Could someone explain to me why chair umpires announce the score only in English? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Could someone explain to me why chair umpires announce the score only in English?

Rosa Luxembourg
11-14-2006, 10:01 PM
:p :devil: :scratch:

scarecrows
11-14-2006, 10:04 PM
http://www.ateaseweb.com/mb/style_emoticons/default/spam.gif

Rosa Luxembourg
11-14-2006, 10:06 PM
http://www.ateaseweb.com/mb/style_emoticons/default/spam.gif

why? :scratch:

they do in Russian, Spanish, German, French, Italian... what's wrong with Chinese?

Dancing Hero
11-14-2006, 10:20 PM
English is the 'world' language in many ways, just the way it is. And English speaking people are frankly poor at learning other languages.

You would think in China, they would give the score in Chinese as well. Mandarin Chinese is the standard language I think. I know there are different dialects of Chinese as well.

:wavey:

El Legenda
11-14-2006, 10:21 PM
because English is so easy to learn, most people can do it. and also Americans cant learn anything else and this is coming from me, american himself ;) :wavey:

Dancing Hero
11-14-2006, 10:25 PM
because English is so easy to learn, most people can do it. and also Americans cant learn anything else and this is coming from me, american himself ;) :wavey:


Ha ha, the English are pretty poor at learning languages as well, they just speak/shout louder in English when they go abroad.:)


I try to learn everyday language to get me about for when I go abroad, basic French, German, Italian for example.

Rosa Luxembourg
11-14-2006, 11:02 PM
because English is so easy to learn, most people can do it. and also Americans cant learn anything else and this is coming from me, american himself ;) :wavey:


the majority Europeans speak perfect English or at least understand well, so then why in Paris they announce score in both languages as they do in Spain, Italy, Germany and Russia?

Yappa
11-14-2006, 11:09 PM
In Paris-Bercy yes, but not in Roland Garros.

rmb6687
11-14-2006, 11:10 PM
isn't it faster to say the english. From what I understand, mandarine numbers are just longer to say.


and they say the scores in both languages at the other tournaments...I def heard spanish in Madrid...and then the umpire would switch.

NyGeL
11-14-2006, 11:21 PM
Becouse umpires doesn't speak chinese.

smucav
11-14-2006, 11:30 PM
The 2006 ATP Official Rulebook:C. Language - Chair Umpire
Chair umpires should announce matches in the language of the Tournament and subsequently in English. Conversations between the Chair Umpire and player may be in any language; however, if the language used is not English, then the Chair Umpire must be prepared to advise the other player of the nature of the discussion.The language of TMC Shanghai is English.

Caralimon
11-14-2006, 11:36 PM
Umpires are not forced to use English if both players speak the local language.

ex. spaniards playing in spain or south america, etc etc

Saumon
11-14-2006, 11:56 PM
In Paris-Bercy yes, but not in Roland Garros.

it depends on the umpire... :shrug: generally Mourier and Maria do it in French only at both events. the players understand the difference between "zero", "quinze", "trente", "quarante" and "égalité" anyway :p

njnetswill
11-15-2006, 12:10 AM
Because none of the umpires are Chinese.

Sjengster
11-15-2006, 12:55 AM
I'm sure they could learn a bit of scoring in Chinese with enough practice, but isn't Chinese one of the hardest languages to learn for a beginner? And being in Shanghai I think it's Cantonese, although someone will correct me on that I'm sure.

Yappa
11-15-2006, 01:33 AM
it depends on the umpire... :shrug: generally Mourier and Maria do it in French only at both events. the players understand the difference between "zero", "quinze", "trente", "quarante" and "égalité" anyway :p

Yeah, but my point was that only in Roland Garros all umpires use french as the only language. Other french tourneys can vary. Or am I wrong?

khyber
11-15-2006, 01:37 AM
I studied Chinese in college and then spent a year living in Taiwan. Back then you were required to pass an English exam to be admitted to a major Chinese speaking University. The reasoning was that even though Chinese was spoken by more people than any other language, pretty much it was only Chinese people speaking it. They wanted access to the most up to date information in science and engineering and that required at least the ability to read English. I assume that is still a concern today both in mainland China and Taiwan.

So it doesn't surprise me that the official language of the tournament is the International language of English.

Mainland China has made a huge push over the last generation to educate everyone in the Mandarin dialect so that there would be a common spoken language. All the younger generation would speak it as well as the local dialect, in this case Shanghaiese.

The numbers aren't that hard to pronounce, but I'm sure it wouldn't come naturally unless you had studied it a bit.

Rosa Luxembourg
11-15-2006, 02:04 AM
Because none of the umpires are Chinese.


none of them are Russian as well but they announced the score in Russian at the Kremlin Cup and the Davis Cup

mandynyuna
11-15-2006, 01:02 PM
Chinese numbers are not really that hard to pronounce. I think they should announce it in both languages especially since the tournament is held in China and the officials want to promote tennis there.

Just to touch on J'torian's point, I think learning English in Asia is more for a practical purpose than for the coolness factor. We learn English to communicate better with the Americans and Europeans when we do business. Here in Singapore, our textbooks are all in English,except for our various mother tongues ( Chinese/Tamil/Malay). Nowadays, the young people(like me) feel more comfortable conversing in English but we still keep in touch with our own languages. It's the result of a multi-linguil(sp?) society we grew up in.

So either the umpires don't want any confusion to occur when they announce the score or they want a common language that everyone can understand.

Oh and they would never announce the score in Shanghainese. As its name suggests, only people living in Shanghai who speak that dialect would understand it. Besides, there are a LOT of Chinese dialects like Hokkien, Cantonese, Teochew, etc which are only spoken in different provinces. They would only announce it in Mandarin since it's like the standardised form of Chinese.