Who RET the most? Least? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Who RET the most? Least?

Angle Queen
02-16-2007, 12:43 PM
I don't have a good memory for these sorts of things, nor the time to look them up. But I'm curious and figured the forum would know. Which active player has retired the most...and least? And what's the latest (in rounds) that a player has retired (e.g. albeit WTA, JHH in the AO finals last year :rolleyes: ).

EDIT to add: I'd also be curious to know who has benefited the most from opponents retiring.

Any help, anyone?

johnnylad
02-16-2007, 01:28 PM
Good question(s)

Sorry I've no answers

Adler
02-16-2007, 01:29 PM
I think Federer didn't retire often

EDIT: he hasn't ever retired, I've checked at atptennis.com

Deivid23
02-16-2007, 01:56 PM
Federer never retires

Davydenko has had a weird history of retirements

Zirconek
02-16-2007, 02:16 PM
I also would like to know. I started a thread some days ago at the Statistics sections, Voo de Mar posted interesting stuff

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?p=4879370#post4879370

Sjengster
02-16-2007, 03:07 PM
I'm pretty sure Jerome Golmard holds this record, he's retired something like 23 times in his career... I might do some checking.

Actually just 20 times, but that's more than enough... most of them came later on in his career as you would expect.

Seneca
02-16-2007, 04:34 PM
There was a big fuss when Agassi gave a walkover at Indian Wells SF (or something of that sort) in 2005. It was the first one in his career which leads me to think that he might not have that much retirements as well.

Too lazy to check myself, of course:angel:

Norrage
02-16-2007, 04:39 PM
Hewitt retires more often nowadays, but I am sure last year was his first ever (or that year before that)..
And Agassi is another that springs to mind.

guga2120
02-16-2007, 04:41 PM
The least would be Agassi.

Angle Queen
02-16-2007, 05:58 PM
I also would like to know. I started a thread some days ago at the Statistics sections, Voo de Mar posted interesting stuff

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?p=4879370#post4879370Sorry I missed that one. (I'm not sure why my search didn't pull it up :mad: ). Indeed interesting stuff.

There was a big fuss when Agassi gave a walkover at Indian Wells SF (or something of that sort) in 2005. It was the first one in his career which leads me to think that he might not have that much retirements as well.I remember that. Seems it started a whole discussion on how the player he'd defeated in the prior round might have fared in his place.

Hewitt retires more often nowadays, but I am sure last year was his first ever (or that year before that)..In Canada maybe. :scratch: I was :eek: .

R.Federer
02-16-2007, 06:03 PM
The least would be Agassi.

Does that mean it's only happened that one time in IW?

Sjengster
02-16-2007, 06:07 PM
Rafter won his last career title when Kuerten retired in the Indianapolis final of 2001 at 4-2 down in the first set - the first real sign of the hip problem, I suppose. Ironic that Rafter's win came by a retirement having just lost the Wimbledon, Montreal and Cincy finals back-to-back (the last of those against Guga, of course), but then he never had the best record in finals.

Jaap
02-16-2007, 06:30 PM
Davydenko does a lot.

I remember a lot of times when he has retired after winning the first set 6-1 or 6-2.:retard:

Sjengster
02-16-2007, 07:01 PM
The least would be Agassi.

Agassi retired ten times in his career, including four times in one year during his injury-riddled 2000 season, so no. There were certainly significant gaps between retirements, mind you; three against Krickstein, McEnroe and Sampras at the end of the 80s/start of the 90s, then nothing until a retirement against Corretja at the YEC in 98, then two more in 99 against Gambill and Escude, followed by the four that I mentioned. That was it, although there were times when perhaps he should have done (RG 05 against Nieminen being an obvious example).

R.Federer
02-16-2007, 07:15 PM
Sampras used to play through throw up and other problems. He must have among the fewest retirements.

In general, do people tend to agree that retirements are more common now than they used to be say a decade or more ago?

Sjengster
02-16-2007, 07:19 PM
Absolutely. There were too many at this year's AO, although how many of them were a consequence of the conditions/heat policy we can't be entirely sure. But look at last year's RG, where you had both a QF and even more worryingly a SF decided by retirement. That's the kind of thing the governing bodies need to be addressing, not this "entertainment" crap. How about an in-depth study of the effects of courts, racquets and balls on the players now as compared to a decade or two ago? I remember Enqvist always maintained that the move towards slower balls was a major cause of his injury problems in his later years, as one can imagine with the hard flat hitting he was famous for.