Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis) [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Books, articles, interviews (non-tennis)

KaseyL
03-19-2004, 07:12 PM
I thought I'd create a thread for some stuff we sometimes discuss in our chat thread, but where it then gets burried in all the posts there.

We could use this thread for all written stuff (books, articles, interviews) we'd like to discuss; things that we think are interesting to some people in here, or matters that shocked us, touched us,... or just advice re books we love reading and would like to recommend... anything along those lines, really.

I got the idea when we created some threads re some TV shows/films.
(finally made the thread :p )

Lisbeth
03-23-2004, 04:29 AM
This is a great idea! Unfortunately I am feeling very uninspired!

dagmar7
03-23-2004, 10:58 AM
My current reading...if anyone wants to discuss.

Still reading Isak Dinesen - Seven Gothic Tales, brilliant storytelling, can't really compare her to anyone elses I can think of, and she seems to really overuse the comma, which I can really relate to, but she makes it work...

"When we are young, the idea of death or failure is intolerable to us; even the possibility of ridicule we cannot bear. But we have also an unconquerable faith in our own stars, and in the impossibility of anything venturing to go against us. As we grow old we slowly come to believe that everything will turn out badly for us, and that failure is in the nature of things; but then we do not much mind what happens to us one way or the other. In this way a balance is maintained."

Audacious, but it struck a chord.:o

Also just read Patricia Cornwall's 'true-crime' novel arguing, not particularly convincingly, that Jack the Ripper's real identity is british impressionist painter Walter Sickert

Philosophy - tormenting myself with Pascal a little.

duck
03-23-2004, 07:21 PM
Also just read Patricia Cornwall's 'true-crime' novel arguing, not particularly convincingly, that Jack the Ripper's real identity is british impressionist painter Walter Sickert

I bought that for my forensically-minded flatmate and she was unconvinced. I also saw Cornwell's documentary which was full of 'possibly', 'maybe', 'perhaps' and was just a little inconclusive for my liking. I found her analysis of Sickert's paintings quite interesting though.

Has anyone read Sarah Orne Jewett? Capote listed her as one of his influences and I have just found a beautifully bound set of her novels (published 1900) on our library shelves. She was obviously big at some stage -has she dropped out of the canon or am I just exposing yet more fearful ignorance? :unsure:

dagmar7
03-24-2004, 10:04 AM
I bought that for my forensically-minded flatmate and she was unconvinced. I also saw Cornwell's documentary which was full of 'possibly', 'maybe', 'perhaps' and was just a little inconclusive for my liking. I found her analysis of Sickert's paintings quite interesting though.

It was interesting to read. Most convincing part of her argument for me - the evidence re some of the many letters that 'Jack the Ripper' sent to the police, newspapers etc. Matching watermarks, artist's supplies used in the creation of some of them, the quality of the doodles and the handwriting and it was one of the letters that produced the matching (mitochondrial) dna that she attaches such importance to.

Least convincing - bases a lot of her argument on building up a profile for him that she believe is consistent with that of a psychopath: secretive, selfish, problems with women, contempt for authority, possibly impotent. The problem with this is that - with the exception of the impotence - this could describe arguably over half the writers and artists of that time. T. S. Eliot anyone? She skirts over the evidence that he might have been in France at the time of some of the killings. Most people who study the murders believe that the killer would have to be expert or practised with a knife - surgeon, fish gutter, butcher etc.- she dismisses this pretty summarily. Lots of other stuff... Some stuff made me think though. His paintings are creepy and frequently seem to represent scenarios involving murdered women and the photos of the Ripper's victims, but murdered women were a popular theme in a lot of art, not really evidence. Edgar Allan Poe: "the death of a beautiful woman is the most poetical topic in the world."

Of course, the fact that this attitude is cultural - not really reassuring. :sad:

Has anyone read Sarah Orne Jewett? Capote listed her as one of his influences and I have just found a beautifully bound set of her novels (published 1900) on our library shelves. She was obviously big at some stage -has she dropped out of the canon or am I just exposing yet more fearful ignorance? :unsure:

One novella/long short story - The White Heron, which my grandmother gave me, a beautifully illustrated version. :cool:

Very polished writing with an incredible feeling for the natural world, the latter perhaps accounting for her fall from fashion. I have a copy of The Country of the Pointed Firs, but haven't got around to reading it yet. :o

KaseyL
03-24-2004, 10:11 PM
have been posting this in our chat thread, so I'd better should put it here:

interesting book on fats: From: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats by Sally Fallon with Mary G. Enig, PhD

See: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0967089735/optimalwellnessc/103-9776911-2728667

comment: it's great, gives great insight (other books of them too) but as so many health books it shouldn't be your 'bible' either. Every scientist has his or her preferences after all, and sometimes 'forgets' the whole picture upon focusing on one thing. I do think this book is a must read if you're interested in your health, but with the above in the back of your mind.

I'm no vegetarian, but on the other hand I'm very careful with what I eat as meat and how much though.

Angele
07-12-2004, 04:27 PM
bump :)

Murkofan
07-12-2004, 04:36 PM
Gracias Angele :worship:

Read these books!

http://a1055.g.akamai.net/f/1055/1401/5h/images.barnesandnoble.com/images/7380000/7382035.gif

Americans have lost touch with their history, and in this thought-provoking book, Professor James Loewen shows why. After surveying twelve leading high school American history texts, he has concluded that not one does a decent job of making history interesting or memorable. Marred by an embarrassing combination of blind patriotism, mindless optimism, sheer misinformation, and outright lies, these books omit almost all the ambiguity, passion, conflict, and drama from our past. In ten powerful chapters, Loewen reveals that:

The United States dropped three times as many tons of explosives in Vietman as it dropped in all theaters of World War II, including Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Ponce de Leon went to Florida mainly to capture Native Americans as slaves for Hispaniola, not to find the mythical fountain of youth

Woodrow Wilson, known as a progressive leader, was in fact a white supremacist who personally vetoed a clause on racial equality in the Covenant of the League of Nations

The first colony to legalize slavery was not Virginia but Massachusetts

From the truth about Columbus's historic voyages to an honest evaluation of our national leaders, Loewen revives our history, restoring to it the vitality and relevance it truly possesses.

http://a1055.g.akamai.net/f/1055/1401/5h/images.barnesandnoble.com/images/7090000/7091906.gif

“I think I could be a good woman, if I had five thousand a year,” observes beautiful and clever Becky Sharp, one of the wickedest—and most appealing—women in all of literature. Becky is just one of the many fascinating figures that populate William Makepeace Thackeray’s novel Vanity Fair, a wonderfully satirical panorama of upper-middle-class life and manners in London at the beginning of the nineteenth century.
Scorned for her lack of money and breeding, Becky must use all her wit, charm and considerable sex appeal to escape her drab destiny as a governess. From London’s ballrooms to the battlefields of Waterloo, the bewitching Becky works her wiles on a gallery of memorable characters, including her lecherous employer, Sir Pitt, his rich sister, Miss Crawley, and Pitt’s dashing son, Rawdon, the first of Becky’s misguided sexual entanglements.

Filled with hilarious dialogue and superb characterizations, Vanity Fair is a richly entertaining comedy that asks the reader, “Which of us is happy in this world? Which of us has his desire? or, having it, is satisfied?”

http://a1055.g.akamai.net/f/1055/1401/5h/images.barnesandnoble.com/images/6320000/6324080.gif

I Capture the Castle tells the story of seventeen-year-old Cassandra and her family, who live in not-so-genteel poverty in a ramshackle old English castle. Here she strives, over six turbulent months, to hone her writing skills. She fills three notebooks with sharply funny yet poignant entries. Her journals candidly chronicle the great changes that take place within the castle's walls, and her own first descent into love. By the time she pens her final entry, she has "captured the castle"--and the heart of the reader--in one of literature's most enchanting entertainments.

Angele
07-12-2004, 04:39 PM
I'm gonna add I Capture the Castle to my reading book but skip the two others for now :p Vanity Fair is going to be a movie I believe so I'll watch it :p And I don't particularily like history :ras:

Angele
07-12-2004, 04:44 PM
I recommend reading anything at all by Nicholas Sparks, all his books are amazing. My personal favorites are The Notebook and A Bend in the Road :hearts: :hearts: They're all great though so you can't go wrong. The only one that I know nothing about is Three Weeks with my Brother which is his latest but it can't help but be great imo. And then of course there is The Bronze Horseman and Tatiana and Alexander by Paullina Simons which is a must read. I bet even you'd like it Marly :p It's romance but it's set during the war. It's heart breaking and heart warming all at the sam time, definetly a must read!

Murkofan
07-12-2004, 04:44 PM
You should always read the book before you watch the movie :p

Murkofan
07-12-2004, 04:45 PM
If there's more war than romance, I might like it :p

Angele
07-12-2004, 04:48 PM
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0061031127.01._PE_PI_SCMZZZZZZZ_.jpg

From Publishers Weekly
Set in her native St. Petersburg, Russia, Simons's latest thick novel (after Tully, etc.) focuses on a WWII love affair. As the story opens, Tatiana, the youngest member of the Metanova family, is just 17; she still shares a bed with her older sister, Dasha. Not long after the country goes to war with Germany, Tatiana meets Alexander, a soldier, and sparks fly. It turns out, however, that Alexander is the same soldier Dasha has been crowing about. Possessed of a strong sense of family loyalty, and living under conditions that permit no privacy, Tatiana refuses to interfere with her sister's happiness, but the attraction between Tatiana and Alexander proves too powerful. Complicating matters, another soldier, Dimitri, has information that could destroy Alexander, and Dimitri likes Tatiana, too. In order to protect both Dasha's feelings and Alexander's life, the star-crossed lovers become part of a deceptive quadrangle as war intensifies around them. Taking her title from a tragic poem by Alexandr Pushkin, Simons skillfully highlights the ironies of the socialist utopia. Despite the novel's sprawling length and its seemingly epic scope, the nearly single-minded focus on dialogue between Tatiana and Alexander leaves other character development shortchanged and the reader with the impression of a peculiarly tiny canvas. Nave and occupying the Cinderella role in her family, Tatiana is certainly a survivor though one who finally outstays her welcome. While her love story is often both tender and fierce, it is also overwrought and prolonged past the breaking point. (June)Forecast: An advertising blitz, five-city author tour and glamorous jacket may distract readers from the novel's shortcomings and ensure short-term success (foreign rights have been sold in 10 countries), but this is not the Russian Thorn Birds the publisher hopes it will be.

Angele
07-12-2004, 04:51 PM
If there's more war than romance, I might like it :p
It's hard to stay if there's more of one than the other... it's probably half and half I'd say. I think you'd like it though, much more than any of my Nicholas Sparks books anyway :p

Murkofan
07-12-2004, 04:56 PM
http://a1055.g.akamai.net/f/1055/1401/5h/images.barnesandnoble.com/images/5230000/5239228.gif

He is a man with an unknown past and an uncertain future. A man dragged from the sea riddled with bullets, his face altered by plastic surgery--a man bearing the dubious identity of Jason Bourne.

Now he is running for his life, the target of professional assassins, at the center of a maddeneing, deadly puzzle. Who is Jason Bourne? To answer that question, he must find the secret buried deep in his own past. And the only one who can help him is a beautiful woman who once would do anything to escape him.

Murkofan
07-12-2004, 04:57 PM
It's hard to stay if there's more of one than the other... it's probably half and half I'd say. I think you'd like it though, much more than any of my Nicholas Sparks books anyway :p

I was unsuccessful in my attempt to read The Notebook :p

Angele
07-12-2004, 04:59 PM
I was unsuccessful in my attempt to read The Notebook :p
You tried to read it and didn't tell me? When was this? :p You should at least go watch the movie though :p

Angele
07-12-2004, 05:00 PM
Btw I can't believe you didn't even get through a 200 page book :p

Kate05
07-13-2004, 05:59 PM
I was unsuccessful in my attempt to read The Notebook :p

Oh so was I. I hate Nicholas Sparks' writing anyway, but my mom bought it for me a week before the movie came out so I tried to read it. Just opted for the movie, which is loads better.

I'm reading Vanity Fair right now too. Well it's been temporarily abandoned because I'm reading it online and I have actual books I need to read, but I have until September to read it before the movie. The movie looks so awesome.

I've been really into biographies lately. I also have a shitload of James Dean biographies and books about his death right now. The book about his death is really intriguing and slightly shocking because you think 'oh well James Dean just died in a car accident' but I guess there's so much more than that.

There's this one James Dean book called Dizzy and Jimmy by one of James Dean's old girlfriends from his NYC days. Most of the dialogue is probably made up crap because I refuse to believe this woman could remember every bit of their dialogue when they were together, but she does portray James as an awfully adorable guy. When they say goodbye and the last few pages made me cry though. I'm sure she would remember their goodbye so I'm believing that part.

The Devil Wears Prada is proving really hard to finish. I normally finish little trash books like that in a day. I did that with the Bridget Jones's Diary sequel. But Devil Wears Prada is interesting but the author's writing is not really gripping, the story just kind of plods along. With Bergdorf Blondes I don't want to get started on how bad Plum Skyes writing, but the story is kind of funny and total fluff.

Angele that Bronze Horseman book sounds really good, I'll have to check it out.

Here's what I'm currently reading I have my substance/well written books and then my trashy/mediocre writing books :lol:

http://a1055.g.akamai.net/f/1055/1401/5h/images.barnesandnoble.com/images/4550000/4551237.gif

Natalie Wood was always a star; her mother made sure this was true. A superstitious Russian immigrant who claimed to be royalty, Maria had been told by a gypsy, long before little Natasha Zakharenko's birth, that her second child would be famous throughout the world. When the beautiful child with the hypnotic eyes was first placed in Maria's arms, she knew the prophecy would become true and proceeded to do everything in her power — everything — to make sure of it.
Natasha is the haunting story of a vulnerable and talented actress whom many of us felt we knew. We watched her mature on the movie screen before our eyes — in Miracle on 34th Street, Rebel Without a Cause, West Side Story, Splendor in the Grass, and on and on. She has been hailed — along with Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor — as one of the top three female movie stars in the history of film, making her a legend in her own lifetime and beyond. But the story of what Natalie endured, of what her life was like when the doors of the soundstages closed, has long been obscured.
Natasha is based on years of exhaustive research into Natalie's turbulent life and mysterious drowning in the dark water that was her greatest fear. Author Suzanne Finstad, a former lawyer, conducted nearly four hundred interviews with Natalie's family, close friends, legendary costars, lovers, film crews, and virtually everyone connected with the investigation of her strange death. Through these firsthand accounts from many who have never spoken publicly before, Finstad has reconstructed a life of emotional abuse and exploitation, of almost unprecedented fame, great loneliness, poignancy, and loss. She shedsan unwavering light on Natalie's complex relationships with James Dean, Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Raymond Burr, Warren Beatty, and Robert Wagner and reveals the two lost loves of Natalie's life, whom her controlling mother prevented her from marrying. Finstad tells this beauty's heartbreaking story with sensitivity and grace, revealing a complex and conflicting mix of fragility and strength in a woman who was swept along by forces few could have resisted. Natasha is impossible to put down — it is the definitive biography of Natalie Wood that we've long been waiting for.

http://a1055.g.akamai.net/f/1055/1401/5h/images.barnesandnoble.com/images/6320000/6326844.gif

The fairy tale wedding of Oscar-winning actress Grace Kelly and Prince Rainier of Monaco captured the imagination of the world. In this intimate look behind the palace gates, bestselling biographer J. Randy Taraborrelli discloses the heartbreaking sacrifices Princess Grace made in her quest to live happily ever after. Based on hundreds of interviews with family and friends, this book reveals: Why Grace decided to marry Rainier...the Prince's startling prenuptial demands...Grace's despair over her husband's refusal to let her continue her acting career...the couple's losing battle to control the behavior of their high-spirited daughters...Grace's advice to Princess Di on adjusting to life as a royal...the facts behind the tragic and mysterious accident that ended Grace's life...and much more.

http://a1055.g.akamai.net/f/1055/1401/5h/images.barnesandnoble.com/images/6580000/6588566.gif

A delightfully dishy novel about the all-time most impossible boss in the history of impossible bosses.
Andrea Sachs, a small-town girl fresh out of college, lands the job “a million girls would die for.” Hired as the assistant to Miranda Priestly, the high-profile, fabulously successful editor of Runway magazine, Andrea finds herself in an office that shouts Prada! Armani! Versace! at every turn, a world populated by impossibly thin, heart-wrenchingly stylish women and beautiful men clad in fine-ribbed turtlenecks and tight leather pants that show off their lifelong dedication to the gym. With breathtaking ease, Miranda can turn each and every one of these hip sophisticates into a scared, whimpering child.

the Devil Wears Prada gives a rich and hilarious new meaning to complaints about “The Boss from Hell.” Narrated in Andrea’s smart, refreshingly disarming voice, it traces a deep, dark, devilish view of life at the top only hinted at in gossip columns and over Cosmopolitans at the trendiest cocktail parties. From sending the latest, not-yet-in-stores Harry Potter to Miranda’s children in Paris by private jet, to locating an unnamed antique store where Miranda had at some point admired a vintage dresser, to serving lattes to Miranda at precisely the piping hot temperature she prefers, Andrea is sorely tested each and every day—and often late into the night with orders barked over the phone. She puts up with it all by keeping her eyes on the prize: a recommendation from Miranda that will get Andrea a top job at any magazine of her choosing. As things escalate from the merely unacceptable to the downright outrageous,however, Andrea begins to realize that the job a million girls would die for may just kill her. And even if she survives, she has to decide whether or not the job is worth the price of her soul.

http://a1055.g.akamai.net/f/1055/1401/5h/images.barnesandnoble.com/images/7200000/7200117.gif

Plum Sykes’s beguiling debut welcomes readers to the glamorous world of Park Avenue Princesses, the girls who careen through Manhattan in search of the perfect Fake Bake (tan acquired from Portofino Tanning Salon), a ride on a PJ (private jet) with the ATM (rich boyfriend), and the ever-elusive fiancé.

With invitations to high-profile baby showers and benefits, more Marc Jacobs clothes than is decent, and a department store heiress for a best friend, our heroine known only as Moi is living at the peak of New York society. But what is Moi to do when her engagement falls apart? Can she ever find happiness in a city filled with the distractions of Front Row Girls, dermatologists, premieres, and eyebrow waxes? Is it possible to find love in a town where her friends think that the secret to happiness is getting invited to the Van Cleef and Arpels über-private sample sale? And how is she going to deal with the endless phone calls from her mother in England demanding that she get married to the Earl next door?

With enormous wit and an insider’s eye, Sykes captures the nuances of the rich and spoiled in a heartwarming social satire, featuring a loveable "champagne bubble of a girl" who’s just looking for love (and maybe the perfect pair of Chloé jeans).

Angele
07-13-2004, 07:10 PM
I think those of you who don't like Nicholas Sparks might still like The Bronze Horseman. The romance in TBH has more substance I'd say, it's not as predictable and the conflicts or problems they have are much more, um, severe I'd say. You can get more involved in the characters. The romantic parts are very :hearts: though, just a warning. But the writing is great and the story really is beautiful so y'all might not hate it that much :p I still recommend Nicholas Sparks for the romance lovers though. Off the top of my head I'm thinking of Anne and Jess but I'm sure there are others who would like them :D

Angele
07-13-2004, 07:15 PM
I wanna read Bergdorf Blondes :bounce: Haven't gotten around to buying it yet but I plan to on my next book store trip. The last time I was there I was debating between that and another book and I ended up with the other book. I can't for the life of me remember what it's called though :o

Ashie_87
07-14-2004, 10:04 AM
Frank McCourt-"Angela's Ashes: A Memoir of a Childhood"

A memoir of growing up in New York in the 1930s and in Ireland in the 1940s. McCourt tells of extreme hardship and suffering, in Brooklyn tenements and Limerick slums - too many children, too little money, his mother barely coping as his father's drinking bouts brought the family close to disaster.

Ashie_87
07-14-2004, 10:08 AM
Frank McCourt-"Tis'" (sequel to Angela's Ashes)

This sequel to Frank McCourt's memoir of his Irish Catholic boyhood, "Angela's Ashes", picks up the story in October 1949 upon his arrival in America. It's the story of McCourt's American journey from impoverished immigrant with rotten teeth, infected eyes and no friends.

Murkofan
07-14-2004, 01:31 PM
Btw I can't believe you didn't even get through a 200 page book :p

I found it to be dismally boring and extremely overwrought :p

Okay, here's what NOT to read: anything by Jennifer Cruisie. Ugh, ugh, ugh.

Murkofan
07-14-2004, 01:42 PM
I'm reading Vanity Fair right now too. Well it's been temporarily abandoned because I'm reading it online and I have actual books I need to read, but I have until September to read it before the movie. The movie looks so awesome.

It does look awesome. I saw the trailer before King Arthur (very mediocre, btw, though Keira Knightley's ridiculous outfits are worth the price of admission :p) and was inspired to read it.

What the hell kind of name is Plum Sykes? :p I hope it's fake :p That and The Devil Wears Prada sounds like I would grow to hate NYC/LA (sorry Kate :p) and the fashion industry even more than I already do :p

Kate05
07-14-2004, 07:24 PM
It does look awesome. I saw the trailer before King Arthur (very mediocre, btw, though Keira Knightley's ridiculous outfits are worth the price of admission :p) and was inspired to read it.

What the hell kind of name is Plum Sykes? :p I hope it's fake :p That and The Devil Wears Prada sounds like I would grow to hate NYC/LA (sorry Kate :p) and the fashion industry even more than I already do :p

The kind of name that's sadly true. She's like a 31 year old British socialite who moved to NYC a few years ago and worked for Vogue under Anna Wintour(evil fashion devilwoman). She's apparently been a heinous bitch(some say brainwashed by Anna) ever since and I read a Telegraph article where it showed just that, I'll try and find it. Plum Skyes life is like a fun mythical thing. :p

They're both set in NYC. ;) :p Plus I live in OC anyway, but it's still basically LA since we have to share everything. "Orange County: Riding LA's ass for years" or "Orange County: LA's pool house" :p

Actually wow I just realized the authors of Bergdorf Blondes and Devil Wears Prada are kind of connected through the Vogue/Anna Wintour thing. Oh but read The Devil Wears Prada anyway, the writer basically just changed names around and "fictionally, novelly" wrote about her experiences as Anna Wintour's junior assistant and it shows you how much of a bitch Anna is.

Ooh King Arthur. I had a small urge to go see it for Keira Knightley and British boy hotness but Jon Stewart called it a "20 pound sack of shit" last week and I went to see Anchorman instead. :p

Murkofan
07-15-2004, 12:04 AM
Unfortunately, Anchorman really isn't much better :p But it did give us the phrase, "Is it because I have breasts? Exquisite breasts?" which my sister and I have enjoyed quite a bit :p

A friend of my has The Devil Wears Prada, so I'll borrow it from her when I get done wading through all of my books :p

Plum Sykes. What a name.

fcap
07-15-2004, 03:14 AM
I wanna read that too!!! Trading Up bye Candace Bushnell i think was a good read :)

Murkofan
07-19-2005, 01:33 AM
Bumped for the new Harry Potter! :D

Lisbeth
07-19-2005, 01:37 AM
Well tell us then :p

Murkofan
07-19-2005, 01:48 AM
Well, I just got it today :fiery: and I've been busy, so I'm only on pg 107 right now :p Hope to be finished with it sometime tomorrow afternoon, depending on RL stuff I have to take care of.

Jess is ahead of me, though, and I expect she'll find her way in here sooner or later :p And besides, you can't read anything we have to say 'til you read it yourself :p Don't wanna be spoiled :p

ally_014
07-19-2005, 04:58 AM
Ooh, I finished it on Sunday (got it Saturday morning) and I had to read one particular page like 3 times before I could properly take it in! It was devastating! (Maybe I am indulging in a little hyperbole there but it was still sad :p) Hurry up and finish so I can talk to someone about it - all my friends are still not even half way through, I mean who really cares about uni work when Harry's there :p

star
07-19-2005, 12:17 PM
I'll just depend on you all to tell me about it.

I think Harry Potter is a great thing.... How old were you all when you read the very first book?

Lisbeth
07-20-2005, 12:01 AM
Oh ... about 30 ;) :lol:

Murkofan
07-20-2005, 02:17 AM
Ooh, I finished it on Sunday (got it Saturday morning) and I had to read one particular page like 3 times before I could properly take it in! It was devastating! (Maybe I am indulging in a little hyperbole there but it was still sad :p) Hurry up and finish so I can talk to someone about it - all my friends are still not even half way through, I mean who really cares about uni work when Harry's there :p

I'm on chapter 20, be done soon, promise! :D

I started reading HP around the time the 4th book, Goblet of Fire, came out. I had no interest in it, but we happened to be at B&N while a big display of all the books, and since I couldn't think of a third book to get (I always get at least 3 books at B&N) I went ahead and got the first HP. I was hooked instantly :D

And GoF came out in 2000, which means I would have been 15 when I started reading 'em.

ally_014
07-20-2005, 10:00 AM
I read the first 3 when I was 12 when my english teacher leant them to me in grade 7 (first year high school). The GoF when I was 14, OoP when I was 16 and now I'm 19! It's weird that I sell them to all these young kids and then I read them, but I was young when I started! But this old couple (about 60 or 70) came into work and bought a copy of every book on Saturday, they said that they wanted to know what all these kids liked about it, and they didn't even have grandkids :)

Murkofan
07-21-2005, 03:00 AM
They should love it :D

And yes, I finished! First, to get it out of my system: a great big giant squeeeeeeee! for Ron/Hermione (not quite there, but almost :p), Harry/Ginny, and Lupin/Tonks :hearts:

I don't think Snape is really evil. A bitter old bastard, yes, but I think he's really on the good side, and that he and Dumbledore had discussed all the scenarios that could come about with Draco being tasked with killing DD. Draco is awful, but DD would rather die than have him become a killer.

Someone else comment :p

star
07-21-2005, 04:16 AM
I'm speechless. ;)