to lose it. But writing them off? Not yet - and certainly not me

PaulieM
06-28-2005, 04:30 PM
The trouble with Federer is that better he gets, the nearer to perfection we expect him to be and he is only human, after all. That said, he is that rare human who seems able to play stupendous tennis whenever he feels like it. He makes it look so easy, disguising the years of mind-bogglingly hard work that have gone into making him what he is now. But, by being so good, the occasional error, the odd missed backhand, fluffed volley or - heaven forfend - double fault (not that there were many yesterday), brings gasps of horror from the crowd.
:awww: