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Roger news and articles

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yanchr
05-14-2005, 09:03 AM
Thanks Stevens Point for taking time to interpret :yeah:

Sounds like he is confident now ;)

SUKTUEN
05-14-2005, 10:32 AM
Roger is ready for RG~!!!!

Go Roger~!!!!

babsi
05-14-2005, 03:18 PM
Thank you, Stevens Piont :)

I should be doing,that -with the tourny in Germany - but I´ve just time to sneak up to the PC,for a few minutes in between chaose management.
I very much hope, my kids will go and studie in far away places,like you do - or at laest move out before they are 30.



__________________________________________________ _____________________
There´s nothing wrong with being a loser - it only depands on how good you are at it
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

SUKTUEN
05-14-2005, 03:27 PM
:eek: :eek: Babsi You are a mother ????????????????? :eek: :worship:

Stevens Point
05-14-2005, 05:05 PM
Press Conference with Roger Federer

Federer vs Davydenko 6-3 6-4

Q: You started a little slowly. You always gave the impression you were able to step up a level when you needed to. Was that your feeling?

A: Well, I had to. Otherwise the result would be very different. But, it's true, the start was slow. I guess that happens but you have to try to avoit it. Because such a start is always a handicap. It's not good, it's dangerous. I thought my serve and my forehand let me down in the beginning. I have to think about why that was the case. But I am happy I turned it around in time. Once I got back to 2-2, I definitely felt better again. I knew now the match actually starts, now I'm warm and from then on it was a good match from my side.

Q: "Now I'm warm", sounds like you think it's a physical thing. Is it a mental thing as well?

A: A little bit of everything. I played a couple of good points to get the break back. But I just didn't feel right in the beginning. I can't explain why. He's a solid player, so he takes advantage of those moments. After I thought my serve really started to work better for me. It gave me a couple of free points. So, I could relax a little bit. I started to use my allround game to stabilize him. That worked well today, because he's a tough player. He moves well. He hits winners from both sides and I have the feeling he improved his serve over the last couple of years. He's a consistent, tough player.

Q: You really are winning your points in a wide variety of ways, even on a clay court. That must be satisfying.

A: I think on clay you have even more options because it's slower, because of the sliding, it makes everything very different. Always, against any player, I have to adapt most of the times and use my all court game to win. On the clay, I have the feeling you can do it even more than on other surfaces. On grass you can maybe come to the net easier, on hard court it's most of the times a hard court battle because the players move so well on that surface. And clay just gives you extra time to create more.

Q: If Gasquet goes on to the final, how much will you relish the chance to play him again?

A: I would definitely look forward. It's always nice to get a second chance to get him. I thought I was doing pretty good in Monte Carlo. I played a good first set. After that he started to unleash some winners on me which wasn't so pleasure, but still nice to see the shots (laughs), because they were good. But I hope it's not going to happen again. I will try to avoid that. But he has proven not only in Monte Carlo that he can play well. Also in Rome he played decent. Here he qualified. You don't see too often two qualifiers in the semis of such an event. I will definitely like to see a challenge against Gasquet.

Q: We heard a lot of things a few years ago and he didn't pregress as quickly. Do you think he is a potential danger in the Slams?

A: I think he's definitely a danger, but danger for the victory? I guess only himself, he can answer that. It's a long way. We all know that. Seven five set matches, it's much more pressure. Of course the French will always be his best shot. I think it's his best surface and he's got the back-up from the fans. There he will be the toughest to beat for ever in his career. And the way he's playing now, he definitely has a shot at going far.

Q: What do you see as his great qualities?

A: He's very allround. Similar to me I would say. He can hit winner off both sides. He definitely moves well. Even though we have the feeling he's a newcomer, he has still been around and gone through many matches against many players. That's helping him now. And with the confidents, we know how they can play the juniors. He's using that to his advantage for the moment.

Q: What did you learn from the game in Monte Carlo?

A: I have hardly seen him play because I haven't been playing since. I thought after that match I needed a rest (laughs). Of course you get the impression during the match itself, against any player, how you might play him next time. So, of course during the match itself you try to change it up, to do something that's doing to be bad for him. I tried that, it just wasn't enough on that day. Definitely I have more ideas now how I would approach the match tomorrow, if he wins. I have played him. I've seen him play. I've seen how he hits the ball. For me it's teh better situation to be in because I'm looking forward to a best of 5 match. I'm very used to those best of 5 matches. More than him probably. That might be a factor playing tomorrow.

Q: Coria said that it was unfair on clay court players in a number of ways firstly tht the Masters Series were so close, back to back, much more than Indian Wells and Key Biscayne, and then that they were five tournaments on clay all important clese together. And last year this final was best of 5 which gives clay court players no chance. Do you think there's any truth in those criticisms?

A: Not quite. Toronto, Cincinatti was fun for me. And I won there. That was also back to back. The Masters Series I've played have all been best of 5. Of course, the last couple of years Indian Wells was best of 3, but it's back to best of 5. So, I don't quite agree with his criticism. He's got his 3 Masters Series on clay plus the Grand Slam. He can play also after Wimbledon on clay if he likes to. So, I think he's not really right. I agree Monte Carlo is early in season, but again that can be an advantage for him, too, because Andy stays home, Andre stays home, sometimes I stay home. There's many top guys not even going there. Now I missed Rome. Who knows. It's also an advantage for him. So, I don't agree with him.

onm684
05-14-2005, 05:42 PM
Thanks Stevens.

SUKTUEN
05-14-2005, 06:00 PM
Thanks Stevens for the interview~~~

Stevens Point
05-15-2005, 08:23 PM
Press Conference with Roger Federer

Federer vs Gasquet 6-3 7-5 7-6 (4)

Q: Straight sets, but not an easy match, was it?

A: No, as expected, he won the last one, so you can't expect an easy match. But in the end straight sets is always convincing in my eyes. So I played a good match, I had to. He moves well and therefore I'm very happy about the way I played today.

Q: When you look back at the tournament, were there any real challenges for you?

A: I thought, the toughest moment was almost when I looked at the draw. I was really worried, because I didn't play Rome. Then came into here and saw Verdasco to play, Ferrero and Kuerten, Berdych, many tough opponents in my section. In the end to come through without losing a set is very nice. It gives me great belief that I can also do better at the French. But at the end I came here to win teh tournament, no matter what. So I am very happy I achieved that.

Q: As so often, you served the big points well.

A: Yes, big points are always important, especially in a final like this. For this reason I call the second set the key moment for sure. I was always down in the second and in the third set, so it was tough. It was tough to break him, he is very confident. He has a fantastic backhand, which makes it hard to go into too many duels into that backhand side. But the game plan I had today was good.

Q: You came to the net a lot, certainly in the first part of the match, and you played a lot of short angles. Was that your intention, to bring him out of his comfort area?

A: Well, I didn't feel like I did much wrong in Monte Carlo. The conditions were a little different, a little quicker. Today I definitely played more angles and used my kick serve more, maybe that is a thing I have to do more on clay, I don't know. A match like this always helps you to look ahead. After a match like today I feel I have more options on clay. I used the drop shot more than I used to.

Q: He was taking up some quite exaggerated positions to return your serve. Is that disconcerting?

A: I saw what he did to my serve in Monte Carlo, so of course I was worried that the same thing will happen again. But I had the feeling today that it was much tougher for him to attack my serve. He was winning an unbelievable percentage on my second serve in Monte Carlo, which really surprised me, because normally I also win a lot of points on my second serve. But he took it like it was nothing. Today I think I made him think a little bit more. I see when he is moving, but I think today I got my serving right, because he didn't break me.

Q: Do your feet still touble you?

A: It was today the same thing that happened to me in Miami, today I also took the tape off because the tape started moving and I didn't want it moving in the wrong place. It looked worse than it actually is. I just wanted to take it off and not take any risk.

Q: The sequence goes on with Championship wins. How difficult is it to keep it going?

A: You mean teh final streak? I didn't actually think about it too much until yesterday, when he said in the presentation, now you have 18 finals in a row. Then it reminded me. Now it's 19. Of course I go into finals feeling well, feeling comfortable. Somehow you always know the streaks will end. You always hope it's not going to be today.

Q: In three weeks time it will be 20.

A: I don't know, that is still many matches away. I have a good feeling, but good feelings don't matter much once it starts to be over five sets for two weeks. I cannot think about aiming for the title. The last few years have been too disappointing for me at the French, so I really have to focus on the early rounds. I think once I get on the way, this is when I really start to be really dangerous at Roland Garros.

Q: Looking back on the matches this week, was the Coria match the one you took the most satisfaction from?

This week? Well, Berdych was nice, to get him back. I think especially also today. I mean, Coria was good, but I had the feeling today I was almost more... You see, Coria, without wanting to take anything away from what I did, but he played five sets in Rome, and he was tired, so that was maybe one of the reasons why he changed up his game. I think today was a tough match for me, just looking ahead mentally. It was a hard break, that loss in Monte Carlo against him. He gave me a sniff, and I still ended up losing, that was disappointing. I haven't lost to too many guys lately. You always want to beat the guys who beat you back. I'm happy I got the chance after already a few weeks to get him back.


(from here the interview in German, feel free to correct my interpretation if you find some mistakes. ;) )

Q: Do you find something fault with your achievement from this week and in view of Roland Garros?

A: No, it is hard to find something that didn't go well. I didn't lose a set during the tournament. This tells how good I played. That's why I can be really satisfied very much with how the week went. I didn't play in Rome and 3 weeks without tournaments,, These can't be underestimated.

Q: Today, we have the impression that your win didn't look elegant, but it was more from hard work. Is this right?

A: Yes, I find it that there were good rallies and good points. But I had to stay concentrated, especially in the 2nd and 3rd set, in which I was always behind, because he served first. It was hard to break him. That is why I concentrated very much during the whole match today. Maybe for this reason, I couldn't play fully freely. But it was for sure the same for my opponent. I knew the danger, he beat me 3, 4 weeks ago. That's why I didn't want that it happens again.

Q: You had a very good feeling and huge self confindence before Paris last year, but these didn't bring good result. Are you planning something different this year??

A: I believe the last couple years were overall good in the preparation for Paris. I won the tournament in Hamburg, and when it didn't go well here, I reached final in Rome. I won also in Munich. The preparation for French actually went always good, I won't change much this year, except that Tony Roche is here. This could cause that I know exactly how I must play, if it is necessary. Maybe I might bet a couple of more ideas of playing on clay from him. I will be definitely arriving earlier there. Tomorrow I will be at Laureus Award in Estoril, I will be flying already today, where I am nominated for Sportsman of the year, it will be surely interesting. Then right away to Paris after that.

Q: What is special to be successful as a defending champion?

A: That is always a special "enough doing", because you come into the tournament with pressure. You know there are many points to lose. Especially at bigger tournaments, like at Grand Slams, where you have many things to lose. For this reason, I am really happy that I could again achieve it here. The tournament here is for me very important.

Q: You said that the tournament here is for you very important, because you won here 3 times, or is there other reasons?

A: This is for sure a reason, because I won here, but the I also like the city very much, and the people are friendly and polite here. I always had the feeling that I am here welcome.

Q: Is Mr. Knapper also important?

A: Yes, our relationship is really close, and he is always happy when I come here and of course if I win here. I don't know if he wants that I win or the Germans win (laugh). But, it is of course special to win here. This tournament is also very important because of him. He is happy already for months, if I come here. For this reason, it would have been pity, if I had missed this tournament here.

Q: Is one prepared for the speech for the final or it just comes??

A: No, that was fully spontaneous. It came to my mind, when I see Boris, I feel always terriblly happy, I can still remember the time when I admired him. Now I believe he raves a little about my tennis, this is very interesting.

Q: How is the collabration with Tony Roche going to be? Are you two getting together week after week??

A: Well, I have to be of course organized well. I consider in which tournament I first play, then when I have time for training, and the best is that I have Tony there. Then I have to see if it is OK for him and if there is no time conflict. But, he is very flexible. I thought here that it would be good, if he sees me play in Hamburg. Then he sees me play on clay.

Q: how does he think of your play on clay?

A: He is satisfied, of course. He has his thoughts, and if he sees small things that I can improve, then he says that, but it is clear that I can't change my play by next day, so it is a long process. But I can also do things very well, which he says, in games.

Q: If you had only one wish that is allowed to come true and you could choose a title win, would that be this year's French Open??

A: I have no clue. Yes, yes, why not. Let's take French Open this year and next year Wimbledon.

babsi
05-15-2005, 10:58 PM
Thank you,Stevens Point - like for the 1000000000000000000 time!

Since I joined here,I´ve worte "thank you" more often,then during my whole ("entier" would be the better word,if I only knew if I can spell it right) life before - I really mean wrote or said.

Writing in an other language knocks quite a few IQ points right off you!

If you haven´t read "Me talk pretty one day" from David Sedaris,go get it - thank me later!


__________________________________________________ ______________________
There´s nothing wrong with being a loser - it just depands on how good you are at it.
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

Stevens Point
05-15-2005, 11:13 PM
Thank you,Stevens Point - like for the 1000000000000000000 time!

Since I joined here,I´ve worte "thank you" more often,then during my whole ("entier" would be the better word,if I only knew if I can spell it right) life before - I really mean wrote or said.

Writing in an other language knocks quite a few IQ points right off you!

If you haven´t read "Me talk pretty one day" from David Sedaris,go get it - thank me later!


Gern geschehen, Susanne. :D

I had this idea to translate the interview from German into English, because he says also interesting stuff there, and it is pity that other people here can't get it. So, I wanted to do what I could do for other people. This task was hard, but it was also good for me. Thankfully it was Saturday and Sunday on which I had more time than usua to do such things!!

Is it a book from Sedaris?? I will check it out!! Thanks in advance, Sue. :)

Dirk
05-15-2005, 11:14 PM
NO ROGER LET'S TAKE BOTH RG AND WIMBLEDON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :bounce:

loveit
05-15-2005, 11:17 PM
NO ROGER LET'S TAKE BOTH RG AND WIMBLEDON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :bounce:


I agree Dirk. I was actually surprised that winning Wimbledon wasn't one of his goals this year and is taking RG over Wimbledon. I hope he wins both.

Stevens Point
05-15-2005, 11:24 PM
I agree Dirk. I was actually surprised that winning Wimbledon wasn't one of his goals this year and is taking RG over Wimbledon. I hope he wins both.
I think Roger is really hungry for winning both RG and Wimbledon this year. It was kind of a silly question that was asked, and Roger answers first, no clue. and I think he didn't mean much in his answer. He will go outthere and try to get the titles.

lunahielo
05-15-2005, 11:48 PM
Originally posted by babsi
Writing in an other language knocks quite a few IQ points right off you!

Never!
I think it adds IQ points to you!!
You always do a nice job in English!

Stevens Point, Thank you, again. :hug:

Daniel
05-15-2005, 11:59 PM
Thannks stevespoint, all these interviews are so great :worship:

numbers are very impressive. He has won Wimbledon the last two years, plus the U.S. Open and the Australian Open in 2004.

By avenging one of only two losses this year, Federer stretched his Open era record - he has now won 19 consecutive finals.

His record for the year is 41-2. Going back to the beginning of last year's U.S. Open, Federer is 57-2.

One of those losses came to Gasquet last month in the Monte Carlo Masters quarter-finals. The other was to Marat Safin in the semifinals of the Australian Open.

"You always want to beat the guys who have beaten you," Federer said.

Gasquet took some comfort from the loss.

"I now have a lot of confidence for Roland Garros, it's a good experience to play three sets in a final against Federer," he said.

Federer took early control of the final and never relinquished it, although Gasquet was no pushover.

"Once you've won once or twice here, you come into the tournament with confidence," Federer said. "It went as I expected, you can't expect an easy match. But winning in straight sets in always convincing."

The 18-year-old Gasquet looks like a younger version of Federer: both use big groundstrokes, one-handed backhands, cover the court well and can hit winners from both sides.

"I knew it would be tough, he showed today how well he can play," Federer said.

Federer was just steadier when it came to the big points. In the first set, he won his first - and only - break point to go up 2-0. That break of serve proved to be decisive.

In the second set, Federer went up 6-5 and fired an ace to win the set in the next game.

"It was difficult to break him, he has a fantastic backhand," Federer said.

Federer came into the tournament after taking three weeks off to rest swollen feet. Between the second and third set, a trainer came out to fasten tape around his left foot.

Daniel
05-16-2005, 12:00 AM
Federer stops Gasquet run to retain Hamburg title Sun May 15,11:59 AM ET



HAMBURG, Germany (AFP) - World number one Roger Federer avenged himself upon wonder-kid Richard Gasquet quicker than he can have ever expected when he beat the 18-year-old Frenchman in the final of the Hamburg Masters Series.

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It was Federer's shock loss to Gasquet in last month's Masters Series in Monte Carlo that triggered a three-week absence from the tour with inflamed feet.

His 6-3, 7-5, 7-6 (7/4) success here also earned him his 41st win in 43 matches since last year's US Open, extended his all-time record of consecutive winning finals to 19, and retained his Hamburg title.

"This is not just a build-up to the French Open, this is a big tournament and one that I was pleased to win and am just as pleased to defend," said Federer.

"I was concerned about what Gasquet did to mys econd serve in Monte Carlo and I was glad to be able to stop him doing that here."

He was always strong favourite for the title, even on his least favourite surface, but it was long odds that Federer should have had the revenge chance against Gasquet, who had had seven matches in nine days, two in the qualifying competition.

This marathon schedule, greatly reduced Gasquet's chances of becoming, just six weeks before his 19th birthday, the third youngest player ever to win a Masters Series title.

"I was a little bit tired, but it's a final and that's different. I had a little bit of pressure, but after a while I felt okay," the Frenchman said.

"I won seven matches in the tournament and lost to Roger Federer, so it's still been fantastic for me. I have gained a lot of experience and confidence."

Gasquet only did himself justice in flashes and the match had a slightly surreal flavour with the roof pulled over even before the start in case of showers, giving a slightly sepia tinge to a blossom-laden May day.

There was also a hint of nostalgia about Federer's classic game, full of flowing drives and frequent net attacks which prevailed over the youngster's harder serving and more ambitious ground strokes.

Federer came to the net almost three times as often as Gasquet and more often mixed in short slices to take his opponent out of his comfort zones.

But the biggest difference was Federer's capacity to win the big points, Gasquet being unable to convert any of his five break points and having his defences broken by the sudden surge of driving pace with which Federer snatched a crucial mini-break two rallies before the end.

Gasquet seemed more nervous than usual both before and during the first set of his biggest final so far.

His famously fluent backhand was spluttering and he contrived to lose his opening service game even though Federer was showing signs, not for the first time this week, of starting slowly.

The teenager double-faulted on the second point and lost a crazy seventh point in which he volleyed a ball which appeared to be going out and let drop a lob landing six feet in.

That put him break point down and that lost game was the difference between them in the first set, even though Federer was making errors with drops and short slices and had to save three break back points in the seventh game.

The second set however saw Gasquet begin to fire. He earned two more break points in the second game - again unconverted - and in the ninth game revealed some of his most dashing moments.

Once the teenager ran back for an attempted pass, whipping it cross court for a winner in the opposite direction to that in which he was moving.

Three rallies later he had the crowd in its feet after a sequence of spectacular retrieves which conjured a point from an apparently lost cause.

However, Federer hung on to his serve all through and things fell apart for Gasquet when he played one bad service game at 5-5 and it cost him the set.

It also cost him the chance of gaining control of the match too, though there were anxious moments between the two sets when the trainer had to take the scissors to a massive bandage on his left foot.

He made no mistake however and after a short time out Federer's foot seemed more than equal to the task of continuing.

The third set went with serve right through, with Federer wearing an increasingly casual air, and Gasquet realizing that a sudden surge from the champion was imminent.

When it came, with a backhand-down-the-line and forehand-down-the-line combination to get him to 5-4 in the tie-break with two serves to follow, it was predictable but nonetheless unstoppable.

It was not a top class performance but it was an eloquent one, saying much for Federer's clay court credentials that he should have won so well in what was his last build-up tournament before the Grand Slam event in Paris.

That should have confirmed the world number one, already a winner of the other three Grand Slams, as one of the front-runners, along with Spain's Rafael Nadal and Argentina's Guillermo Coria, for the French Open.

Daniel
05-16-2005, 12:01 AM
19 and counting
Federer avenges loss, extends finals win streak
Posted: Sunday May 15, 2005 10:12AM; Updated: Sunday May 15, 2005 2:27PM


Roger Federer had more winners than Richard Gasquet (38 to 24), but he also had more unforced errors (40 to 27).
Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images

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HAMBURG, Germany (AP) -- Top-ranked Roger Federer beat French teenager Richard Gasquet 6-3, 7-5, 7-6 (4) Sunday to defend his Hamburg Masters title and win his tour-leading sixth championship of the year.

By avenging one of only two losses this year, Federer stretched his Open era record -- he has now won 19 consecutive finals he has played since October 2003.

Federer is 41-2 this year. Going back to the beginning of last year's U.S. Open, Federer is 57-2.

Federer lost to Gasquet last month in the quarterfinals of the Monte Carlo Masters. On Sunday, Federer took early control and never relinquished it, although Gasquet was no pushover.

"Once you've won once or twice here, you come into the tournament with confidence," said Federer, who didn't drop a set on the way to his 28th career title.

The 18-year-old Gasquet looks like a younger version of Federer: both use big groundstrokes, one-handed backhands, cover the court well and can hit winners from both sides.

"I knew it would be tough, he showed today how well he can play," Federer said.

Federer was just steadier when it came to the big points. In the first set, he won his first -- and only -- break point to go up 2-0. That break proved to be decisive.

In the second set, Federer went up 6-5 and closed out the set with an ace.

Neither player faced a break point in the final set and Federer was helped by a double-fault from Gasquet to go up 4-2 in the tiebreaker. But a backhand from Gasquet that sailed wide gave Federer two match points. He only needed one. Gasquet's forehand went wide, giving Federer the match.

Federer had more winners (38 to 24), but he also had more unforced errors (40 to 27).

Gasquet was in his second career final and could have become the youngest winner in Hamburg.

"Roger was simply better today," Gasquet said.

The $2.7 million clay-court event is a warm-up for the French Open, which starts May 23. The French Open is the only major that Federer hasn't won.

Copyright 2005 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Daniel
05-16-2005, 08:52 AM
FEDERER TAMES GASQUET



HAMBURG, Germany: World number one Roger Federer avenged himself upon wonder-kid Richard Gasquet quicker than he can have ever expected yesterday when he beat the 18-year-old Frenchman in the final of the Hamburg Masters Series.

It was Federer's shock loss to Gasquet in last month's Masters Series in Monte Carlo that triggered a three-week absence from the tour with inflamed feet.

His 6-3, 7-5, 7-6 (7-4) success here also earned him his 41st win in 43 matches since last year's US Open, extended his all-time record of consecutive winning finals to 19, and retained his Hamburg title.

"This is not just a build-up to the French Open, this is a big tournament and one that I was pleased to win and am just as pleased to defend," said Federer.

"I was concerned about what Gasquet did to my second serve in Monte Carlo and I was glad to be able to stop him doing that here."

He was always strong favourite for the title, even on his least favourite surface, but it was long odds that Federer should have had the revenge chance against Gasquet, who had had seven matches in nine days, two in the qualifying competition.

This marathon schedule, greatly reduced Gasquet's chances of becoming, just six weeks before his 19th birthday, the third youngest player ever to win a Masters Series title.

"I was a little bit tired, but it's a final and that's different. I had a little bit of pressure, but after a while I felt okay," the Frenchman said.

"I won seven matches in the tournament and lost to Roger Federer, so it's still been fantastic for me. I have gained a lot of experience and confidence."

Gasquet only did himself justice in flashes and the match had a slightly surreal flavour with the roof pulled over even before the start in case of showers, giving a slightly sepia tinge to a blossom-laden May day.

Nostalgia

There was also a hint of nostalgia about Federer's classic game, full of flowing drives and frequent net attacks which prevailed over the youngster's harder serving and more ambitious ground strokes.

Federer came to the net almost three times as often as Gasquet and more often mixed in short slices to take his opponent out of his comfort zones.

But the biggest difference was Federer's capacity to win the big points, Gasquet being unable to convert any of his five crucial break points and having his defences broken by the sudden surge of driving pace with which top-seeded Federer snatched a crucial mini-break two rallies before the end.

Gasquet seemed more nervous than usual both before and during the first set of his biggest final so far.

His famously fluent backhand was spluttering and he contrived to lose his opening service game even though Federer was showing signs, not for the first time this week, of starting slowly.

The teenager double-faulted on the second point and lost a crazy seventh point in which he volleyed a ball which appeared to be going out and let drop a lob landing six feet in.

That put him break point down and that lost game was the difference between them in the first set.

Mrs. B
05-16-2005, 09:00 AM
It was not a top class performance but it was an eloquent one, saying much for Federer's clay court credentials that he should have won so well in what was his last build-up tournament before the Grand Slam event in Paris.

has this writer been lurking at mtf? :lol:

lsy
05-16-2005, 09:38 AM
Q: If you had only one wish that is allowed to come true and you could choose a title win, would that be this year's French Open??

A: I have no clue. Yes, yes, why not. Let's take French Open this year and next year Wimbledon.

He finally said it out ;) We all knew he's very eager to take down RG! Thanks for the translation Stevens, very much appreciated!

yeah why not Rogi? You can win it, just keep believing in yourself!

Thanks for the articles Daniel :wavey:

Yasmine
05-16-2005, 10:25 AM
Here is an audio of the interview. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/default.stm top right of the window, click on Audio. Very nice interview I think ;)

Mrs. B
05-16-2005, 11:30 AM
thanks, yasmine. :wavey:

Roger, you know, if you cut off a bit on, you know, on, you know, ... ;) :lol:

Stevens Point
05-16-2005, 11:35 AM
Here is an audio of the interview. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/default.stm top right of the window, click on Audio. Very nice interview I think ;)
Dank U :D :D

ytben
05-16-2005, 11:36 AM
Stevens Point san, again thank you thank you thank you for taking the time to translate the interview for us, language challenged people :worship: :kiss: :D

Stevens Point
05-16-2005, 11:52 AM
Stevens Point san, again thank you thank you thank you for taking the time to translate the interview for us, language challenged people :worship: :kiss: :D
Do- itashimashite! :D

Maybe we might need someone to translate French into English if he holds interviews in Paris in French,,, because I don't understand French,,,,, :sad:

fightclubber
05-16-2005, 01:51 PM
stevens.. the interivew and the extra translation are great. I will add it to the site as I told you with the rest.
When you have time, can you tell me hwat roger said ( at the trophy ceremony) to Boris? Ionly understood he named Boris and he laught. Also He said something about gasquet and that you have to come from the qualies?? I do not understand german at all... But I laught of roger laught. its sooooooooooooo nice.
Silvy:worship: :worship: :worship:

Stevens Point
05-16-2005, 02:03 PM
stevens.. the interivew and the extra translation are great. I will add it to the site as I told you with the rest.
When you have time, can you tell me hwat roger said ( at the trophy ceremony) to Boris? Ionly understood he named Boris and he laught. Also He said something about gasquet and that you have to come from the qualies?? I do not understand german at all... But I laught of roger laught. its sooooooooooooo nice.
Silvy:worship: :worship: :worship:
I didn't get everything what he said to Gasquet, but he congratulated him for his wonderful week and said that he is a newcomer. Not sure, but he might have said of his qualifying first and reaching final...

I didn't get what he talked of Boris, I wonder, too, because everyone there was laughing...

Sorry Silvy, I can't help much. :sad: :sad:

lsy
05-16-2005, 02:10 PM
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1484691,00.html

Federer brings Gasquet down to earth

Federer 6-3, 7-5, 7-6 Gasquet

Richard Jago in Hamburg
Monday May 16, 2005
The Guardian

It was billed as episode two of the world No1 versus the wonder kid, but it hardly felt like a revenge. That was because the only moment Roger Federer seemed in danger of going down to the 18-year-old Richard Gasquet was when the trainer took a large pair of scissors to a bandage on the champion's left foot and began making alarming inroads.
The battered sole that was revealed may yet be an obstacle to Federer winning next week's French Open - despite the three-week injury break he took between his startling Monte Carlo loss to Gasquet and the 6-3, 7-5, 7-6 beating he gave him here. Fortunately, however, the physio's hand suffered no jerks nor trembles and Federer returned to trample a path to yet another collection of remarkable statistics.

There was an extension of his all-time record of consecutive winning finals to 19, his 41st win in 43 matches since last year's US Open, his third Hamburg title in four years, and more than enough other stuff for an anorak's feast. But we knew Federer was likely to achieve these things. More remarkable in a way is that he got the chance to atone so quickly, and it was a tribute as much to Gasquet as to good fortune that Federer got it.

The teenager struggled his way through an unlikely sequence of seven wins, two in the qualifying competition, as a result of which he probably started the final too tired to do himself justice.

"My toughest moment was when I saw the draw," said Federer, which sounded a little incongruous, a moment of humorous gamesmanship coming from Mr Nice. "There was Verdasco, Berdych and Kuerten in my section, so to come through the tournament without dropping a set was fantastic."

But there were enough flashes from Gasquet to show how and why last month he had produced such an amazing result. There were a couple of withering returns of the sort that had made mincemeat of Federer's second delivery in Monte Carlo, plus a first serve of his own that was consistently 25mph faster than the maestro's, and a backhand like a dream - fierce, accurate, so hard to read and surely destined to become one of the celebrated strokes of the modern game. But Gasquet started indifferently, once spraying a mishit so unexpectedly into the VIP section that it made several of them sway in alarm. He improved, but the match turned on his inability to chisel out any of the bigger points or to win the crucial second set. Five times Federer saved break points, and in the tie-break exuded such coolness about the business of wrapping up the match that it was unsurprising that Gasquet delivered a double fault.

"I was tired," admitted the man-boy, suddenly looking more boyish. "But this was a final so it was different. And it was against Roger Federer, which is a dream for me. It still feels incredible even though I lost."

Federer reckoned it had been important to keep his serve out of trouble better, which he managed by spinning it heavily in more often, rather than serving Gasquet up with pace. He also increasingly seems to be taking something from Tim Henman's tactical style on clay. Federer sliced balls in short and angled, sometimes carving them into drops, to bring his opponent out of his comfort zone, and he worked his way into the net three times as often as Gasquet.

We can expect to see him developing more of these plays at Roland Garros. Long brutal rallies won't win him the title. "I can't go to the French Open thinking about aiming to win it," Federer said. "There are many hours on court, so many points to be won so much can happen. I have good feelings but feelings don't matter much when it starts.

"The whole deal is over two weeks. I will have to focus on early inroads and see what happens. I can't think about aiming for the title."

But others think about him aiming for it. On this evidence Federer is playing well enough - along with Rafael Nadal and Guillermo Coria - to be considered one of the favourites. If so, more history may be beckoning.

================================================== =======

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,5205-1613889,00.html

May 16, 2005

Federer finds feet for his Paris quest
From Neil Harman Tennis Correspondent in Hamburg



AND now on to Paris. Roger Federer resumed normal service yesterday, winning the Masters Series tournament in the chill of the Rothenbaum here for the third time in four years, and Richard Gasquet proved beyond dispute that he has the capacity to become a bit of a legend himself.
Federer, having missed the Rome championship a week earlier with inflamed feet, showed a pretty sharp pair of heels in his 6-3, 7-5, 7-6 victory over Gasquet, who had beaten him in the quarter-finals of the Monte Carlo Masters a month ago, when doubts about the Swiss’s durability on clay were raised. This result, his nineteenth successive final win, should put some of the suspicions to one side.



The world No 1 has not beamed so much through an acceptance speech and neither can a runner-up have received the sustained acclaim as that which wrapped Gasquet in an embrace of such warmth that the bear hug from Walter Knapper, the tournament director, was an unnecessary extra layer. Knapper was thrilled that his event had been rescued by such a match. “What would Roland Garros and Wimbledon not give for a final like this?” he said.

The French Open would go down on its knees, that is for sure. Federer needs to win the championship to complete his grand-slam collection and if Gasquet were to be standing on the second Sunday in Paris, his opponent ought to be ready for an onslaught, both from a flashing blade and ferocious vocals, the like of which he will never have experienced before.

We should remain balanced for the sake of the lad who is not 19 until next month. Rafael Nadal reaches the same age on men’s semi-finals day in Paris and that he sat out this event with a blistered finger means all else that happened this past week should be judged accordingly. (Andy Murray celebrated his 18th birthday yesterday and plays in the boys’ singles at Roland Garros.) The loss of Nadal and Carlos Moyà before they started here, and the sudden departures of Andre Agassi and Andy Roddick, were such that none is any the wiser about his title prospects when the dust starts to fly a week today.

Of Federer, there is a certainty of purpose and a game that is undoubtedly beginning to benefit already from the arrival of Tony Roche, his coach, in Germany a week ago. Roche, a natural grass-court player who won the French Open in 1966, knows his charge is not going to win by staying back, so there is more slice, the drop shot is a regular weapon (although Gasquet started to pick it a bit early for Federer’s liking) and he is going to have to play plenty of the low volleys that interspersed his victory haul. To have beaten Guillermo Coria, last year’s beaten French Open finalist from Argentina, so imperiously in the quarter- finals was a huge step in the right direction.

He knew, also, that he could not afford to start as stickily as he had in the semi-final against Nikolay Davydenko. He walked out nonchalantly into the arena, with his hands deep in his pockets, but once released, he swept into a 3-0 lead, held off three break points in the seventh game and won the opening set in 33 minutes. Gasquet had break points in the first two games of the second set but, as he bemoaned later, his returning lacked real devil.

“He won all his service games, that is the key,” Gasquet, who breaks into the top 30 for the first time, said. “But this was my first Masters final, against Federer. I feel I did a good match. I see the future now. I won seven matches (he had qualified), I have a lot more experience and I go into the French with a lot of confidence.”

lsy
05-16-2005, 02:15 PM
stevens.. the interivew and the extra translation are great. I will add it to the site as I told you with the rest.
When you have time, can you tell me hwat roger said ( at the trophy ceremony) to Boris? Ionly understood he named Boris and he laught. Also He said something about gasquet and that you have to come from the qualies?? I do not understand german at all... But I laught of roger laught. its sooooooooooooo nice.
Silvy:worship: :worship: :worship:

Can't remember who told me this, Probably Mrs.B, but it was sth like Roger said Richard had won one more match than him here and that he likes Boris or sth.

Silvy, just wondering, do you get lots of Rogi matchs in Argentina? I'm always amazed by the number of fans who leave messages in RF.com who're from Argentina. I mean considering they has many great tennis players themselves, comparitively, fans from Spain are relatively rare. Just a random obervation ;)

Stevens Point
05-16-2005, 02:41 PM
Dani and lsy :worship: :worship: :worship:

PaulieM
05-16-2005, 02:54 PM
Q: If you had only one wish that is allowed to come true and you could choose a title win, would that be this year's French Open??

A: I have no clue. Yes, yes, why not. Let's take French Open this year and next year Wimbledon.
:eek: how about both :D

lsy
05-16-2005, 03:01 PM
Q: If you had only one wish that is allowed to come true and you could choose a title win, would that be this year's French Open??

A: I have no clue. Yes, yes, why not. Let's take French Open this year and next year Wimbledon.
:eek: how about both :D

Apparently he's not as greedy as his fans ;)

PaulieM
05-16-2005, 03:08 PM
so i was taking a trip down memory lane yesterday, and since wimbledon is getting closer and closer(i'm so excited) here's a nice article about roger from last year's wimbledon :D

AWESOME FEDERER STILL THE KING
For the second year running it ended in tears of joy for Roger Federer.

The quiet man of tennis and defending champion picked up the famous gold Wimbledon men's singles trophy on Sunday afternoon after defeating Andy Roddick 4-6 7-5 7-6 6-4 in a final as patchy as the sunshine and showers which have enveloped SW19 for the past fortnight.

It could get to be an annual event on the first weekend in July such is the burgeoning talent of the Swiss star, who boasts a 100% record in Grand Slam finals, having won the Australian Open earlier this year.

There are those who believe one day he could emulate Pete Sampras' seven Wimbledon titles given health and fitness.

And he just might, because on Sunday afternoon the world number one demonstrated the precious art of the great champions - he won while playing nowhere near his best against a man ranked number two in the world and who possesses the fastest serve on the planet.

"I threw the kitchen sink at him but he went to the bathroom and got his tub," was Roddick's verdict.

But when Roddick sits down and views the video of a match which was interrupted twice by rain and in which the American squandered six break points on the Federer serve in the final set, he must acknowledge that this was the big one which got away.

If Federer had been close to genius for six matches at this tournament, here for long periods he was a mere tennis mortal and one who struggled to deal with the power and pace of Roddick.

"He played very aggressively. I got lucky today for sure," said Federer after he had collapsed to his knees on crashing the winning ace and then shed a tear as he was being congratulated by Wimbledon referee Alan Mills.

"It was emotional, an unbelievable feeling and I am enjoying this moment. I have a 100% record in finals of Grand Slams and these are the ones which really count."

At times, however, the Centre Court crowd did not know whether to clap or groan as the chill day and the big-match nerves seemed to affect each player at different times.

Roddick had announced his intentions from the opening skirmishes. He was going to hit the ball as hard as possible as often as possible. No finesse, little guile, just raw, unrefined power.

It was hit or miss, win or bust tennis.

Gambling perhaps, but when you possess a second serve consistently faster than Federer's first delivery then it pays to play to your strengths.

It certainly did in the first set when Roddick broke the Federer serve in the third game and then saved four break points on his own delivery in the next. Even a 36-minute break for rain with Roddick leading 3-2 did nothing to disturb his tunnel vision.

The set was duly gathered and we wondered whether Roddick could keep up the precision of his artillery.

The answer appeared to be no when Federer raced to a 4-0 lead in the second set, but even so it was by no means the imperious champion witnessed previously throughout the championship.

Federer was struggling for timing and rhythm and Roddick was constantly gnawing away at the Swiss serve.

The American pulled it back to 4-4 and looked to be favourite to take the set until fate played its part in the 12th game.

With the score at deuce a backhand return from Federer clipped the net cord, tottered for an agonising moment on top of the tape and then trickled down the net on Roddick's side.

It gave Federer a set point he barely deserved but he took it in impressive style with a running forehand down the line.

One set each. It was a match absorbing in its unpredictability, but lacking in consistent quality. The stoppages did not help and with spits and spots of rain in the air the players left the court again halfway through the third set with Roddick leading 4-2 after having broken the Swiss serve in the third game.

They returned to sunshine for the first time and at last it seemed the heat had coaxed the apparent tension from the champion. He won three games in a row and took the set to a tie-break in which he demonstrated the full repertoire of his shot-making.

In particular two backhands, one cross-court, one down the line, plus two aces, proclaimed the fact that Federer was back on speaking terms with his talent.

Two sets to one and now Roddick needed inspiration. It was not as if he did not have his chances. Indeed he failed to convert six break points on two Federer service games in the fourth set, perhaps the defining moment in the match coming in the sixth game.

A net cord from Roddick was followed by a complete mis-hit from Federer which the American stretched out for but could only put out via the frame of his racket. Roddick approached the net and shook it forcibly for several seconds, releasing his frustrations but also loosening his concentration.

Federer immediately responded with an ace, then went on to break the Roddick serve in the next game and from then on the outcome was inevitable.

The Swiss star finally ended it with his 12th ace and then collapsed on his knees, leant back in a move which would have fractured the vertebrae of the Average Joe, and then rose to salute the roar of the packed court.

"It's tough but I left nothing out there and Roger is a great champion," said Roddick, for whom there was to be no fourth of July victory parade.

The best thing was that with Roddick 21 and Federer 22 this could become the rivalry men's tennis has been seeking.

RogiFan88
05-16-2005, 03:14 PM
Federer smooths way to Paris
By Barry Wood in Hamburg
(Filed: 16/05/2005)

Roger Federer warmed up for the French Open by stretching his record in ATP finals to 19 successive victories when he beat Richard Gasquet to win the Hamburg Masters.

Federer's surprise defeat by Gasquet in April led to him taking three weeks off. But he returned in style here, beating Gasquet 6-3, 7-5, 7-6 yesterday.

Gasquet, 18, who had to qualify for the tournament, was clearly tired after seven matches in nine days and he failed to show the form that took him to victory over Federer in the Monte Carlo quarter-finals.

Federer caught Gasquet cold and broke him in the second game with an overhead shot that clipped the net cord but fell in his favour.

Federer then struggled to maintain his advantage, fighting off three break points at 4-2 and then two more early in the second set.

Gasquet played just one poor service game, but crucially it came at 5-5 in the second set when he was broken to love, and Federer claimed the set by winning 12 of the last 13 points.

After no break points in the third set, Federer took the tie-break 7-4.

"To come through the week without losing a set is very nice, and it gives me great belief that I can also do better at the French Open," said Federer, who has gone no further in that tournament than the third round in the last three years.

"I have a good feeling, but feelings don't matter much once it starts. It's the real deal over five sets for two weeks. I cannot think about aiming for the title. The last few years have been too disappointing for me, and I really have to focus on the early rounds."

Despite his defeat, Gasquet will approach the French Open, which starts next Monday, in good spirits. "I have a lot of confidence now for Roland Garros, because I played some great matches here and today was a good experience for me," he said. "I was nervous at the beginning of the match but then it was OK. But I didn't return good in all the match. That was the key, I think."

Amelie Mauresmo retained her Italian Open title yesterday, beating Patty Schnyder 2-6, 6-3, 6-4, and, she hopes, putting herself in prime position for a decent run at the French Open.

Mauresmo arrived in Rome unsure of her form and fitness. A strained abdominal muscle had limited her clay-court season and a lack of direction had scuppered her results.

But back at her favourite city and her favourite event, she gradually began to find her rhythm.

From a miserably poor start against Schnyder, she began to apply the pressure in the second set. A furious argument with Romano Grillotti, the umpire, over a missed line call seemed to clear her head and from that moment on, Mauresmo was able to take control.

"I just took it as a relaxed tournament," she said. "And then finally, I'm here with the trophy on the last day. Maybe I should do that at every tournament I go to, especially the grand slams and the French Open."

The French Open, though, is where Mauresmo struggles most. Overwhelmed by the pressure of performing well in front of her home crowd, she has never got beyond the quarter-finals.

Winning two Italian titles from five finals over the last six years proves she can beat anyone on clay - now she just has to learn how not to beat herself when she gets to Roland Garros.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml;sessionid=F5U1YXLMXS32RQFIQMFSM5OAVCBQ0 JVC?xml=/sport/2005/05/16/stfede16.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/05/16/ixtenn.html

fightclubber
05-16-2005, 03:18 PM
Can't remember who told me this, Probably Mrs.B, but it was sth like Roger said Richard had won one more match than him here and that he likes Boris or sth.

Silvy, just wondering, do you get lots of Rogi matchs in Argentina? I'm always amazed by the number of fans who leave messages in RF.com who're from Argentina. I mean considering they has many great tennis players themselves, comparitively, fans from Spain are relatively rare. Just a random obervation ;)
HI ISY
THANKS!!!!

YES, we got lots of matches. Sometimes is impossible.. I work at the time of the european tour, so I feel bad. And the bad thing for me is the last 2 uyears I had no vcr to tape them.
Anyway.. We have cable tv, If you do not pay cable, you do not see matches on tv.
We have ESPN that has the rights for MAsters series and Masters cup, The we have some events for FOX sports (they are showing DUSSELDORFF cup, or showed Dubai but only semis and finals), and TYC that shows Davis Cup, and FEDS cup and Buenos Aires, Mexico and chile torunaments...
We arelucky but, Hamburg they did not show 2 matches and one was my letter to roger I miss that part. Hopefully Ill be able to get a copy someday...

Kisses

Silvy

RogiFan88
05-16-2005, 03:23 PM
Stevens, your translation of the German interview is v much appreciated [your English is v good -- a few minor errors but nothing that prevents comprehension, which is the main thing -- you're doing v well]! Danke!!

SUKTUEN
05-16-2005, 06:06 PM
Thankyou so much for the artciles~

moonlight
05-16-2005, 07:24 PM
Apparently he's not as greedy as his fans ;)


Federer determined to make amends

World number one Roger Federer has set his sights on winning the season's three remaining Grand Slam events.
The Swiss player, who has won six titles already this year, lost in the semi-finals of the season's first major, the Australian Open, in January.

But Federer said he intended to make amends for that defeat to Marat Safin.

"Wimbledon and Roland Garros are important goals but it would be great to win the final three Slams of the season," said the 23-year-old. ;)

The first of those challenges will come at the French Open, which begins next Monday.

Federer has struggled at Roland Garros in previous years but will be top seed and has just won the Hamburg Masters.

"If I win in Paris it means I have won every Slam, which is something only a few players can claim," he said.

After the French Open comes Wimbledon, and Federer admitted the London event was his favourite.

"I guess Wimbledon will always remain number one in my heart," said the Swiss star, who picked up his second title at SW19 last summer.

"It was where I won my first Grand Slam, and all my heroes have played there.

"I've cried there more than any other tournament. I'm just very sentimental about that tournament more than any of the others."

Federer, who has won 41 of his last 43 matches, is to be honoured at the World Laureus Sports Awards, which take place in Portugal on Monday.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/4553133.stm

RogiFan88
05-16-2005, 09:24 PM
FEDERER RELISHING WIMBLEDON RETURN

Newly-crowned Hamburg Masters champion Roger Federer is already looking beyond the forthcoming French Open, and cannot wait to get stuck into his favourite Grand Slam tournament of Wimbledon.

Federer, Wimbledon champion in 2003 and 2004, made it 41 victories in his last 43 matches by overcoming Richard Gasquet in the final in Germany on Sunday.

After a brief overnight stop-off in Estoril in Portugal for the World Laureus Sports Awards, Federer will travel to France, where he will begin preparations for Roland Garros - the only Grand Slam competition he has failed to win.

However, the 23-year-old clearly has his sights firmly set on the south-west London tournament that starts at the end of June.

"If I win in Paris it would mean I have won all of the Grand Slams, which would be great," said Federer.

"But I guess Wimbledon will always remain number one in my heart.

"It was where I won my first Grand Slam, and all my heroes have played there.

"When I beat Pete Sampras there (in 2001) it was a huge milestone in my career. That's when it all started for me.

"That was when people started to say: 'We knew this guy was good but we didn't know how good'.

"I've cried there more than any other tournament.

"I'm just very sentimental about that tournament more than any of the others."

Federer dominated the last calendar year in tennis, winning three of the four Grand Slams on offer, with triumphs in the US Open, the Australia Open and Wimbledon.

Although the Swiss star tumbled out at the semi-final stage at the Australian Open earlier this year, he feels he is in excellent form ahead of the three remaining majors of the year.

"I've got six titles already this year, and last year was remarkable and surprising for me.

"I definitely want to do well in the French Open, and then at Wimbledon.

"I am the top seed in the world, and I want to hang on to it."

http://www.sportinglife.com/

jtipson
05-16-2005, 09:44 PM
Thanks RF.


"I am the top seed in the world, and I want to hang on to it."


I sincerely hope that's a misquote, or a stupid journalist ;)

RogiFan88
05-16-2005, 10:44 PM
Posted on May 14, 2005
Federer Clubs Coria at ATP Hamburg

In a battle of two guys who know how to play in Hamburg, World No. 1 and two-time tournament champ Roger Federer sent a crisp and clear message to the Roland Garros contenders that he is for real after defeating Guillermo Coria 6-4, 7-6(3) in a quarterfinal encounter on Friday.

Federer, who has faced some serious competition amid poor conditions, has dropped ZERO sets all week and is the outright favorite to capture his sixth ATP title on the season on Sunday.

“I have the feeling, I'm back to a very good form on clay,” said Federer. “The last few years I've always felt good here in Hamburg. I don't want to over estimate my level of play. Because once I get on the French Open courts, the balls are different, the clay a bit quicker, who knows. I will just have to adjust again. I'm feeling good.”

Federer was actually 3-1 down in the first set and 5-3 down in the second set before overcoming both deficits. Coria served for the second set at 5-4 but Federer broke for the third time in the match.

“I had my chances, especially serving at 5:4 in the second set. I had to fight very hard for each point. The game was played at such high intensity,” Coria said. “It was a shame I couldn't take my chances. Today the way I feel is that it is almost impossible to beat Federer.”

Sorry, Guillermo, it wasn’t a shame.

Among the other winners on Friday were a pair of qualifiers who will face each other in the semifinals with Richard Gasquet (d. Seppi) and Christophe Rochus, a 3-6, 6-0, 6-3 victor over Juan Ignacio Chela.

Federer will meet Nikolay Davydenko, who defeated Filippo Volandri 7-6(5), 6-4 in Saturday’s semifinals.

“It's the best moment of my career so far,” said Rochus, who sort of resembles a tennis ball. “I have to enjoy it, even if I know I have one more match tomorrow. Today, it's like a present to me. So, I have to enjoy it first and then tomorrow start to be back for the semifinal.”

In the doubles semifinals, No. 2 seeds Bjorkman-Mirnyi take on Croatians Ancic-Ljubicic and No. 6 seeds Paes-Zimonjic play No. 8 Llodra-Santoro

http://www.tennis-x.com/story/2005-05-14/d.php

lunahielo
05-16-2005, 10:48 PM
Good article.
That was such a beautiful match.
Rogi just *flowed* across the court!

babsi
05-17-2005, 09:36 AM
Thank you so much,everyone - you all are just the best :) :) :) :) :)




__________________________________________________ ______________________
There´s nothing wrong with being a loser - it just depands how good you are at it
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

Puschkin
05-17-2005, 12:12 PM
I sincerely hope that's a misquote, or a stupid journalist ;)

:confused: There is nothing wrong with that sentence.

Puschkin
05-17-2005, 12:37 PM
It is bit early, but.....

Federer Gunning for Third Wimbledon Win

Thursday, 12 May, 2005

Would-be usurpers be warned. Roger Federer has two clear objectives for 2005. “My top priority is to retain my Wimbledon title” said the two-time defending champion during his winning run at Indian Wells in March. “And I want to stay No. 1 in the world” he added. On the evidence so far, there seems every likelihood that the 23-year-old Swiss superstar will achieve both.

Before the end of April Federer had won five of the seven tournaments he had contested and had stood at match point in both the matches he lost. Yet, even if his season is as spectacular as last year’s all-conquering campaign when three of the Grand Slams, three Masters Series events and five other tournaments fell to his talented racket, those two moments will continue to haunt him. True champions hate to lose and Federer knew that he could have - perhaps should have - found a way to win them both.

Marat Safin’s lunging backhand lob that had landed on the baseline to deny Federer a place in the Australian Open final where, 12 months earlier, he had beaten the Russian for the title, was a shot in a million. Federer’s attempt to hit a winner by firing the ball between his legs as he raced towards the back fence would have been a shot in a billion. But the ball was caught by the net band and rebounded his side of the net. “I still felt like I was going to win” he said ruefully “but Marat played some great tennis after that”.

Against Richard Gasquet in the quarter-finals in Monte Carlo, Federer missed the line with a fierce forehand to the youngster’s backhand that would have sealed the fate of the remarkable French teenager. Unfortunately for Federer the 18-year-old saved two more match points and then proceeded to reel off some spectacular backhands to claim a famous victory. “On that match point I should have gone the other side, to his forehand, but I only missed it by just a little bit, you know” said the smiling Federer.

For a man who has been pulling rabbits out of the hat all year those were painful moments. Speaking about his ability to conjure a victory when not playing at his best, Federer said “I dig much deeper now. Being a set down doesn’t bother me like it used to. Before I would get frustrated and totally change up my game and would be in a sort of panic mode. That doesn’t happen any more”.

Winning, of course, breeds confidence but it is not only a mental issue. He is stronger too. For the physical improvement he can thank Pierre Paganini, his trainer at home, and Pavel Kovak who travels with him on the road. Pavel can always be seen sitting courtside alongside Federer’s girlfriend Miroslava Varinek. “Mirka” also takes care of the tedious daily details of life on the Tour giving Roger the time and space to concentrate on his tennis and his training. “I think finally all the hard work is paying off. Because I’ve improved physically I can fight through tough matches where before I would have had to change my game” says Federer.

Now it is others who have to make changes as they attempt to derail the Federer Express. By common consent Federer is the most gifted player on the planet, potentially the most complete player of all time. Old timers like Rod Laver and Charlie Pasarell are full of praise for Federer’s extraordinary talents. “I don’t think I could have beaten him” said Laver modestly - though most of us believe that the great double Grand Slam champion would have been Federer’s equal if given the same competitive opportunities using modern equipment. Indian Wells tournament chairman Pasarell is simply in awe of the man. “I’ve never seen a talent like his. It’s ridiculous what he can do with a racket” he said after seeing Federer successfully retain his title.

Even his present challengers are ready to admit that Federer is in a class of his own. “I’ve never seen as complete a player” said Safin. “He can do it all and he has so many options”.

Young Rafael Nadal, the 18-year-old Spaniard who was two points away from scoring a repeat victory over the world No. 1 in Miami last month, was equally forthright. “Oh yes, Federer is the best player right now. He has all the shots - very good forehand, great backhand, he serves great and volleys so well too and his slice is so difficult when he attacks. No other player can do all that”.

Nadal might have added that Federer can also cover the court like a gazelle, can pluck aces out of the air on important points like rabbits out of a hat and has the reflexes of a Formula One driver.

Barring accidents, then, Roger Federer will be the overwhelming favourite to win a third consecutive Wimbledon title. He makes no secret of the fact that he would like to equal Pete Sampras’ four in a row and Bjorn Borg’s five. Yet he is conscious how fragile the life of a tennis champion can be now that the game has become so demanding physically. That is why he did not make himself available for the early rounds of the Davis Cup this year. “I just felt that I had to skip Davis Cup and play my schedule till after Wimbledon without any bad experiences, you know, no risk from injuries from playing too much”.

Even with a lighter schedule Federer’s 35 winning matches in 2005 have already taken their toll. Injuries to both feet (he is suffering from plantar fascitis - inflamation of the tendons under the foot) prevented him from competing in Rome and raised doubts about the immediate future. Whether he will be fit to compete in Hamburg and the French Open remains to be seen.

Although he has never been past the quarter-finals in Paris, Federer will still start as the official favourite. As Andy Roddick said “Wherever he plays, regardless of the surface, Federer will start as favourite. He has raised the bar. The rest of us are trying to catch him”. It will be fascinating these next few weeks to see if anyone can.

Written by John Barrett

Source: http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/articles/2005-05-12/200505121115414699358.html

babsi
05-17-2005, 01:52 PM
Thank you Puschkin - an early bird,but a pretty one :)

Oh,oh some exciting weeks are ahead of us - hope everthing ends in joyfully excitment.
Somehow I´m pretty optimistic about his chances at the French - not that this is based on anything special -he played great at the Hamburg masters (from what I´ve heard) - but he did so last year as well,which I could WATCH.


__________________________________________________ ______________________
There´s nothing wrong with being a loser - it just depands on how good you are at it
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

Nocko
05-17-2005, 02:01 PM
:worship: Thank you very much for those many good articles!! :worship:

yanchr
05-17-2005, 04:39 PM
Ya, so many thanks to everyone here to take time to find such good articles. Your effort is very much appreciated :) :hug:

I just can tell obviously even if he hadn't said it out that he wants to win RG THIS YEAR. But Roger, let's not make Wimbldeon as the cost of it. You know I love Wimbledon so much just as you do. So both, OK? ;)

SUKTUEN
05-17-2005, 05:09 PM
Thankyou ~~Kiss

lunahielo
05-17-2005, 05:37 PM
Last Updated: Tuesday, 17 May, 2005, 01:20 GMT 02:20 UK

Model pro Federer a worthy winner

By Jonathan Overend
BBC Five Live tennis correspondent


When I asked Roger Federer in Houston last year why he spends so much time speaking to the media, his first response was: "You guys make me laugh."


Federer won the World Sportsman of the Year award in Estoril

That was, of course, followed by a careful appreciation of his responsibility (as world number one) to promote the sport.

This was illustrated earlier this season in Melbourne when he was recording an interview for Sportsweek.

He offered to walk the length of a corridor and back again so the studio could check for the best mobile phone reception.

In Hamburg recently my radio chat with him was restricted to three questions.

Not ideal but Roger, being Roger, offered three thoughtful responses lasting just under three minutes. Perfect.

In my football interviewing days, you could ask 10 questions and still not get three minutes.

It would normally be "each-game-as-it-comes" nonsense from a gum-chewing player with half an eye on the bar or half a foot on the bus.

He fully deserves the award not just for his outstanding efforts on the tennis court but also his exemplary attitude off it

But Federer provides a magnificent relief. Here is a champion who is genuinely interested in those who show an interest in him.

He may get bored of the "can you win the French?" question or - even worse - the inconsequential enquiry "would you beat Sampras?" But he never shows it.

The news conference is a peculiar ritual, but Federer is the model professional.

Like the other players, he's contractually obliged to speak after every match but, for this multi-lingual clever clogs, that means in English, French and Swiss-German.

Chuck him a poser in ancient Greek and he'll probably surprise you with a lucid response.

I mention all this because he's just won Sportsman of the Year at the Laureus Awards.

He fully deserves it not just for his outstanding efforts on the tennis court, but also his exemplary attitude off it.

At a time when some tennis officials appear to be taking coverage of their sport for granted, Federer realises his duty to keep it at the forefront of the public conscience - worldwide.

And what a story he is becoming.

Twenty seven titles at the age of 23, four of them Grand Slam events, he's already won six this year and, most amazingly of all, he's won the last 19 finals he's played.

That sequence dates back to October 2003.

Those feet which dance so fluently around the tennis court remain, in metaphorical terms, firmly on the ground

The last final he lost was at Gstaad in Switzerland in July 2003, the tournament immediately after his debut Wimbledon victory (yes, Juliette the cow and all that).

Jiri Novak doesn't have too many claims to fame but, the way things are going, he'll be regaling friends and family for years about the day he beat Federer in that final.

If he now wins Roland Garros, to complete the set of all four majors, columnists will need to grab for even more super-superlatives and the record books will be re-written.

Federer's trophy cabinet is getting severely clogged by oddly shaped glassware, and his earnings are getting silly.

But those feet which dance so fluently around the tennis court remain, in metaphorical terms, firmly on the ground.

That's the most joyful thing about this most deserving winner of the Sportsman of the Year accolade.
:)

SUKTUEN
05-17-2005, 05:40 PM
:angel: Roger~~

GOD PLEASE Bless Roger health ~~~ Love you ~~ :worship: :worship:

Puschkin
05-20-2005, 07:27 AM
News in brief (IV)
By Guillaume Baraise
Thursday, May 19, 2005
Roger Federer, meanwhile, had two further sessions on the Philippe-Chatrier court (including one with Jerome Haehnel), an arena where success has eluded him in the past and on which he is keen to get off the mark.

Source:http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/articles/2005-05-19/200505191116500275829.html

babsi
05-20-2005, 11:51 AM
EUROSPORT will actuelly televies the French Open :) - so wonder do happen!

Let´s hope they find it in there hearts to devote eaquel time to women AND men!

Hope a lot of people watch - the viewership has to be bigger then, that for snooker!
Hopfully alot of spanienards and french can go deep into the drawing, to keep the numbers up - if only switzerland had more citiciens :(

But let´s enjoy the moment - can´t wait!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



__________________________________________________ ______________________
There´s nothing wrong with being a loser - it just depands on how good you are at it
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

Shabazza
05-20-2005, 01:54 PM
EUROSPORT will actuelly televies the French Open :) - so wonder do happen!

Let´s hope they find it in there hearts to devote eaquel time to women AND men!

Hope a lot of people watch - the viewership has to be bigger then, that for snooker!
Hopfully alot of spanienards and french can go deep into the drawing, to keep the numbers up - if only switzerland had more citiciens :(

yeah it really makes me angry that Eurosport doesn't cover mens tennis anymore :mad: only XXP showed Hamburg in Germany
i guess even if the viewership is bigger then snooker they won't chenge their program :sad:
Well, at least they show the GS-tour :rolleyes:

Daniel
05-20-2005, 02:55 PM
Thanks for the articles :D :D

SUKTUEN
05-20-2005, 03:32 PM
thanks

*M*
05-21-2005, 01:25 AM
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,5205-1620821,00.html

Federer looks for love affair in Paris
By Ashling O'Connor

ROGER FEDERER goes into the French Open next week admitting that he does not know what the tournament means to him. Historically a struggler on the clay at Roland Garros, the world No 1 believes that this is the year he can progress beyond the quarterfinals for the first time and even win the only grand-slam title to have eluded him.
Then, perhaps, the Swiss can profess as much love for the French Open as he is barely able to contain for Wimbledon. “You don’t want to have to win the tournament to like it, but at least if you can get beyond the first week you start to get a relationship going with the fans and the tournament itself,” he said.

In the past, Federer, 23, has barely warmed up before beginning his preparations for grass. Six visits to Paris have yielded three first-round exits. Last year, a tough third-round draw against Gustavo Kuerten, the Brazilian and a darling of the French crowd, hardly helped.

“The last three years didn’t work for me, so I need a statement of results,” Federer said. “I like the French (Open), but I’m a little bit caught in between.

“Where does the French Open stand for me? I think that has been holding me back from playing well. Once maybe it was a physical problem, once mental, but I feel like this year could be a good year. I want to go further, which is a big challenge because I feel there I have the most opponents.”

These will no doubt include Richard Gasquet, who beat him in Monte Carlo last month. Federer avenged the defeat — only his second this year — by dispensing with the 18-year-old Frenchman in the final of the Hamburg Masters this month, a clay tournament of which he is now fond.

“I arrived there the first few times and I said what a horrible place to play tennis. Too cold, too wet, too this, too that. The year I won my first time, I didn’t even want to go. Then I was in the final. Can you believe it?” Federer said, before being named Laureus world sportsman of the year this week. “I’ve won three times, which shows I really like the place.”

Developing a similar affection for the French Open could mean the difference. As will Tony Roche, his part-time coach, who guided Stefan Edberg, one of Federer’s idols. “Nobody can teach me how to play a forehand any more, it’s too late. A coach is about strategy. We are almost like two coaches helping myself,” Federer said. “He can’t make me a different player from today to tomorrow. I didn’t take him to win the French this year or in five years, but I hope he is going to make me a better player and by this I hope to win all four grand-slam tournaments.”

lunahielo
05-21-2005, 01:53 AM
Great article.
Thanks, *M*~~

RogiFan88
05-21-2005, 02:15 AM
Nope, only Guga can have the love affair w Paris [or the other way around]. ;)

TenHound
05-21-2005, 03:02 AM
Gotta love Rog's honesty - " I arrived here the first few times & said what a horrible place to play tennis!!" Why we love him!!

RogiFan88
05-21-2005, 03:43 AM
May 21, 2005
Federer Is in Control, On and Off The Court
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

PARIS, May 20 - It was the Wednesday before the French Open and Roger Federer, the world's finest tennis player, was genially doing interviews and a photo shoot in a gilded hotel, with his girlfriend and his personal assistant by his side.

They happen to be the same woman: Mirka Vavrinec, a former Swiss player he has been romantically involved with since the 2000 Summer Olympics.

When he is home in Switzerland, Federer regularly sees his mother, Lynette, and meets with the coordinator of his charitable foundation, who happen to be the same person. And he spends time with his father, Robert, and with the man who negotiates his tournament deals and appearance fees, also one and the same.

Tennis has long been a family game, but Federer has extended the family connection beyond the kitchen table or the players' box to the boardroom. In the process, he is trying to take command of his career in a much more complete way than most of the world's leading athletes.

"I approve everything," Federer said, knowing that detachment from the commercial aspect of his sport has led some of his peers and predecessors to financial ruin. "You see and hear that and always wish that it's not going to happen to you, but you hardly ever have a guarantee, except, of course, if you really take it into your own hands like I did."

He has no agent, although he does have a lawyer and tax adviser based in Switzerland. Unlike some of his rivals, he requires no more than one courtesy car for his entourage to go from lodging to loge.

The decision to go it relatively alone, made in early 2003 - after his agent, Bill Ryan, left the International Management Group - dovetails neatly with Federer's independent streak. The same character trait allowed him to put together one of the finest seasons in tennis history in 2004, without the services of a formal coach. He has hired Tony Roche on a part-time basis this season.

Top agents, who would like nothing better than to change Federer's do-it-himself approach to personal finance, contend that his decision is costing him millions. They also say that it is costing them millions, because some of his sponsorship deals, including one with Nike, were signed for far less than his market value. As a result, he is making it harder for their clients to receive what they deserve.

"If you add it all up, Maria Sharapova is probably making over 20 million bucks a year in off-court sponsorship deals, and Roger is not even close to that," said one agent, who did not want to be named because he did not want to spoil any chance of working with Federer in the future.

"As far as I can determine, he's not even close to making 10 million off court, and you're talking about potentially the greatest tennis player ever."

But on the top floor of a hotel Wednesday - with the Eiffel Tower and the tree-lined Champs-Élysées for a backdrop - Federer, who made more than $6 million in prize money last year, sounded like a star at peace with his career moves.

"I think the thing that makes me feel good is that I am taking decisions by myself, and I used to hate taking decisions," he said. "And I think that is also what has helped me to maybe even become a better player and to become a better person, more of a grown-up person."

After Ryan split with I.M.G. in 2002 and Federer was unable to keep working with him because of contractual restraints, Federer considered hiring another agent or management company. "I finally said, 'I think we should try to handle things on our own for a while,' " he said. "We is my parents and my lawyer and Mirka, and we started to help each other out, and suddenly we thought, 'It seems like we can handle this.'

"Of course we had to be more into it, to speak more, to make sure things happen quicker, make sure you are well organized. You can imagine. For this, I wasn't prepared in the beginning, and there were times, of course, where you think, 'If I would have known that,' or, 'Oh, man, I wasn't planning on coming back to Basel to sort things out and decide on a few business things.' "

But, Federer said, he feels more comfortable having control of all his dealings.

"I feel you use a different part of your brain; you have to think more in the future and in a different way," he said. "I think it's kind of a good balance sometimes to get away from the tennis and talk business for a while."

The arrangement is not without complications, particularly when the woman he wants to spend more time with is occupied with his business.

"In the beginning, sometimes we had issues where I think that, and she thinks this, and we're like 'O.K., let's not fight,' " Federer said, referring to Vavrinec. "At least if we fight about it, and we forget about it after, then we can cuddle each other, so it doesn't really make a difference. By now, it's no problem, but in the beginning, like in Wimbledon for that first time, you go through those times when she's so exhausted and is maybe irritated a little bit, like I was."

The Wimbledon he was referring to was 2003, when Federer won his first Grand Slam title. It was indeed a big spike in the learning curve for him and Vavrinec, whose career had already been cut short by a leg injury. She was already coordinating Federer's travel and his media and sponsorship obligations.

"There was this big boom, and everybody wanted so much from us," Federer said. "To be caught off guard, it was interesting."

Federer has since hired a firm based in Germany to handle some of his communication needs. His mother continues to answer all his fan mail and e-mail messages, but her main responsibility is the Roger Federer Foundation, which was established in December 2003.

"When Roger was starting to earn good money, his father and I said, 'We think it's a good thing you give back a bit of your own fortune to those who are less advantaged,' " Lynette Federer said in a telephone interview.

Federer's father is Swiss, but his mother was born and reared in South Africa. They met when Robert Federer was working in Johannesburg for a Swiss pharmaceutical company. Although they eventually settled in Basel, a small city near the French and German borders, they have maintained strong ties with South Africa. Roger was first taken there when he was 3 months old, and returned frequently as a boy, so Federer's foundation begin its charitable work there.

In connection with an organization called Imbewu, a word that means seed in the Xhosa language, Federer's foundation is now paying for the schooling and meals for hundreds of children in New Brighton Township, near the city of Port Elizabeth. He traveled there in March, skipping the first round of Davis Cup play for Switzerland. And like many top tennis players, he has also been active in fund-raising for Asian tsunami relief.

"Sometimes with a little time, you can create an unbelievable amount of money or a lot of happy faces," he said.

But some people are still frowning over Federer: the many men who cannot beat him and the many agents who cannot join him.

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/21/sports/tennis/21tennis.html?pagewanted=2

*M*
05-21-2005, 07:53 AM
Nice article -- I like that Roger has as much control over his business affairs as his tennis shots. It's just nice seeing someone with that much talent taking his career seriously and making the most of it. I hate hearing stories of young guys making millions and squandering it away, winding up almost bankrupt because they thought the dough would roll in forever. As he has said himself, the more people you have around you, the less it becomes about tennis. I think he's right that the extra maturity and foresight he's had to develop for the business side of his career has also helped the tennis side of his career.

Here's another nice article, written by the same guy:

http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/05/20/sports/tennis.php

Federer stays grounded as he thinks of clay
Christopher Clarey


PARIS This is Roger Federer's moment, and he is handling it rather well. Journalists like revisionism: to debunk the myth, to deconstruct the image. But though it would certainly be titillating to report that Federer, ever more the millionaire with each passing tournament and title, has turned into a menu-chucking, minion-berating egomaniac at the age of 23, there was no evidence of that during an interview with him this week at his hotel in central, postcard-ready Paris with the Louvre and Tuileries gardens nearby and the French Open looming.

Despite the occasional clay-court slip and the rise of Rafael Nadal, Federer's fluid tennis game remains on a pedestal, yet his manner does not.

The handshake and eye contact at hello and good-bye are firm; the attitude and answers disarmingly relaxed. When he yawns once - still recovering from a nearly all-night celebration in Portugal after being named world sportsman of the year by the Laureus Foundation ahead of men like Lance Armstrong, Michael Schumacher and Michael Phelps - he apologizes.

Believe me, it is not always this easy, but what makes the next Grand Slam tournament of the year particularly interesting is that the French Open has never been easy for Federer.

Though he has swept nearly all before him in the last two seasons, winning three of the four major titles in 2004 and putting a head lock on the No. 1 ranking, he has still not made it past the quarterfinals of the world's premier clay-court event.

"I'm having a good feeling this year," Federer said. "I'm not saying I'm going to win it, but I have the feeling I'm going to do better."

He actually began his Grand Slam career at Roland Garros, walking onto the Suzanne Lenglen court at the age of 17 to play Patrick Rafter, the genial Australian, in the first round and losing in straight sets. But while his game and confidence have grown nearly as fast as China's economy since then, that sort of performance has remained more the rule here than the exception.

He was beaten in the first round in Paris again in 2002 and 2003 and still failed to get past the first week during his dreamy 2004 season when three-time French Open champion Gustavo Kuerten bounced him out of the world's premier clay-court event in straight sets in the third round as Federer shanked shots off the frame, slipped repeatedly on the clay and even, gasp, missed an overhead.

The easy explanation is to group him with all the other great modern attacking players who never won at Roland Garros: John McEnroe, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and, most recently, Pete Sampras.

But the easy answer would not necessarily be the right answer. Federer, for all his offensive weapons, does not rush the net nearly as often as his predecessors. He also plays with more spin, which allows him more margin for error when conditions get heavy and rallies get long.

"I feel like I stay back much, much more," Federer said. "They almost had to look for the net otherwise they would lose. If you could keep them at the baseline, you were the better man, where I feel like if I'm at the baseline, I'm the better man. Of course with the points I have and the ranking I have, it's natural to feel this way."

Sampras's one-handed backhand was also inferior to Federer's, and the racket head on Sampras's Wilson Pro Staff was 5 square inches, or 32.5 square centimeters, smaller than the one that Federer uses, which is still quite modest by modern standards at 90 square inches.

"I'm not saying with a bigger racket Pete would have won the French, but it would have helped," Federer said.

Unlike McEnroe, Edberg and Sampras, Federer grew up on clay. It was the surface of choice when he was learning the game as a boy in Basel, Switzerland, and he would play on it in the winter, too.

"They would put a big bubble over the court when it got cold," he said. "Up until I was about 12, I really only played on clay."

When he left home at 14 to live at a training center in Ecublens, near Lausanne, the indoor courts were quick Supreme. The outdoor courts were clay.

So there is no compelling reason that Federer can't win on the sticky stuff. He already has. He has won the Masters Series event in Hamburg three times, most recently last week when he did not drop a set along the way.

Hamburg's playing conditions are the slowest of all the major clay court events. It turns out that Federer likes his clay damp and heavy, perhaps because it gives this deeply creative and instinctive player even more time than usual to pull rabbits out of hats with his racket. In Monte Carlo this season, when he was stunned in the quarterfinals by the French teenager Richard Gasquet, he was less than delighted when the organizers did not water the court between the second and third sets.

"Strange, isn't it?" he said of his clay-court tastes.

Though it can get heavy near dusk on a cool, damp day in Paris, the conditions at Roland Garros are generally on the quicker side. Federer's biggest problem has been finding his timing and bearings on the Center Court, where he finally won a match last year only to lose to Kuerten in the next round.

"The dimensions are so strange," he said. "I never really got used to the center court, and I think this is also one of the reasons for what has happened."

That is also the main reason he came straight to Paris on Tuesday after the awards ceremony and celebration in Lisbon. There is nothing like total immersion to overcome a language barrier, and he and his part-time coach, Tony Roche, have been practicing on center court for two hours every day.

"I've got to do it," Federer said. "If I want to win the French, this is the court I'm going to have to do it on, so I better get used to it."

But it is not just about the setting. It is also about the competition. Put Federer on grass, and the number of men with a realistic chance of beating him probably numbers no more than four. Put Federer on clay, where Spaniards and Argentines thrive, and we are quickly into double digits, one of whom is Nadal, the 18-year-old from Mallorca who has won in Monte Carlo, Barcelona and Rome this year and will be seeded No. 4 in his first French Open.

"Quite impressive isn't it?" Federer said, as if he were talking about a sculpture instead of a sculpted young rival. "He's already bigger than me, and he's five years younger. Imagine how he looks in five years. It's impressive, but it's good that you've got these different types of guys and players.

"I like to be challenged by other guys and have that rivalry going, and on the clay I feel like I have many tough opponents, more than on other surfaces."

So could the French Open become an obsession? "Wimbledon will always stay No. 1 in my heart," he said. "That's clear, because of the emotions I had there, and because of my idols. They all won over there, but I am aware that if I can win the French what it does to my spot in history. So for this reason, I think this will always also have a very special place, because I will only get another 7 to 10 to maybe 15 maximum chances."

Fifteen? Federer is clearly keeping his options open and enjoying his tennis.

"If you look at Andre, you almost have to go there," he said, referring to 35-year-old Andre Agassi, who will be playing in his 17th Roland Garros next week.

Federer has turned Agassi into his foil of late, beating him up on different continents and surfaces, but the American still has the edge in the history-making department. He has won in Australia, London, New York and Paris: the only man in the last 35 years to manage it.

Unlike Sampras, Federer's chances of giving Agassi company at some stage in the next one to 15 years are good. He has the shots, the moves and the aura. The questions are in the mind and the legs. As for the manners, may his never change.

Shabazza
05-21-2005, 12:06 PM
great articles :yeah: - it's realy nice to have this thread, i don't have to search for most of the articles anymore
I really appreciate your work thx :D

yanchr
05-21-2005, 12:56 PM
"As far as I can determine, he's not even close to making 10 million off court, and you're talking about potentially the greatest tennis player ever."

Hey, 10 million is already MUCH compared to the majority in this world. Maybe Roger just thinks so too ;)

Great articles! Thanks a lot :worship:

Sometimes I really find it hard to believe Roger is what he is. So much maturity being still this young, so nice attitudes toward life and everything, and all the qualities he bears, all these even make his beautiful tennis totally a bonus....

SUKTUEN
05-21-2005, 02:16 PM
thankyou~~

babsi
05-21-2005, 02:41 PM
Thanks for posting - great articles :)









__________________________________________________ ______________________
There´s nothing wrong with being a loser - it just depands on how good you are at it
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

marchen
05-21-2005, 08:02 PM
"In the beginning, sometimes we had issues where I think that, and she thinks this, and we're like 'O.K., let's not fight,' " Federer said, referring to Vavrinec. "At least if we fight about it, and we forget about it after, then we can cuddle each other,


I love this...it sounds so sweet.. :smooch:

TenHound
05-21-2005, 08:04 PM
Yes, I loved that part that Yanchr singled out!! Goddamn, he's not greedy enough!!

Daniel
05-21-2005, 10:39 PM
Federer seeks career Grand Slam at French Open

By STEVE WILSTEIN, AP Sports Writer
May 21, 2005

AP - May 21, 11:41 am EDT
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PARIS (AP) -- Year after bedeviling year, the thick red clay at the French Open buried the career Grand Slam aspirations of Pete Sampras. Is that to be the fate, too, of his heir as king of the game, Roger Federer?

Federer doesn't think so.

After six early exits at Roland Garros, Federer now has reason to believe he can master the grueling surface and join Andre Agassi as the only active men to win all four majors. Standing most prominently in Federer's way are two precocious 18-year-olds, Spain's Rafael Nadal and France's Richard Gasquet, defending champion Gaston Gaudio of Argentina and the countryman Gaudio beat last year in the final, Guillermo Coria.

Along with his No. 1 seeding, the 23-year-old Federer comes into the French with his confidence high following his title on similar red clay courts in Hamburg last week, where he beat Gasquet 6-3, 7-5, 7-6 (4) in the final. Low key by nature, a realist from experience, Federer does not suffer from low expectations.

``Honestly, I don't see it being such an unbelievably tough draw,'' he said Saturday. ``I'm not worried playing anybody.

``I'm confident I can do it. If I won't ever do it, this will only show at the end of the career. You have to be a little patient.''

A career Grand Slam, especially in this era of deep fields, is a testament not only to extraordinary tennis talent but extreme versatility -- winning on grass, hard courts and clay. Each surface requires different skills: power, quickness, creativity and net play on grass; all-court offensive and defensive abilities on hard courts; patience, durability, grace and finesse on clay.

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Only five players have accomplished the feat: Agassi on all three of those surfaces; Fred Perry, Don Budge, Rod Laver, and Roy Emerson in the days when the Australian, Wimbledon and U.S. Nationals were on grass and the French was the lone major on clay.

Sampras, Arthur Ashe, Boris Becker, Jimmy Connors and Stefan Edberg all won three of the majors but failed to take the French. Of those, the only real surprise was Connors, who played well on clay elsewhere and had a baseline game well suited to Roland Garros. Sampras, Ashe, Becker and Edberg never quite adjusted their serve-and-volley styles to the baseline demands of the red clay.

Federer, who won the Australian, Wimbledon and U.S. Open last year and Wimbledon the year before that, has lost in the first round of the French three times -- 1999, 2002 and 2003. He reached the fourth round in 2000, the quarters the next year and the third round last year.

Perhaps that is why, despite Federer's top seeding and his 155-16 match record while winning 21 of his last 36 tournaments, he is only the 5-2 second choice among the oddsmakers. The No. 4-seeded Nadal, making his debut in the French main draw, is the 2-1 favorite after winning five clay tournaments so far this year, including the Italian Open.

Not since Mats Wilander in 1982 has a player won the French in his debut.

If they play according to their seedings, Nadal could celebrate his 19th birthday on June 3 by playing Federer in the semifinals. They could have met in the quarters, but No. 2 Lleyton Hewitt's withdrawal allowed Nadal to move up behind No. 3 Marat Safin, the Australian Open winner this year.

Nadal has impressed everyone on the tour, even those he hasn't played against, such as the 35-year-old Agassi.

``I think you see the game take big steps every five years or so,'' Agassi said. ``It's almost in hindsight you can look back at five-year marks and see that there's been a transition in not just who the players are but also the way the game's being played. There are a few guys out there that play the game in a way that pushes the game forward. Obviously Roger's been one of these guys for a while. I think Nadal has also shown that there's a way of playing this game that people haven't done yet, especially on the clay.


AP - May 21, 11:25 am EDT
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``It's time. It happens sooner or later when the real special ones start coming around. I think over the next five years, there's going to be a lot of titles decided by these guys.''

In Nadal, Safin sees a player brimming with confidence and energy.

``He can run forever,'' Safin said. ``He doesn't really get scared of anything. He just goes for it. He's really ambitious. As we can see, it's his life: Be there forever on the court until he gets it.''

Nadal and Gasquet could play each other in the third round in a match that already is being billed in the French media as the tournament's titanic teen duel.

``Before talking about his actual game,'' Gasquet said of Nadal, ``I think what we have to talk about is his way of struggling and fighting back all the time. His physical fitness is enormous. I think he plays tennis all right, but his mental attitude is absolutely exceptional, the way he fights so much. He's from another planet. ... If I play him, I hope I will be able to fight back and make it very tight.''

Andy Roddick, who moved into the No. 2 spot, is not considered much of a contender, despite his recent clay-court title in Houston. In four previous visits to Roland Garros, Roddick has lost in the first round twice and the second and third rounds once each.

The oddsmakers installed Roddick as a 60-1 choice, not far behind Agassi at 50-1. Coria is the 7-2 third choice, followed by Juan Carlos Ferrero at 12-1, Gasquet and Gaudio at 15-1 each, and Safin at 20-1.

The women's title is up for grabs with No. 10 Justine Henin-Hardenne, the 2003 French champion, the top choice at 8-5; No. 14 and two-time finalist Kim Clijsters at 6-1; No. 2 Maria Sharapova at 7-1; No. 3 Amelie Mauresmo at 10-1; No. 1 Lindsay Davenport and No. 6 Svetlana Kuznetsova at 15-1, and No. 11 Venus Williams at 18-1.

Serena Williams had been the second favorite until she pulled out Friday, a few hours before the draw, because of lingering problems from the left ankle she sprained six weeks ago.

Russia's Anastasia Myskina, the defending champion, didn't get much respect from the oddsmaker, who made her a 30-1 long shot.

Clijsters had considered pulling out because of an injury to her right knee, suffered at the German Open a few weeks ago when she attempted one of her trademark splits on a shot.

``The last couple of days I've been gradually building up my intensity, my practice sessions,'' she said. ``Today was the first time I played some points. I was still a little shaky. ... It's not easy. It's a challenge.

``I'm not going to stop doing the splits. That's part of my game, and it's helped me a lot. I don't know how many of those I've done. This is the first time on clay that something went wrong. It was just bad luck.''

Daniel
05-22-2005, 12:06 AM
PARIS (Reuters) - World number one Roger Federer, a four-times grand slam champion, believes this will be the year when he can finally win the French Open for the first time.

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"I'm confident I can do it," the Swiss told reporters on Saturday. "If I win the French, I've got them all."

Federer has won every grand slam but the Paris tournament, which starts Monday.

The gifted all-court player has been busy rewriting tennis history but has never gone beyond the quarter-finals in Paris, where he has lost in the first round in two of the last three years.

The quiet Federer, who has the perfect game to shine on clay as he proved by winning in Hamburg last week without dropping a set, is slightly irritated by suggestions he had a French Open problem.

"I agree it's the only one I haven't won but I won three (grand slam titles) last year," he said.

"You can't expect to win them all right away. You have to be a little patient."

Federer can expect a strong challenge at Roland Garros from Spanish teen-ager Rafael Nadal, who is trying to become the first man to win the French Open on debut since Swede Mats Wilander in 1982.

Daniel
05-22-2005, 12:09 AM
Federer faces tough road at French Open
Story Tools: Print Email
Matthew Cronin / tennisreporters.net
Posted: 2 hours ago



Roger Federer has already proven he knows how to tough out Grand Slams on fast and medium-paced surfaces.

Now if he wants to prove his historical worth, he'll have to show that he has the wile and the guts to go all the way at the major that has made him look the most human, the French Open.

Federer was handed a brutal draw on Friday, beginning with talented young Swede Robin Soderling, a potential matchup with Olympic bronze medallist Fernando Gonzalez in the third round, and possibly 1998 French champion Carlos Moya or one of the few men he has never beaten, No. 17 Dominik Hrbaty, in the fourth round.

And that's just the first part of his test. The always-dicey David Nalbandian may await in the quarters and then in the semis, he could take on the soaring Rafael Nadal or defending champ Gaston Gaudio.


Roger Federer faces an uphill road at the French Open. (Fabian Bimmer / Associated Press)

Yet Federer doesn't believe that the mountain is too large to climb.

"Honestly, I don't see it being such an unbelievably tough draw. Maybe we see different players in the draw, but I'm not worried about playing anyone. I knew the draw was going to be tough, no matter who is in my region. Maybe you think its tough because Nadal is in my section. But that will be in the semis so if I'm there, I'll be quite happy."

Happy could be considered advancing past the quarterfinals, which is his career mark. But better for Federer is much more than that, it's becoming a major factor in the tournament, something he has never been.

Last year, the Swiss Superman was literally overpowered by three-time champ Gustavo Kuerten; rarely able to impose himself and having tremendous problems returning serve. This year, Federer has had another fine run-up on clay, winning his third Tennis Masters Series Hamburg title and at the same time, avenging a loss to talented young Frenchman Richard Gasquet in the final.

But Federer has always played well in the smaller confines of Hamburg, where he is able to more carefully construct points at his leisure. It's on Court Centrale at Roland Garros where he has trouble, as Paris' main show court is bigger, faster and slipperier. Proper decision-making is key on that court, as it's nearly impossible to win just by employing one style. Federer knows he'll have to mix in more serve and volley this year, which is why he brought his part-time coach, Tony Roche, over to Europe early so he could get the proper training.

What makes four-time Grand Slam champion Federer such a great player is because he has so many options. Most times over the past two years, he's made the right decisions. But at Roland Garros, he's appeared to be unsure about how to win.

"It's very physically demanding for a guy that doesn't naturally play a counter-punching game," said John McEnroe. "Guys that succeed there usually sit and wait to see what their opponent does, and then feast off indecisiveness and attacking players because they have that extra bit of time.

"Federer is a guy in the middle - he's not naturally attacking or a counterpuncher - he's got all the gifts in order to win the French Open, all the shots and all the ability, but he's not shown that he can put it together mentally to stay with it. He plays a high-precision game, he goes for a lot, and he doesn't play as safe as the other clay court players. Expect him to win it? I'm not sure that I would expect him to win it, but it wouldn't surprise me if he did win it. There's a handful of guys that realize that they can only beat him on that surface and so they are going to be that much more prepared and give more of an effort than they would on another surface, so that makes it harder for him to pull it off."

Federer realizes that one way to immediately stamp his mark on history is to do what Andre Agassi did - to win all four majors on all four surfaces. Pete Sampras never did that, nor did Bjorn Borg or Rod Laver. Federer has made mincemeat out of Agassi over the past year and clearly feels that if the American once did it, he should be able to handily take care of business.

"If I win the French, I've got them all," Federer said. "I'm confident I can do it. Everybody keeps asking [if I can win the French], and I don't quite understand why. I agree it's the one I haven't won, but it's because I won the other three last year, I can't expect to win them all right away. You have to be patient."

The Swiss has to believe that he'll get some breaks when it comes to his draw. Nadal has won five clay court titles this year and is most oddsmaker's favorite, but the Spaniard will likely have to knock off the rising Gasquet in the third round. Moreover, the 18-year-old has never entered a Grand Slam a favorite before and there's no way to really gage how he'll properly handle the pressure.

By all appearances over the past two months, Nadal does have what it takes to eventually become a Slam winner. But warm-up tournaments have nowhere near the pressure of a Grand Slam, especially if you are a Spaniard and that tournament is Roland Garros. Spanish careers are measured by whether you won the French, which is why Moya, Juan Carlos Ferrero and Albert Costa are national heroes, and the likes of Alex Corretja, Felix Mantilla and Alberto Berasategui have been largely forgotten.

Federer is sick of hearing about Nadal, who he edged in the Miami final on hardcourts. When he was asked on Saturday to characterize the Spaniard's game, he didn't go to great lengths praising it, merely saying, "It's suited for clay. He grew up on it. This is where he will have the most success throughout his career."

The top half of the draw is by far the toughest, containing the three men who have been the hottest since late March - Federer, Nadal and Gaudio.

In the bottom half of the draw, only No. 8 seed Guillermo Coria — who reached the final last year before wildly choking — has had a solid season on clay, but he still didn't win a title. He should face either Ferrero, the '03 champ who seems to be improving daily, or Aussie Open titlist Marat Safin, whose completely fallen on his face since February.

In the last quarter, Agassi and No. 2 Andy Roddick are slated to meet in the quarters, but that happening is improbable, given that both men flamed out last year. Agassi has a negotiable draw up until the fourth round, when he could face Feliciano Lopez (who beat him Hamburg), French up-and-comer Gael Monfils or tough Argentine veteran Guillermo Canas.

"Everything would suggest I'm playing considerably better than I was last year," Agassi said.

Roddick has an even easier draw, with only Italian Filippo Volandri and the clay challenged Ivan Ljubicic standing in his way. But that's what we though last year when he stunned in the second round by French journeyman Olivier Mutis.

But unless something dramatic happens, whoever comes out of the bottom half of draw will be the underdog. It's Federer's performances against the princes and former kings of clay that will determine the outcome of the tournament.

He's the top dog who keeps saying that he has the meanest bite out there. While he may not have Nadal's bulging biceps, he does have his oversized ambition. Now we'll see whether he has the will to put himself through what is sure to be a meat grinder of a tournament.

"I'm having a good feeling this year," Federer told the International Herald Tribune early this week. "I'm not saying I'm going to win it, but I have the feeling I'm going to do better."

lunahielo
05-22-2005, 12:09 AM
Thanks, Daniel.. :hug:

SUKTUEN
05-22-2005, 11:21 AM
thankyou so much Daniel~~~ :wavey: :wavey:

yanchr
05-22-2005, 11:56 AM
Thanks Daniel :)

Federer is sick of hearing about Nadal, who he edged in the Miami final on hardcourts. When he was asked on Saturday to characterize the Spaniard's game, he didn't go to great lengths praising it, merely saying, "It's suited for clay. He grew up on it. This is where he will have the most success throughout his career."
Sick or not, I'm not sure. But I think he is so honest without any fake compliment or exaggeration when characterizing Nadal's game. I believe he actually doesn't think too high of Nadal's game, not as high as Gasquet's, with the game he himself has.

Nocko
05-22-2005, 01:45 PM
:worship: Thank you very much for great articles. :eek: :eek: Wow, soooo many!!

WyveN
05-22-2005, 02:09 PM
Interesting what Federer says about always picking Wimbledon over the FO ;)

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2094-1622169,00.html

OBSESSION with winning that one elusive Grand Slam title can unnerve even the most remorseless of competitors. Remember how the normally methodical Ivan Lendl became consumed by his desire to win Wimbledon, and the usually assured Pete Sampras ultimately became racked with self-doubt at the mention of Roland Garros.
Roger Federer, without question a player gifted enough to be mentioned in the same breath as these two greats, is aware that glances are already being made in his direction. Admittedly, like anybody else aged just 23, he is justified in thinking they are premature, but his lack of success at the French Open is a huge anomaly, given his triumphs at tennis’s other major tournaments.



One quarter-final finish in six attempts on the red Parisian brick dust is not the sort of record expected of a competitor who many believe will ultimately be hailed as the greatest of all time, especially as he was taught the nuances of the game on clay courts.

Just as he has done twice in the previous three years, Federer filed immaculate credentials prior to his arrival in Paris by winning the Masters Series event in Hamburg — notoriously the most demanding and slowest of clay court events by virtue of the frigid and often damp conditions.

However, memories of last year’s third-round demise at Roland Garros to a barely half-fit Gustavo Kuerten and three first-round exits would seem to justify questioning whether something psychological is hampering the world No 1.

“Ah yes, the French Open. We are getting to that time again,” Federer acknowledges with an expression that suggests he has given the matter plenty of thought. “I don’t like to look at it as the one thing missing from the set in my collection. And I certainly don’t view winning it as the only thing left to accomplish in my career.


“Most people know how highly I revere Wimbledon and I feel that the Centre Court is the most magical place for a player. If I could choose between winning Wimbledon or Roland Garros, I would always pick Wimbledon. And, looking a long time into the future, if I was to win Wimbledon 10 times but never managed to win the French Open and was then given the choice, I would pick an 11th Wimbledon title rather than a first French.”

Affectionate words indeed, but proof of Federer’s determination to work harder in the pursuit of Parisian triumph is his request for coach Tony Roche to spend a month by his side throughout the clay-court season. Federer’s relationship with the seasoned Australian is mostly conducted over the telephone, and Roche has been told it is not imperative for him to be at Wimbledon, but obviously this is a time when a little advice and assurance are necessary.

Early tests await. Federer’s first-round opponent, the 20-year-old Swede Robin Soderling, defeated last year’s French Open semi-finalist David Nalbandian in Hamburg, while potential third-round challenger Fernando Gonzalez reached the quarter-final two years ago and has won four clay-court titles.

But there is no doubt that Federer has the game to prevail on the dirt. He is, without doubt, the most adaptable player of the modern era and is perfectly equipped to survive protracted baseline encounters.

“Clay has always felt natural to me,” he insists. “The way I slide, it makes me feel good, but I always think back to the start of my professional career and it presented a problem. The first 11 clay-court matches of my pro career ended in defeat. There was Gstaad in 1998 and 1999, a bad loss in Monte Carlo to (Vince) Spadea (7-6 6-0) and then another at Roland Garros to (Patrick) Rafter after I was given a wildcard entry.

“In 1999 I was also beaten in both rubbers when Switzerland played Belgium on clay in Brussels, and then in 2000 I lost to (Andrei) Medvedev in Rome and (Andrei) Pavel in Hamburg. I remember all those matches, and although I didn’t even win too many sets, I was never the favourite. At the time, playing indoors was not a problem for me; neither was grass or a hard court. But on clay I could not create surprises because you have to hit too many balls and, both physically and mentally, you have to be so tough.

“Back then I wasn’t, but now I am so much stronger and know I can play well in Paris.”

Nocko
05-22-2005, 02:20 PM
Thanks WyveN. :worship:

Shabazza
05-22-2005, 02:24 PM
Thanks Daniel :)


Sick or not, I'm not sure. But I think he is so honest without any fake compliment or exaggeration when characterizing Nadal's game. I believe he actually doesn't think too high of Nadal's game, not as high as Gasquet's, with the game he himself has.
I think so, too. For the fighter Nadal is, Federer respects him a lot, but not for his technical skills, which are indeed one level lower than Federers.

Nocko
05-22-2005, 02:31 PM
I think so, too. For the fighter Nadal is, Federer respects him a lot, but not for his technical skills, which are indeed one level lower than Federers.
I agree with you. And his tennis is't artistic---exciting, but not beautiful. :p

SUKTUEN
05-22-2005, 03:25 PM
:devil: :devil:

“Most people know how highly I revere Wimbledon and I feel that the Centre Court is the most magical place for a player. If I could choose between winning Wimbledon or Roland Garros, I would always pick Wimbledon. And, looking a long time into the future, if I was to win Wimbledon 10 times but never managed to win the French Open and was then given the choice, I would pick an 11th Wimbledon title rather than a first French.”

:devil: :devil: :devil:

Roger~~~you make afraid~~~~ :o

yanchr
05-22-2005, 04:19 PM
“Most people know how highly I revere Wimbledon and I feel that the Centre Court is the most magical place for a player. If I could choose between winning Wimbledon or Roland Garros, I would always pick Wimbledon. And, looking a long time into the future, if I was to win Wimbledon 10 times but never managed to win the French Open and was then given the choice, I would pick an 11th Wimbledon title rather than a first French.”

I happen to doubt his sincerity saying these words.

But, 10 Wimbledon... :eek: :eek: OMG Roger, so big appetite :p

ytben
05-22-2005, 04:23 PM
Yeah I am a bit thrown off by that comment of his. Since in one of his interview he did say he will prefer to win FO this year and then Wimbly next year :confused:

SUKTUEN
05-22-2005, 04:26 PM
Yeah I am a bit thrown off by that comment of his. Since in one of his interview he did say he will prefer to win FO this year and then Wimbly next year :confused:

I want Roger win RG and Wimby both in this year~!! :devil:

lsy
05-22-2005, 04:26 PM
Yeah I am a bit thrown off by that comment of his. Since in one of his interview he did say he will prefer to win FO this year and then Wimbly next year :confused:

yeah...I was only gone for a night and came back with all these articles with so much talks...and all seem to conflict each other :rolleyes:

Just play and no need to give so much info to the media Rogi...we all know how they work :o

Or maybe Rogi is just as confused as we are with his different "talk" lately :shrug:

SUKTUEN
05-22-2005, 04:31 PM
Good Luck Roger~ that what I can say~~

yanchr
05-22-2005, 04:32 PM
Yeah I am a bit thrown off by that comment of his. Since in one of his interview he did say he will prefer to win FO this year and then Wimbly next year :confused:
The difference is, this year's Wimbledon will not be his 11th if he wins it ;) ;)

Ya lsy, I think he is confused with his own words too :lol: Poor Roger :lol: though actually we all know what he wants this year whatever he said and will say, it is BOTH :p

SUKTUEN
05-22-2005, 04:36 PM
Yes win both RG and wimby is perfect !!! :yeah: :yeah:

Shabazza
05-22-2005, 04:36 PM
Yeah I am a bit thrown off by that comment of his. Since in one of his interview he did say he will prefer to win FO this year and then Wimbly next year :confused:
exactly, i've allready said in another thread that i really doubt his words, especially, when the reporter is british..and the way he has prepared himself for RG is a sign how much he wants to have good results there (which means to win ;) ).

SUKTUEN
05-22-2005, 04:40 PM
what is the weather in France?

ytben
05-22-2005, 04:43 PM
Well no matter what he said, as long as his rackets will also be doing some talking I will be happy ;)

lsy
05-22-2005, 04:47 PM
Ya lsy, I think he is confused with his own words too :lol: Poor Roger :lol: though actually we all know what he wants this year whatever he said and will say, it is BOTH :p

I'm not really liking this. I don't know where all these quotes are being taken from but there's no need to talk so much to media about which one he prefers or like to win really, as we know the different medias are just going to take it out of context in their favour.

I hope I'm wrong, but man who's under pressures and unsure/insecure talks more comparitively :o If he doesn't care about RG, he won't be here so early and all focus to get used to the cout.

SUKTUEN
05-22-2005, 04:49 PM
Roger be careful and be clam~! then you will win~~

Stevens Point
05-22-2005, 04:52 PM
what is the weather in France?
According to Yahoo!, it looks good tomorrow.

http://weather.yahoo.com/forecast/FRXX0076.html

SUKTUEN
05-22-2005, 04:54 PM
very hot ?

Yasmine
05-22-2005, 04:56 PM
Isy I think you have a point here :worship: ! We should definitely be careful on what we read of transcribed interviews and the article written about what he said or did.:angel:
I read an article on the french version of RG website, where they say he's in a bad mood, but i'm not sure what to think of it. The only result that counts is when he plays... here is the link, it's in french, I'll translate the bit about Roger within the next few minutes ;)
http://www.rolandgarros.com/fr_FR/news/articles/2005-05-21/200505211116676170860.html

Nocko
05-22-2005, 04:56 PM
According to Yahoo!, it looks good tomorrow.

http://weather.yahoo.com/forecast/FRXX0076.html
Stevens, You always do well !! Thanks for the information!! :hatoff:

SUKTUEN
05-22-2005, 04:56 PM
Stevens is a good fans

Stevens Point
05-22-2005, 04:59 PM
very hot ?
well, 62 degrees in F, so it is about 20 in C, so very comfortable temperature, I think...

Yasmine
05-22-2005, 05:00 PM
It was about the Benny Berthet day, where a lot of players have played for charity with retired players and to practice: like Steffi Graf&Hénin played doubles against Safin and Gilles Simon (who I don't know...:p ) so it must have been a fun day! I know a couple of people from the french forum went so if there are photos, i'll post them here;).

En milieu d'après-midi, Roger Federer était encore sur le "central", avec Mikhaïl Youzhny. Le Suisse, de mauvais poil, n'était visiblement pas dans un bon jour…
here is what it means.
In the middle of the afternoon, Roger Federer was on centre court with Mikhaïl Youzhny. The swiss, in a bad mood was obviously not in a good day... why if they're writing such thing, are not giving more explanations (they should shut up otherwise) :shrug:

SUKTUEN
05-22-2005, 05:01 PM
well, 62 degrees in F, so it is about 20 in C, so very comfortable temperature, I think...

thanks

Stevens Point
05-22-2005, 05:01 PM
Thank you ladies. :)

You guys are also great fans of Roger!! :worship:

SUKTUEN
05-22-2005, 05:02 PM
thanks~~this is my best love interview~~ :D :D

yanchr
05-22-2005, 05:03 PM
I hope I'm wrong, but man who's under pressures and unsure/insecure talks more comparitively :o If he doesn't care about RG, he won't be here so early and all focus to get used to the cout.
I think you are very secure in saying so. It's out of nature. But I also believe Roger was forced to say this much by the media, probably not out of his own will.

Whatever, we all know he actually can't care about this RG any more if you ask me. Pressure must be felt there especially from himself. Will he manage to handle it all? Let's just sit back and see, and not get too nervous ;)

Roger, just play now. Don't let anything distract you.

yanchr
05-22-2005, 05:10 PM
In the middle of the afternoon, Roger Federer was on centre court with Mikhaïl Youzhny. The swiss, in a bad mood was obviously not in a good day... why if they're writing such thing, are not giving more explanations (they should shut up otherwise) :shrug:
Why if you were reading such things without giving more explanations, have to expose it here :p ;) ;)

Thanks for the information :wavey: :p But you've helped my nerves to grow even tighter :p :p

Yasmine
05-22-2005, 05:18 PM
Why if you were reading such things without giving more explanations, have to expose it here :p ;) ;)
Because it's on the official RG website and i thought people who don't understand french would want to know what is said about Roger in there;)
(is it good enough reason? :devil: )

Thanks for the information :wavey: :p But you've helped my nerves to grow even tighter :p :p
sorry :hug: :hug: :hug: but we found the explanation... go to the SYNNY latest interview :lol:

yanchr
05-22-2005, 05:26 PM
Because it's on the official RG website and i thought people who don't understand french would want to know what is said about Roger in there;)
(is it good enough reason? :devil: )
Yes it is *sincerely* :worship: :worship:
sorry :hug: :hug: :hug: but we found the explanation... go to the SYNNY latest interview :lol:
:hug: No, I'm not at all blaming you :hug:

BTW, Good one from you and RogiNie :yeah::lol:

lsy
05-22-2005, 05:28 PM
I think you are very secure in saying so. It's out of nature. But I also believe Roger was forced to say this much by the media, probably not out of his own will.

Whatever, we all know he actually can't care about this RG any more if you ask me. Pressure must be felt there especially from himself. Will he manage to handle it all? Let's just sit back and see, and not get too nervous ;)

I don't believe anybody can force sth out of your mouth :p I know Rogi likes to be nice and co-operates with media etc, but when you're asked stupid question, just don't answer else more often than not it'll make you look stupid instead. It's nth if you say you prefer Wimby more than RG, but saying you'd rather have 11th wimby than 1st RG?...at least wait till you have the 10th Wimby first, Rogi... :o :tape: Though I still like to know in what circumstances was he asked and what's the contest of his answer...doubt we'll get it anyway :rolleyes:

I may sound harsh on Rogi, but I'm more upset with the media taking advantage of the situation to their favour than anything actually :(


Roger, just play now. Don't let anything distract you.

That's the only thing he should care about NOW! COME ON ROGI!!! The show is on!!! :bounce: :banana:

Yasmine
05-22-2005, 05:29 PM
:hug: No, I'm not at all blaming you :hug:
I didn't think so, but still I don't like stirring people's nerves;) Roger does enough of that for us as it is :p

RogiFan88
05-22-2005, 05:43 PM
I'm quite anxious for Rogi at RG this year w an unknown to start [not a good thing for Rogi] and possible another one in R2 [if Almagro wins his R1 match].

Enough pressure already for Rogi to prove himself on Chatrier [his most unhappy court] esp in R1 where a lot of players are nervous just to make the first hurdle and as the No1 player w all the expectations after winning Hamburg again [not that that s matter cos when he won it in 02 and 04 he was also the "fave" and didn't do much at RG].

I just want Rogi to bite the bullet and get this slam over w... forget the negativity, the hounding press [they get worse every article and I feel they like to trap players -- and Rogi is too honest anyway], what other players say.

I won't rest until he's made it through ;)

I'm tired of people taking articles and quotes out of context... then run away w erroneous info and turn what players say [or don't say] into damning phrases!

Rogi and Juanqui, Gaston, Richard and Rafa have the crap draws whereas the other half, esp Guille [who has to be pleased, no, has to think he has the trophy in the bag], are relatively free of the big, hot clay guys...

ALLEZ, ROGI!!!!!

Rogi will need all the support he can get in Paris. If by some miracle he wins, I will be ecstatic!

Blaze
05-22-2005, 05:52 PM
I feeling very sorry for Roger.
Was it a bad thing for him to win all the other slams and not this one and now everyone will be putting pressure on him.

Maybe he just wanted to silence the press about this whole career grandslam and the importance of it. Saying he would takie 11 wimbledon over 1 RG might have being the best way to explain to the media that winning the career grandslam is not his focus now :shrug:

But I just hope he would be angry enough as he was last year during USO to pull of a "Surprise win".

lsy
05-22-2005, 06:03 PM
But I just hope he would be angry enough as he was last year during USO to pull of a "Surprise win".

:yeah:

He does tend to do that

Shabazza
05-22-2005, 06:29 PM
:yeah:

He does tend to do that
Indeed :cool:

lsy
05-22-2005, 06:33 PM
Indeed :cool:

Let's hope he does it here too :cool:

babsi
05-22-2005, 06:51 PM
Let's hope he does it here too :cool:


Yes,just let´s!

The media is a two headed beast - on head is praising you - the other bits you in the ass!


__________________________________________________ _____
I´m here to represant,the needle in the vein of the establishment
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

TenHound
05-22-2005, 06:57 PM
I'd be more encouraged about his prospects, if I saw somewhere him acknowledging that he found Paris slippery in the past, but has finally learned to move there as well as Hamburg. Until he masters that, titles are far away. I was hoping he'd take a break earlier in the season & come to Paris for extra practice. Could it be the wrong shoes as it is in other sports when players slip?

Sounds like Gasquet is intimidated by Thuggy - just hoping to it a "tight match"!!

There's new hope that those of us previously dependent on the woeful espn-USA feed might actually get to see real tennis. They are finally offering (& advertising) what they call ESPN Deportes that we can order - call 800-Deportes. I can't tell if that's the feed they broadcast to Latin America, or a special feed for the Spanish speaking audience in US. It looks more hopeful as the webpage for it has picture of Coria, while US espn webpage has picture of Pandy. Since Latin America gets to see all Roger plus the Spanish players, whereas US doesn't even get much Roger anymore I would definitely order it if it's your feed.
Would one of our Spanish speakers, Silvy or whoever has the time, possibly check this out for us?? I can't read a word of Spanish. Could you go to espn.com - on the menu going down the left-side of the page, it says Espn Deportes. I tried to find the schedule to see at least what their broadcast schedule for Paris is. Could someone post their RG schedule, along w/any info. they have on who they're going to broadcast. Thank you sooo verry much! I could order it tomorrow & see Roger, Guga, Coria....not understanding one word if it's in Spanish, but it's better than Pandy, Wms....One other question - do they show the Belgians?? Thanks again.

lsy
05-23-2005, 09:50 AM
I kept wondering why hasn't anybody interview Roche about Rogi in RG, well here it is. I agree with what he said on the transition from RG to Wimby for rogi.

================================================== =======

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,5205-1623446,00.html

May 23, 2005

Federer sets sights on matching Borg's double triumph
From Neil Harman, Tennis Correspondent in Paris


TONY ROCHE endured more anguish than at any time in his coaching career trying to inspire Ivan Lendl to a leap of faith and to win Wimbledon on the surface that betrayed him at every turn. Twice a runner-up, five times a grand-slam semi-finalist on grass, Lendl accumulated vast riches elsewhere, but the one that would have made him feel really different was always out of reach.
It is not unusual for a player to want one championship so much it burns inside — ask John McEnroe, Pete Sampras and Boris Becker if they had a single regret and they would say it was their inability to endure at Roland Garros. For the next two weeks — assuming that he lasts that long — Roger Federer, the world No 1, will face the ultimate test of his character, with Roche at his side.


Remarkably, given that he was raised on the grass courts of Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Roche’s only grand-slam victory was here (two weeks after he had won the Italian Open). He also reached two US Open finals at Forest Hills and reached the Wimbledon final once, where he found Rod Laver in typically imperious form. As a coach, where he is happy to be at Federer’s beck and call, he remains impassive, unpretentious and as solid as the granite from which he appears to have been chiselled.

“Roger knows what he has to do,” Roche said yesterday as his charge prepared for his first round against Dudi Sela, an Israeli qualifier. “It is so important to have variety in your game and it is how you use it and when that matters. He cannot afford to be too cute. Patience is the crux. It is a big advantage as a player to be able to finish the points and that is a tremendous asset he has.

“Roger wants to do this and there have not been many people as talented as him to come through our sport. It is very hard to win the French, it’s the hardest I think, because there are more good players capable of playing well on it than on any other surface. It would be an enormous achievement and wonderful for tennis, too, because of the way Roger is appreciated, not just for the way he plays but because he is such a good bloke. If you have those, you have a lot going for you.”

Federer has set great store on winning a third successive Wimbledon title. It is his chief goal for the year and such desire thus raises the prospect of him becoming the first man to lift clay and grass grand-slam titles back-to-back since Bjorn Borg 25 years ago. It has a nice symmetry. “Some can make the transition quickly,” Roche said, “Becker and Edberg were comfortable on the grass within two or three days, but Ivan (Lendl) really needed two more weeks. There never seemed to be enough time for him to be quite right.”

In 1987, when he won the French title beating Mats Wilander in a four-hour marathon, Lendl found only one man better than him on grass, Pat Cash. “I think the further you get in the French, the better you have to be hitting and seeing the ball and I don’t see any success he might achieve here getting in the way of Wimbledon for Roger,” Roche said. “If he plays smart, I believe he can win both.” Don ’t forget, too, that in the two matches he has lost since the Olympic Games, Federer has had match points and he did not drop his serve once en route to the title in Hamburg the week before last.

Tim Henman’s prospects suddenly took on a rosier hue yesterday afternoon. The British No 1, a semi-finalist last year, had been drawn against Potito Starace, the Italian who gave Marat Safin a decent run for his money in the third round last year. But Starace has a twisted ankle and into his place has come Juan Pablo Brzezicki, of Argentina, ranked No 147, who, according to his nation’s leading tennis writer, clocks up thousands of miles each year looking for his “lucky strike” in tennis. He has never won a tour match in his life.

Shabazza
05-23-2005, 11:55 AM
well said Roche :yeah:
Let's hope Roger can do the double :angel: , quite optimistic aren't I ;)

SUKTUEN
05-23-2005, 04:22 PM
thankyou

Daniel
05-23-2005, 06:00 PM
Thanks lsy :)

Daniel
05-23-2005, 06:05 PM
PARIS (Reuters) - Roger Federer thundered past qualifier Dudi Sela 6-1 6-4 6-0 Monday to take his place in the second round of the French Open.

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Seeking the only grand slam title to have eluded him, the Swiss world number one left his Israeli foe dazed with a succession of powerful winners on the Roland Garros center court in an 89-minute masterclass.

"I'm happy with that win, I feel I have prepared well for this event," said the winner of the Hamburg Masters earlier this month.

Federer, a third round loser last year, will face either Spain's Nicolas Almagro or German Philipp Kohlschreiber in the next round.

Winner of three of the four grand slams in 2004, Federer has never progressed beyond the quarter-finals in the French capital.

"You can never be unhappy winning in straight sets," Federer said. "So it's good... good start.

"He was doing a lot of different things... starting inside the baseline then moving very far back. It made it hard to get rhythm but all in all it was all right."

Federer said he had to work out his opponent as he went along, having never watched him play before.

"I heard he was rather a small guy, you know, not the big type," he said. "Then in practice I got to see he's a righty, he's got a backhand with one hand.

"Half an hour before the match, practising on the same court, that's when I saw him for the first time.

"I was able to relax a bit because I hadn't heard anything of him so he was not supposed to break through at this tournament or anything.

"It kind of gives confidence that if you play tough you should come through."

Federer has a 42-2 record this season, winning six of the eight tournaments he has entered.

Daniel
05-23-2005, 06:06 PM
Federer cruises past unknown Sela
Story Tools: Print Email
Associated Press
Posted: 18 minutes ago



PARIS (AP) - Roger Federer didn't know anything about Dudi Sela before playing him Monday in the first round of the French Open.

That didn't stop the top-ranked Swiss from beating his Israeli opponent 6-1, 6-4, 6-0.
Federer said his scouting report on Sela was limited to just "half an hour before the match."

"I warmed up next to him on the same court. That's it. I warmed up with my friend and he warmed up with his friend," Federer said. "I hadn't heard anything about him. So I think you can relax a little bit because he's not supposed to break through in this tournament.

"If you play tough, you know you should get through. Once I win a set 6-1, I'm not usually going to lose a match."

Federer also knows nothing about his next opponent - Spain's Nicolas Almagro, who beat Germany's Philipp Kohlschreiber 7-6 (4), 6-4, 6-3 - but he does believe his game still needs improving.

"I just wasn't happy on a few of my forehands. I also think I could have served better," Federer said.

Federer, who won the Australian Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open last year, has lost in the first round of the French three times - 1999, 2002 and '03. He reached the fourth round in 2000, the quarterfinals the next year and the third round in 2004, where he lost to three-time champion Gustavo Kuerten.

With that sort of history at Roland Garros, Federer was careful not to take Sela lightly after being broken twice in the second set.

"It's true, you know, when I'm down a break and he looks like he's going to get the next game as well," Federer said. "It makes you wonder sometimes. But I reacted just in time not to let that affect me too much."

Federer is 42-2 this year and has won six titles - Doha, Rotterdam, Dubai, Indian Wells, Miami and Hamburg.

Only Richard Gasquet in quarterfinals of the Monte Carlo Masters and Marat Safin in the Australian Open semifinals have beaten Federer, who has won 21 of his last 36 tournaments.

Daniel
05-23-2005, 06:14 PM
Yeah I am a bit thrown off by that comment of his. Since in one of his interview he did say he will prefer to win FO this year and then Wimbly next year :confused:

It is ok to have 11 Wimbleodns and 0 RG.

Daniel
05-23-2005, 06:16 PM
Federer Seeks Career Grand Slam at French
By STEVE WILSTEIN
The Associated Press




PARIS - Year after bedeviling year, the thick red clay at the French Open buried the career Grand Slam aspirations of Pete Sampras. Is that to be the fate, too, of his heir as king of the game, Roger Federer? Federer doesn't think so.

After six early exits at Roland Garros, Federer now has reason to believe he can master the grueling surface and join Andre Agassi as the only active men to win all four majors. Standing most prominently in Federer's way are two precocious 18-year-olds, Spain's Rafael Nadal and France's Richard Gasquet, defending champion Gaston Gaudio of Argentina and the countryman Gaudio beat last year in the final, Guillermo Coria.

Along with his No. 1 seeding, the 23-year-old Federer comes into the French with his confidence high following his title on similar red clay courts in Hamburg last week, where he beat Gasquet 6-3, 7-5, 7-6 (4) in the final. Low key by nature, a realist from experience, Federer does not suffer from low expectations.

"Honestly, I don't see it being such an unbelievably tough draw," he said Saturday. "I'm not worried playing anybody.

"I'm confident I can do it. If I won't ever do it, this will only show at the end of the career. You have to be a little patient."

A career Grand Slam, especially in this era of deep fields, is a testament not only to extraordinary tennis talent but extreme versatility - winning on grass, hard courts and clay. Each surface requires different skills: power, quickness, creativity and net play on grass; all-court offensive and defensive abilities on hard courts; patience, durability, grace and finesse on clay.

Only five players have accomplished the feat: Agassi on all three of those surfaces; Fred Perry, Don Budge, Rod Laver, and Roy Emerson in the days when the Australian, Wimbledon and U.S. Nationals were on grass and the French was the lone major on clay.

Sampras, Arthur Ashe, Boris Becker, Jimmy Connors and Stefan Edberg all won three of the majors but failed to take the French. Of those, the only real surprise was Connors, who played well on clay elsewhere and had a baseline game well suited to Roland Garros. Sampras, Ashe, Becker and Edberg never quite adjusted their serve-and-volley styles to the baseline demands of the red clay.

Federer, who won the Australian, Wimbledon and U.S. Open last year and Wimbledon the year before that, has lost in the first round of the French three times - 1999, 2002 and 2003. He reached the fourth round in 2000, the quarters the next year and the third round last year.

Perhaps that is why, despite Federer's top seeding and his 155-16 match record while winning 21 of his last 36 tournaments, he is only the 5-2 second choice among the oddsmakers. The No. 4-seeded Nadal, making his debut in the French main draw, is the 2-1 favorite after winning five clay tournaments so far this year, including the Italian Open.

Not since Mats Wilander in 1982 has a player won the French in his debut.

If they play according to their seedings, Nadal could celebrate his 19th birthday on June 3 by playing Federer in the semifinals. They could have met in the quarters, but No. 2 Lleyton Hewitt's withdrawal allowed Nadal to move up behind No. 3 Marat Safin, the Australian Open winner this year.

Nadal has impressed everyone on the tour, even those he hasn't played against, such as the 35-year-old Agassi.


"I think you see the game take big steps every five years or so," Agassi said. "It's almost in hindsight you can look back at five-year marks and see that there's been a transition in not just who the players are but also the way the game's being played. There are a few guys out there that play the game in a way that pushes the game forward. Obviously Roger's been one of these guys for a while. I think Nadal has also shown that there's a way of playing this game that people haven't done yet, especially on the clay.

"It's time. It happens sooner or later when the real special ones start coming around. I think over the next five years, there's going to be a lot of titles decided by these guys."

In Nadal, Safin sees a player brimming with confidence and energy.

"He can run forever," Safin said. "He doesn't really get scared of anything. He just goes for it. He's really ambitious. As we can see, it's his life: Be there forever on the court until he gets it."

Nadal and Gasquet could play each other in the third round in a match that already is being billed in the French media as the tournament's titanic teen duel.

"Before talking about his actual game," Gasquet said of Nadal, "I think what we have to talk about is his way of struggling and fighting back all the time. His physical fitness is enormous. I think he plays tennis all right, but his mental attitude is absolutely exceptional, the way he fights so much. He's from another planet. ... If I play him, I hope I will be able to fight back and make it very tight."

Andy Roddick, who moved into the No. 2 spot, is not considered much of a contender, despite his recent clay-court title in Houston. In four previous visits to Roland Garros, Roddick has lost in the first round twice and the second and third rounds once each.

The oddsmakers installed Roddick as a 60-1 choice, not far behind Agassi at 50-1. Coria is the 7-2 third choice, followed by Juan Carlos Ferrero at 12-1, Gasquet and Gaudio at 15-1 each, and Safin at 20-1.

The women's title is up for grabs with No. 10 Justine Henin-Hardenne, the 2003 French champion, the top choice at 8-5; No. 14 and two-time finalist Kim Clijsters at 6-1; No. 2 Maria Sharapova at 7-1; No. 3 Amelie Mauresmo at 10-1; No. 1 Lindsay Davenport and No. 6 Svetlana Kuznetsova at 15-1, and No. 11 Venus Williams at 18-1.

Serena Williams had been the second favorite until she pulled out Friday, a few hours before the draw, because of lingering problems from the left ankle she sprained six weeks ago.

Russia's Anastasia Myskina, the defending champion, didn't get much respect from the oddsmaker, who made her a 30-1 long shot.

Clijsters had considered pulling out because of an injury to her right knee, suffered at the German Open a few weeks ago when she attempted one of her trademark splits on a shot.

"The last couple of days I've been gradually building up my intensity, my practice sessions," she said. "Today was the first time I played some points. I was still a little shaky. ... It's not easy. It's a challenge.

"I'm not going to stop doing the splits. That's part of my game, and it's helped me a lot. I don't know how many of those I've done. This is the first time on clay that something went wrong. It was just bad luck."


May 21, 2005 1:38 PM

Puschkin
05-24-2005, 07:35 AM
Post-match Interview: RG 1st round

THE MODERATOR: Questions in English for Roger.

Q. Well, did you have a good solid scouting report on your opponent today?

ROGER FEDERER: Half an hour before the match. I warmed up with him on the same court. That's what I got. That's it.

Q. So warmed up with your opponent?

ROGER FEDERER: I didn't. On the same court. I warmed up with my friend and he warmed up with his friend.

Q. What did you notice?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I heard he was a rather small guy, you know. Not the big type. Then in practice you just get to see he's a righty, he's got a backhand with one hand. I think Tony looked more at him than I. I had to look at the ball and stay focused.

Q. How pleased are you with your performance?

ROGER FEDERER: It was all right. Just happy to be through, really, kind of match. There's good moments, but also, you know, bad moments.

You can never be unhappy winning in straight sets, so it's good. Good start.

Q. Anything different about the court from when you practiced on it last week?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, we had to play through sunshine, rain, wind and everything. So there was a little bit of everything here. Made it tough. You know, balls were quick. Then, you know, new balls ‑‑

The balls we're very slow after the rain, and new balls come, so you have to always adjust.

He was starting inside the baseline, then he was moving very far back. He was doing a lot of different things, you know. That kind of made it maybe difficult in the beginning to try to get the rhythm. All in all, it was all right.

Q. Give us the bad moments.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I just wasn't happy on a few of my forehands. I think I could have also served better. But that got better throughout the match, so...

Q. When you're trailing down a service break in the second set, do you ever whim‑whams, bad moments, saying, "I've lost here in the first round before, what's going on?" Are you beyond that sort of thing?

ROGER FEDERER: No, because I won the first set 6‑1, you feel good. Once I win usually a set 6‑1, I'm not going to lose a match. But it's true, you know, when I'm down a break in the second, he's looking like he's going to next game as well, it makes you wonder sometimes.

But I reacted just in time to not let that influence me too much.

Q. In Hamburg you didn't drop your serve at all. To drop it twice in a set is almost unheard of.

ROGER FEDERER: That's a good problem to have, I'm telling you.
Q. He was a bit of a surprise package.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, you know, some games he was swinging very freely I had the feeling today. Of course, sometimes he gets a good game. But still feels like maybe sometimes it shouldn't happen. But, I mean, his service game, his own, in that set, when it rained and everything, he was playing also very unconsistent. One game was good; one game was bad. So it really shows he's still quite young. But he's got potential. You see that too. He can hit the ball hard, he can also stay back. But he's rather small, so he's got to ‑‑ has to be strong, his fitness, throughout his whole career.

Q. Same with Henman. He's playing a player that none of us have really heard of. Is it almost tougher to play someone you don't know, you've never seen, you don't have a feel for anything about their game at all?

ROGER FEDERER: Who is he playing?

Q. Some unpronounceable Polish, Argentinian chap.

ROGER FEDERER: He's got the same thing going on. Same problem, I mean. I think he's probably happy to see that Starace is not playing because that would be tougher because of his run last year here. It's true, it kind of makes it tough times.

But usually, you know, let's say when I lost to Berdych or I lost to Nadal or Gasquet, I knew they were really good, they could take the step within the next ‑‑ this week. I'm playing them right now. Then you're rather worried. But today I haven't heard anything from him. So I think you can at least relax a little bit because he's not supposed to break through in this tournament. That kind of gives you confidence, that if you play tough, you know, you should come through. It's going to be the same for Tim.

Q. You're a continental European. In some ways, would this be the Grand Slam you're most comfortable at?

ROGER FEDERER: Close from home?

Q. Yes. Are there things about being here that are more familiar, more familiar, than being in New York, London or Melbourne?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I feel everywhere the same. Because of the language, I speak them all, the three languages of the Grand Slams. You know, you staying in the city, so the city is big. That's obviously a little bit different to Switzerland. Because I travel so much, I get used to it. It's always nice when I come to these big cities because there's so much to do. Then again, you know, you're kind of happy when you leave, and you're happy when you come back.

I feel the same way at almost every Grand Slam, except, you know, Wimbledon is in this tiny village, I would call it, because I never go to the city. Melbourne is kind of a regular‑size town, you know. It's just New York and here which are really, really big. I guess it's good to come here early, you know, kind of get used to the whole thing going on.

Source: http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/interviews/2005-05-23/200505231116864232629.html

babsi
05-24-2005, 08:36 AM
Thank you for the interview,Puschkin :) - the first of many,from this place,hopfully




__________________________________________________ ____
I´m here to represant,the needle in the vein of the establishment
(Billie Joe Armstrong)

Yasmine
05-24-2005, 08:49 AM
thanks for posting the interview again, I had posted it in the RG thread too;)

Puschkin
05-24-2005, 08:59 AM
thanks for posting the interview again, I had posted it in the RG thread too;)

I try to keep some order in the threads :p , but it does not really matter, does it? ;)

betbull
05-24-2005, 12:37 PM
i am not sure how to say that .. of if it is of any interest at all - but is there a special dedicated thread that deals with tennis-bets?? i would know some nice ones .. regarding rodger ..

cheers
j.

Yasmine
05-24-2005, 12:52 PM
I try to keep some order in the threads :p , but it does not really matter, does it? ;)
:yeah: very good! much more organised than me :worship:

SUKTUEN
05-24-2005, 03:34 PM
Thanks for the interview~~

Daniel
05-24-2005, 07:02 PM
Thanks Puskin :D

Daniel
05-25-2005, 06:38 PM
Federer and Nadal look unstoppable
Wednesday, May 25, 2005 Posted: 1:28 PM EDT (1728 GMT)




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PARIS, France -- World number one Roger Federer and teenage sensation Rafael Nadal confirmed their status as favorites for the French Open with comfortable second round victories in Paris on Wednesday.

Federer beat Spanish 19-year-old Nicolas Almagro 6-3 7-6 6-2 as he bids for the only grand slam to elude him.

Nadal was mightily impressive as he brushed aside Belgium's Xavier Malisse 6-2 6-2 6-4 to earn a mouthwatering third round match with French talent Richard Gasquet.

The 18-year-old Gasquet, seeded 30th, is the one of only two men to beat Federer on clay this year and he dispatched Dutchman Peter Wessels 6-3 7-6 6-1.

"I'm very pleased to have got the first two rounds out of the way," said Gasquet.

"Now there's a big match awaiting me. I won't be the favorite but if I can beat Nadal it would be fantastic."

Swiss ace Federer next plays the Czech Republic's Tomas Behrend or Chilean 25th seed Fernando Gonzalez.

He could meet fourth seed Nadal in the semifinals if the seedings work out.

Daniel
05-25-2005, 06:39 PM
PARIS (Reuters) - Roger Federer maintained his focus to carve out a 6-3 7-6 6-2 victory over Spain's Nicolas Almagro and reach the French Open third round Wednesday.

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The Swiss top seed was surprisingly stretched to a tiebreak in the second set by his 76th-ranked opponent but Federer restored order by charging through it 7-0.

Federer clinched victory on his second match point when Almagro sailed a forehand wide to end the match after one hour 47 minutes.

He next faces Chilean 25th seed Fernando Gonzalez or German qualifier Tomas Behrend.

Daniel
05-25-2005, 06:55 PM
Day 3 - Roger Federer Interview
Wednesday, May 25, 2005
Player Overview

Video Interview


Instructions

Real Player 8
(28.8 Kbps modem or higher)


Download RealPlayer





Q. Andre liked to say that after two rounds at the French Open, you really know where you're at. Do you know now after two rounds what you have here at the French Open? >

ROGER FEDERER: Just to explain a little bit, I thought it was quite different today, you know, than my previous match ‑ first of all, the opponent, but then also the conditions. I thought it was different court, as well. I thought it was much quicker. Had to kind of get used to that.

I feel I'm in the tournament, of course. I got the rhythm. I saw what is out there really, you know, what to expect. I thought today was a good test because I thought I had to focus more than in my last match to come through.

Q. On Friday Richard Gasquet and Rafael Nadal are going to play. You've had two very hard games against them. You beat Nadal. You narrowly lost to Gasquet. Can you compare the merits of the two players. >

ROGER FEDERER: Well, they're very different. Nadal is going to be very different to anybody else anyway at the moment because he's one of the few lefties we have in the game. But Richard's got the crowd behind him this week. It will be interesting to see who is going to win that, of course, because they're up‑and‑coming and now they face each other. I guess it's going to be a better match for a third round match for them.

Q. You had a bit of a hiccup when you served for the second set, but played great in the tiebreak. You must have been pretty pleased with that.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, relieved, relieved. I didn't feel like I played a bad game. But definitely played ‑‑ didn't play a great game, you know, to serve it out. I wish I could have had more first serves in. But, you know, that's how it goes. Took a big swing at it on the breakpoint and it worked. He didn't make many of them, but on that breakpoint he did. Definitely a big relief to come through in the tiebreaker.

I started it well. I knew the importance of the second set. That was good.

Q. You've talked about liking the courts maybe a bit like Hamburg, damp and wet. You see it like this today. Do you still feel that way or would you be happy on a dry, fast court like that?>

ROGER FEDERER: No, it's good. Conditions were different today, so I at least got a look at ‑‑ and I'm through at the same time. Get a feeling for the tournament, for everything, even though I've been here for over a week now. Yeah, it's definitely quicker. You know, plays different. So you got to construct the points a little bit different than I would say in Hamburg. But this doesn't mean I'm going to play less good.

Q. No preference for one or the other?

ROGER FEDERER: No, you've got to get used it. Of course, you know, Hamburg was good. But, again, the stadium is very closed in. There's not very much wind. Of course, here it's much more open. Things change. You can't wish like it was.

Q. Looking ahead to your next opponent, have you played him before? If so, what are his strengths and qualities?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, we don't know who I'm going to play yet, so we'll see about that. I've played them both. Behrend once in Gstaad, as far as I remember. Pretty comfortable there. Gonzalez, I've beaten him on a few occasions, recently in Monte‑Carlo. Well, I'm the favorite anyway, so doesn't matter.

Q. As you may know at the US Open this year they're planning to have a replay system where the chair umpire has the computer screen to call up questionable situations. Jim Curley, the tournament director from the US Open has been here for a week talking to various players. I don't know if he has spoken to you or not. Whether he has spoken to you or not, do you have a view on the challenge system they're talking about, giving the players one or possibly more challenges per set to question the calls?

ROGER FEDERER: I spoke to Jim Curley. I spoke to him. We spoke about the issue. I have a very strong opinion about it. I'm absolutely against it. I'm against the challenge system. I'm for the way it is right now, don't change that. Told him about the difficulties about looking also ahead for all the other tournaments, how much money will blow out by doing that because I think it's going to cost too much money. We can use that for other reasons than for this couple of calls a match.

Of course, the big issue's about the Serena and Jennifer Capriati match, and that was in the beginning of the third that that happened. So for me it didn't really play a big role for the outcome. So I was against it. He acknowledged that. That's my opinion.

Q. You're not just against the challenge system; you're against the whole idea of replay?

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, correct.

Q. The same thing is happening with soccer. A lot of people are against replays. They think it takes away from the passion of sport. Do you think replays should be kept out of sport altogether?>

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, every sport is different. The only thing I could see being good for soccer is really if the ball is so close to the line, like we've seen some goals, because that can really change, of course, also the future of how the match is going to progress.

But we're here to talk tennis, so let's leave the soccer to them. We'll get enough other problems.

Q. While you're debating all sorts of manner of things, Tim Henman came in here earlier and talked about the tennis balls at Wimbledon. >

ROGER FEDERER: Okay, next problem, yes (smiling).

Q. I know you're solving the world's problems at the moment. But he mentioned at Wimbledon they don't ‑‑ when they're delivered to the courts, they're already out of the cans, therefore they've had time to go flat, when they're delivered to Wimbledon.

ROGER FEDERER: They're opened a week before.

Q. A week before, and he feels that's wrong. I wonder, as the defending champion...

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I guess that is wrong. Because when we go practice, we open the balls one minute before practice. Usually, that's what I remember from all the matches I usually play, they opened them let's say five games before we start playing with them. Obviously, a week before is very early. But what it really does to the balls, the experts can tell.

It is a little strange in my eyes, too, yeah.

THE MODERATOR: Questions in French.

Q. You played on central court the first day, and today on Suzanne Lenglen. Can you tell us more about the difference between the two courts and does it change your game, the way you build up your shots?

ROGER FEDERER: It should not. But it's true that they are very different courts. You have far less space in the Suzanne Lenglen, it's obvious. Does it change something to the game? I find it very difficult to answer that question. You cannot go so far back in Suzanne Lenglen because you don't have as much space as you have on Philippe Chatrier. It's the only difference I see.

Q. After the first round you said you had a few problems with your strokes, your serve, your forehand. Do you think you have improved?

ROGER FEDERER: I'm very happy to win, but I always feel that there are things that could be adjusted and improved. I was working and training yesterday to improve a number of things in order to play better today. I think my match today was better than the first day. He was a much more dangerous opponent today. I was more focused, more collected than during the first round.

Q. Do you play at the same level as you did in Hamburg?

ROGER FEDERER: No, it's very different. The match was very different. Coria served differently. Today the conditions were very different from Hamburg. I'm going to speak with Tony and see what he thinks. I have my ideas about that, but I would like to discuss that with Tony first and then I'll see how I face the next match.

Q. If you're going to face Gonzalez, how are you going to face this opponent?

ROGER FEDERER: It could be a dangerous match. He loves clay. I think this is his tournament. I'm sure that he's going to fight for it even more than in other tournaments. He has a fantastic forehand, so I have to watch out. I have done it before. I've managed to resist this forehand, so I think it will work again if I play against him.

Q. The other day Nadal said you are the absolute favorite in Wimbledon and the fast surface, but that here in Roland Garros there's no absolute favorite. Do you agree with that?

ROGER FEDERER: That's an interesting way of putting pressure on people (smiling). It's clever. He's not stupid.

I think there are a number of favorites here, and he knows well who they are. And the answer for Wimbledon is not stupid either. He must be very tired because he hasn't played for two weeks.

Q. Every time we ask him if he's the favorite, he says no, he's not the absolute favorite.

ROGER FEDERER: It's true. I see that with other possible favorites. Not the absolute favorites, Coria, Ferrero, Safin, Roddick, Moya, myself. I wouldn't like to play against many of those players. I think we have many dangerous opponents here ‑ Nadal being one of them. Maybe slightly more dangerous than others.

It's the first time he's here in Roland Garros, so he might need a bit of time. They have the same age, Gasquet and him, so maybe he doesn't like the idea of Gasquet having reached the third round, as well.

Q. You always say in your case the first rounds are the most difficult for you. After these two rounds, how do you see your tennis and what are the things that you should improve in your game if you want to go further on?

ROGER FEDERER: If I win in three sets, I should not worry too much. I'm saving my strength and my energy by winning in three‑setters. I don't think I need to explain that to you. But these are important matters for me. The way I play is a bit irrelevant. For each match I know I have this possibility of improvement and I have to analyze the matches. I will have to see about this last one. I think it was an interesting one. The next one is going to be a challenge against a clay courter. Each of these matches makes me better on the surface.

Q. A question from a countryman. Will you have time to send an SMS to talk about James Blake with Stan?

ROGER FEDERER: No problem. I'm on his side, not on Blake's side, that's obvious. I'm very happy that he managed to beat Massu. I haven't seen the match. Unfortunately, I was already in the hotel. What he has managed is absolutely fantastic. I think we should pay him compliments for that. I will not say that he's a favorite here, but he has a good chance against Blake.

Q. Are you going to give him advice?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't think it's very good to give people advice. My tennis is very different from other people, so what I might say might not help. If he wants me to help him, he can get in touch with me. But I didn't help him for beating Massu, and he did win. That was the best possible solution.

RogiFan88
05-26-2005, 02:12 AM
GSTAAD - Rogi will not defend his Gstaad title this year, preferring to concentrate on Wimby and No 1!

babsi
05-26-2005, 12:01 PM
Thank you,Daniel :)
it is very nice of you to take the time to pst such a long interview :)

babsi
05-26-2005, 12:04 PM
[QUOTE=RogiFan88]GSTAAD - Rogi will not defend his Gstaad title this year, preferring to concentrate on Wimby and No 1![/QUOT


That was to be expected - even if it is a though decision - it´s the right one to make .

Nocko
05-26-2005, 03:06 PM
Yes. and he'll play DC after wimby, won't he?

Thanks very much for intervews and articles. :worship: :worship:

SUKTUEN
05-26-2005, 06:08 PM
Roger always think about Wimby~~

Daniel
05-26-2005, 06:40 PM
PARIS - The world's best tennis player is firmly against introducing video replays into the sport. Roger Federer said he voiced his objections to Jim Curley, the U.S. Open tournament director, who has been at the French Open this week asking players their thoughts on using video technology at Flushing Meadows this summer.

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"I have a very strong opinion. I'm absolutely against it," Federer said Wednesday after beating Nicolas Almagro in the second round at Roland Garros. "I'm against the challenge system. I'm for the way it is right now. Don't change that."

Federer, who improved to 43-2 overall this season, said video technology goes against the unpredictable nature of sport and is too expensive.

"I think it's going to cost too much money," he said. "We can use that for other reasons than for a couple of calls a match."

___

SUKTUEN
05-27-2005, 03:32 PM
thanks

Puschkin
05-27-2005, 03:33 PM
Ice cool Federer burns Gonzalez
By Araz Gulekjian
Friday, May 27, 2005

Top seed and world number one Roger Federer's hopes of adding the Roland Garros crown to his lavish Grand Slam collection remain intact after the 23-year-old Swiss star subdued Chilean Fernando Gonzalez 7-6 (9), 7-5, 6-2 on Friday to advance into the fourth round.


Federer hammered 11 aces and produced 36 winners, while Gonzalez littered the court with 66 unforced errors in scorching mid-afternoon heat on Court Philippe Chatrier.

In six visits to the claycourt showpiece, Federer has never got beyond the quarter-finals and has lost in the first round three times (1999, 2002 and 2003).

The Swiss now meets Spanish No14 seed Carlos Moya, a five set victor over fellow countryman Fernando Vicente.

The Swiss stylist, who has yet to drop a set in the tournament, got off to a roaring start when Gonzalez, 24, hit a slew of unforced errors to drop his delivery in the fourth game. The hard-hitting Chilean, ranked 26, broke right back and shook the rust off his game to fire at will with penetrating forehand drives.

Gonzalez, the 2004 Olympic gold medalist in the doubles, was executing his game plan to perfection. With eight of his 16 forehand winners coming in the first set, the strategy was to pound the Federer backhand - his most vulnerable shot on clay - as hard as possible all day long.

But that is easier said than done, and the Swiss star extricated himself from of a serious jam, saving two set points in the tie-breaker to pocket a close first set.

In the second set, both men once again traded their deliveries early with Federer making a decisive break in the 11th game to serve it out in the following game when a Gonzalez forehand clunked into the net.

From there on, Federer took the initiative, breaking his opponent two more times as Gonzalez endured a monumental collapse to let the Swiss coast to victory.

Source: http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/articles/2005-05-27/200505271117202341258.html

SUKTUEN
05-27-2005, 03:35 PM
"Ice cool Federer burns Gonzalez"

I love this~~~~ :devil:

Puschkin
05-27-2005, 03:38 PM
They are quick, today;)

Day 5 - Roger Federer Interview
Friday, May 27, 2005

Q. Did you like this test today? It was hot and it was two tough first sets against a really good opponent. Did you like this test for future matches to come here?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't need no more tests, you know. I don't know what tests you want me to do. One five‑setter, one quick one, one quick set, one long set, you know. One tiebreak. It's not going to make any difference as long as you win, you know.

Today was dangerous; I knew that. It was all about handling his pace, you know, and his forehand. So I got close, you know, being a way tougher match.

I'm happy to be through ‑ in three sets especially.

Q. You seem more comfortable on clay than in previous years. Are you doing things differently?

ROGER FEDERER: No. I think Guga was stronger than Gonzalez. That was the difference.

But I definitely improve every year. And with the experience as well, you know, you know better where you're good at, where maybe you're not as good at, how you get around maybe your weaknesses and the way, you know, maybe you move also. You always got more time to improve. Those things definitely make a difference.

I'm not the only one improving, you know. Everyone always is moving.

Q. Almost at the end of the first‑set tiebreak you had a couple of really bad miss‑hits. Was that funny bounces? Do you remember those?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, sort of. I know I always shank a little bit, you know. I was struggling with his spins, to be honest, with his forehand. Unbelievable zip on the ball. So it was tough for me to really get the rhythm going, and that was all the way through the set, you know. He always kept me guessing on his forehand. So sometimes when I was on it, you know, just didn't have the timing yet.

Q. How do you get used to the fact that he can hit these unbelievable shots out of nowhere, and then of course he can miss some, too.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you gotta find his backhand, huh? But he sets it up well with his serve, you know. He's moving well, so he always gets around his backhand most of the time. I don't have that double‑handed backhand, you know, where I can always find his backhand. And if you do find, you know, just he's off of it.

It's a dangerous match. Like I said, you have to weather the storm against this guy. Once you're through it, you know, it gets easier. That's how it was in the third set.

Q. The other day you were talking about instant replay when the press conference ended. I'd like to follow up by asking, what are your thoughts on the argument that instant replay gives tennis a human element and that somehow it's another thing that the fans can become involved with, adds in some way to the drama?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know which human element ‑‑ it's an electronic, isn't it?

Q. The current system with the linespeople out there as opposed to machines.

ROGER FEDERER: No, that's why I'm saying we shouldn't change anything, keep the people out there and make the calls, you know. You can argue with them a little bit. I like this idea.

So I just don't see reasons to change that. Hope that answers your question (smiling).

Q. Just on a different topic, I don't know if you were asked about this in Australia, Scott Draper is sort of struggling two careers, golf and tennis. I don't know if you golf, but what are your thoughts on sort of trying to juggle those two very different sports? They both involve a ball but they're quite different.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I admire that, absolutely. Because not only is he doing it, he's playing both at the professional level. That's kind of quite unbelievable. I don't play golf, you know, myself, but I could imagine especially how many hours you have to spend on a golf course, you know, to improve. If you don't go there, you'll drastically be a worse player. I admire that very much.

But I think it must be very nice for him, you know. If he's not in the mood to play tennis, he can go play golf. The other way around, too. He's having a good life, I guess.

Q. You are using more and more your backhand slice, slice backhand. Do you feel that is a weapon now on your game?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, today I had to (smiling).

Q. Not today. But usually you are hitting a lot of...

ROGER FEDERER: Slice more.

Q. Today I understand because the guy was hitting very hard.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, that was today. But I've always mixed it up, so I don't feel a big difference of me playing more slice, you know. It's maybe become more efficient, but I've always been slicing on the returns, you know, and also in the game to mix it up. So I don't feel that I've done anything very different.

Q. You feel you are the best player in history?

ROGER FEDERER: No (laughing). I'm too young.

Q. Because I feel that.

ROGER FEDERER: I'm too young, I'm too young.

Q. You're on the way to be, no?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, if I keep on playing like last year, yeah. But not every year will be this way; I know that.

Q. Is Gonzalez' spin more difficult than Nadal, but Nadal is a little more consistent?

ROGER FEDERER: No. It's ‑‑

Q. You said you had trouble with Gonzales' spin.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's totally different. I cannot compare. One is coming from a left‑hand, the other from a right hand. I guess you find Nadal's backhand easier, you know, than Gonzalez's. But that's just the way. It's impossible to compare those players.

Q. Which is more difficult to handle or you can't compare?

ROGER FEDERER: Haven't played Nadal enough yet, you know. But I've seen five sets' long, but didn't have the feeling he was going for too much. He goes for placement on his forehand.

Q. How do you feel at the end of the first week? How confident, how good do you feel here in Roland Garros on clay?

ROGER FEDERER: Good. I think it's a job well done so far. I haven't lost a set. Through to the fourth round. That's obviously what you hope for when you start the tournament. Now I'm where I want to be, you know ‑ fit, through to the second week basically.

But, you know, the opponents are not getting any easier, so I'm looking forward to the next match.

THE MODERATOR: French questions, please.

Q. Roger, did the heat pose a problem for you? Can you adapt quickly to the heat, or is it a problem for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you've got to adapt. I mean, it's much warmer in Australia or in America. Once in a while it goes over 30 degrees in Europe, but that doesn't mean you can't play anymore. It's not a problem for me. It wasn't a problem today. I think maybe it was a bit difficult for him, but that could be surprising.

Q. In terms of your last match in Monte‑Carlo, did you try to apply a different tactic? It seems you were in better control of the match today than in Monte‑Carlo. Is that just an impression?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I think it's pretty similar between today and Monte‑Carlo. I was always in control. I could have won in two sets. I served for the match, and he broke my serve and we went to the third set. But even in the third set, I got the feeling that I was better.

Today, the only moment was in the first set when I felt that I was having slight difficulties. But he couldn't always move around to get on to his forehand. So as I was saying a moment ago in English, you try to stay in the match. In the third set, he was tired. He wasn't moving as well as the beginning of the match, and it was an entirely different match.

Q. For some months you've been working with Tony Roche. You said that you started working on a more aggressive game. What are you working on with Tony Roche, today on clay in particular?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, he joined me a few days before Hamburg and I've been playing matches, obviously. After Hamburg, we came here.

I played a lot of points with a number of players to get used to the balls, to get used to the central court and so on. So what we've been doing is mostly talking rather than training, as we did in Australia. Because for that, you need to take some time off, to work two, four, five hours during the day on some details of the game.

So we've been talking.

Q. What have you been talking about?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, about the game on clay, his vision of my game on clay, my vision. I don't think I'm playing any different than last year. Even last year I was playing quite well.

Q. Could you tell us more about the importance of your serve on clay. This is a weapon that is sometimes underestimated.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's true that it's not the fastest serve on tour, but it's an important weapon for me and I've got a good second serve and I can count on that, which is why I can take risks on my first serve.

We've seen Gonzalez. If you serve well, it's more difficult to break, particularly when the weather is dry and the balls are fast.

So if you take a risk on your serve and you've served well, you take the advantage, which is why you need to be concentrated at the beginning of the point.

Q. Next round: Moya. What's the key to the match?

ROGER FEDERER: It will be interesting. He's a great champion. I appreciate him very much. I don't think he'll be in much fitness trouble, even after his five sets today. He has too much experience with that type of match.

I was surprised that he went to five sets. He had some difficulty in his recent matches. This might show that he isn't feeling as fit as the previous years.

But that doesn't mean anything. He's won this tournament before; he knows how to do it. Obviously, it's going to be tough.

Q. To feel that you're truly in control of your game on clay, what is missing, to feel that you're as in control as on other surfaces?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I never said I didn't feel at ease on clay.

Q. Yeah, but as at ease as other surfaces?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I haven't lost a set yet. What's the problem? There is a possibility for me here. I don't see why I should be at all worried by anything. I've played less on clay than Coria or Nadal, but that doesn't mean anything.

Q. Who's the player you fear the most here?

ROGER FEDERER: No one. I'm No. 1. I've beaten everyone. Why should I fear anyone? I respect everyone, that's for sure.

Source: http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/interviews/2005-05-27/200505271117202273097.html

SUKTUEN
05-27-2005, 03:45 PM
thanks ~~!!!

Roger you are so nice guy!!

Daniel
05-27-2005, 06:38 PM
PARIS, France -- World number one Roger Federer withstood an assault from Fernando Gonzalez to clinch a 7-6 7-5 6-2 victory and move into the last 16 of the French Open.

Federer now takes on 1998 champion Carlos Moya, who put out Fernando Vicente in a five-set marathon for a place in the quarter-finals.

"That's one step further than last year," said Federer who was dumped out of the 2004 tournament in the third round by Gustavo Kuerten.

Gonzalez, a gold medal winner at the Olympics last year, has the build of a boxer and he used that brute force, allied to his thunderous forehand, to get the measure of Federer in a bruising first set.

The Chilean recovered from being broken in the third game to break back in the fifth and take the opener into a tiebreak.

But he then squandered two set points before Federer, after a 54-minute tussle, clinched the set on his fourth set point when Gonzalez netted a backhand return.

Federer had won all three of the pair's meetings coming into this clash, including a three-set third round win on clay on Monte Carlo last month, and edged ahead with a break in the second set to lead 2-1.

Gonzalez gamely clung on to hit back at 2-2 but had to fight off three break points in the seventh game.

However, the blistering 34-degree heat was taking its toll on the Chilean as he began to pay a heavy price for his first set assault and Federer took the second set 7-5 when Gonzalez again netted a routine backhand.

Federer was comfortably in control and two more breaks against the exhausted Gonzalez soon took him to 5-1 ahead in the third set.

The Swiss then set up match point with his 11th ace and then wrapped up the match after 2hr 10min with a forehand winner.

Meanwhile, Moya dug deep to beat fellow-Spaniard Vicente for the 12th time on Friday, winning 6-4 7-6 6-7 0-6 6-4.

The 14th seed squandered a host of match points in the third and fifth sets before finally clinching victory in three hours, 51 minutes when Vicente dumped a return into the net.

Moya dropped just four games in beating his old foe in the second round last year and looked on course for a straightforward victory when he took a two-set lead.

Vicente snatched the third set 7-3 on a tiebreak and then romped through the fourth set. Moya bounced back in the decider, though, breaking early and holding on to reach the last 16.

Daniel
05-27-2005, 06:38 PM
Tournament favourites Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal remain on course for a French Open semi-final showdown after both reached the last 16 on Friday.
Federer continued his pursuit of a first French Open title with an impressive win 7-6 (11-9) 7-5 6-2 over Fernando Gonzalez.

And Nadal then beat fellow 18-year-old Richard Gasquet 6-4 6-3 6-2.

Federer will play former champion Carlos Moya next, while Nadal takes on Sebastien Grosjean.

Top seed Federer was delighted to see off the dangerous Gonzalez in straight sets, especially having faced two set points in the opening set tie-break.

The Swiss took control midway through the second and hit top form in a hugely impressive third set.

The level of tennis is moving

Roger Federer

Federer lost in the third round last year to three-times champion Gustavo Kuerten, so was especially pleased to progress.

"That's one step further than last year," he said. "Today was dangerous. It was all about handling his pace on his forehand so I am happy to get through.

"I lost at this stage last year to Guga, but he's a better player than Gonzalez. I have to improve every year but I am not the only one improving.

"The level of tennis is moving."

Have Your Say on Five Live
Can Federer win his first French Open?

Nadal gave emphatic evidence of his title credentials against the in-form Gasquet, breaking the Frenchman in the first game and never looking back.

A partisan home crowd did their best to lift Gasquet but after just one hour 49 minutes, Nadal had wrapped up his 20th straight victory.

"That was excellent," said Nadal afterwards. "The French crowd were very fair.

"Gasquet is a great player and I expect to see him in the top 10 very soon."

The Spaniard added: "There was a lot of talk about this match and that created pressure.

"But also the pressure of playing at home was extra for him and that probably affected him and worked in my favour. I was very strong on court.

"The bounce was also high and that wasn't good for him. The next matches will become more complicated. I will do my best but I can lose at any time."

Gasquet said: "The heat was really a problem. I had a problem resisting the heat during three sets. I found it very hard today."

Daniel
05-27-2005, 06:39 PM
Open-Fired up Federer into French Open last 16
Saturday May 28, 01:09 AM



PARIS, May 27 (Reuters) - He is never billed as a claycourt expert and is not the cognoscenti's favourite for the French Open title but nobody seems to have told Roger Federer.
The world number one lost his Australian Open crown to Marat Safin in January and most pundits favour his rivals to win the only grand slam to have eluded the Swiss when Roland Garros ends next Sunday.

But after Federer wiped away the challenge of gutsy Chilean claycourter Fernando Gonzalez to reach the fourth round he could barely hide his irritation at suggestions he should be anything less than favourite to triumph on his least favourite surface. ADVERTISEMENT



"I'm number one...I've beaten everyone...why should I fear anyone?" he said, spelling out his credentials after his comprehensive 7-6 7-5 6-2 win on Friday.

"I never said I didn't feel at ease on clay. I haven't lost a set yet...what's the problem?

"There is a possibility for me here. I don't see why I should be at all worried by anything. I've played less on clay than (last year's runner-up Guillermo) Coria or (pre-tournament favourite Rafael) Nadal, but that doesn't mean anything."

Reigning Wimbledon and U.S. Open champion Federer lost to rising French hope Richard Gasquet in the quarter-finals of the Monte Carlo Masters claycourt event last month.

That was only the second time he had been beaten in 2005 after his Australian Open semi-final loss to Safin in Melbourne.

He won the claycourt Masters title in Hamburg earlier this month and has every right to feel aggrieved that commentators are looking elsewhere for a champion at Roland Garros.

Friday's victory guided the Swiss world number one into the last 16 in Paris for the first time since 2001 and set up a fascinating battle with 1998 champion Carlos Moya of Spain.

"It will be interesting. He's a great champion," Federer said. "I appreciate him very much. I don't think he'll be in much fitness trouble, even after his five sets today.

"He's won this tournament before, he knows how to do it. Obviously, it's going to be tough."

SUKTUEN
05-28-2005, 06:51 AM
thanks

babsi
05-28-2005, 09:47 AM
Thank you Puschkin and Daniel :) :)

Daniel - is school already over for you - you seem to have a lot of time to post all those articles and stuff - I´m not complaining :) - just wondering :)

Daniel
05-28-2005, 10:23 AM
Babsi :bigwave:
no school and work are not over yet :(
just make soe time to get online every day Roger plays :bounce:

PaulieM
05-28-2005, 08:04 PM
TENNIS
I fear nobody - Federer

Sat, 28 May 2005
World number one Roger Federer insists he fears nobody as he sets his sights on a first French Open title.


The top seed has already achieved one target in reaching the second week for the first time in four years and he hopes to be still around next Sunday where he could become only the sixth man to win all four Grand Slams.

"I'm number one. I have beaten everyone. Why should I fear anyone?" said the Swiss after moving into a fourth round clash against 1998 champion Carlos Moya with a 7-6 (11/9), 7-5, 6-2 win over Chilean Fernando Gonzalez.

"I haven't lost a set. There is a possibility for me here and I don't see why I should be worried by anything. I have played less on clay than Rafael Nadal and Guillermo Coria, but that doesn't mean anything." {:) good stay confident}

Moya, the 14th seed, has been struggling at Roland Garros this year and needed five sets to see off Spanish compatriot Fernando Vicente 6-4, 7-6 (7/4), 6-7 (3/7), 0-6, 6-4 to make his date with Federer.

Ominously for the Spaniard, he has never beaten the top seed in five career meetings.

Last year, Federer's French Open campaign came up short against triple champion Gustavo Kuerten in a morale-sapping third round defeat, a loss which followed two consecutive first round exits in 2002 and 2003.

Despite his two Wimbledon titles and Australian and US Open victories, Federer has never made it beyond the quarterfinals here before this year, but confidence isn't a problem.

"Moya is a great champion and I appreciate him very much. He has had some difficulty in his recent matches and this might show that he isn't feeling as fit as previous years.

"But that doesn't mean anything. He has won this tournament before, he knows how to do it."

Tony Roche also knows how to win here, taking the title in 1966 and the Australian has been brought on board by Federer to help him in his title push.

But the Swiss star is not keen to divulge too much of their working arrangements.

"Tony joined me a few days before the last tournament in Hamburg but I have played a lot of points with a lot of players to get used to the balls, to get used to the centre court," said Federer.

"So we have been talking rather than training just as we did in Australia. We have been talking about the game on clay, his vision of the game and my vision."

Federer also believes that his comparatively gentle service will stand him in good stead for his final Roland Garros push.

"It's true that it's not the fastest serve on the tour but it's an important weapon for me and I've got a good second serve which I can count on.

"That is why I can take risks on my first serve.

