how Imus will be remembered [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

how Imus will be remembered

celia
04-13-2007, 12:34 AM
what a way to end a long and fractious career.

El Legenda
04-13-2007, 12:37 AM
what end? im sure he will go to Sirius...

Johnny Groove
04-13-2007, 01:03 AM
Is he the only story in the whole fucking world? Jesus, every new station and blog and even sportscenter is talking about this clown. :o

Johnny Groove
04-13-2007, 01:41 AM
Imus will recover.............



But, take a look at Mirkaland's signature:o :o

mirkaland :retard:

zicofirol
04-13-2007, 01:44 AM
what end? im sure he will go to Sirius...

no way, howard stern is there and he hates him, lol. He said Imus was always a prick to everyone in nbc...

Also stern said he once heard Imus insult a black woman with the N word and he (Stern) went to NBC radio executives to say he should be fired for that, he also said that imus is a "anti-semite and a racis" and that everyone that ever worked with him hates him, lol...

Sparko1030
04-13-2007, 04:13 AM
Is he the only story in the whole fucking world? Jesus, every new station and blog and even sportscenter is talking about this clown. :o

Yeah, what he said was awful but com'on....where's the surprise in it? He's a big mouth rasicst, doh! Never should have had a show in the first place if that's a problem. (now, if only Rush Limbaugh would saying something as stupid....oh wait, he has and he's still on the air :scratch: :lol:) The only good thing is I guess the news of the paternity of ANSmith's daughter has some competition on the airwaves. :rolleyes:

I should add a very big thumbs up :yeah: to the Rutgers BB team though-they've been very classy and mature through the whole thing. That's how you defeat an idiot-don't sink to thier level....

R.Federer
04-13-2007, 04:58 AM
He looks like a poorly preserved pre-historic relic. It is incredible, how wrinkled and weird he looks!

El Legenda
04-13-2007, 05:05 AM
since the early 1990's, he's radio show has raised over $40,000,000 for charity

R.Federer
04-13-2007, 05:11 AM
since the early 1990's, he's radio show has raised over $40,000,000 for charity

He can continue to do charity. Just get him off the airwaves.

buddyholly
04-13-2007, 01:22 PM
Any time I ever flicked past his show, I was bored in one minute, wondering why a guy who slowly mumbles into a microphone while apparently still chewing on last night's dinner had any audience at all.
I was slightly amused by his sidekick who seemed only to be there to kiss his ass and declare "oh I-Man, you are so great.

So I do not care one bit about the I-man. But I am very amused by the spectacle of arch-clown racists such as Sharpton and Jackson being the ones to bring him down.

Jim Jones
04-13-2007, 02:16 PM
In the U.S. people always love comebacks. He will be back.

jayjay
04-13-2007, 06:46 PM
since the early 1990's, he's radio show has raised over $40,000,000 for charity

All well and good, but it doesn't give someone the right to make comments like that and not face the consequences.

tangerine_dream
04-13-2007, 07:56 PM
Of all the things in the world to get righteously angry over people choose to focus their energy on a clown like Don Imus for saying something that black rap artists have been saying for years without incident. :retard:

zicofirol
04-13-2007, 09:20 PM
Of all the things in the world to get righteously angry over people choose to focus their energy on a clown like Don Imus for saying something that black rap artists have been saying for years without incident. :retard:

that's right, they fired him just because of the pressure, the guy has said more offensive stuff in the past but this time it got more media attention so he got fired...

zicofirol
04-13-2007, 09:23 PM
Of all the things in the world to get righteously angry over people choose to focus their energy on a clown like Don Imus for saying something that black rap artists have been saying for years without incident. :retard:

that's right, they fired him just because of the pressure, the guy has said more offensive stuff in the past but this time it got more media attention so he got fired...

Jlee
04-13-2007, 10:00 PM
The reason I think it's important to cover this story is that it took THIS LONG for him to be fired.

I agree. Those other comments you posted were just as awful as his most recent one. I'm glad to see him off the airwaves, even if it did take a long time for it to happen.

Of all the things in the world to get righteously angry over people choose to focus their energy on a clown like Don Imus for saying something that black rap artists have been saying for years without incident. :retard:

I definitely understand what you're saying. Some of the lyrics to those songs are unbelievable. Why are people not fighting against that like they did against Imus? I think the rap songs have a much more significant impact on people's attitudes towards groups of people anyway.

celia
04-13-2007, 11:13 PM
Any time I ever flicked past his show, I was bored in one minute, wondering why a guy who slowly mumbles into a microphone while apparently still chewing on last night's dinner had any audience at all.
I was slightly amused by his sidekick who seemed only to be there to kiss his ass and declare "oh I-Man, you are so great.

So I do not care one bit about the I-man. But I am very amused by the spectacle of arch-clown racists such as Sharpton and Jackson being the ones to bring him down.

You give Sharpton and Jackson too much credit. Imus' big mouth brought him down. that and his dementia -- he seemed to have forgotten for a moment that he was talking live on a TV show.

I wonder how long Mrs. Imus will stick around now.

celia
04-13-2007, 11:16 PM
I definitely understand what you're saying. Some of the lyrics to those songs are unbelievable. Why are people not fighting against that like they did against Imus? I think the rap songs have a much more significant impact on people's attitudes towards groups of people anyway.

There has been a fight since the 1980's to clean up rap. Many women have participated including Tipper Gore and Oprah Winfrey. Tipper found herself roundy ridiculed for her comments back in the day. Oprah has been maligned for refusing to allow rappers on her show. These are just two examples of the the women who have taken a moral (if you will) stance against rap music for its defamation of women. The problem is that they have not succeeded. Perhaps until now.

celia
04-14-2007, 12:43 AM
NEW YORK - Don Imus' racist remarks got him fired by CBS on Thursday, the finale to a stunning fall for one of the nation's most prominent broadcasters.

Imus was initially suspended for two weeks after he called the Rutgers women's basketball team "nappy-headed hos" on the air last week. But outrage kept growing and advertisers kept bolting from his CBS radio show and its MSNBC simulcast, which was canceled Wednesday.

"There has been much discussion of the effect language like this has on our young people, particularly young women of color trying to make their way in this society," CBS President and Chief Executive Officer Leslie Moonves said in announcing the decision. "That consideration has weighed most heavily on our minds as we made our decision."

Imus, 66, had a long history of inflammatory remarks. But something struck a raw nerve when he targeted the Rutgers team — which includes a class valedictorian, a future lawyer and a musical prodigy — after they lost in the NCAA championship game.

A spokeswoman for the team said it did not have an immediate comment on Imus' firing. But Imus was scheduled to meet with the team Thursday evening at the governor's mansion in Princeton, N.J., and the team was seen entering the mansion.

He was fired in the middle of a two-day radio fundraiser for children's charities. CBS announced that Imus' wife, Deirdre, and his longtime newsman, Charles McCord, will host Friday's show.

The cantankerous Imus, once named one of the 25 Most Influential People in America by Time magazine and a member of the National Broadcasters Hall of Fame, was one of radio's original shock jocks. His career took flight in the 1970s and with a cocaine- and vodka-fueled outrageous humor. After sobering up, he settled into a mix of highbrow talk about politics and culture, with locker room humor sprinkled in.

He issued repeated apologies as protests intensified. But it wasn't enough as everyone from Hillary Clinton to Barack Obama (news, bio, voting record) to Oprah Winfrey joined the criticism.

The Rev. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson met with Moonves on Thursday to demand Imus' removal.

Jackson called the firing "a victory for public decency. No one should use the public airwaves to transmit racial or sexual degradation."

Said Sharpton: "He says he wants to be forgiven. I hope he continues in that process. But we cannot afford a precedent established that the airways can commercialize and mainstream sexism and racism."

In a memo to staff members, Moonves said the firing "is about a lot more than Imus."

"He has flourished in a culture that permits a certain level of objectionable expression that hurts and demeans a wide range of people," Moonves said. "In taking him off the air, I believe we take an important and necessary step not just in solving a unique problem, but in changing that culture, which extends far beyond the walls of our company."

It's also likely to trigger a wider debate about expression and forgiveness. Some of Imus' fans have pointed to inflammatory statements made by Sharpton and Jackson in the past, or in the lyrics of popular music.

Losing Imus will be a financial hit to CBS Radio, which also suffered when Howard Stern departed for satellite radio. The program earns about $15 million in annual revenue for CBS, which owns Imus' home radio station WFAN-AM and manages Westwood One, the company that syndicates the show nationally. One potential replacement: the sports show "Mike & the Mad Dog," which airs afternoons on WFAN.

The radiothon had raised more than $1.3 million Thursday before Imus learned that he had lost his job. The annual event has raised more than $40 million since 1990.

"This may be our last radiothon, so we need to raise about $100 million," Imus cracked at the start of the event.

Volunteers were getting about 200 more pledges per hour than they did last year, with most callers expressing support for Imus, said phone bank supervisor Tony Gonzalez. The event benefited Tomorrows Children's Fund, the CJ Foundation for SIDS and the Imus Ranch.

Imus, whose suspension was supposed to start next week, was in the awkward situation of broadcasting Thursday's radio program from the MSNBC studios in New Jersey, even though NBC News said the night before that MSNBC would no longer simulcast his program on television.

He didn't attack MSNBC (a unit of NBC Universal, owned by General Electric Co.) for its decision — "I understand the pressure they were under," he said — but complained the network was doing some unethical things during the broadcast. He didn't elaborate.

Sponsors that pulled out of Imus' show included American Express Co., Sprint Nextel Corp., Staples Inc., Procter & Gamble Co. and General Motors Corp. Imus made a point Thursday to thank one sponsor, Bigelow Tea, for sticking by him.

The list of his potential guests began to shrink, too.

Newsweek Editor Jon Meacham said the magazine's staffers would no longer appear on Imus' show. Meacham, Jonathan Alter, Evan Thomas, Howard Fineman and Michael Isikoff from Newsweek have been frequent guests.

Imus has complained bitterly about a lack of support from one black politician, Harold Ford Jr., even though he strongly backed Ford's campaign for Senate in Tennessee last year. Ford, now head of the Democratic Leadership Council, said Thursday he'll leave it to others to decide Imus' future.

"I don't want to be viewed as piling on right now because Don Imus is a good friend and a decent man," Ford said. "However, he did a reprehensible thing."

Imus' troubles have also affected his wife, whose book "Green This!" came out this week. Her promotional tour has been called off "because of the enormous pressure that Deirdre and her family are under," said Simon & Schuster publicist Victoria Meyer.

People are buying it, though: An original printing of 45,000 was increased to 55,000.

Imus still has a lot of support among radio managers across the country, many of whom grew up listening to him, said Tom Taylor, editor of the trade publication Inside Radio.

Rutgers' team, meanwhile, appeared Thursday on "The Oprah Winfrey Show" with their coach, C. Vivian Stringer.

At the end of their appearance, Winfrey said: "I want to borrow a line from Maya Angelou, who is a personal mentor of mine and I know you all also feel the same way about her. And she has said this many times, and I say this to you, on behalf of myself and every woman that I know, you make me proud to spell my name W-O-M-A-N."

RickDaStick
04-14-2007, 12:52 AM
While i am no fan of Imus, It does bother me that the women from the Rutgers basketball team are supposed to be both physically and MENTALLY tough people to be able to make it to the NCAA finals in basketball, yet they are all torn up from the comments of a silly 67 year old man?

Allez-Alejo
04-14-2007, 12:56 AM
While i am no fan of Imus, It does bother me that the women from the Rutgers basketball team are supposed to be both physically and MENTALLY tough people to be able to make it to the NCAA finals in basketball, yet they are all torn up from the comments of a silly 67 year old man?

Exactly, obviously the comments were stupid, but why must such a big deal be made over these comments. If they were made by a black or if the comments were made by Imus regarding a white group there would be no mention of it. Additionally, Sharpton needs to get a life; grown people should be able to talk for themselves.

Allez-Alejo
04-14-2007, 01:04 AM
Imus also, in one way or another, was responsible for the raising of millions of dollars for charities for children. One must wonder if Sharpton, Jesse Jackson or the NAACP will take these charities under their wings. I highly doubt they will, and believe they will simply cast them aside as unfortunate side effects. If the charities were for underprivilaged black children however, there is no doubt they would take them.

jayjay
04-14-2007, 01:47 AM
Some of the lyrics to those songs are unbelievable. Why are people not fighting against that like they did against Imus?

They are.

ps. Did anyone see Snoop Dogg's statement of "defence" for his use of such language? Both funny and sad. Check it out, if you have not yet heard/read it.

MissMoJo
04-14-2007, 03:15 AM
ps. Did anyone see Snoop Dogg's statement of "defence" for his use of such language? Both funny and sad. Check it out, if you have not yet heard/read it.

lol. All I could think when I heard it was that it definitely didn't go through a publicist.

Jlee
04-14-2007, 03:43 AM
They are.

ps. Did anyone see Snoop Dogg's statement of "defence" for his use of such language? Both funny and sad. Check it out, if you have not yet heard/read it.

Good, I guess I just haven't seen the effects of it yet.

Sidenote: I don't know if it was the basketball team that was making an issue out of this, was it? I thought that they were trying to enjoy their basketball success and got hounded by reporters who wanted their opinion so they could write a story. I didn't get the impression that they were blowing the issue out of proportion, I thought it was mostly the media.

There has been a fight since the 1980's to clean up rap. Many women have participated including Tipper Gore and Oprah Winfrey. Tipper found herself roundy ridiculed for her comments back in the day. Oprah has been maligned for refusing to allow rappers on her show. These are just two examples of the the women who have taken a moral (if you will) stance against rap music for its defamation of women. The problem is that they have not succeeded. Perhaps until now.

I'm not extremely educated on the subject, so thank you. Hopefully something good that will come out of this Imus mess is that the efforts to clean up rap will finally gain some ground.

jayjay
04-14-2007, 10:55 AM
[QUOTE=Jlee;5187916]Good, I guess I just haven't seen the effects of it yet.

While multi billion dollar corporations are behind it (and have multi billion dollars raking in because of it), there won't be any change to the lyrics.

Sidenote: I don't know if it was the basketball team that was making an issue out of this, was it? I thought that they were trying to enjoy their basketball success and got hounded by reporters who wanted their opinion so they could write a story. I didn't get the impression that they were blowing the issue out of proportion, I thought it was mostly the media.

Absolutely, as with everything these days, its media led first and foremost. US media were probably worried about what new "breaking news" story they would have to cling onto after ANS stuff died down, and Imus came running in to help them out.

I'm not extremely educated on the subject, so thank you. Hopefully something good that will come out of this Imus mess is that the efforts to clean up rap will finally gain some ground.

Rap will never be cleaned up.

Not a fan of Fox News by any means, but Bill O'Reilly has been on their case for a long while, I remember he had a feud going with Ludacris.

jayjay
04-14-2007, 11:02 AM
For those who missed out on Snoop's 'words of wisdom', as I said, both :lol: and :o at the same time. John Gibson is a muppet, but on this he was on the mark.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,265445,00.html

Snoop Dogg 'Clarifies' Use of the Word 'Ho'

The issue of banning racially offensive words and words that are crude and demeaning to women has now entered a new phase of the debate.

Yesterday on this program the Rev. Al Sharpton promised he would go after the rappers and record execs who sell the word ho as entertainment and make hundreds of millions of dollars doing so. Well, we will see. Sharpton has been jumping on Imus like a trampoline, and that's OK as far as it goes.

What goes a lot farther are the rappers who think this is language that is OK for them to use, but not OK for anyone else to use, anyone such as an old white man like Don Imus.

Take the bad boy rapper Snoop Dogg. He issued a statement through MTV today and was stunning in its blunt candor and in its near total lack of concern about the problems that result from promulgating this language. The mighty Snoop said:

"It's a completely different scenario. [Rappers] are not talking about no collegiate basketball girls who have made it to the next level in education and sports. We're talking about hos that's in the 'hood that ain't doing (bleep), that's trying to get a (bleep) for his money. These are two separate things."

So Snoop's position is that he is an expert on who is a ho and who is not, and therefore he is licensed to label hos and others are not. He said:

"First of all, we ain't no old-ass white men that sit up on MSNBC going hard on black girls. We are rappers that have these songs coming from our minds and our souls that are relevant to what we feel. I will not let them (bleepers) say we in the same league as him."

So we can now assume that there is a higher form of calling someone a ho and a lower form of calling someone a ho. And when we hear Snoop call a woman that name then we can take it to the bank that she is, and it's OK that she is called that.

I don't know about you, but I'm feeling much better about this. Obviously Imus must be flogged while Snoop and those he rolls with are off the hook.

That's My Word.

sigmagirl91
04-14-2007, 01:31 PM
"It's a completely different scenario. [Rappers] are not talking about no collegiate basketball girls who have made it to the next level in education and sports. We're talking about hos that's in the 'hood that ain't doing (bleep), that's trying to get a (bleep) for his money. These are two separate things."


"First of all, we ain't no old-ass white men that sit up on MSNBC going hard on black girls. We are rappers that have these songs coming from our minds and our souls that are relevant to what we feel. I will not let them (bleepers) say we in the same league as him."



Rap songs do not differentiate between a college-educated woman vs. a "hood rat." They neatly lump together every woman of every race, color, education level, etc. into that "ho" stereotype. So, what is he talking about?

There's no "love" in a song that tells a man to "slap up his bitch" and "clock the ho." Puh-leeze....give me a break.

Richard_from_Cal
04-14-2007, 05:28 PM
what a way to end a long and fractious career.
Bill Mahr, isn't he back on television?

Jlee
04-15-2007, 02:51 AM
While multi billion dollar corporations are behind it (and have multi billion dollars raking in because of it), there won't be any change to the lyrics.

Absolutely, as with everything these days, its media led first and foremost. US media were probably worried about what new "breaking news" story they would have to cling onto after ANS stuff died down, and Imus came running in to help them out.

Rap will never be cleaned up.

Not a fan of Fox News by any means, but Bill O'Reilly has been on their case for a long while, I remember he had a feud going with Ludacris.

*sigh* You're right.

And Snoop Dogg is :eek:

celia
04-15-2007, 03:05 PM
Bill Mahr, isn't he back on television?

:lol: Good point. But Bill is a lot younger and he speaks much more clearly than the old mumbling fool. Don't you agree? I honestly think Imus is finished.

Richard_from_Cal
04-16-2007, 08:55 PM
:lol: Good point. But Bill is a lot younger and he speaks much more clearly than the old mumbling fool. Don't you agree? I honestly think Imus is finished.
Bill Mahr is 51, Don Imus is...66? Old for a radio personality, discounting G.G. Liddy, or the like.

Wait, Rick Dees is still on in L.A...I've seen his billboards. He's 57!

http://www.rick.com
.
.
.
....anything is possible. Imus might be back.

celia
04-17-2007, 03:37 AM
Bill Mahr is 51, Don Imus is...66? Old for a radio personality, discounting G.G. Liddy, or the like.

Wait, Rick Dees is still on in L.A...I've seen his billboards. He's 57!

http://www.rick.com
.
.
.
....anything is possible. Imus might be back.

Rick Dees? is he still alive?? :eek:

Lee
04-17-2007, 04:05 AM
Rick Dees? is he still alive?? :eek:

alive and kicking :rocker2: