Federer vs. Sampras part II [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Federer vs. Sampras part II

pj80
03-10-2007, 02:19 AM
here is something for mimi and angiel to annalyze, i love yall...


http://www.pacificlifeopen.com/1/news/federer1.asp

Joyce_23
03-10-2007, 09:37 AM
I guess you expect outrage now but I enjoyed reading it so thanks. I am not one of those people that thinks Pete is way better then Roger. I just appreciate Pete and really liked him during his career but Roger is taking tennis to a whole new level and you gotta respect him for doing that. This article is just great if you ask me, two legends taking the court together and training sounds like a blast and I wish I could have seen it. Now are you done with trying to provoke people in here? If you don't like Pete or the people that post here then don't come here. Simple enough.

gmak
03-10-2007, 02:40 PM
i would pay to see this instead of any Grand Slam final ;)

Pete :worship:

angiel
03-10-2007, 03:24 PM
here is something for mimi and angiel to annalyze, i love yall...


http://www.pacificlifeopen.com/1/news/federer1.asp


Love you too pj80.:p :p ;) :wavey: great article.

angiel
03-10-2007, 03:30 PM
Here are some more news.


Federer beats Sampras
10/03/2007 16:01 - (SA)
















Indian Wells - Roger Federer took great delight in beating his childhood idol Pete Sampras at the American player's home in a friendly match during his build-up to the Pacific Life Open.

The two met only once on the ATP circuit, in the fourth round of Wimbledon in 2001 when Federer triumphed in the fifth set.

"Beating him in his backyard in Wimbledon was so special to me so I wanted to beat him in his house," a beaming Federer told reporters on Friday.

The Swiss maestro spent two days hitting with Sampras while visiting the 35-year-old former world number one at his Beverly Hills home in Los Angeles.

"It was great," said Federer. "I knew I was coming to LA so I'm kind of thinking: 'Who's around in LA?'

"I rang up Pete and asked: 'Any chance?' He was like: 'Yeah, sure.'

"I was totally excited because he was one of my favourite players when I was growing up."

Grand slammers

Sampras, who won 14 grand slam titles and more than $43m in prize money during a 15-year career, retired after winning the 2002 US Open final against compatriot Andre Agassi.

Federer's five-set victory at Wimbledon in 2001 ended Sampras's 31-match winning streak at the All England Club.

"It was very enjoyable to actually hit with him, you know," said the 25-year-old Swiss.

"It would be kind of cool to maybe play an exhibition against him. We'll see. He was playing very well, but not good enough to beat me," world number one Federer added with a broad smile.

Asked for the final score, he replied: "I can't tell you. But it was good fun. We did play some games and sets and tiebreakers.

"I'm happy to see that he's actually still enjoying tennis. He's probably back into tennis after being golfed out."

angiel
03-10-2007, 03:33 PM
Tennis: Federer reveals Sampras session
Sunday, 11 March 01:46 AET


Roger Federer has revealed how he visited seven-time Wimbledon champion Pete Sampras recently and practised with the tennis legend.

"Surprisingly he was very good," Federer said of the 35-year-old, "but not good enough to beat me!"

Federer and Sampras only played each other professionally once, when the then Swiss teenager beat the American in Wimbledon's fourth round in 2001.

"I had the idea of seeing how good he plays because he was one of my favourite players when I was growing up," Federer added.

"Beating him in his backyard in Wimbledon was so special to me, so I wanted to try to beat him in his house.

"It was very enjoyable to actually hit with him. He was playing very well."

angiel
03-10-2007, 03:36 PM
Federer Trains With Sampras

The world's number one Roger Federer revealed that he had visited Sampras in Los Angeles and trained with him.

On the eve of the Indian Wells Tournament, Roger Federer revealed that he had spent time in Los Angeles, where he had trained with Pete Sampras, who had won Wimbledon seven times and is one of the best tennis players in history. Even though it was only a training, there were some competitive sparks flying.

- He is in a surprisingly good shape, but this was not enough for him to take me on. I was curious to see how good he was because he was my idol when I was growing up. When I defeated him at Wimbledon, it was special for me and now I wanted to do the same on his ground, said Federer.

The two great tennis players only met once, on the "holy" grass in Wimbledon, where Federer defeated Sampras in five sets. However, this was way back in 2001. Federer currently has 41 successive wins under his belt and has won the last three grand slams, which has made Sampras concede that his records would soon be broken. Federer remained a gentleman and complimented the man who had dominated the world of tennis just as Federer is now.

- Playing with him is excellent because he still hits very well. It would be nice if we played an exhibition match in the future, but we still have to see about that, said Federer.

Whichever way it goes, if the two played this match, the audience would definitely be asking for an extra ticket.

Objavljeno: 10.03.2007. u 14:18h

angiel
03-10-2007, 03:39 PM
Roger Federer, Pete Sampras Enjoy Two Day Practice Session

Posted on March 9, 2007


Roger Federer revealed in his pre-tournament press conference Friday that he had practiced with Pete Sampras in Los Angeles in the lead-up to the Pacific Life Open.

Federer and Sampras met just once on the ATP circuit - in the fourth round of Wimbledon in 2001 when Federer won 7-5 in the fifth set.

Here is what Federer had to say about their practice sessions this week:





Q. I'm not sure I heard you correctly. You say you practiced with Pete?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, we hit together for two days.

Q. How did he play?
ROGER FEDERER: Very good, surprisingly. Very good, you know. Not good enough to beat me (laughing).


Q. If you could describe a little bit about playing with Pete. I mean, you get some flashes of his great shots, the winning forehand. What was it like?

ROGER FEDERER: That was great. Well, I knew I was coming to L.A., so I'm kind of thinking, who's around in L.A.? So, I rang up Pete and said, "Any chance?"
He was like, "Yeah, sure."
I'm totally excited. So right away I had the idea, anyway seeing how good he plays because he was one of my favorite players, when I was growing up and beating him in his backyard in Wimbledon was so special to me. I wanted to try to -- I wanted to beat him in his house. So it was very enjoyable to actually hit with him. It would be kind of cool to maybe play an exhibition against him. We'll see. But he was playing very well.

Q. Did you play some sets or?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, we did play some games and sets and tiebreaks and --

Q. What was the score?
ROGER FEDERER: Can't tell you. But it was good fun.


-- Tennis-X.com

jacobhiggins
03-10-2007, 09:53 PM
This is the audio link of the interview. Go to the page and there's a link on the front page.

You can tell Roger had a real good time and he actually talks a little bit more about Pete.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/default.stm

Greg-Pete fan
03-11-2007, 10:33 AM
Wonderful news:worship: Any pictures?:)

Mimi
03-12-2007, 07:38 AM
it again shows that pete is not sore about roger's about to break his records by hitting with him, pete is a gracious champion :worship:, its great to see the two tennis kings have respect towards each other

the_natural
03-12-2007, 09:12 AM
I wonder why the score wasnt disclosed ;) hehe I think i know why, "we played a few sets... a few tiebreaks" methinks pete was more than Federer had bargained, he did straight set Robby and Andy on hard courts though.

angiel
03-12-2007, 05:45 PM
I wonder why the score wasnt disclosed ;) hehe I think i know why, "we played a few sets... a few tiebreaks" methinks pete was more than Federer had bargained, he did straight set Robby and Andy on hard courts though.


I think so too my dear:worship: :worship: :worship:

angiel
03-12-2007, 05:56 PM
Federer and Sampras meet in friendly backyard battle

INDIAN WELLS, California, (AFP) - Roger Federer never got the opportunity to face Pete Sampras in a Wimbledon final but they will forever be linked for their Grand Slam achievements.
They are the benchmark for greatness in men’s professional tennis and sadly they played in different eras and so they only faced each other once in the early rounds of the 2001 Wimbledon.
But Federer revealled Friday that he recently visited Sampras at his home in Los Angeles and practised with the seven-time Wimbledon champion for two days.

“He was very good, surprisingly,” Federer said. “Very good you know, but not good enough to beat me.”
Federer and Sampras met just once in their pro careers in the round of 16 at the 2001 Wimbledon with Federer winning in five sets 7-6 (9/7), 5-7, 6-4, 6-7 (2/7), 7-5.
“Beating him in his backyard in Wimbledon was so special to me, so I wanted to try to beat him in his house,” Federer joked Friday as he prepared to play his opening match in the 5.3 million dollar ATP/WTA Pacific Life Open.
Sampras said in January that he expects Federer will break his record of 14 Grand Slam singles crowns one day. Federer picked up his 47th career singles and 10th Grand Slam title by winning the Australian Open in January.
Sampras turned pro in 1988 and Federer ten years later. Besides the seven Wimbledons, ‘Pistol Pete’ won two Australian Open crowns and five US Open titles, including the 2002 championship in the final match of his career.
“I knew I was coming to L.A. so I rang up Pete,” Federer said.

****

angiel
03-13-2007, 03:41 PM
Federer enjoyed hitting with idol Sampras before Open
Retired great hosted Pac-Life champ in L.A.




Leighton Ginn
The Desert Sun
March 10, 2007

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
INDIAN WELLS - When Roger Federer was flying into Los Angeles for the Pacific Life Open, he was trying to think of the perfect hitting partner.
He didn't do too badly.

Federer hit with his idol Pete Sampras at Sampras' home in Los Angeles for two days. Federer said he was impressed with Sampras, who stopped playing professionally after winning the 2002 U.S. Open.

"Very good, surprisingly," Federer said of Sampras, "(but) not good enough to beat me."

The pair had a legendary match in 2001, when Federer, then just a budding pro, beat Sampras to halt Sampras' 31-match winning streak at Wimbledon. Sampras had won Wimbledon seven times.

Federer said they played sets, but wouldn't say who won. However, the winner was implied.

"He was one of my favorite players when I was growing up, and beating him in his backyard in Wimbledon was so special to me," Federer said. "So I wanted to try to beat him in his house."

angiel
03-13-2007, 04:06 PM
11 March 2007
FEDERER TRAINS WITH SAMPRAS
WORLD OF SPORT...

ROGER Federer has been warming up for his expected 42nd consecutive victory by playing the legendary Pete Sampras.

The Swiss star will be going for his fourth consecutive Grand Slam at the Pacific Life Open in California this week.

And the World No.1 has been getting in shape by playing seven-time Wimbledon champion Sampras after visiting him in LA.

Federer said: "Pete was one of my favourite players when I was growing up. It was very enjoyable to hit with him. He played well."

angiel
03-13-2007, 04:20 PM
Federer plays Sampras — just for fun
World No. 1, in Southland for Pacific Life Open, says he and the retired all-time Grand Slam champion recently got together for a few informal games and sets. He won't say who won, though.


By Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
March 10, 2007



Roger Federer, bound for Los Angeles and looking for fresh competition, flipped through his mental rolodex and stopped at S.

As in Pete Sampras, who has more Grand Slam tournament titles, 14, than any other player. Federer is closing fast with 10.

"I'm thinking who's around in L.A.?" Federer said Friday. "So I rang up Pete and said, 'Any chance?' He was like, 'Yeah, sure.' I'm totally excited. He was one of my favorite players when I was growing up, and beating him in his backyard in Wimbledon was so special to me. So I wanted to try to beat him in his house."

Federer reported they played some games, sets and tiebreakers this week at Sampras' Southland home. He also refused, while smiling, to report the score but did offer a scouting report of Sampras' current form.

"Very good, surprisingly," Federer said. "Very good, you know. Not good enough to beat me."

Federer-Sampras would have packed Stadium Court in the Pacific Life Open at Indian Wells on Friday, the opening day of men's play. Alas, Sampras, 36, is retired, and Federer, 26, the three-time defending champion, probably won't play until Sunday.

Still, Federer-Sampras comparisons are always irresistible.

"Looking head to head, I thought Sampras had the better shot for me," Gustavo Kuerten said. "As he [Federer] has been growing better and better, I'm sure he's getting close…. By the record and the numbers, he's breaking down one after the other. I think … in one or two years, he's going to be the best player in tennis ever."

As for Kuerten, a former No. 1 and three-time French Open champion, his current goals are modest. He had hip surgery in September 2004 and played only one match on the ATP Tour last year. He needed a wild-card spot to enter this tournament, and has not gone past the second round in three previous events this year on the main ATP Tour.

There were flashes of the old Kuerten form in his opening match here. But it wasn't enough as rising youngster Juan Martin Del Porto defeated Kuerten, 7-6 (5), 6-2, in the first round.

"I had my chances," Kuerten said. "… Overall, I think [it] was very good. I think he's a good player. Probably this year, he will finish around top 50 or better.

"That means my average is getting closer to where I want it. I just need to get a little bit more consistency, and then maybe some more endurance."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

angiel
03-15-2007, 07:16 PM
Thursday, March 15, 2007










Federer and Sampras meet in friendly backyard battle


INDIAN WELLS (AFP) - Roger Federer never got the opportunity to face Pete Sampras in a Wimbledon final but they will forever be linked for their Grand Slam achievements.

They are the benchmark for greatness in men's professional tennis and sadly they played in different eras and so they only faced each other once in the early rounds of the 2001 Wimbledon.

But Federer revealled Friday that he recently visited Sampras at his home in Los Angeles and practised with the seven-time Wimbledon champion for two days.

"He was very good, surprisingly," Federer said. "Very good you know, but not good enough to beat me."

Federer and Sampras met just once in their pro careers in the round of 16 at the 2001 Wimbledon with Federer winning in five sets 7-6 (9/7), 5-7, 6-4, 6-7 (2/7), 7-5.

"Beating him in his backyard in Wimbledon was so special to me, so I wanted to try to beat him in his house," Federer joked Friday as he prepared to play his opening match in the 5.3 million dollar ATP/WTA Pacific Life Open.

Sampras said in January that he expects Federer will break his record of 14 Grand Slam singles crowns one day. Federer picked up his 47th career singles and 10th Grand Slam title by winning the Australian Open in January.

Sampras turned pro in 1988 and Federer ten years later. Besides the seven Wimbledons, 'Pistol Pete' won two Australian Open crowns and five US Open titles, including the 2002 championship in the final match of his career.

"I knew I was coming to L.A. so I rang up Pete," Federer said.

"I'm totally excited. I had the idea of seeing how good he plays, you know, because he was one of my favourite players when I was growing up."

Federer doesn't rule out seeing if he can arrange an exhibition match in public against Sampras.

"It would be kind of cool to maybe play an exhibition against him. We'll see. But he was playing very well."

They played several sets and tiebreaks but when asked to reveal the score Federer replied, "I can't tell you. But it was good fun."

angiel
03-22-2007, 06:56 PM
Tennis-X March Notes Wrap-Up


Posted on April 21, 2007




Former No. 1 Gustavo Kuerten on the Roger Federer vs. Pete Sampras debate: "Looking head to head, I thought Sampras had the better shot for me. As he [Federer] has been growing better and better, I'm sure he's getting close...By the record and the numbers, he's breaking down one after the other. I think -- in one or two years, he's going to be the best player in tennis ever."...

angiel
03-23-2007, 04:39 PM
http://www.tennisone.com/images/photos/federer.sampras.forehands.jpg

angiel
03-23-2007, 04:42 PM
http://blog.rogiotaworld.lolipop.jp/images/2001_Wimbledon_After_defeating_Sampras.jpg

angiel
03-27-2007, 04:11 PM
Pete & Roger.



http://rs.tennis-warehouse.com/tw/ProductImages/01MATCHDVD.JPG

angiel
04-02-2007, 06:57 PM
Djokovic May Be Federer's Heir Apparent
Tennis

By TOM PERROTTA
April 2, 2007



Novak Djokovic, the 19-year-old Serbian who won the Sony Ericsson Open yesterday, may not win a Grand Slam title this year, or next year, or for as long as Roger Federer remains healthy and motivated. But when Federer does begin to fade, Djokovic is the mostly likely candidate to replace him atop the tennis world.

The young Serb with the effortless strokes dismissed Federer's most recent nemesis, Guillermo Canas, in straight sets in the Sony Ericsson final, 6–3, 6–2, 6–4. Earlier in the week, he beat Rafael Nadal, to whom he had lost in the final of the Pacific Life Open two weekends ago. He also pummeled his friend and boyhood rival, Andy Murray, 6–1, 6–0. Djokovic did not lose a set the entire tournament and won 59 of 60 service games, a performance so dominant that only Ivan Lendl, who won every set he played in 1989, might say he won this title with greater ease. Djokovic is now the youngest man ever to win this event, an honor he stole from the 1990 champion, a 19-year-old by the name of Agassi.

How does Djokovic compare to the 19-year-old Agassi? He's far, far better. The chief reason is that Djokovic has a wonderful mind for tennis. Unlike Agassi, who did a lot more hitting than thinking in his early days, Djokovic plays with purpose on every point. Canas is a fit and frustrating opponent, the sort of athlete who can coax Federer into 51 unforced errors in three sets. Djokovic made 30 yesterday against 44 winners. For most of the match, he hit mediumpaced shots with lots of topspin. He mixed in backhand slices, and hit dozens of short, spinning angles that forced Canas far to his left or right. When those angles created openings, Djokovic had plenty of power on both his forehand and two-handed backhand (his best shot) to end points. By the end of the afternoon, Canas, who grabbed his hamstring off and on and received treatment for it, looked as if he had run about 10 more miles than Djokovic ( Djokovic was not exactly fresh and wisely approached the net more often, shortening the points, as he tired).

Djokovic is not only superior to the young Agassi in mind but in strokes, too. He needs to improve his backhand slice, and his volleys often lack depth and bite. Although he has a fine drop shot, he perhaps relies on it too often. But for a 19-year-old whose game is not serveand-volley, he already volleys adequately (he's been working with doubles expert Mark Woodforde). He moves exceptionally well (he, like Federer, often seems to glide) and has more patience than most young players with enough raw power to hit lots of winners. His serve is a fine combination of power (close to 140 mph at times) and finesse (he often hits spin serves as first serves, hits a top-notch second serve that kicks very high, and places all his serves well).

He's also tough in tense moments. Against Nadal, he closed out the match after fighting off three break points. Against Canas, he survived a 22-minute game, and a 38-stroke rally on break point, in the second set to prevent Canas from tying the score at 3–3. As Canas knocked one groundstroke after another deep into the court, Djokovic moved him side to side and set up a winning point with a crosscourt forehand hit as slowly, and at as sharp an angle, as one will ever see in men's tennis. It looked more like table tennis.

As of today, Djokovic is ranked inside the top 10 for the first time in his career (no. 7). In tennis, youthful success is a good indicator of future performance: 17 men besides Djokovic have moved inside the top 10 ranking as teenagers since the tour created a ranking system in 1973, and among them are most of the best players of the last 30 years. As a group, they have won 66 Grand Slam titles. The first one to win a major, Bjorn Borg, did so at the French Open in 1974 (he was 18). Including that tournament, the world has seen 132 majors through this year's Australian Open, so our 17 top teenagers have won half of the most important events in the sport since Borg won his first.

There are exceptions, of course. Federer, who was not a teenage top 10, has won 10 of the other 66 majors. Aaron Krickstein, the youngest top 10 player (age 17 years and 11 days), didn't win one. Neither did Andre Medvedev, Jimmy Arias, or Kent Carlsson. Michael Chang, the second youngest, won only one.

Djokovic certainly seems more like the great teenagers of the past — Pete Sampras, Borg, Agassi, Mats Wilander, John McEnroe, Boris Becker, and Stefan Edberg among them — than those whose bright futures quickly dimmed. As well-rounded as this young man's game is right now, it's easy to imagine him doing all things better: more forceful shots, fewer mistakes, better volleys, more accurate serves. It would be great if he could develop such range, and consistency, while Federer remains at his best.

***

angiel
04-10-2007, 04:35 PM
YESTERDAY'S HEROES
Here today, gone tomorrow

Glory is fleeting. Nowhere is this more apparent than in sport.

Last week at the Swimming World Championships in Melbourne, Australia, U.S. superfish Michael Phelps asserted himself as perhaps the greatest swimmer the world has ever seen, and most certainly the greatest swimmer at the moment. His sheer dominance made the great (and recently concluded) career of Australian Ian Thorpe - "The Thorpedo" - seem small by comparison. We here at Stir think that's a little unfair (and not at all because this reporter is an Australian).

Why couldn't Phelps have come along in 2027, giving Thorpe a couple of decades to strut around as the world's best? It's downright cruel. But Thorpedo, if you're reading this, we want you to know you're in good company - company like:


Miguel Indurain: The Spanish rider won the Tour De France five times in a row. Did he get to bask in his greatness for even a decade? No, the Tour De Lance began almost immediately after The Indureign.

Greg Norman: The Great White Shark was the No. 1 golfer in the world for 331 consecutive weeks - a record that looked to never be broken. Enter Tiger.

Pete Sampras: So dominant was the King of Swing that he probably figured 14 grand slam titles would be a record for many years to come. But he didn't figure on Roger Federer.

Note: We're thinking the Florida Gators should bask in the glow while they can, because Duke or Kentucky or UCLA or UConn will probably win the next five NCAA titles straight, and Joakim, even you'll be forgotten.

Konrad Marshall/The Times-Union

the_natural
04-22-2007, 05:22 AM
YESTERDAY'S HEROES
Here today, gone tomorrow

Glory is fleeting. Nowhere is this more apparent than in sport.

Last week at the Swimming World Championships in Melbourne, Australia, U.S. superfish Michael Phelps asserted himself as perhaps the greatest swimmer the world has ever seen, and most certainly the greatest swimmer at the moment. His sheer dominance made the great (and recently concluded) career of Australian Ian Thorpe - "The Thorpedo" - seem small by comparison. We here at Stir think that's a little unfair (and not at all because this reporter is an Australian).

Why couldn't Phelps have come along in 2027, giving Thorpe a couple of decades to strut around as the world's best? It's downright cruel. But Thorpedo, if you're reading this, we want you to know you're in good company - company like:


Miguel Indurain: The Spanish rider won the Tour De France five times in a row. Did he get to bask in his greatness for even a decade? No, the Tour De Lance began almost immediately after The Indureign.

Greg Norman: The Great White Shark was the No. 1 golfer in the world for 331 consecutive weeks - a record that looked to never be broken. Enter Tiger.

Pete Sampras: So dominant was the King of Swing that he probably figured 14 grand slam titles would be a record for many years to come. But he didn't figure on Roger Federer.

Note: We're thinking the Florida Gators should bask in the glow while they can, because Duke or Kentucky or UCLA or UConn will probably win the next five NCAA titles straight, and Joakim, even you'll be forgotten.

Konrad Marshall/The Times-Union

Such a shame pete had so many chances to win at least 4 more slams from 93 onwards and soon his record will be gone, ahh well he just wanted to win he didnt care about the fame

almouchie
04-23-2007, 08:50 AM
i wonder if he invited him to stay at his house
or only to pratice with him

Mimi
04-23-2007, 09:12 AM
yeah, he should have won 94/97 us open, 96 wimby and made it 17 slams which is not so easy to got broken, but now, yeah, i agree with you, roger will soon break his 14 slams record :sad:
Such a shame pete had so many chances to win at least 4 more slams from 93 onwards and soon his record will be gone, ahh well he just wanted to win he didnt care about the fame

angiel
04-23-2007, 07:26 PM
yeah, he should have won 94/97 us open, 96 wimby and made it 17 slams which is not so easy to got broken, but now, yeah, i agree with you, roger will soon break his 14 slams record :sad:



I hopes he dont break his record at all???:eek: :eek: :mad: :devil:

pj80
04-23-2007, 10:57 PM
add us open 1998/1999, australian open 1999/2000...to bad he was injured in those, something federer has yet to be

Mimi
04-24-2007, 02:20 AM
yeah, he lost to rafter ini 5 sets in 1998 us open, he was in good form after winning wimby, 2 or 3 pre-us open tourneys, then sadly he withdrew from 1999 us open with injury, otherwise i do think he may win the 99 as well :sad: :sad:



add us open 1998/1999, australian open 1999/2000...to bad he was injured in those, something federer has yet to be

the_natural
04-30-2007, 09:06 AM
yeah, he lost to rafter ini 5 sets in 1998 us open, he was in good form after winning wimby, 2 or 3 pre-us open tourneys, then sadly he withdrew from 1999 us open with injury, otherwise i do think he may win the 99 as well :sad: :sad:

Yeh but at the 98 USO he was really startin to play well, I think it was the 3rd set and he was startin to cruise but he moved in for this volley (he won the point) but there was this weird sort of twist/jerk as he moved in and it did something to his leg, he stopped moving as well and then he lost the next 2 sets, even his serve lost a bit of sting (he won that set he got hurt in, he already had the break and was near the end of the set). I think its fair to say he woulda won that USO if he won that match cos mark played horribly in the final and was going for tooooooo much.

94 USO, 95 AUS (Both because of his thalessemia and emotional drain for 95) 96 Wimb (I still hate that Ace they gave to Krajicek in the 2nd set tie break, it did change that tie break for both guys, both thought it was out but pete got a bit unnerved and richard got very loose after that!!!! But it was fair for Krajicek to win even though pete had played a very good first 2 sets), 96 french (Thallessemia and tough matches). 97 USO (Korda played Brilliant but after the rain delays pete was thrown off, but he screwed up and korda didnt let up 3-0 up in the fifth and pete lost his serve!!!), 99 USO (Injured just before!!!). 2000 Aus (Injured near end of 4th beginin of 5th was out for several weeks after). 01 USO (Was fatigued and slow in the final, and also played soo tentative !!! but safin match took alot outta him SUPER SUNDAY!!!).

Maybe 01 Wimbledon as well cos He had a slow start in that tournament and was very unmotivated early, but if he pulled through against Federer he might have woken up and probably would have played well bcos he woulda been in the Quarters. Federer also got a very very unfair ace in that first set breaker!! it was Way out.

angiel
04-30-2007, 06:01 PM
I am confuse, I saw natural name but I can't find his post, what's going on????:confused: :( :confused:

Eden
05-03-2007, 08:59 AM
Volleying with Sampras
Pete Sampras has been enjoying life out of the spotlight since leaving tennis in 2002 as one of the best men's players in history.
By DAVE SCHEIBER

Pete Sampras has been enjoying life out of the spotlight since leaving tennis in 2002 as one of the best men's players in history. The perennial No. 1-ranked star - six straight years - and winner of a record 14 Grand Slam events has been enjoying retirement and raising his young family with wife Bridgette Wilson-Sampras in Los Angeles. We caught up with Sampras, 35, last week at Jim Courier's Mercedes-Benz Classic charity event at the St. Pete Times Forum, where he talked about a range of topics - including this generation's most dominant male player, Roger Federer, as he seeks an elusive French Open triumph next month in Paris.

What ways do you stay active these days?

I have two little boys - Christian, who's 4 1/2, and Ryan, 1 1/2 - so they keep me busy. I've been playing golf, and I've been playing a little bit more tennis. I play a once-a-week home poker game - a little Texas hold 'em. I play basketball twice a week. So I've been trying to keep busy, stay in shape, have some fun, spend some time with my kids and my wife.

Have you enjoyed playing tennis again?

Actually, playing tennis has been good for me, because I didn't play for about three years. I took some time off and actually got a little restless and maybe a touch bored. I believe every man needs to work. And I went from this crazy life of working a lot to not doing anything at all and it was fun at first. But after a while, it wears pretty thin. So I'm going to play a few events - (Tampa), Boston and one more in Charlotte. It gives me something to prepare for and focus on. I'll be playing on the Outback Champions Series (seniors). Competitively, it's not anything like it used to be as far as intensity, but we all have a lot of pride. And we all want to win and play well.

What impresses you about today's men's game?

Two things. Roger Federer's dominance and how great he is. Just the way he handles himself on and off the court is a real credit to all sports. The other thing is I think there are less great players today, but there are a lot more good players. After Federer and (Rafael) Nadal, you look at kind of three through eight -- they're really, really good players but they're not major championship winners, like (Boris) Becker and (Stefan) Edberg, or (Jim) Courier and (Andre) Agassi. Still, the guy ranked No. 50 today is probably better than the guy ranked No. 50 when I was playing.

Anything else about Federer?

He's dominated the game probably more than anybody in the history of the game. It's just amazing how consistent he's been. I think Nadal on clay is kind of his biggest challenge now. Maybe one day he can meet that challenge and beat him.
Agassi recently said Federer needs to win the French Open to complete his resume.
When you've achieved so much - and I fell into that a little bit winning Wimbledons and the U.S. Open and Australia - it's okay, what's next? For the last couple of years of my career, it was, 'Why haven't you won the French?' It's happening to Roger now. And as he gets older and guys get a little better, it does become a little tougher. He grew up playing on clay and he's gotten to the (French Open final). I think he can win it - things really need to fall into place.

What about your generation of tennis?

I was part of an American generation that might have been the best generation ever to play the game, for sure the best American generation. Jim, myself, Andre, Michael (Chang), we combined to win more than 20 majors, we all hit or got close to No. 1 - Michael was a match from doing it. Not only that, but consider the generation of guys we competed against: Edberg, Becker, Ivan Lendl for a little bit. These were truly legends of the sport. Those mid '90s, when I played Andre in the finals of a few majors, it transcended the sport. People who didn't watch tennis were into it when I played in the finals of Wimbledon, or the U.S. Open, and had great matches with Jim. We developed a rivalry. We always had one another to be compared to, but also to push. All of us fed off one another.

Would Federer have held up well in it?

Oh yeah. He would have done just fine. I think he would have more challenges, with guys coming in a little bit more and attacking more. But I think great players figure it out. If he had played in my generation, he would have been right up there.

Source: http://www.sptimes.com/2007/05/03/Sports/Volleying_with_Sampra.shtml

Mimi
05-03-2007, 09:05 AM
thanks Eden for the article, i hope some sore roger fans (of course I am not referring to you) who keep on saying that pete is a jealous old man who is afraid of roger breaking his records are going to read this article, and then they can clearly see that pete is not sore but gracious and has only good words to say on roger ;):p

the_natural
05-03-2007, 10:20 AM
Yeh but at the 98 USO he was really startin to play well, I think it was the 3rd set and he was startin to cruise but he moved in for this volley (he won the point) but there was this weird sort of twist/jerk as he moved in and it did something to his leg, he stopped moving as well and then he lost the next 2 sets, even his serve lost a bit of sting (he won that set he got hurt in, he already had the break and was near the end of the set). I think its fair to say he woulda won that USO if he won that match cos mark played horribly in the final and was going for tooooooo much.

94 USO, 95 AUS (Both because of his thalessemia and emotional drain for 95) 96 Wimb (I still hate that Ace they gave to Krajicek in the 2nd set tie break, it did change that tie break for both guys, both thought it was out but pete got a bit unnerved and richard got very loose after that!!!! But it was fair for Krajicek to win even though pete had played a very good first 2 sets), 96 french (Thallessemia and tough matches). 97 USO (Korda played Brilliant but after the rain delays pete was thrown off, but he screwed up and korda didnt let up 3-0 up in the fifth and pete lost his serve!!!), 99 USO (Injured just before!!!). 2000 Aus (Injured near end of 4th beginin of 5th was out for several weeks after). 01 USO (Was fatigued and slow in the final, and also played soo tentative !!! but safin match took alot outta him SUPER SUNDAY!!!).

Maybe 01 Wimbledon as well cos He had a slow start in that tournament and was very unmotivated early, but if he pulled through against Federer he might have woken up and probably would have played well bcos he woulda been in the Quarters. Federer also got a very very unfair ace in that first set breaker!! it was Way out.

can u see it now?

angiel
05-03-2007, 04:58 PM
can u see it now?


Yes my dear, I saw it.:worship: :D :rolleyes:

angiel
05-03-2007, 05:01 PM
Sampras: Fed will pass me


Set to make his debut on the seniors tour on Thursday, Pete Sampras has said that Roger Federer will surpass his record of 14 Grand Slam titles.


"Roger will pass me. No doubt. He's got 10 now, and I think he'll have 18, like [American golfer] Jack Nicklaus," Sampras told the Boston Globe about the Swiss world number one.

The American, who retired from the sport after winning his record 14th Grand Slam title at the 2002 US Open, will make his first appearance in the Champions Series at Boston's Champions Cup on Thursday against 1998 Australian Open winner Petr Korda.

Sampras joins the likes of John McEnroe, Mats Wilander, Todd Martin, Pat Cash, Wayne Ferreira, and Jim Courier in Boston.

"I shut it down for about three years," Sampras said. "I didn't watch any tennis, didn't pick up a racket."

Though he has been on a three-year layoff from the sport, Sampras recently picked up the racket again in March when he got an phone unlikely call from Federer around the time of the Indian Wells Masters.

"Roger called me when he was on the way to Indian Wells and asked if he could stop by," says Sampras. "I didn't really know him. But I found he's a great guy. Very pleasant."

"We played on my court, and I'd say I held my own. But Roger has an extra gear, and that makes him so great."

Sampras added that his return could not have come at a better time.

"I was getting restless," the five-time U.S. Open champion said. "I thought this would be good for me to get fit and focused."

Four-time Grand Slam winner Courrier, who organises the seniors tour, said that despite the break the 35-year-old Sampras could still be one of the best in the world.

"I can assure you that his game is more than ready to take on the competition here. This week, we're up against it," Courier said.

"If Wimbledon was best-of-three, Pete Sampras would be the No. 2 seed right now."

Eurosport - Jeremy Stahl - 03/05/2007 16:23

angiel
07-03-2007, 09:41 PM
Federer all class, but Sampras the king on grass

Nirmal Shekar


TENNIS / Sampras had to face opponents of greater stature than Federer





London: Watching a mostly baseline-hugging Roger Federer imperiously dismiss the unimpressive Marat Safin from his regal presence in a third round match on the centre court in the 121st Wimbledon championships, on Friday evening, this writer, overcome by that unavoidable disease – nostalgia – generally affecting those who have spent too many summers watching sport on manicured English lawns, reached for the rewind button.

It was July 1980 and Bjorn Borg took on John McEnore in the first of their two finals here. Everybody who watched that five-set epic will easily recall the fourth set tiebreak which McEnroe won 18-16.

But, vivid in my memory, and much easier to recall, are McEnroe’s magical volley winners played with a dazzling sleight of hand.

The great left-handed conjurer is still around, in these parts, keeping us entertained from the commentary box. But the stroke that he played with such breathtaking virtuosity — the volley — is on its way to extinction. When the odd player now chooses to serve and volley on every point, it almost seems like a vestigial trait.

Lost art

Even Roger Federer, who can masterfully play every stroke in the book — and some that are not there because the ones who wrote the game’s manual could not have even dreamed of his brand of shotmaking genius — has won at least three of his four titles (barring the first, in 2003, when he served and volleyed for the most part against Mark Philippoussis in the final) spending much of his time on the baseline.

Then again, Philippoussis is the only natural serve-and-volleyer that Federer has played in the finals, the other two being Andy Roddick (2004 and 2005) and Rafael Nadal (2006). This got me thinking about the two men whose records the Swiss maestro is going after — Borg and Pete Sampras.

These two had to take on some of the finest volleyers of their times while winning five and seven titles respectively.

While it is hardly Federer’s fault that few of his chief rivals venture up to the net — and that his own volleying skills have never been fully tested because of this — there is no doubt at all that Borg and Sampras had to deal with several gifted net-rushing opponents.

While we are at it, another intriguing aspect of this comparison has to do with the stature of the players that these three great champions have beaten in winning a cumulative total of 16 titles.

Let us look at Borg’s dream run first. In his first final, in 1976, the Swede took on Ilie Nastase, one of the most gifted shotmakers the game has known.

In the following two years, he played Jimmy Connors, a man who’d rather leave the court in a body bag than without the title.

Then came Roscoe Tanner in 1979. If you think Andy Roddick serves big, then you should have seen Tanner serve with a wooden racquet. His was a thundering serve that came down like a guillotine.

Finally, there was McEnroe, whose wicked leftie serves the great Swede dealt with in 1980, successfully, and then again in 1981, without success.

Of course, these were just the final opponents. There were serving-and-volleying dangermen elsewhere in the draw, men such as Mark Edmondson, Victor Amaya and our own Vijay Amritraj. And remember, three of those five years (1978-80), the Swedish iceman also won the French Open.

Borg’s final opponents, together, won 17 Grand Slam singles titles — Nastase (2), Connors (8), McEnroe (7).

Now, on to Sampras. In his first final in 1993, the great man played Jim Courier, a four-time Grand Slam champion. His other final opponents were Boris Becker (six Grand Slam titles), Goran Ivanisevic (one), Andre Agassi (eight) and Pat Rafter (two). Sampras’ final opponents together won 20 Grand Slam titles. In comparison, Federer’s final opponents have won four (Nadal three and Roddick one).

While on the one hand it is easy to say that you can only play the field that is available during your time, on the other, it would be unfair to Borg and Sampras if we did not weigh the opposition that they faced with a degree of fairness.

Yes, Federer is so dominant now that he could very well go on to beat every single major record of significance — Borg’s five-in-a-row at Wimbledon, Sampras’s seven Wimbledon titles and 14 overall, as well as his six years as year-end No.1.

But this should take nothing away from the greatness Borg and Sampras achieved at Wimbledon.

All this leaves us with a simple question: who is the greatest Wimbledon (grass court) champion of all time?

Here is my choice: Pete Sampras. I believe if Sampras and Federer had met at their respective peaks at Wimbledon, the former would have won seven out of 10 times.

At the U.S. Open, too, it would have been in Sampras’s favour (6-4). But on the Rebound Ace in Australia, Federer would have beaten Sampras seven out of 10 times and on clay at Roland Garros, the Swiss would have triumphed eight out of 10 times.

Job on hand

With a backlog of 90 matches and a rather bleak weather forecast for the first half of the second week, Wimbledon officials have a job on their hands when play resumes at 11 a.m. (3.30 p.m. IST) on all courts on Monday. The organisers had hoped to complete at least the women’s third round matches on Saturday. But, with the weather unrelenting, they had no option but to call off play at 7 p.m.

The second week is full of promise, weather permitting. But the more it rains, the lesser the chances of Federer being stopped short of Bjorn Borg’s record of five straight titles.

Players such as Andy Roddick and Nadal would struggle to mount a challenge to the great Swiss on a softer surface where the bounce may be unpredictable.

Eden
08-01-2007, 07:23 PM
Here is the official page for their meeting in Macao on November 24th :)

http://www.federersamprasmacao.com/index.html

Greg-Pete fan
08-01-2007, 07:50 PM
Here is the official page for their meeting in Macao on November 24th :)

http://www.federersamprasmacao.com/index.html

Nice page, thanks Eden :)

angiel
08-01-2007, 08:32 PM
Here is the official page for their meeting in Macao on November 24th :)

http://www.federersamprasmacao.com/index.html


thank you Eden.:wavey: :angel:

angiel
08-03-2007, 09:03 PM
Great Debate Comes To The Web


By Tennis Week
08/01/2007

Pete Sampras is in the Hall of Fame, Roger Federer is headed there. Federer beat Sampras in their lone professional meeting at the 2001 Wimbledon and more recently on Sampras' backyard court in a practice set. In November, the current and former World No. 1 players will face off in a series of exhibition matches staged on indoor carpet courts in three Asian cities.


Two of the leading contenders for the mythical tennis title of greatest of all time will cross paths on a court again and now there is a web site devoted to promoting their exhibition series Federer Sampras Macao.com. The site offers brief video interviews with both men as well as comments from other players who have played Sampras or Federer.

"I logged on and saw the main visual of Roger and I going head to head in Macao," Sampras said. "It's exciting stuff and seeing the promotional materials and expectations building up, is giving me butterflies and a real thrill. This is going to be one helluva match. I also enjoyed Roger's complimentary comments about my game, and the comments too from other great players."

Hall of Famer Mats Wilander gives Sampras, in his prime, the edge over Federer as of now.

"You have to put [Sampras] as the best player in the world. Level wise, it is very difficult to say if it is Pete Sampras or Rod Laver," Mats Wilander tells the site. "But if you talk about the level that Pete Sampras played at, I would have to say that, when he played well there was no way Roger Federer would have beaten him. Not yet!"

Tim Henman, who beat Federer in the 2001 Wimbledon quarters after the Swiss stylist toppled Sampras, lost six of seven matches against Sampras. Henman is 6-7 lifetime vs. Federer, but believes the 11-time Grand Slam champion is the more complete player.

"He has a more complete game than Sampras," Henman says. "Sampras had a bigger first and second serve. In the conditions Pete was playing, it was easier to be more aggressive all the time. Now with the courts and the balls much slower, Roger is so effective because he has so many attributes to his game."

Sampras said he sees some of the qualities he exhibited in winning Wimbledon seven times in an eight-year span from 1993-2000 to four-time Wimbledon winner Federer. Both Sampras and Federer are outstanding athletes who combine quickness agility and leaping ability to play explosive all-court tennis.

"When I look at Roger, I'm a fan," Sampras said. "I mean, I'm a fan of how he plays, what he's about, just the fact that I think he's a class guy on and off the court. He's fun to watch. Just his athletic ability, what he's able to do on the run. I think he can and will break every tennis record out there. I just think he's the only really great player I see playing. I think Nadal is really good and he's a great player, but I just think there's less of him. Today I think Roger is two, three levels above the rest. The fact that he seems like he's even getting better. You combine all that, I don't really see anyone threatening the No. 1 ranking. I think he's just too consistent and too good and has a fear factor in everyone else that I had at times, but I think he has it even more."

Their lone professional meeting came, appropriately enough, on the lawn of the All England Club in July of 2001. In a classic Centre Court clash, the 15th-seeded Federer stunned the seven-time Wimbledon king with a dramatic 7-6 (9-7), 5-7, 6-4, 6-7 (2-7), 7-5 fourth-round triumph that was both a coming of age for Federer and the end of an era for Sampras. Federer's victory snapped Sampras' 31-match Wimbledon winning streak and came nearly three years to the day after he swept the Wimbledon singles and doubles junior titles.

Staring across the net, Sampras couldn't help but see the similarities between himself and Federer. From strong serve, the athletic, all-court attack, the one-handed backhand, the understated demeanor on court and even the same Wilson Pro Staff racquet, there is a shared style between the players.

"At the time, I wasn't sure. I knew he was talented. I mean, I knew he was really, really good," Sampras said. "I actually didn't play a bad match. I just lost a tight one at the end. I didn't know how far he was going to take it and where he was going to go. I think I've seen him the last couple years just get a little better, a little better, just kind of figure it out. You just kind of figure it out on your own. He has his formula for being the best player in the world, like I had. I didn't know if he was going to dominate like he is today, but just who I see, him playing the way he's playing, I just think he's really, really good. Kind of sit back and watch him, put myself on the other side of the net, see how I would play him. You know, I think we both would have our hands full."

In March, Federer called Sampras prior to playing Indian Wells, Sampras invited Federer over to his Los Angeles home and the pair played competitive practice sets on Sampras' backyard court in their first meeting since the 2001 Wimbledon.

"I was very happy that I held my own," Sampras said. "It was great to play Roger and it was terrific fun."

Federer was pleased with the qualify of play that day and from that backyard match the idea of staging an exhibition was born.

"The game was close and Pete was playing great tennis, but not good enough to beat me. I won't be telling you the score though!" Federer said. "The tennis was so good that we felt it was a pity not to share the shots, energy, and excitement with the world one more time. We are both delighted to be visiting Asia and Macao and putting on a great game for our many fans in the region."

angiel
08-09-2007, 08:42 PM
Federer, Sampras cross tennis paths



Inquirer
Last updated 05:44am (Mla time) 08/09/2007


MANILA, Philippines -- Pete Sampras and Roger Federer face each other in one of the most anticipated tennis events in recent years, “The Tennis Showdown,” set Nov. 24 at the Venetian Macau Resort Hotel’s new 15,000-seat event center.

Considered the best players of their generation, the match is only the second time that the former World No. 1 and the current top-ranked netter will meet.

Federer beat Sampras in the fourth round of Wimbledon 2001 won by wild card Goran Ivanisevic of Croatia.

During a press conference in Hong Kong recently, Venetian Macau owner William P. Weidner said the event is an “absolutely classic game between two phenomenal sportsmen.”

“We are delighted to bring to Macau what has to be one of the most thrilling match-ups in international tennis,” said Weidner.

Sampras holds the most Grand Slam titles at 14 and the most Wimbledon crowns at seven. He also holds the record for the most number of weeks as World No. 1 (286 weeks) and was year-end No. 1 for a record six consecutive years, from 1993 through 1998.

On the other hand, Federer has been ranked number 1 since February 2004. He holds 11 Grand Slam singles titles, including five straight Wimbledon crowns.

For details on how to watch the event live, call the Macau Government Tourist Office-Philippines at 812-2595 or 813-0947, at Suite 11-D Valero Tower, 122 Valero Street, Salcedo Village, Makati City or www.macautourism.gov.mo

angiel
08-23-2007, 02:36 AM
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/upload/news/20-1(55).jpg




08-21-2007 18:40

Federer, Sampras Set for Seoul Duel in November



By Kim Tong-hyung
Staff Reporter

Tennis fans will be presented with the dream match they have been waiting for when world No.1 Roger Federer goes up against the legendary Pete Sampras at a southern Seoul court in November.

According to officials at Sema Sports Marketing, which announced the match as official Tuesday, Federer and Sampras will meet at the Olympic Tennis Court in Jamsil, southern Seoul, on Nov. 20 in an exhibition match for bragging rights as the greatest tennis player ever.

The match will mark the start of the ``Federer-Sampras Asia Tour’’ that also stops at Malaysia and Macao.

The two players have met only once in their careers, with the up-and-coming Federer beating Sampras, who was at the tail-end of his prime, 3-1 in the fourth round of Wimbledon in 2001.

Sampras, who was inducted to the International Tennis Hall of Fame in January, is a former world No.1 tennis player from the U.S. who won a record 14 Grand Slam men’s single titles, including seven Wimbledon crowns and five U.S. Open titles that stand as records for both tournaments.

He finished No. 1 on the ATP rankings for six consecutive years, a record for the open era and tying him for third all-time.

As ridiculous as Sampras’ achievements are, the Swiss-born Federer seems to be on pace to put up even better numbers than his boyhood idol.

Federer so far has won 11 Grand Slam men’s titles, three Tennis Masters Cup titles and 14 ATP Masters Series titles.

His rivalry with Spanish clay-court genius Rafael Nadal has turned into this generation’s version of the Sampras-Agassi rivalry.

This year at Wimbledon, Federer reached his ninth consecutive Grand Slam singles title, which is an all-time record in men’s tennis. By winning, he tied Bjorn Borg's open-era record of five consecutive Wimbledon championships.

Federer has been ranked No. 1 in the world since Feb. 2, 2004, and holds the all-time record for most consecutive weeks as the top-ranked male player. His current lead in the rankings guarantees that on Aug. 27 he will break Steffi Graf's record for most consecutive weeks (186) as the top-ranked male or female player.

Federer also visited Seoul last year for an exhibition match against Nadal.

thkim@koreatimes.co.kr

angiel
08-23-2007, 02:39 AM
Tennis’ Past and Present Meet in Seoul



AUGUST 22, 2007 06:20


Roger Federer (26, Switzerland) and Pete Sampras (36, USA) will meet on the court in Korea this year.

They were born ten years apart and are regarded the best tennis stars in the world in their prime. This year, tennis fans in Korea will be able to see them live in action. Excitement for the upcoming competition between the greatest tennis players of the past and present is rising.


Federer, currently ranked No. 1 in the world, and former title-holder Sampras will be playing in the “Hyundai Card Super Match VI” at the Olympic Tennis Center at Jamsil Indoor Gymnasium on November 20.


This will be the first exhibition held between the two, and already speculation about the outcome has begun.


Federer is returning to Korea a year after his match against Rafael Nadal (Spain), ranked No. 2 in last year’s world ranking. “I’m pleased to return to Korea after the incredible encouragement and support I received from 10,000 Korean fans last year. My heart’s racing at the thought of meeting my idol, Pete Sampras.”


This will be Sampras’ first visit to Korea. Sampras also revealed his excitement toward the upcoming match. “It is a unique feeling to know I am going to compete against someone who will break my records very soon,” he stated.


Their match in Seoul is a prologue of their Asia Tour, which includes exhibitions in Korea, Malaysia, and Macao.


Federer has won 11 Grand Slam men’s singles titles and accumulated 50 career titles on the ATP (Association of Tennis Professionals) Tour.


Pete Sampras holds the current record for Grand Slam men’s singles titles (14 titles). His prime was in the 1990’s when won 64 career titles before his retirement in 2003. Sampras has returned to the court for senior tours.


Both Federer and Sampras are known for their powerful serves and volleys. They display many similarities in their games, excelling on the grass courts at Wimbledon, where Sampras won the singles’ title seven times and Federer is reigning champion for the fifth consecutive year. On the other hand, neither hold any titles on the clay court of the French Open.


The two players have met only once before, in the fourth round of Wimbledon in 2001. After 3 hours and 41 minutes, Federer beat Sampras, 3-2.