"I think it's a job well done so far. I haven't lost a set, through to the fourth round. I am where I want to be, fit and through to the second week." :)

Moya needed treatment on an injured shoulder during his win over Vicente but he believes that having won the title here, that will give him a psychological edge going into Sunday's match.

"I have won here which he hasn't, that might have some influence," said Moya.

"He doesn't have many doubts. He has only lost twice all year and is very confident. His serve is better than me right now, better forehand, better backhand, better volley.

"But I will try and use the circumstances to my advantage."

http://sport.iafrica.com/tennis/french_open/news/444514.htm

SUKTUEN
05-29-2005, 08:25 AM
Roger ~~ keep your Power~

Daniel
05-29-2005, 08:38 AM
Federer faces past champion Moya

Latest results
Roger Federer could get the first tough test of his French Open credentials on Sunday when he plays Carlos Moya.
The Swiss top seed has yet to drop a set, but may be stretched by clay-court specialist Moya, a former Paris winner.

Meanwhile, Spain teenager Rafael Nadal continues his bid to become the first debutant winner since Mats Wilander in 1982 when he plays Sebastien Grosjean.

Top seed Lindsay Davenport meets a rejuvenated Kim Clijsters in the pick of the women's fourth-round battles.

But the game between Federer and Moya will steal most headlines at Roland Garros.

"It will be interesting. He's a great champion," said Federer, who has won 44 of his 46 matches this year.

Federer's serve is better than mine, better forehand, better backhand, better serve and volley

Carlos Moya

"He's won this event before, he knows how to do it."

Moya won the title in 1998, but has lost all five of his previous meetings with the world number one.

"I think he is the favourite, but you never know what can happen," he said.

"He doesn't have many doubts. His serve is better than mine, better forehand, better backhand, better serve and volley.

"The thing is I've won here already, which he hasn't. That might have some influence."

In other action, Justine Henin-Hardenne faces US Open holder Svetlana Kuznetsova, while last year's runner-up Elena Dementieva plays another Russian, Elena Likhovsteva.

Bulgarian 15-year-old Sesil Karatantcheva, who stunned Venus Williams in the third round, faces Emmanuelle Gagliardi.

SUKTUEN
05-29-2005, 09:10 AM
Moya think he can win Roger~~ :rolleyes:

Stevens Point
05-29-2005, 07:21 PM
Post match interview after defeating Moya

Q. One set and a half of tennis of extraordinary quality, that's what we saw. Did you feel the same way.

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, but not all that fantastic because he's injured. And with the problem in the shoulder, he has let me play on my service. I think he is very disappointed to have to play like this. But it went fine.

There were good moments and bad moments. Obviously, and, you know, the rhythm isn't there. I felt that he had no faith in his own tennis. So I have very little to say.

I'm glad that I managed to save some energy, and I was even surprised that he finished the match, which proves that he's a real champion. He could have stopped before.

Q. What about the future? Do you see this match as a sort of match between brackets?

ROGER FEDERER: Yes. It's one more round and nothing else. Nothing much to say. Nothing much to think.

I think my training from yesterday and my training for tomorrow is going to be more important, and what really will matter in the end is the fact that I saved energy.

Q. Now Hanescu. What do you think?

ROGER FEDERER: I played him once in Davis Cup. It was a difficult match. I was just back from Australia. I was very tired. I had a few possibilities during the first set but let them go, and then I got more into the match during the second set.

Here, we're playing on clay so it gives me confidence.

But he was very good, so he can play even better than that.

Q. You had in mind that it could be Nalbandian, no?

ROGER FEDERER: No, no. I saw the match.

Q. Before that.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I was not even thinking about that match. I was thinking about my match against Moya. You never know how Moya is going to be. You never know, because he can wake up one morning with a shoulder problem or not. I noticed straightaway that he had a problem. I knew that, but I still had to remain very focused. So I was thinking about my own match.

Then I watched Nalbandian and Hanescu. I thought he could win. But then he let go many opportunities at the beginning, and then he went 6‑2, and then won the fourth and the fifth.

Q. Did you speak with Carlos about his shoulder?

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, I just said that I hope this pain will go away and that he can play again without any pains. All of the players know what it is to play with a pain in the shoulder like that. It is not fun.

He had ice on it already, so that was a good decision, I think.

Q. I don't know whether you discussed already here the match against Hanescu. What do you remember of the match in Bucharest? You were just coming back from Australia.

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, I was just arriving from Australia. I got back on Wednesday in the evening, I was hitting Thursday and Friday. Then, as I said, it was a very tight first set and then I got more into the match and I finished well.

But I think that he has improved since, and he managed to beat Nalbandian in the last two sets so easily. I know that he's an extremely good clay‑courter. It shows this week, and it probably will show next week maybe.

Q. This was clay indoors. Here, this is not indoors. Does that make a difference?

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, because of the wind, among other things.

But apart from that, I don't know. It's always different feelings. At the time, I had just No. 1, so it was a good thing for him, but it was difficult for him as well.

Now, next time we face each other, it's a totally different situation. I think he has had the experience on the central court, so it's going to help him tomorrow because he's not on any of the minor courts.

THE MODERATOR: Questions in English, please.

Q. Very convincing performance. Is there anything in your game you're not satisfied with at the moment?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I thought, you know, Carlos couldn't play 100%. It was very obvious to me. So for me it's very hard to kind of say how well I played, you know. It's not possible just because I knew in how much sort of pain he was and that he was far off from 100%.

So for me it was all about kind of being focused, try not to make many errors and try to use the advantage that he couldn't serve, you know, to break him and kind of get to him ‑‑ make it get to him mentally, you know. Obviously, it did, through to the second set.

Once I won the second, it was quite obvious I'm gonna win this.

So, yes, it was tough to stay concentrated out there for the whole time because of the circumstances.

Q. Into the second week. It's a different challenge now, isn't it?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, it is. I'm very relieved in a way, as well, but happy to have come so far again after a few years of tough times here in Paris.

So at least now, you know, can walk away. I've won four matches, which is good. But of course once you get to the quarters, you want more, especially because I haven't been using kind of my reserve tank yet. I still have a lot of energy left. I'm looking forward to hopefully another few more matches.

RogiNie
05-29-2005, 07:46 PM
and we are looking forward to a few more matches too :D
thanks Steven :)

a girl 13
05-29-2005, 08:33 PM
Roger is so kind for his opponents...

lunahielo
05-29-2005, 08:46 PM
Thank you, Stevens Point.
And~~Thank you Roger!

sierra91
05-30-2005, 01:17 AM
Thank you, Stevens Point.
And~~Thank you Roger! DITTO!

Daniel
05-30-2005, 01:37 PM
PARIS - When Roger Federer charged forward and blew an easy volley, he glared at the ball dribbling at his feet, swiped at it in anger, kicked it and still couldn't get it over the net. A frustrated Federer on the verge of defeat? Not exactly: At the time, he was up by two sets and 3-0 in the third set. But his standards are high and, aside from the occasional misplay, he has met them thus far at the French Open.

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The top-ranked Federer equaled his best showing at Roland Garros when he advanced to the quarterfinals Sunday, shaking off the errant volley to beat an ailing Carlos Moya 6-1, 6-4, 6-3.

Federer improved to 45-2 this year. He has yet to drop a set through four rounds at the only Grand Slam event he hasn't won.

"I'm very relieved in a way, and happy to have come so far after a few years of tough times here in Paris," Federer said.

"I've won four matches, which is good. But of course once you get to the quarters, you want more, especially because I haven't been using my reserve tank yet. I still have a lot of energy left. I'm looking forward to hopefully another few more matches."

Moya, the 1998 champion, gave Federer little trouble while playing with a sore shoulder that hindered his serve and forehand. The Spaniard said he needs rest and isn't sure whether he'll play Wimbledon.

"I'm glad that I managed to save some energy," Federer said. "I'm surprised that he finished the match."

Federer's opponent Tuesday will be 90th-ranked Victor Hanescu, who upset No. 10 David Nalbandian 6-3, 4-6, 5-7, 6-1, 6-2. Hanescu, who arrived in Paris with a record of 6-9 this year, will play in his first Grand Slam quarterfinal.

"When I started to play tennis, I was dreaming to be here," Hanescu said. "My family is a poor family. When I was young, we didn't have so much money even to eat sometimes. Now I'm here and very happy."

Daniel
05-30-2005, 01:38 PM
PARIS (Reuters) - World number one Roger Federer underlined his status as French Open favorite just before the unruly home crowd decided to steal the limelight on a rainy day at Roland Garros Sunday.

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Federer had hammered former champion Carlos Moya 6-1 6-4 6-3 to reach the quarter-finals when the fans stopped Spaniard Rafael Nadal, regarded by many pundits as the Swiss top seed's main rival for the title, from playing for nearly 10 minutes.

The 18-year-old Nadal had won the first set of his fourth round match against Sebastien Grosjean 6-4 and had just broken the Frenchman for a 1-0 lead in the second set when the booing and jeering started.

The fans packing center court were annoyed with Argentine umpire Damian Steiner, who refused Grosjean's request to check a ball mark on the red clay during the last point of that game.

They started stamping their feet and gesturing with their thumbs down. The boos and whistles became louder as Nadal made several attempts to re-start the match.

Eventually, Grosjean had to ask the crowd to calm down before play could resume.

The 15,000 crowd were then delighted to see Grosjean win the second set 6-3 but Nadal, who never lost in cool, recovered to build a 3-0 lead in the third set when there was another break.

This time only the rain was to blame and the pair will resume battle Monday.

SORE SHOULDER

Federer, chasing the only grand slam title to elude him, proved his ambitions were serious by crushing Spain's Moya in just an hour and 41 minutes in the first true test of his campaign.

The elegant 23-year-old, who has not dropped a set yet, played close to perfection until 14th seed Moya, who was hampered by a sore shoulder, bowed out by failing to return a blistering forehand on the third match point.

The Swiss said his impressive win was not that relevant because of Moya's physical problems.

"Not all that fantastic because he's injured," Federer said when asked to assess his form.

"With the problem in the shoulder...I think he is very disappointed to have to play like this. But it went fine."

The gifted Federer has the perfect game to shine on clay but has never advanced past the quarter-finals at Roland Garros and disappeared in the first round in two of the last three years.

He faces a seemingly easy passage through to the semi-finals as he now meets world number 90 Victor Hanescu of Romania, who overcame former Wimbledon finalist David Nalbandian 6-3 4-6 5-7 6-1 6-2.

If he beats Hanescu, Federer could then meet Nadal for a place in the final.

The opening match on the first week's final day had seen world number one Lindsay Davenport stage a remarkable comeback to beat Kim Clijsters 1-6 7-5 6-3 and reach the quarter-finals.

The only remaining American in either singles draw, top seed Davenport looked helpless in the first set and was 3-1 down in the second but she recovered to beat Belgian Clijsters for the first time in seven meetings.

"I'm really a little bit amazed I was able to pull that match out today," said Davenport.

Daniel
05-30-2005, 01:39 PM
PARIS (AFP) - Ruthless Roger Federer equalled his best ever French Open performance when he booked a place in the quarter-finals with a clinical 6-1, 6-4, 6-3 demolition of former champion Carlos Moya of Spain.

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The top seed, bidding to become only the sixth man to win all four Grand Slams, will take on unseeded Romanian Victor Hanescu for a place in the semi-finals.

The Swiss had reached the last eight in 2001 but had failed to get beyond the third round since.

However, his form this year suggests that he will be a tough act to stop although there is still the formidable barrier of fourth-seeded Spaniard Rafael Nadal possibly waiting in the semi-finals.

Moya, playing in his 10th Roland Garros, was hampered by a severe shoulder injury and Federer admitted it was his intention to exploit the weakness.

"He wasn't 100-percent. I knew how much pain he was in and that he couldn't serve so I had to make sure I got to him mentally," said Federer who was knocked out in the third round in 2004 by an inspired Gustavo Kuerten.

That came after enduring first round defeats in 2002 and 2003.

"It's a relief to be in the second week because I have had a few tough years in Paris.

"Now I want more. I feel as if I haven't used my reserve tank yet and that I have a lot of energey left."

Moya, the 14th seed and winner here in 1998, had never beaten Federer in five previous attempts and the fact that he twice needed treatment on his injured right shoulder didn't help his cause.

Federer raced through the first set in just 27 minutes with breaks in the second and sixth games, wrapping up the opener with a sweet drop shot.

He broke again in the third game of the second set courtesy of a pinpoint, running backhand and was two breaks up in the third to lead 4-0 before the 28-year-old Moya temporarily stopped the rot to break back to go 1-4.

But the world number one wasn't to be denied and he took the tie in the next game after just 1hr 42mins on the Suzanne Lenglen court when Moya hit a lob long and out.

Despite the win, the 23-year-old refused to look beyond the quarter-finals after Hanescu had suprisingly knocked out Argentinian 10th seed David Nalbandian, last year's semi-finalist, 6-3, 4-6, 5-7, 6-1, 6-2.

"Hanescu beat Nalbandian so it will be a difficult test," said Federer who easily beat the Romanian in their only career meeting in the Davis Cup on clay last year.

babsi
05-30-2005, 02:53 PM
Thank you Stevens piont and Daniel :) :)

SUKTUEN
05-30-2005, 02:55 PM
thanks~~!!!

Shabazza
05-30-2005, 04:09 PM
thanks steven point and daniel - nice interviews :)

Stevens Point
05-31-2005, 07:49 PM
So! Post match interview after Roger defeating Hanescu!

Q. This is an obvious question. What do you think you doing against Rafa Nadal and against David Ferrer, all the time, and what do you think about the match in these conditions?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, everybody's been looking forward a little bit to this one ‑ both of us, first time in the semifinals of a French Open. So it's going to be really interesting to see. For me, it's a big moment. It's one of those chances, you know, to maybe walk away with the title here, you know.

But still got two matches to go, hopefully, and I'm really looking forward to this one, if it goes according to like now, against Nadal. It will be interesting.

I don't know the conditions in three days' time, because we got two days off now. We'll both be 100%.

Q. This match, this next match, is going to remind you of the Miami match somewhere, somehow?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, somewhere, for sure. All the matches I've played against him, also the one before, you know, where he beat me. You don't have to forget that one either.

But I think throughout five sets you definitely get a feeling for what kind of and type of player is he. I think I've learned very much, you know, how to play him. Because in the beginning I didn't really play very well at all, and he took advantage of that, you know, totally.

So I had to fight my way back. Came through, and in the end, I was I felt the fitter player. He looked extremely tired in the fifth, and that kind of surprised me.

But I don't know. Now we're on clay. Rallies can be even tougher. But I thought Miami was a tough match. I think we can expect the same ‑ not that we're going to play five sets again, but tough rallies and hard hitting.

Q. It looked like it was going to be a pretty tough go with Gonzalez and then Moya and now Nalbandian. Now that it's done and over with, were you sort of worried about that? Then after Moya got hurt and you didn't have to play Nalbandian today, is that just the way Grand Slam tournaments are, you just have to relax and let it unfold at its own, or were you at one point worried about having to beat those three guys in order to get to the semis?

ROGER FEDERER: I said from the start I don't think my draw is extremely tough. You know, I just thought it's a regular draw. It's more to me who said, "Look, you got this hell of a tough draw." And I looked at the draw and I thought, "Where is this tough draw, you know, everybody's talking about?"

Because I don't fear no players, but I respect them all. I said that very clearly. Of course if I would have played Moya at his best, you know, it would have been a totally different match, you know.

Nalbandian or Hanescu, for me, it doesn't really matter either. I've beaten him, too, now, over the years. I don't fear him. Hanescu is the better player, he beat Nalbandian. I would have said it's better to play Nalbandian, because he lost. It's very simple.

For me, it's important in the end is I haven't lost any energy. I'm through to my first semifinal here at the French Open. That is for me the big thrill of course.

Q. Which is for you the biggest surprise yesterday, they lost Gaudio, Coria and Safin? Which is for you the biggest surprise for you personally? Second, in which way you are better compared to 12 months ago when you lost with Kuerten on clay?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think everybody was a little bit surprised, you know, everybody lost at the same time, you know. Because I thought those were also three big favorites to win the title here, you know, next to Nadal and myself. And to see them all go out, you know, it's definitely a surprise, even though we know all the qualities of Ferrer, Robredo and Davydenko, you know. They've showed also throughout the clay court season what tough players they are.

But of course to then to pull off such a great win for each one of them is definitely great. So I was surprised.

Q. Which one the more?

ROGER FEDERER: They're all about the same. No, seriously. I mean (smiling)...

I thought all three gonna win, you know? All three lost. But this is tennis. We've got the knockout system.

So within three hours, we know who the winner is, basically. If you're not feeling great, you're out. We saw what happened with Kiefer; he couldn't even play, you know.

So a Grand Slam, it's a long time and you have to stay fit and healthy, you know. We see what happens to players who not feel at 100%. Over five sets, it doesn't forgive.

Now I've got two days off. I have to make sure I stay all right and healthy so I am a 100% against Nadal. You have many hours where you can do stupid things or eat something, and suddenly you're not 100%.

Q. What about yourself compared to 12 months ago on clay? What do you think you do better now?

ROGER FEDERER: I just think it's purely the experience, you know. The big matches, the big occasions I've faced. It's just overall more believing into my game ‑ not only my clay court game, my game in total.

Q. If you do win here, how would this compare to the other Grand Slams that you've won?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's not quite there yet, are we? But that would be definitely a dream come true, you know. Because like you all know, it would mean that I won them all. At 23, 24, that would be quite something.

Not quite there yet, so just relax (smiling)...

Q. Do you think it would have been better to play Nadal in the final, I mean, instead of having one big semifinal for many people counts as a final, and on the other side player which is not you would say same kind of consideration?

ROGER FEDERER: Well that's, I think, dangerous for the one that will come through that semis, you know, if you can back it up with a solid performance in the finals, and be the big favorite in the finals, having already feeling like he's done great, you know. But it's the finals, you don't want to lose. You'd rather lose the semis than lose the finals really.

It's kind of I think a tricky situation for the two of us. But, seriously, I've been in this situation many, many times, so I won't have a problem. I don't think Rafael will have a problem, but he's much younger and not so experienced.

But I don't know, I don't think that will play a role. We'll play the match like there's no tomorrow, basically, you know, and just make sure the one who gets through is very fit and goes at the same again for the finals.

Q. What happened with the three double‑faults? Was it just one of those moments when you lose everything for the moment?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's an awkward moment. Serving for the match. Double break. You're feeling everything's in control, and that's exactly how I felt. So I really started to feel like I'm really hitting my shots beautiful, you know. My forehand was working like I wanted it to work. You know, you miss the first matchpoint. I would say crowd gets more into it. He moved on the one breakpoint, double‑fault again. Suddenly you serve two doubles and you don't feel so good anymore.

Hasn't happened to me in a long, long time, to serve so bad, you know, closing out the match. It just happens, I guess. I was too much in my zone, you know. I was ‑‑ just wanted to get it over and done with too quick. I was so happy the way I was playing, and making my first semifinals appearance, and got a little overexcited there, I guess, just for a couple minutes.

Q. Do you remember the last time you did something like that?

ROGER FEDERER: I remember one time in a satellite I served three double‑faults from the start. So that, I guess, is eight years ago in Switzerland (smiling).

THE MODERATOR: Questions in French, please.

Q. Are you really surprised to find yourself in the semifinal having lost no sets and having played less than 10 hours all together? Are you really surprised?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I'm surprised to find myself in a semifinal. I know that I could, I had this potential. But when you find yourself in a semifinal, I still have two matches to go if I want to win the tournament.

I have the feeling everything is going fast, a bit too fast, and I'm not used to that in a way. I have now two days ahead of me to ponder over things and see what can happen for the future, and I hope to be in great shape for that match against Nadal.

Q. Precisely, let's talk about those two days. What are you going to do during those two days?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I'm taking a vacation (smiling). Many possibilities in two days.

I'll see what I'll do.

Q. Don't you think there is a risk that you would lose the momentum of this tournament, having a break of two days?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I had the same case in the US Open, and it was three or four days' interruption in that case. So I'm not worried about losing the momentum, losing the rhythm.

No, it gives me more time to get prepared to play a lefty. I haven't played a lefty. Here, this time, I haven't played a lefty. I think last time was Hamburg first round. So you have to get used to that. So two days are perfect for that.

Q. You said that you were talking a lot with Tony. Can you say a bit more? Is he somebody who is pushing you or giving you some more calm?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, he relaxes me. During a match he will push me, but when we train he's extremely calm, extremely collected and quiet. He just gives me advice, that's all. But it's all very calm. It's quite normal that we talk to each other. This is exactly the reason why he's here. If he's made such a long trip, this is the reason why, that we can discuss.

Otherwise, we could do it over the phone. We can discuss before the matches, we can discuss after the matches. We talk about all sorts of things. Sometimes it's even about tennis. There is no specific reasons why we discuss or no specific point in tennis that we systematically discuss.

Q. You said that Nadal was a very different player from anybody else. What do you mean exactly?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, we have very few very good lefties. In a way, it's something that we have missed in the last years since we lost Rios and Ivanisevic on the circuit.

We have to get used to play against Nadal because we have very, very few players playing like he does.

Q. A player here never went further than a semifinal, but he won 14 Slams. Does that ring a bell?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I don't think I'm stupid (laughter). I think I know slightly the history of tennis ‑ a little bit.

Q. So can you say something about you and Sampras, because you've been compared quite a lot.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, we've been compared quite a lot, but I play very differently. I'm much more a baseliner than he was. I think the only thing that we have in common is that we have a very aggressive style. We are not staying five meters behind the baseline like the Argentines or the Spaniards. But I think my game is very different from Sampras.

But I would love to have the same results, even without Roland Garros (smiling).

Q. Do you think that you have improved your game match after match here in Roland Garros? You said for the first round that you were not very happy with your serve and your forehand. Have you done something in order to improve your game?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yes. You have various stages in the tournament like this. The first round you're a bit nervous, it's a difficult hurdle, you haven't played on those courts for a year and you have to get adjusted. Everything depends on your game, so you play safe. You don't send your shots too close to the lines, for instance.

And then the second round you are more adjusted, but you're meeting people that are more difficult to play, and, therefore, your level of game has to go up.

I think that today I can be pleased. It was one of my best matches ever. This is why I can say that I'm quite pleased with my level of tennis. It's very important to keep that level, and I'm going to use these two days as best as possible.

Q. Tonight you have the Champions Dinner. Can you tell us, what were the very important moments last year.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, there were many of those. Do you have time, because that will take us quite a lot of time (smiling).

Well, let's be serious. For instance, '99. '99, I had the junior prize. I was playing a challenger, and I came during the tournament. I can't remember who was the Player‑of‑the‑Year; I think it was Sampras. I think he had left already because he had lost, but it was a fantastic evening. It was the very first time in my life.

So 2004 was a very nice memory as well. This year I intend to go. It's always good to be with the ex‑champions.

Q. You played Nadal in the final in Miami and you told us what sort of lessons you could draw from that. How different is it to play against him on clay or on hard surface?

ROGER FEDERER: I cannot answer that question. I haven't played him on clay yet. We will see.

I think the match here is going to be very different from Miami, maybe a bit more sliding, more dropshots. I don't know. I don't know. We'll see.

I can give you the answer after the match.

Q. Do you think he's getting tired?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not at all. He has enough time to recover anyway.

RogiFan88
06-01-2005, 03:50 AM
Federer faces showdown
By Mark Hodgkinson in Paris
(Filed: 01/06/2005)

There was a double sense of satisfaction at Roland Garros yesterday, with Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal reaching the semi-finals and preserving enough energy to suggest that their much-awaited meeting has all the makings of a classic. The sense is that their Friday match may leave the Sunday final as a real afterthought.

Jolly Roger: Federer is yet to drop a set this year at Roland Garros
This is supposed to be the most demanding of the four Grand Slams, fraying players mentally and physically, but the two main contenders have reached the business end of the tournament with a wide-eye freshness and a renewed sense of purpose. It promises more than a few pyrotechnics, the world No 1 against the man of the moment, a teenager playing his first French Open.

The colour and the atmosphere of their matches may have been quite different, Federer continuing with his smooth and cultured run and Nadal showing plenty of urgency and brutality of intent, but they have had little to trouble them thus far. Federer has yet to drop a set, Nadal has lost only one.

Federer, who reached the semi-finals here for the first time in his career, was never in any danger against Victor Hanescu, an unseeded Romanian, and advanced 6-2, 7-6, 6-3. Nadal delighted in his performance in his all-Spanish quarter-final, defeating David Ferrer 7-5, 6-2, 6-0 with his explosive and confrontational game, at one point firing a forehand straight at his opponent from whites-of-the-eyes range.

Federer was in bullish, self-confident mood. "I said from the start that I didn't think my draw was extremely tough," he said. "You know, I just thought that it was a regular draw. It was put to me, 'Look, you got this hell of a tough draw.' And I looked at the draw and I thought, where is this tough draw that everybody is talking about?"

Nadal and Federer will be meeting for the first time on this surface, having avoided each other during the European clay-court season. Their two previous matches have been on a cement court in Key Biscayne, with Nadal defeating the Swiss in the third round last season, and in April this year, when he led the five-set final by two sets to love and then came within two points of victory.

Each can prevent the other from making history. Nadal is attempting to become the first player since Mats Wilander, then an unseeded 17-year-old, to win the French Open on his debut. And Federer has hopes of becoming only the sixth man to win all four Grand Slam events, having already added two Wimbledons, an Australian Open and a US Open to his portfolio of trophies.

Only twice has Federer experienced defeat this season, losing to the Russian Marat Safin in the semi-finals of the Australian Open and to Frenchman Richard Gasquet in the quarter-finals at Monte Carlo. Safin was celebrating his 25th birthday that day, and Nadal will turn 19 on Friday. It would cruel, and fairly bizarre, for Federer if he were to lose to two birthday boys in quick succession at Grand Slam events.

The key period of Nadal's victory was the business end of the first set. He had already saved two set points at 4-5 on his own serve, and he then avoided another with the most astounding of forehands: he was forced almost as wide as the advertising hoardings, and hit the ball on a perfect topspin parabola down the line and just inside the baseline. Ferrer could hardly believe what he had just witnessed, but then Nadal did it all again in the next game, once more ignoring all the geometries and age-old orthodoxies of a tennis court to give himself two break points, converting the second and then serving out the set. Ferrer, suffering with back pain, faded badly in the second and third sets.

Hanescu, the quiet man of tennis, caused Federer no problems, never finding a ploy to bump his opponent off cruise control. The only shock came when Hanescu tried some amateur aerobatics, jumping to attempt a shot through his legs. It was dangerous and potentially very painful.

Andrew Murray, the British top seed, reached the quarter-finals of the junior event with a 6-2, 6-2 win over Gianluca Naso, of Italy.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml;sessionid=5WMCDY1KNT0ATQFIQMFSNAGAVCBQ0 JVC?xml=/sport/2005/06/01/stfedr01.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/06/01/ixtenn.html

Federer and Nadal set up showdown
Stephen Bierley in Paris
Wednesday June 1, 2005
The Guardian

And so, on the ninth day, the semi-final that everybody wanted to see became a reality. Roger Federer, the world No1, beat Romania's Victor Hanescu 6-2, 7-6, 6-3, and Rafael Nadal, the second most successful player on the men's circuit this year, defeated fellow Spaniard David Ferrer 7-5, 6-2, 6-0. The only shame is that their match on Friday will not be the final.
Federer said: "I know everybody is looking forward to it, and for both of us it is the first time we have been in the semi-finals of the French Open. For me it's a big moment. It's one of those chances to walk away with the title here. It will be interesting."

Climactic, perhaps, is the word that would spring to most minds.

It will be their second meeting this year and the third in all. The first was last year at the Nasdaq-100 Open in Key Biscayne, Florida, where Nadal, then only 17, won 6-3, 6-3 in the third round. It was not a score that counted for too much, since Federer was feeling the effects of his Australian Open victory and his tournament win in Indian Wells. He was tired and a little ill.

In April this year, at the same tournament in Key Biscayne, they met for a second time, on this occasion in the final, with the Spanish teenager two points from victory in the third-set tie-break before the Swiss battled back to win 2-6, 6-7, 7-6, 6-3, 6-1.

"In the beginning I didn't play very well that day, and I think I learned how to play him," said Federer yesterday after his routine quarter-final against Hanescu. What surprised the Swiss on that occasion was the way Nadal faded physically. "On clay the rallies can be even tougher and I think you're going to see a lot of hard hitting."

Yesterday's victory over Ferrer was Nadal's 22nd consecutive win on clay, a run that has encompassed the Monte Carlo, Barcelona and Italian Open titles. "Roger will be the favourite, but I think I can win if I play my best tennis, and he doesn't play his best," said Nadal.

Obviously it is a hugely important match for both of them. For Federer, victory would put him on the verge of becoming only the sixth player to have won all four grand slam titles. For Nadal, playing in his first French Open, a win would open the door for an opening grand slam title.

"I don't want to think about it too much because I don't want to put too much pressure on myself, but obviously it will be a wonderful match to play in," said Nadal, who against Ferrer displayed moments of high-octane brilliance, even though the latter was struggling with a bad back.

Before this year Federer had won only nine matches at Roland Garros in six years, losing in the first round in two of the last three years, having reached the last eight in 2001 when he lost to Spain's Alex Corretja. After winning the first set easily against Hanescu, the world No90, Federer underlined his determination by fighting back from a break down in the second to force a tie-break, which he took 7-3.

Only at 5-1 in the third did the world No1 betray any nerves. He failed to covert two match points and lost his serve after committing three double-faults. When he served for the semi-final a second time the Romanian staved off one more match point before hitting a forehand long after just over two hours of play.

Federer knows the pressure he will face on Friday, and his perceptions have changed over the past 12 months. "It's pure experience. The big matches, the big occasions I've faced. It's about believing in my game, not only my clay-court game, my game in total." And so the wait begins, the anticipation immense. As Federer says: "We'll play the game like there's no tomorrow."
http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1496355,00.html

babsi
06-01-2005, 02:49 PM
Thanks,Steven and RogiFan :) :)

lsy
06-01-2005, 03:32 PM
Just saw some highlight of the ITF World Champions Dinner and a short interview with Rogi after he got the award.

Q : so many highlights in 2004, which one stand out among all?

Rogi said have to be defending Wimbledon, especially in the final, it was a tough battle vs Andy, and he turned it around with the rain delay, and definitely also the year end Master Cup coz it's the last tournament of the year and best 8, also he came back from injury, to win that was really special.

Q : you won this same award in junior 6 years ago and I r'ber you saying you hope one day to win the men award, did he really believe he can?

Rogi said well obviously he hoped so and will be great if it happens but doesn't really matter coz at that point, he's more concern on getting on the right path of his career but it's good to be back now esp he's still in the tournament, RG and that's great.

Q : It's always difficult to defend being on top and had so many ranking points to defend but he seems to be still so relax, how did he do that?

Rogi said yeah well it's always his strength to stay relax as a person and not to feel too much pressures, and yes he agrees it's tough to think of those points but it was more worrying at the beginning of his career when things aren't sure, now he has many wins, he just have to play every tournament, prepare well and it has been working great so far.

================================================== ==

Also the commentator talked about Rogi enjoys being around with the old time great players then they mentioned that the interview he had with Rogi and they talk about Roche, Rogi said he's working on hitting a bit more slice, going back to the old days, more slice on the bh and that's what Tony is there taking him on the play.

Anybody notice that?

SUKTUEN
06-01-2005, 04:37 PM
thanks~!!!

Shabazza
06-01-2005, 07:05 PM
Just saw some highlight of the ITF World Champions Dinner and a short interview with Rogi after he got the award.

Q : so many highlights in 2004, which one stand out among all?

Rogi said have to be defending Wimbledon, especially in the final, it was a tough battle vs Andy, and he turned it around with the rain delay, and definitely also the year end Master Cup coz it's the last tournament of the year and best 8, also he came back from injury, to win that was really special.

Q : you won this same award in junior 6 years ago and I r'ber you saying you hope one day to win the men award, did he really believe he can?

Rogi said well obviously he hoped so and will be great if it happens but doesn't really matter coz at that point, he's more concern on getting on the right path of his career but it's good to be back now esp he's still in the tournament, RG and that's great.

Q : It's always difficult to defend being on top and had so many ranking points to defend but he seems to be still so relax, how did he do that?

Rogi said yeah well it's always his strength to stay relax as a person and not to feel too much pressures, and yes he agrees it's tough to think of those points but it was more worrying at the beginning of his career when things aren't sure, now he has many wins, he just have to play every tournament, prepare well and it has been working great so far.

================================================== ==

Also the commentator talked about Rogi enjoys being around with the old time great players then they mentioned that the interview he had with Rogi and they talk about Roche, Rogi said he's working on hitting a bit more slice, going back to the old days, more slice on the bh and that's what Tony is there taking him on the play.

Anybody notice that?

I'm not sure, don't think he plays much more bh slice than usual, but i will look for it during his match against Nadal. Well, if i have the nerv to do that ;)

and thx for the Interviews

TheMightyFed
06-02-2005, 06:40 AM
Great article from "The Hindu" Website:

Sport

The match of the fortnight




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A collision between Swiss imagination and Spanish repetition, writes Rohit Brijnath
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

All summer, as they inadvertently eluded each other on clay, no contest has been so debated or demanded or tantalised the salivary glands, and now fittingly it has arrived in Paris. On Sunday, the French Open men's trophy will be awarded. On Friday, in a semifinal, the tournament will be decided. Roger Federer versus Rafael Nadal. On clay. Tennis nirvana is at hand.

Both men will be eager to eyeball each other across the net for talking has become tiresome. In 11 days, each has done five press conferences, and always the Swiss is asked of the Spaniard, the Spaniard of the Swiss. Both men are polite, it is only on court that they discourteously show rivals the door.

At best, Nadal said Federer was favourite at Wimbledon but there was no absolute favourite at Roland Garros, to which Federer smiled and responded: "That's an interesting way of putting pressure on people. It's clever. He's not stupid."

Federer and Nadal are scarcely equals. One man searches for his fifth Grand Slam title, the other his first Grand Slam final; one man has redefined greatness the other is yet to discover it. But clay, one man's weakest surface, the other's strongest, has given the contest some measure of evenness. When playing Federer, every fractional advantage matters.

If either man wins the title, Friday's victory will give it a certain legitimacy. Federer will be a more authentic champion of clay if he can outplay clay's finest practitioner this season; Nadal's pre-eminence on clay will be complete if he can manhandle tennis' pre-eminent player on it.

Federer is on an 11-match clay streak, Nadal has gone 22 consecutive clay matches without defeat. Federer has not dropped a set in Paris, Nadal only one; Federer has been on court over nine hours, Nadal over 10; Federer has dropped serve eight times, Nadal nine. Neither has been tested, now they will be tried. Bathrooms breaks are not advised for spectators on Friday evening.

Both men have little in common except unruly hair and Nike headbands. Otherwise they play with different hands and represent a clash of cultures. Federer is urbane, stylish and fluent speaker of many languages, Nadal owns warrior genes, muscles that belie his boyishness and brutalises English as he does his opponents. In a duel, Federer might choose a silk shirt and a sabre, Nadal shorts and boxing gloves.

Both have played memorable strokes this fortnight, Federer a drop shot that not so much stopped but went in reverse on landing, Nadal a forehand-on-the-dead-run winner from outside the tramlines that challenged belief.

Federer likes to own the baseline, Nadal is comfortable behind it; Federer is a superb frontrunner, Nadal to win will have to be one. In glib terms, Federer owns a hundred shots while Nadal can play the same shot a hundred times, a collision between Swiss imagination and Spanish repetition.

Federer is a professor of spin, many of them subtle; Nadal hits forehands of furious topspin whose kick television cannot translate but can be seen occasionally in the way it forces players back. Federer will have to muster all his single-handed backhand skills to pass this test; Nadal's double-handed backhand just passes muster.

Nadal has this week been called tennis's finest young talent since Boris Becker; Federer is arguably tennis's finest talent, of this era or any other. The Swiss's tennis is lyrical and sings of confidence, and as he said, when asked if he fears any player, "no one. I'm No. 1. I've beaten everyone." He gives his rivals respect, he says, but as Nadal might discover, he does not confuse it with mercy.

Shabazza
06-02-2005, 09:53 AM
Both men have little in common except unruly hair and Nike headbands. Otherwise they play with different hands and represent a clash of cultures. Federer is urbane, stylish and fluent speaker of many languages, Nadal owns warrior genes, muscles that belie his boyishness and brutalises English as he does his opponents. In a duel, Federer might choose a silk shirt and a sabre, Nadal shorts and boxing gloves.
:lol:
sabre vs boxing gloves - that's a good way to put it :cool:
a very nice article :yeah:

1sun
06-02-2005, 01:40 PM
'He gives his rivals respect, he says, but as Nadal might discover, he does not confuse it with mercy.' DAM FUCKIN RIGHT! i so want ffed to rip nadal a new one and silence the critcis and media who ever question whether roger would win this one.great article.roger al the luck in the world. i hav so many mixed feelings about this match but i can just imagine how im goin to feel if roger wins this one.if he wins it will probably be noted as one of the most important and significant wins in his career ever.

RogiNie
06-02-2005, 02:38 PM
Great article mdhubert, thanks :D

Nathy
06-02-2005, 02:41 PM
Hi all,

A few words to say that Rogi has just been awarded the "Prix Orange" in the FO which is for the most fair-play and the nicer player (in two the words: the fav of the public) :bigclap: :bigclap: :bigclap:

:bounce: GO GO GO ROGER!!! :bounce:

Stevens Point
06-02-2005, 02:45 PM
I am glad that he won the award and not French players nor Nadal!!

Thanks for the info!

mitalidas
06-02-2005, 02:46 PM
Never thought I'd say this: I LOVE THE JOURNALISTS!!!!

The journalists go for Federer
By Benjamin Adler
Thursday, June 2, 2005

As the much-awaited semi-final between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal attracts the full glare of the media spotlight, we sought the opinions of eight knowledgeable journalists who follow the circuit all year round. The majority were tipping Roger.

Christian Despont, Le Temps (Switzerland): Federer
I don't think it will be a close match. One of the two will seize the initiative and win easily. If Roger plays like he did against Kuerten last year, he won't be able to withstand a clay court specialist on his surface. But if he raises his game the way he can, he is untouchable. Roger has the pride of a champion, no fear of pressure and I know he's going to be well prepared for this match.

Roger Jaunin, Le Matin, author of the book "Roger Federer" (Switzerland): Federer
In a way, it's a shame this match isn't the final, but I'm not even sure that its winner will lift the tournament. I'm going for Roger because I feel he's more capable of controlling this type of big game. It may well turn out to be a long match and if it does, Roger has the added advantage of control for the fifth set and is physically fresher. He's a more complete athlete than Nadal.

Chris Clarey, New York Times (United States): Federer
I have faith in Roger's ability to learn and these days he analyses his opponents very effectively. With time and objectivity, he has overcome the "barriers" of clay and now has a clear idea of the way he needs to play on Friday. Roger had not yet drawn on his reserves of energy and he possesses a variety of unique shots that can break down Nadal's defences. It will be a close and spectacular match, but Grosjean caused the Spaniard problems by varying his attacks and no one does that better than Roger.

Philippe Bouin, L'Equipe (France): Federer
The weather will be crucial. If it's hot, like during the Nadal - Gasquet match, the bounce will be high and it will be much tougher for Roger. But if it's cool, he will have more time to turn around his backhand. But Federer is capable of beating Nadal in any weather. He has exceptional variety in his game, possesses a full array of shots and knows how to use them. Nadal has a more limited armoury and what's more, he has had a highly emotional time over the last two months.

Rino Tommasi, Sky Italia (Italy): Federer
The surface may suit Nadal better, but Federer has pure talent on his side. It's a shame this isn't the final. Nadal has the physique of a 23-24-year-old player, and he proved in the final against Coria in Rome that he has the mental toughness. However, Roger gets less tired on court, he expends less energy, and over five sets, that can be a decisive factor. Nadal is not as gifted and does not have the same variety of shots. Roger also has the better serve and is better at the net.

Barry Flatman, Sunday Times (United Kingdom): Nadal
It will be a great match that will still be talked about in several years time. I think Nadal will win it, as he's bursting with confidence and afraid of no one. Federer has a fantastic record in Grand Slam finals, but it's not a final, even if it ought to be. There is a tiny bit more doubt in Federer's mind. He has not yet lost a set so, in my opinion, the first set is going to be extremely important.

Ulbaldo Scanagatta, La Nazione (Italy): Nadal
This game sees the two most prestigious players come face to face. It's a final in all but name. If it's hot, that will favour Nadal as his topspin will kick up even more, his shots will be more lively, forcing Federer to play his backhand above the shoulder. Nadal is an incredible athlete and my money's on him, but the purist in me hopes that Federer wins.

John Roberts, The Independent (United Kingdom): Federer
Roger has more experience and is more mature, but Nadal has the advantage of playing on a surface that suits his style perfectly. A victory for Nadal would be good for tennis, as it would place him firmly in the circle of Federer's main rivals. He would go to the very top. Spain has had many champions since the Manolo Santana era, like Bruguera, Corretja, Moya, and Ferrero. All have elevated tennis in their country to new heights, and now Nadal is also at his zenith. Spain is crazy about him, he has charisma and he's a fighter. He's definitely got the "X factor", but for Federer, this is a great opportunity to make an impression at Roland-Garros and win the tournament. Roger is the superior player and my head says he will win, but my heart hopes it's Nadal.

Nathy
06-02-2005, 02:51 PM
I am glad that he won the award and not French players nor Nadal!!

Thanks for the info!

So am I :)

Not at all, he was on TV to talk a while and the comentator gave him this award :)

Stevens Point
06-02-2005, 02:57 PM
It would have looked strange if the two journalists from Switzerland had picked Nadal, but it is good to see that more non Swiss/Spanish journalists picked Roger as their predicted winner!!!

Thanks for the article!

lsy
06-02-2005, 03:02 PM
Hi all,

A few words to say that Rogi has just been awarded the "Prix Orange" in the FO which is for the most fair-play and the nicer player (in two the words: the fav of the public) :bigclap: :bigclap: :bigclap:

:bounce: GO GO GO ROGER!!! :bounce:

:D Thanks for the info, Nathy!

Who awarded him for it?

babsi
06-02-2005, 03:09 PM
Thanks for the articles --that´s very nice of you all :)

It´s good to know,that most journos think Roger is the better man :)

Nathy
06-02-2005, 03:35 PM
:D Thanks for the info, Nathy!

Who awarded him for it?

Gerard Holtz, the comentator (presentator) on France 3 (a French Channel) :cool:

Roger deserves it soooooo much!! :worship:

SUKTUEN
06-02-2005, 04:09 PM
Thanks ~!!!!!

Many friends support Roger~!!!!!!!!!!! :hug: :hug:

mitalidas
06-02-2005, 04:18 PM
One more


Nadal v Federer - Courier's verdict
Former French Open champion Jim Courier gives BBC Sport the lowdown on the most anticipated match of this year's French Open - Rafael Nadal v Roger Federer.

Courier: "As soon as the draw came out everybody took a sharp intake of breath.
"When you look at the other side of the draw, with Nikolai Davydenko and Mariano Puerta, this really is the de-facto final.

"This is as good as it's going to get. There's been two days of hype to build it up - it's fantastic."

Jim Courier is trying to qualify for The Masters Tennis at the Royal Albert Hall, from 29 November to 5 December.

FOREHAND

Federer - 10/10: It's the best in tennis - it's got everything. He has power, the ability to make angles and counter-attack.

Nadal - 9/10: It's his big shot and he can dominate from the baseline with it.

BACKHAND


I've never seen Federer lose a match because of fatigue
Jim Courier

Federer - 8/10: He's got a lot of variety on it, he can hit slice, top-spin, everything, but it can be attacked and be a little more in and out than his forehand.
Nadal - 8/10: It's basically just a solid two-hander that he uses to keep the ball in play with and allow him to open up his forehand. It does the job for him.

SERVE

Federer - 9/10: A great serve with tons of variety and spin, and it's very difficult to know where it's going.

Nadal - 5/10: He's left-handed but it's not a great serve - he uses it more to start the point, but it gets him into the rallies and that's where he is at his best.

NET GAME

Federer - 9/10: He's very adept at the net and has a real ability to improvise according to any situation.


Nadal - 3/10: I'm not slamming his volleys, but they're an unknown quantity because he spends very little time up at the net. If I was rating my own volleys it would be at a similar level - I can volley, but if I'm hitting low volleys time after time, it's going to be a long day.
STAMINA

Federer - 9/10: I've never seen Federer lose a match because of fatigue.

Nadal - 10/10: He can run all day and he gets an extra point for his enthusiasm.

SPEED

Federer & Nadal - 10/10: Both of these guys have great movement.

MENTAL TOUGHNESS

Federer - 10/10: He has grown into being a great competitor and you only have to look at his winning ratio in finals to see how mentally tough he is.

Nadal - 10/10: He is a natural competitor, a true fighter, and the only player I have ever seen who retreats from the coin-toss like a boxer returning to his corner ready to fight.

WHO'S GOING TO WIN?

Federer - he has the ability to come to the net, he has more experience, and he will really want to win this one because he knows that if he does, and with Davydenko or Puerta waiting in the final, he will almost certainly go on to win the title.

Story from BBC SPORT:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/sport1/hi/tennis/4602259.stm

SUKTUEN
06-02-2005, 04:19 PM
thanks

Shabazza
06-02-2005, 09:03 PM
thx a great interview from Courier - He knows what he's talking about. :yeah:

babsi
06-03-2005, 09:33 AM
thx a great interview from Courier - He knows what he's talking about. :yeah:
Yes,he does :) - Roger still has to win the match - he is the only one who can make you experts look smart:)

Yasmine
06-03-2005, 12:26 PM
Another article about Roger's match up with Nadal ;) from RG website

The journalists go for Federer
By Benjamin Adler
Thursday, June 2, 2005

As the much-awaited semi-final between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal attracts the full glare of the media spotlight, we sought the opinions of eight knowledgeable journalists who follow the circuit all year round. The majority were tipping Roger.

Christian Despont>, Le Temps (Switzerland): Federer
I don't think it will be a close match. One of the two will seize the initiative and win easily. If Roger plays like he did against Kuerten last year, he won't be able to withstand a clay court specialist on his surface. But if he raises his game the way he can, he is untouchable. Roger has the pride of a champion, no fear of pressure and I know he's going to be well prepared for this match.

Roger Jaunin>, Le Matin, author of the book "Roger Federer" (Switzerland): Federer
In a way, it's a shame this match isn't the final, but I'm not even sure that its winner will lift the tournament. I'm going for Roger because I feel he's more capable of controlling this type of big game. It may well turn out to be a long match and if it does, Roger has the added advantage of control for the fifth set and is physically fresher. He's a more complete athlete than Nadal.

Chris Clarey, New York Times (United States): Federer
I have faith in Roger's ability to learn and these days he analyses his opponents very effectively. With time and objectivity, he has overcome the "barriers" of clay and now has a clear idea of the way he needs to play on Friday. Roger had not yet drawn on his reserves of energy and he possesses a variety of unique shots that can break down Nadal's defences. It will be a close and spectacular match, but Grosjean caused the Spaniard problems by varying his attacks and no one does that better than Roger.

Philippe Bouin, L'Equipe (France): Federer
The weather will be crucial. If it's hot, like during the Nadal - Gasquet match, the bounce will be high and it will be much tougher for Roger. But if it's cool, he will have more time to turn around his backhand. But Federer is capable of beating Nadal in any weather. He has exceptional variety in his game, possesses a full array of shots and knows how to use them. Nadal has a more limited armoury and what's more, he has had a highly emotional time over the last two months.

Rino Tommasi, Sky Italia (Italy): Federer
The surface may suit Nadal better, but Federer has pure talent on his side. It's a shame this isn't the final. Nadal has the physique of a 23-24-year-old player, and he proved in the final against Coria in Rome that he has the mental toughness. However, Roger gets less tired on court, he expends less energy, and over five sets, that can be a decisive factor. Nadal is not as gifted and does not have the same variety of shots. Roger also has the better serve and is better at the net.

Barry Flatman, Sunday Times (United Kingdom): Nadal
It will be a great match that will still be talked about in several years time. I think Nadal will win it, as he's bursting with confidence and afraid of no one. Federer has a fantastic record in Grand Slam finals, but it's not a final, even if it ought to be. There is a tiny bit more doubt in Federer's mind. He has not yet lost a set so, in my opinion, the first set is going to be extremely important.

Ulbaldo Scanagatta, La Nazione (Italy): Nadal
This game sees the two most prestigious players come face to face. It's a final in all but name. If it's hot, that will favour Nadal as his topspin will kick up even more, his shots will be more lively, forcing Federer to play his backhand above the shoulder. Nadal is an incredible athlete and my money's on him, but the purist in me hopes that Federer wins.

John Roberts, The Independent (United Kingdom): Federer
Roger has more experience and is more mature, but Nadal has the advantage of playing on a surface that suits his style perfectly. A victory for Nadal would be good for tennis, as it would place him firmly in the circle of Federer's main rivals. He would go to the very top. Spain has had many champions since the Manolo Santana era, like Bruguera, Corretja, Moya, and Ferrero. All have elevated tennis in their country to new heights, and now Nadal is also at his zenith. Spain is crazy about him, he has charisma and he's a fighter. He's definitely got the "X factor", but for Federer, this is a great opportunity to make an impression at Roland-Garros and win the tournament. Roger is the superior player and my head says he will win, but my heart hopes it's Nadal.

Translation: David Spratt (Sportstranslations)

babsi
06-03-2005, 01:39 PM
Thanks,Yasmin :)
I´m almost to nervos to read right now :(

SUKTUEN
06-03-2005, 04:49 PM
thanks a lot

RogiNie
06-04-2005, 07:24 PM
Roger's interview :) I'm glad he smiled and made jokes although he lost..




Q. Very difficult moment for you to have to analyze what happened out there, but could you try for us, please.

ROGER FEDERER: Simple version for me is, uhm, started bad and finished bad basically (smiling), was good in the middle ‑ and that was not good enough. That's like the short and simple version.

Of course, you know, afterwards you go further, but that's for me what I sum up right now.

Q. You seemed to find a formula in the second set. You got on his backhand with a lot of topspin. You couldn't seem to sustain it. Any explanation of why you weren't hitting the ball the way you normally do?

ROGER FEDERER: You know, you got to understand, you're not going to see the same guy out on the court against a totally different player. You know, the points are played a different way. The kick doesn't bounce to his backhand, it bounces to his forehand. So it changes everything.

You never got to forget that, so you will never see me play the same way like I will play Marat, Andy and Lleyton, let's say, compared to this guy, you know.

I think that's, again, what didn't do me very good, you know. It was the start, basically get used to it, again, to his lefty spin, you know. Kind of always takes me a while to figure out. It's not good, you know, to lose a set until you kind of figure it out.

But all in all I'm not so happy with my performance, to be honest, you know. I think there was definitely a better chance to do better today because I didn't feel like he was much better than me today. You know, I really thought I had the keys to beat him today, and it was just unfortunate that I wasn't at my best.

Q. Did you at any time in the match appeal to the chair umpire to halt because of darkness and pick it up tomorrow?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I could hardly see the ball in the end, you know. I am disappointed we continued. I don't want to say it was a coin toss or anything in the end, you know. I paid poorly to finish off the match. You know, he was just consistent and solid.

I wished we could have continued tomorrow. But I guess it's too late now.

Q. You're in a more difficult position than in Miami, but you managed to come back from that. Did you try to draw on that experience? Did you think you could come back?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, at sort of Love‑15 down in the last game, yeah. You think, "Yeah, let's do it like in Miami." But you don't just pull a rabbit out of the hat, do you? It's sort of tough to do, you know, especially against him. He's so solid, you know.

So that's why I look at that result in my Miami as a very big result in my career because, coming back from two sets to love is enormous, plus he was up a break, plus he was up in the breaker eventually. To come back in the heat, you know, like this against him, that was a great effort.

Q. Throughout the tournament he's been saying that you're the favorite, playing down his chances. Do you think that was a tactic on his part? What do you think about that?

ROGER FEDERER: Really confused me, it really did. Took it very lightly today, so (smiling)... :rolls:

Q. Apart from what's happening in the second, third or even fourth set, can we establish there is an invisible law, like a law of gravity, there's a law of clay, that even most complete player has less chances than the first‑class specialist for clay? Pete Sampras never made it. You failed last year and this year. Do you think this kind of law exists ‑ like law of gravity, it's invisible, but it exists. John McEnroe, Edberg, Becker. You failed last year, you failed this year.

ROGER FEDERER: What do you want me to say?

Q. Do you feel the most complete player has less chances than the first‑class clay specialist?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I don't believe.

Q. Let's put it another way. How determined does this defeat tonight make you come back one day and win this title?

ROGER FEDERER: I mean, my disappointment, it's obvious. You know, I was far down in the tournament, you know. Wasn't much left between, you know, this and the finals, and maybe a chance to win it, you know.

But I don't know, the disappointment is still in ‑‑ I would say it's in control. I'm not going to destroy the locker room and never play tennis again, you know. I'm not at that point. So I feel like the motivation's big, you know, to come back the next few years and to do better, you know. So I still got more left in me at the French Open, which, at the moment, is a good sign.

Q. How much of a favorite do you make Rafa for the final?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I guess they play similar games, huh? Now how he matches up against a left‑hander, it's tough for me to tell, you know. But I would pick him as a favorite, you know, for what he's gone through.

But he would also be a little bit stupid if he would underestimate Puerta. I think he knows the danger. It's going to be a tough final, I hope.

Q. Do you feel Rafa deserved the victory? Do you feel Rafa has improved since your Miami match?

ROGER FEDERER: Oh, I mean, of course he has. He deserved his victory. He was the better player tonight. Never take anything away from somebody who beat me, because I was trying my best. At times I played good; sometimes I didn't play so good.

But I didn't feel like he's a totally different player to Miami. I mean, it's only two months ago. It's not much time to really improve your game. Even on clay, you know, he should have beaten me in three sets in Miami. And here I was already at four sets.

I know I can beat him on any surface, which is good to know, because he's going to be a threat in the future. It's a pity, you know, he beat me here in the semis of a Slam, which is tough.

Q. We know how well he can play on clay. We think he's pretty darn good on hard court. Is it possible that tonight we saw the two best players in the world on the court, any surface?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, I don't quite agree with you. Once I play this guy, he's the best with me. Then the next time I play Andy, and he's the best again, you know. You guys could be a little more consistent.

These guys are going to be heavy favorites for Wimbledon ‑ Hewitt, Roddick and Safin, in my eyes. And Rafael is coming in with very little preparation, you know. But I still believe he's going to be good on grass, too. No question.

The guys who make it to the Top 5, they can play on any surface. It's how tennis work. Just one clay court season doesn't say you're good on clay and bad on the rest of the surfaces, you know.

But this was definitely a big match of my career and of this year. But the other guys are for me, in my eyes, as good as Rafael.

Q. What do you feel let you down most? Your serve? Your forehand?

ROGER FEDERER: A little bit of both, yeah. I mean, definitely there's times where my serve didn't work the way I wanted it to. I think for a while I had ‑‑ it was my feeling, I had a great first serve percentage. That definitely dropped. My forehand was working well, and then suddenly didn't work that well.

Got to go through it with Tony and see why this happened because usually my forehand's the most consistent shot in my game.

Q. Will it take more of looking at his spin and more matches to really get it?

ROGER FEDERER: His spin is definitely one of the issues. You know, he's got incredible spin. And it's just, like I said, it's a different match if you play him. Not so easy because now we have two lefties in the final, okay, but we don't have many in the top hundred, so...

Q. You said very clearly that you had difficulty to play well throughout the match. What do you credit this ability to in such a match?

ROGER FEDERER: I didn't understand your question.

Q. You said very clear that you had a hard time playing well through the match. What do you credit this difficulty?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know. I think I don't know right now. It's too close to the match. But I spoke briefly to Tony, and what he felt, you know. That was ‑‑ we quickly analyzed what we thought. It was just too much up and down. But that's definitely got something to do with the opponent.

I give it a hundred percent and it's not good enough.

Q. You say it's more to the opponent than something you were not able to do?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you know, it's tough to impose yourself on clay over five sets, it's obvious, against him. He's going to make you hit tough shots. And especially him being a lefty mixes everything up. You know, I think I've been clear on this.

THE MODERATOR: Questions in French.

Q. We felt you were a bit nervous at a certain time, especially when a spectator spoke to you during the fourth set. Did this bother you or not necessarily?

ROGER FEDERER: No. The public was absolutely fantastic. It's almost like as if it was a victory for me when you have the public with you, supporting you. That's why I'm not that disappointed, because the public really supported me. They wanted to see a longer match.

It's as if you had won the tournament. It's very difficult to have the support of the public here in Paris without doing much. I won quite a bit of their support, and this was really great. When somebody says in five sets between the first and the second, it's wonderful.

Q. Were your feet aching?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I was in good shape physically, so that's why I'm disappointed, because I missed the opportunity to reach a fifth set. I'm not even that tired. The points weren't as hard to win as in Miami. Maybe I'm wrong or maybe I've improved physically, but my feet aren't aching and I'm fine.

Q. Were you bothered by the wind? You missed quite a few forehands. Was that due to that?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, wind is never helping you. It makes the ball sway a bit more. I think it was rather the opponent, how the day evolved.

Q. What was the difference between you and Nadal today?

ROGER FEDERER: I think he was more consistent, he was more constant throughout the match. I was a bit less consistent. I did a good job in the beginning and not that well afterwards. I think I didn't do such a great match. I could have played a better match. He was okay, but he was not very consistent.

Q. We felt you were a bit hesitant as far as tactics. What was your strategy when you started? You wanted to be more aggressive or you wanted to remain on the baseline?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I would have rather started off on the baseline, and if there were a shorter ball, I would have attacked and come to the net. At one point you start reflecting whether you're going to go up to the net on such a shot or not. This has to do with his game because if you go to the net, you're going to get a topspin shot. Sometimes I was confident, other times I wasn't. I was trying to get a winning point on my forehand. I think that my tactics were okay, but I should have played a bit better, and that's exactly what I wasn't able to do.

lina_seta
06-04-2005, 09:26 PM
great interview roger!! =) some ppl cut parts from it to make him look arrogant HOW UNFAIR!! >=(

u can ALWAYS TELL that roger's talking by the constant "you know"..
as u can tell that nadal is talking by his "no?" at the end of sentences heheh

lunahielo
06-04-2005, 09:29 PM
Terrific interview. Thanks lina_seta~
I really like his *short version* at the beginning.
He tells it like it was.

SUKTUEN
06-05-2005, 11:50 AM
Roger will kick Nadal's Ass next time!~!!!

Shabazza
06-05-2005, 12:16 PM
great Interview from Roger - always giving good answers even when he lose

babsi
06-05-2005, 08:57 PM
great Interview from Roger - always giving good answers even when he lose
Yes,he does :)

Thanks for posting :)

Daniel
06-05-2005, 10:15 PM
thanks :)

Daniel
06-05-2005, 10:28 PM
PARIS (AFP) - Rafael Nadal has proved he is as good as it gets on claycourts but Roger Federer believes he also has what it takes to excel on grass.

ADVERTISEMENT

Federer was the latest victim of Nadal's amazing unbeaten run on clay in the semi-finals of the French Open late Friday.

The top seed lost 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 and he now heads begins his preparations for a third straight Wimbledon crown.

The quick grasscourts in London are the antithesis of the slow claycourts in Paris and few players have managed to master both in the same summer.

In recent times, Swedish legend Bjorn Borg was the only man who successfully switched from one to the other in the space of two or three weeks, doing it an incredible five times in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

Since then the likes of Pete Samras, John McEnroe, Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg have come up short at Roland Garros, while the Spanish and South American claycourters who have dominated in Paris have failed miserably in London.

Federer is the latest to struggle in the French Open, falling for the seventh time against Nadal but he thinks the 19-year-old Spaniard has the game one day to pull off the difficult double.

"The guys that are going to be heavy favourites for Wimbledon are Hewitt, Roddick and Safin in my eyes," he said.

"And Rafael is coming in with very little preparation, but I still believe he's going to be good on grass too. No question.

"The guys who make it to the top five, they can play on any surface. It's how tennis works.

"Just one clay court season doesn't say you're good on clay and bad on the rest of the surfaces."

Unlike in ths year's French Open Nadal will not be making his Wimbledon debut later this month.

He won through to the third round in 2003 at just 17, the youngest player to do so since Boris Becker in 1984, before losing to Thailand's Paradorn Srichaphan, but he did not play last year due to an injury to his left ankle.

But win or lose, Nadal looks set to make his mark at Wimbledon for his flamboyant sporting attire.

Wearing an Apache-like bandana, a long, green, sleeveless shirt and three-quarter-length white pants, he has cut a dashing figure at Roland Garros where the dress code is relaxed.

But Wimbledon has been known to be stuffier about what players wear although the main provision is usually that their clothes be predominately white.

Nadal says he fully intends to keep his pants on in London pointing out cleverly that men used to play in long trousers up until World War II.

Daniel
06-05-2005, 10:29 PM
The fourth seed is now one match away from emulating Mats Wilander's feat of 1983 by winning the Roland Garros title on his debut in Paris.

"Being in the final is a dream," said Nadal after the two-hour 47-minute victory.

"I've just beaten the man who's the number one to me, not only for his tennis but also as a person."

Top seeded Federerbowed out by hitting a forehand long on the first match point.

"Started bad and finished bad basically," said Federer, who had his chances but could not produce his very best tennis when it counted.

"Was good in the middle and that was not good enough.

"I'm not going to destroy the locker room and never play tennis again, you know. I'm not at that point.

"The motivation's big to come back the next few years and to do better."

Fourth seed Nadal extended his winning streak on clay to 23 matches and will be the overwhelming favourite to take the title when he faces Puerta in Sunday's final.

The unseeded Puerta advanced by wearing down Russian Nikolay Davydenko 6-3 5-7 2-6 6-4 6-4 earlier on a stormy day.

Looking slightly nervous and struggling with his serve, Federer was broken in the opening game of the first set and again in the fifth.

The two players then traded breaks and Nadal, leading 5-2, served for the set, only to be broken.

The Spaniard reacted straight away and broke Federer in the following game to take that first set in 43 minutes with the 23-year-old Swiss netting a forehand.

The momentum swung Federer's way in the second set as the Swiss built a 5-1 lead before being broken while serving for the set, which he eventually took with Nadal netting a backhand.

The tense fight continued in the third set until Nadal broke Federer in the sixth game with a sharp volley.

Federer underlined his mental strength by breaking back immediately but Nadal, determined not to give anything away, captured his opponent's serve again in the 10th game, taking the set with another forehand winner.

Nadal came back from an early break in the fourth set and took control of the match, meeting each of his winners with his trademark fist-pumps and yells.

A raging volley gave the burly left-hander with the devastating forehand two match points.

He only needed one, prevailing just before darkness fell.

Daniel
06-05-2005, 10:29 PM
Nadal turns 19, KOs Federer on same day
Spaniard dazzles top-ranked player; Puerta next in final
By DALE ROBERTSON
Copyright 2005 Houston Chronicle
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• Dale Robertson's notebook: On Tennis: It's all sunshine and finals for the new prince



PARIS - It's possible there wasn't a man anywhere on the planet Friday who could have deprived Roger Federer of his first French Open final.

Unfortunately, Federer was playing a boy.

No ordinary boy, though. Oh no. On his 19th birthday, Rafael Nadal established beyond any reasonable doubt that he is the finest clay-court player in the world. The Spanish teenager also served formal notice to the still-best player in the world on every other surface that he had better watch his back.

What looms as tennis' next great rivalry reached full bloom on Court Central. Nadal, the fearless, ferocious and often audacious young lefthander, repeatedly broke Federer's serve — nine times in all — and, finally, his spirit, winning the last five games of the nearly two-hour, 47-minute slugfest to prevail 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3.

"It's a dream for me," Nadal said. "I am in my first final. I won today against the No. 1 — not only the No. 1 player for tennis, but the No. 1 for the person (he is) and for his (sportsmanship). Beat Federer in the semifinal of a Grand Slam? Is incredible."

Nadal's sixth consecutive victory in his French Open debut and his 23rd in a row overall organized a rendezvous Sunday with Mariano Puerta, the surprising Argentine, and the first final between two lefties here in 59 years.

Does that bode well for Puerta? Not if Nadal, seeded fourth and ranked fifth, stays on the same relentless tear he has been on since letting Federer off the hook in the Nasdaq-100 Open.

The unseeded Puerta, a first-round loser in the U.S. Clay Court Championships at Houston in April, came from two-sets-to-one down to defeat Nikolay Davydenko 6-3, 5-7, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 and reach his first Grand Slam final, too.

"I would pick (Nadal) for the favorite, after what he's (done)," Federer said. "But he would also be a little bit stupid if he underestimates Puerta. I think he knows the danger. Now we see how he matches up with another lefthander."

Federer conceded Nadal's deadly reverse spin befuddles him. Committing 62 unforced errors to Nadal's 32, he definitely did not play up to his usual excellent standards, which had produced 46 victories in 48 matches in 2005 plus six tournament titles.

Still, the match proved worthy of its hype, offering a sufficient quantity of riveting exchanges to keep the crowd of more than 15,000 entranced until the end, when Nadal coaxed one last errant forehand from Federer with darkness descending on Paris.

Because the semifinal card had been delayed at the outset for 1 1/2 hours by heavy rain, the City of Light was twinkling by the time the top seed was ushered out of the only Grand Slam he has not won.

Had a fifth set been necessary, it would have been played today. Federer was of the opinion, not surprisingly, that the fourth set should have been carried over.

"I could hardly see the ball in the end," he said. "I played poorly to finish off the match, (so) I am disappointed we continued. I wish we could have continued tomorrow. But I guess it's too late now."

In perfect light at the outset, Nadal broke Federer, sending the message that it would not be a stroll in the Bois de Bologne next door for a guy who has grown used to lazy afternoons in the park. But, having had to dig out of that two-set-and-a-break jam in Miami, he never expected Nadal to act his age.

"I started bad and finished bad, basically," Federer said. "I was good in the middle, but that's not good enough. It took me a while to figure out his lefty spin. It's not good to lose a set while you are figuring something out."

Federer got the first break of the fourth set and seemed pointed back in the right direction, but then his forehand went awry without a warning. So there would be no escaping this time around.

"Love-15 (ahead) in the last game," Federer said, "you think, 'Yeah, let's do it like Miami.' But you don't just pull a rabbit out of a hat, do you?"

Not against Nadal on the red dirt, you don't. He is 37-2 on clay this year.

Puerta, ranked 37th when the tournament began, also had rallied from a two-sets-to-one deficit in his five-set triumph over countryman Guillermo Cañas in the quarterfinals Wednesday. The adrenaline might be flowing, but he badly needs another day off to prepare for Nadal's onslaught.

The Ukrainian-born Russian Davydenko, who turned 24 Thursday, failed to serve out a victory in the semifinals against Tommy Robredo, but he prevailed nonetheless. Presented with essentially the same opportunity against Puerta, leading 4-2 in the fifth, he was broken again. And this time, he could not recover.

Puerta ran off the final four games of his match, finishing it appropriately with a screaming inside-out forehand — easily his best weapon of the French fortnight — with a deep approach that Davydenko barely nicked.

lunahielo
06-05-2005, 10:44 PM
Thanks, Daniel.........:wavey:
Roger is still the best. We all know it~~
It just wasn't meant for him to go farther at RG.

Take Halle and your beloved Wimbledon, Ninja~!!

Grass~~glorious grass~~at last!

soonha
06-06-2005, 07:58 AM
...ATP Race correction Sunday from the ITF: "Rafael Nadal will remain in second place on the ATP Race today even if he wins the 2005 Roland Garros title. The Spaniard will in fact tie (Roger) Federer for 665 points, but Federer will take the top spot because more of his points will have been earned at the mandatory events." ...

You're the Eternal No.1, Roger. Nobody can touch this! :bowdown:

Shabazza
06-06-2005, 02:09 PM
...ATP Race correction Sunday from the ITF: "Rafael Nadal will remain in second place on the ATP Race today even if he wins the 2005 Roland Garros title. The Spaniard will in fact tie (Roger) Federer for 665 points, but Federer will take the top spot because more of his points will have been earned at the mandatory events." ...

You're the Eternal No.1, Roger. Nobody can touch this! :bowdown:
He is! :cool:
Nice ava soonha btw. :)

babsi
06-06-2005, 02:49 PM
Thanks,Daniel - busy as allways :)

Thanks,soonah - for the clearing up - Roger will race ahead of Nadal from now on :)

Shabazza
06-06-2005, 02:53 PM
Thanks,Daniel - busy as allways :)

Thanks,soonah - for the clearing up - Roger will race ahead of Nadal from now on :)
Definitely, no question about that! :)

Stevens Point
06-06-2005, 03:31 PM
From Gerry Weber Open website!

http://www.gerryweber-open.de/Bilder/federer200px(2).jpg

Federer seeks GERRY WEBER OPEN hattrick
Montag, 06.06.2005

World number one Roger Federer hopes the GERRY WEBER OPEN will give him a confidence booster ahead of Wimbledon. “The decisive time of the season is about to start,” Federer said at a crowded press conference in Halle. “This tournament is very important for me. I hope to win it again to get in good shape for Wimbledon. I need to be at the top of my game to defend my title in England and also finish the year as the top-ranked player.”
Federer, despite his semi-finals exit at Roland Garros, was pleased with his performance at the French Open. “I have never reached the semi-finals in Paris so I was very happy. The loss against Nadal didn´t mean the end of the world for me.” Federer hopes Spanish sensation Rafael Nadal “stays in the tournament long enough” to potentially meet in the semi-finals”.
“I will have revenge on my mind and I do fancy my chances on grass,” said Federer. “I´m more of a favourite on this surface because my game is suited for grass.” Federer was full of praise for the 19-year-old Nadal. “I was impressed by the way he shook off the pressure at the French Open,” said Federer. “It´s good for the sport of tennis that he won the tournament. There is enough pepper in tennis at the moment.”
Before he crosses Nadal´s path again, Federer has a first-round clash with Sweden´s Robin Soederling ahead. “That will be tough – he will be no push-over.” Federer considers Andy Roddick, Sebastien Grosjean and Lleyton Hewitt as favourites to win Wimbledon “due to their experience”. “But Tim Henman is always a favourite in that tournament,” stated Federer.
Federer believes “a new breed of young players” is out to make some noise on the tour. “Players like Nadal, Richard Gasquet or Tomas Berdych just live their dream. They have nothing to lose and play with a lot of energy. “But it will be tough for them to supplant me from the top spot,” he added with a smile. (picture: pmk)

lsy
06-06-2005, 03:31 PM
No trophy from RG, but at least Rogi got an orange :hug: :yippee:
(guess who got a lemon :tape: )

I think this is the award that Nathy mentioned Rogi got the other day...voted by the journalists/reporters I think...

=========================================

For those of you who read French :

http://www.orange-citron.org/

Le joueur ou la joueuse au meilleur "esprit sportif", (fair-play et qualités humaines) vis à vis de la presse et du public.
"It's the player we love to love." :hearts:

Gustavo KUERTEN dit : "It means much more than just winning tournaments, points, money... It's an honour for myself a human being it's great achivement..."

Prix Orange (Presse) 25eme anniversaire : Guy FORGET

Prix Orange du Public 2005 : Roger FEDERER

http://www.orange-citron.org/images/illustrations/orange/2005.jpg

lunahielo
06-06-2005, 03:36 PM
Originally posted by [b]soonha]/b]
...ATP Race correction Sunday from the ITF: "Rafael Nadal will remain in second place on the ATP Race today even if he wins the 2005 Roland Garros title. The Spaniard will in fact tie (Roger) Federer for 665 points, but Federer will take the top spot because more of his points will have been earned at the mandatory events." .

thanks for this good news, soonha......

Go Rogi!!.

SUKTUEN
06-06-2005, 03:53 PM
Thankyou so much for the wonderful photo~~

Nathy
06-06-2005, 05:33 PM
No trophy from RG, but at least Rogi got an orange :hug: :yippee:
(guess who got a lemon :tape: )

I think this is the award that Nathy mentioned Rogi got the other day...voted by the journalists/reporters I think...


Yes it is what I was talking about, you're absolutely right Isy :) Thanks anyway for posting this link and article :hug:

Nocko
06-06-2005, 06:11 PM
Thanks for many good articles!! :worship: :worship:

RogiFan88
06-06-2005, 07:08 PM
- - > TOURNAMENT TALES:

-- > The week before Roland Garros was a busy time for world No. 1 ROGER FEDERER. The Swiss star received the Laureus World Sportsman of the Year award on Monday night in Portugal, celebrated until 4am and then flew to Paris to get as much practice as possible on the Roland Garros Philippe Chatrier court, the main arena of the French Open. Federer also kept busy off the court with several media opportunities, doing interviews and photo shoots for publications such as Men's Vogue, The New Yorker, Paris Match, Le Figaro, L'Equipe and Le Parisien.

Nathy
06-06-2005, 07:40 PM
He is always available :worship:

SUKTUEN
06-07-2005, 04:29 PM
thanks

soonha
06-07-2005, 08:04 PM
Off-form Federer overcomes Soderling in Halle

Tue Jun 7, 2005 5:02 PM BST
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BERLIN, June 7 (Reuters) - An out-of-sorts Roger Federer was given a stern test by Sweden's Robin Soderling before coming through his first round match at the Halle Open on Tuesday.

The Swiss world number one and top seed, normally so dominant on grass, was playing his first match since losing to Spaniard Rafael Nadal on clay in the French Open semi-finals last week, eventually beating the Swede 6-7 7-6 6-4.

"It was harder than I expected and defeat was certainly very close today," Federer told DSF television. "I knew the match would be very tough but thankfully not so tough that I am out of the tournament."

An inspired Soderling, ranked 35 in the world, took the first set and pushed Federer all the way, playing some thumping passing strokes and breaking the Wimbledon champion back in the third set to temporarily stay in contention.

Federer, who could meet Nadal in the Halle semis, said he had trouble with his returns and was lacking match practice on grass.

"There were definitely some good moments but I am pleased I have another match to play before Wimbledon," he said.

"I think in general I need to come to the net more energetically and finish off the points more effectively."

Play was interrupted in the sixth game of the final set with Soderling serving when the normally unflappable Federer complained that the Swede had stopped playing in the middle of a point after the ball appeared to land out.

Soderling, 20, went on to win the replayed point and that game but Federer broke him again at 4-5 to extend his winning streak on grass to 25 matches.

"Afterwards he won the point anyway by serving an ace and then jeered right into my face so it's certainly a problem with him right now," Federer said of the incident.

The Wimbledon champion will play Germany's Florian Mayer in the second round.

Earlier on Tuesday, former French Open champion Juan Carlos Ferrero beat Vladimir Voltchkov of Belarus 6-7 6-4 6-4.

RogiFan88
06-07-2005, 08:53 PM
BASEL05

Rafa will play Rogi's tourney!

Nathy
06-07-2005, 08:59 PM
BASEL05

Rafa will play Rogi's tourney!

Will Roger play there? If so, that's good so that they meet in the Final and Roger wins at home against "the new King (of clay)" :p

Yasmine
06-07-2005, 09:22 PM
No I think Roger is not playing Basel this year;) Someone corrects me if I'm wrong;)

Mrs. B
06-07-2005, 09:28 PM
BASEL05

Rafa will play Rogi's tourney!

he's been there the last 2 years.

Nathy
06-07-2005, 10:35 PM
No I think Roger is not playing Basel this year;) Someone corrects me if I'm wrong;)

They say he would on Swiss TV :confused: He is not playing in Gstaad but I think he'll play in Basel...

Shabazza
06-07-2005, 11:19 PM
They say he would on Swiss TV :confused: He is not playing in Gstaad but I think he'll play in Basel...
yep he won't play Gstaad, but I haven't heard smething about him skiping Basel!

Stevens Point
06-07-2005, 11:25 PM
The moderator of the highlights vs Soderling which I posted in Gerry Weber Open Thread says before the video ends that Roger and Nadal confirmed today that they will be playing in Basel in late October this year. He speaks Swiss German, but Stafan, you should be able to understand him! :)

Shabazza
06-08-2005, 12:00 AM
The moderator of the highlights vs Soderling which I posted in Gerry Weber Open Thread says before the video ends that Roger and Nadal confirmed today that they will be playing in Basel in late October this year. He speaks Swiss German, but Stafan, you should be able to understand him! :)
I watched it and yes he said that Nadal and Roger will play in Basel. :)

Nathy
06-08-2005, 12:05 AM
The moderator of the highlights vs Soderling which I posted in Gerry Weber Open Thread says before the video ends that Roger and Nadal confirmed today that they will be playing in Basel in late October this year. He speaks Swiss German, but Stafan, you should be able to understand him! :)

I did understand :p but wasn't sure of it ;)

Stevens Point
06-08-2005, 01:43 AM
Don't they have the interview in English??

OK, the interview in German, and my rough translation follows. Meine Deutsch-sprechende Freundinnen und Freunde, wenn ihr findet, was nicht stimmt, bitte korrigiert ihr!! Danke! :worship: )

Pressekonferenz mit Roger Federer (SUI) nach seinem Sieg gegen Robin Söderling (SWE).

? Roger, verglichen mit dem letzten Jahr war das ein erheblich schwierigerer Start, oder?

! Ja, das stimmt natürlich. Ich hatte viel weniger Zeit zur Vorbereitung als in den letzten zwei, drei Jahren, als ich immer spätestens am Mittwoch vor dem Turnierstart hier war, weil ich in Paris früher ausgeschieden war. Auf diese Weise konnte ich mich immer viel intensiver auf die Rasensaison vorbereiten. Jetzt komme ich von einem harten French-Open-Wochenende und bin nicht so frisch wie ich es gern wäre. Ich bin ja erst seit eineinhalb Tagen hier. Es war also hart, deshalb bin ich auch sehr glücklich, durchgekommen zu sein. Es war, wie erwartet, ein sehr enges Match.

? Hatten Sie so ein enges Match wirklich erwartet?

! Naja, man erwartet schon ein hartes, enges Match, aber dieses war ja schon ein bisschen mehr als das: Er war zwei Punkte davon entfernt, mich zu schlagen. Gut, letztlich habe ich gewonnen, und diese Art Matches sind sehr wichtig. Ich habe schon eine Menge solcher Matches gespielt und anschließend das Turnier gewonnen, das können also schon wegweisende Spiele sein. Natürlich hofft man während des Matches, dass es leichter geht. Hätte ich verloren, würde ich jetzt hier sitzen und hätte keine Matches mehr vor Wimbledon zu spielen, außer dem Doppel morgen Die Sache sähe also ganz anders aus. Aber jetzt kann ich nach vorn schauen, und das selbstbewusst, weil ich in allen Matches, die ich hier noch spiele, der Favorit bin. Ich muss versuchen, diesen Bonus zu nutzen und mich gut auf Wimbledon vorzubereiten. Nicht alle Sachen waren heute total schlecht, es war eigentlich sogar eine sehr ordentliche Vorstellung, aber Söderling spielte eben auch richtig gutes Tennis. Ich glaube, er hat gut daran getan, meinen Service sehr lang zu returnieren, mich an der Grundlinie zu halten und aggressiv zu spielen. Dass es heut so ein enges Spiel wurde, hat viel mit ihm zu tun.

? Was war passiert, als Sie sich im dritten Satz setzen hinsetzten und der Oberschiedsrichter auf den Court kam? Ein Problem mit dem Linienrichter?

! Nein, kein Problem mit dem Linienrichter. Der Ball prallte auf, Söderling fragte mich schon nach dem Call des Linienrichters und spielte dann doch normal weiter. Das ist glaube ich nicht sehr fair von ihm. Er hat den Punkt weitergespielt, nachdem auch er offensichtlich glaubte, der Ball sei 'aus' gewesen. Er hat auch gestutzt, dass sie ihn nicht ausgegeben haben. Das ist dann nicht sehr fair, dann weiterzuspielen. Dann spielte er einen Stop, das Publikum raunte, ich spielte einen Volley, und er machte den Punkt. Viele Sachen vorher waren auch schon etwas seltsam. Dies waren die Gründe, warum ich den Oberschiedsrichter sehen wollte. Ich wollte wissen, was er dazu zu sagen hat, weil ich mit den Argumenten des Stuhlschiedsrichters nicht einverstanden war. Es ist natürlich ein schweres Los für den Stuhlschiedsrichter, aber ich dachte wirklich, dass er den Ballwechsel unterbricht. Stattdessen brachte er einige seltsame Argumente: "Wir spielen hier nicht auf Sand!" Außerdem habe ich ihn gefragt, ob er nicht auch gesehen habe, dass Söderling aufgehört hat zu spielen, und er sagte "Ja". Das machte für mich keinen Sinn. Naja, ich fand diese Erklärungen jedenfalls etwas seltsam und wollte eine Wiederholung des Punktes. Alles in allem eine etwas unglückliche Situation.

? Was erwarten Sie von Ihrem nächsten Gegner Florian Mayer?

! Er spielt ein komplett anderes Tennis als die meisten anderen Spieler, hat eine sehr andere Technik. Es wird interessant sein zu sehen, wie es ist, gegen ihn zu spielen, weil ich bisher nur im letzten Jahr in Wimbledon mit ihm trainiert habe. Man denkt immer, er würde viel schlechter spielen als er es eigentlich tut. Ich weiß, dass er gefährlich ist, weil ich ihn schon viele tolle Matches habe spielen sehen. Es ist jetzt das erste Mal seit einiger Zeit, dass er nicht mehr so konstant auf hohem Niveau spielt, trotzdem bleibt er gefährlich, gerade in Deutschland.

? Glauben Sie, das Federer-Nadal-Duell wird das beherrschende in den nächsten Jahren?

! Ja, könnte sein, es gibt da aber auch ein paar, die eine andere Meinung haben. Wir sollten die anderen nicht vergessen: Roddick, Safin und Hewitt. Ich sehe da nicht nur Nadal, darum wird es auch so spannend in der Zukunft.



Q. Roger, compared with the last year, it was a considerably more difficult start, right?

A. Yes, that is of course right. I had much less time for preparation than the last two, three years when I got here no later than on Wednesday before the start of the tournament, because I had lost earlier in Paris. This way, I could always prepare for the grass season much more intensive. Now I come from a hard French Open weekend and am not fresh like how I would like to be. I have been here for just one and a half days. It was hard, and I am very happy that I got through. It was, like expected, a very close match.

Q. Did you really expect a close match like this?

A. Well, you always expect a hard and close match, but this one was a little more than this. He was two points away from defeating me. I won at last, and this kind of matches are very important. I have played such matches a lot and later won the tournament. These could be way-showing matches. During the match, you of course hope that the match goes easier. If I had lost, I would be now sitting here and would have no more matches to play before Wimbledon except my doubles match tomorrow. The things would look entirely different. However, now I can look ahead, and the self conficence, because I am the favorite in all the matches I play here. I have to try to use this bonus and to prepare for Wimbledon. Not all the things were bad today. It was actually a very ordinary performance, but Söderling played really good tennis. I think he did very well to return my service long to keep me at the baseline and to play aggressively. There are many to do with him that it became a close match today.

Q. What happened when you sat back and the umpire came onto the court in the third set? A problem with the linesman?

A. No, no problem with the linesman. The ball hit, and Söderling asked me after the call from the linesman and then he continued to play normally. I think that wasn't very fair of him. He continued to play that point, after he also apparently thought that the ball was out. Er hat auch gestutzt, dass sie ihn nicht ausgegeben haben(please someone translate this sentence for me---- :worship: ). Then, it is not fair to continue to play. Then he played a stop ball, the crowd murmured, I played a volley, and he won the point. Many things beforehand were also a little odd. Those are the reason why I wanted to see the umpire. I wanted to know what he had to say on that, because I didn't agree with the arguments of the umpire. It is of course much for him, but I really thought he interrupted the ralley. Instead, he had some odd arguments: "We are not playing on clay!" Besides, I asked him if he didn't see Söderling stop playing, and he said "yes". That was for me nonsense. Well, I found these explanations a little strange in any case and wanted that point to be repeated. A little unfortunate situation.

Q. What are you expecting from your next opponent, Florian Mayer?

A. He playes completely different tennis than the most other players and has a very different technique. It will be interesting to see how it is to play against him, because I only had a training session with him in last years Wimbledon so far. You may think always that he plays much worse than he actually does. I know that he is dangerous, because I saw him play many brilliant matches. It is now the first time since a while ago that he no longer plays constantly the high level. Neverthless, he is dangerous,, (we are) in Germany.

Q. Do you think that Federer-Nadal-duel becomes the most dominating in the next years?

A. Yes, it could be. But, there are also some who have another opinion. We should not forget the others. Roddick, Safin, and Hewitt. I am not looking at only Nadal, that's why it is becoming so exciting in the future.

RogiFan88
06-08-2005, 04:21 AM
he's been there the last 2 years.

but this year he's more of a threat [as if Rogi needs any more... Henman, Nalby, etc.] :p

Stevens Point
06-08-2005, 08:43 AM
What a waste of time! I didn't even have to translate the German one.



Interview with Roger Federer
Dienstag, 07.06.2005

Press-Conference with Roger Federer (SUI) after his win against Robin Soderling (SWE).

? Roger, compared with last year this was a more difficult start on grass, wasn't it?

! Yes, you're right, of course. There was obviously much less time this year than the last two or even three years, when I lost early at the French Open. I remember I was arriving here on Wednesday before the tournament started, then having five or six days to get ready for the season. Now I was coming from a tough French Open-weekend and I was not as fresh that I was like to be. This year it was basically one and a half day. It was tough, but I'm really happy to have come through today. It was, as expected, a tough match.

? Did you expect such a tough match?

! Well, you expect a tough match, but this one was obviously a bit scary, because he was two points away from beating me. Anyway, I made it, and these kind of matches are very important. I had a couple of matches like this and won the tournament in the end, so these can be crucial matches. Of course during the match you hope it's gonna be easier. If I had lost, I would have sit here and had no more matches to play almost before Wimbledon, except the doubles tomorrow, things would be very different. But now I can look ahead, I'm confident, because every match I play here this week, I'm the favourite. I've to try to use that und try to get prepared well for Wimbledon. Not all things today were totally bad today, it was a great performance, but I think he played also really good tennis. I think, he did a good job returning my serve, keeping me on the back, playing aggressive - today's tough match had a lot to do with him.

? What happenend when you sat down in the third and the supervisor came on the court? A problem with the linesman?

! No, there was no problem with the linesman. Well, when the ball bounced Söderling had already asked me for the call but continued playing afterwords, which I don't think is very fair from his side. Well, he continued the point after he hit the ball and was obviously also in disbelieve that they call it in. That again I think is not very fair. He played a stop, crowd got involved, I got to the net and he hit the winner. Too much things were going on just before around that one bounce. These are the reasons why I wanted to see the supervisor to see, what he had to say, because I didn't like the arguments the chair-umpire gave me. It's a tough call to make for the umpire, but I really thought he clearly stopped the point. But he gave me some weird arguments like "We're not on clay". Besides I asked the umpire if he saw that the other had stopped playing and the umpire said "Yes". For me that didn't make any sense. Anyway, I found this was a strange explanation they gave and wanted to replay the point. All in all it was an unfortunate situation.

? What do you expect from your next opponent Florian Mayer?

! He plays a completely different game than most other players, a very different technique. It'll be interesting to see how he'll finally play in a serious match because so far I just practiced with him last year in Wimbledon. He plays much better than he seems to be. I know how dangerous he is, because I saw him playing pretty good matches. After his fabulous last year he wasn't able to hold his level constantly now, but nevertheless he remains quite dangerous, especially in Germany.

? Do you think the duel Federer-Nadal will become the big competition in the following years?

! Yes, it could be, but there are some other players who have an other opinion. I think we should not forget Hewitt, Safin or Roddick. I don't see only Nadal, therefore it will be interesting in the future.

babsi
06-08-2005, 12:06 PM
Hi,Stevens piont - poor you,all the hard work - but what a great practice and you did very well :)
Couldn´t find one spelling mistake - which means, there could be a hundret of them!

Nathy
06-08-2005, 02:46 PM
Thanks Stevens Point, I read YOUR translation, not the other one ;)

Mrs. B
06-08-2005, 03:22 PM
but this year he's more of a threat [as if Rogi needs any more... Henman, Nalby, etc.] :p

he won't get past him on home soil. and this is not clay. :p

RogiFan88
06-08-2005, 03:30 PM
i hope you're right, bebop! i see rafa's into a 3rd set?

Nathy
06-08-2005, 03:36 PM
i hope you're right, bebop! i see rafa's into a 3rd set?

Yes and it is 4-3 for Waske right now :p

Mrs. B
06-08-2005, 03:37 PM
i'm keeping my fingers crossed that this is his year to get the Basel title, Rogifan. about time, eh?

Nathy
06-08-2005, 03:44 PM
Waske defeated Nadal 4-6 7-5 6-3 :p

babsi
06-08-2005, 04:18 PM
Waske defeated Nadal 4-6 7-5 6-3 :p
Wow - great job Mr. Waske - stopped watching after the first set,there was too much Nadal is great talk going on (now Nadal is the one,who has to cope with all the media frenzy)

Puschkin
06-08-2005, 04:24 PM
i'm keeping my fingers crossed that this is his year to get the Basel title, Rogifan. about time, eh?

That's probably the one he craves most after Wimbledon!

Nathy
06-08-2005, 04:33 PM
stopped watching after the first set,there was too much Nadal is great talk going on (now Nadal is the one,who has to cope with all the media frenzy)

:lol: So did I :p

SUKTUEN
06-08-2005, 05:02 PM
Is Roger playing now ? :eek: :eek:

Nathy
06-08-2005, 05:10 PM
Is Roger playing now ? :eek: :eek:

No no he isn't anymore ;)

SUKTUEN
06-08-2005, 05:36 PM
thankyou~I go to sleep now~~ good night~

ToanNguyen
06-08-2005, 07:53 PM
Hi all. This will be my first time here but I saw this article and find it is quite interesting. The author is right though. People, especially the media should cut Roger some slack.

Ease up on Roger
Federer has received bum rap for bold statement
Posted: Wednesday June 8, 2005 10:12AM; Updated: Wednesday June 8, 2005 1:20PM


Roger Federer may have lost to Rafael Nadal on clay in the French semis, but he's won 25 straight matches on grass through Tuesday.
Bob Martin/SI

I was surprised to see some of the fierce criticism of Roger Federer during the French Open. He was called arrogant and egotistical for saying that he doesn't fear any other tennis player. No one would even notice if either Williams sister made such a statement. What's also forgotten is the second part of his statement, which said, "I have respect for every player." Doesn't that criticism seem unfair to Federer?
-- Diana, San Francisco

If Federer is arrogant and egotistical, Rafael Nadal is a pusher, Justine Henin-Hardenne is lackadaisical, and Andy Roddick is a clay court specialist. I'm stunned at how many people took Federer to task for saying he fears no one but respects everyone. Gee, you win three Slams last year, you've lost two matches to top 10 players over the last two years, you've won on all surfaces. And you're supposed to fear ... whom, exactly?

Yet Federer did indeed take some shots for that statement. Many of you -- and many players -- also have noted this, but part of what makes Federer so admirable is that he's remained so humble. In victory and defeat, he's never anything less than a pro. The ESPN crew will tell you that Federer is hands down the most cooperative top player out there. Federer loses a crusher to Nadal and spends hours deconstructing the match -- in four languages -- for every media outlet around. Arrogant and egotistical? No. If anything, I sometimes think Federer might not have enough swagger.

Quick story: last Thursday, the ATP communications staff shrewdly arranged a pre-match photo-op with Nadal and Federer. In the middle of the day, they posed side-by-side on a gangplank at Roland Garros. The result looked like a boxing poster, and the whole thing was very cool. A lot of players in Federer's shoes never would have consented to this -- Sampras and Agassi come immediately to mind.

I've won four Majors and you want me to pose with this upstart teenager like he's my equal?

Yet there Federer was, smiling and even placing his arm around Nadal. "See you tomorrow," he said cheerfully. Part of me admired Federer for being such a sport and "taking one for the team." Another part of me felt like telling him, "Dude, you're the king. Start acting like it!"

Yasmine
06-08-2005, 07:56 PM
Great Article and great post, thanks for coming to post here;) You're wellcome anytime :worship:

ToanNguyen
06-08-2005, 08:11 PM
:) Thank you, Dancing Queen. I felt welcome already.

RogiFan88
06-08-2005, 08:12 PM
Rogi is in the ESPN magazine w Sharapova on the cover...

Seleshfan
06-08-2005, 08:34 PM
Welcome Toan! Thanks for sharing.

Minnie
06-08-2005, 08:51 PM
Hi Toan - is that a whole article? Can you tell me where its from? I'd like to post that 0n a BBC tennis website for all the "Fed haters" who spew their venom there. You would not believe some of the things they say ... and neither would you want to know! There's a band of Fed fans on that site who will just LOVE this article! But for the rest, it would help if I could tell them where this article came from.

soonha
06-08-2005, 09:12 PM
Hi Toan - is that a whole article? Can you tell me where its from? I'd like to post that 0n a BBC tennis website for all the "Fed haters" who spew their venom there. You would not believe some of the things they say ... and neither would you want to know! There's a band of Fed fans on that site who will just LOVE this article! But for the rest, it would help if I could tell them where this article came from.
It's from an article written by Jon Wertheim of CNN/SI.com(http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/jon_wertheim/06/07/post.french/index.html)

Shabazza
06-08-2005, 09:14 PM
Hi Toan :wavey: