Agree or Disagree with this Assessment? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Agree or Disagree with this Assessment?

cobalt60
10-16-2006, 05:03 PM
I was watching the Madrid matches on the Tennis Channel and the announcers were discussing how hard it is for one player to get into any kind of rhythm when their opponent was playing listlessly. One would think that if one is playing well, an aggressive smart player would try and make quick dispatch of this opponent. But does this apply to every player or not? Does it make sense to think that some players get totally thrown off when their opponent is playing poorly? Thoughts. Thanks.

That tennis kid
10-16-2006, 05:05 PM
It can disrupt a player's rhythm or make them lose focus; so yes some players will likely be distracted by an opponent playing poorly. Additionally, a similar thing happens with injured players; often their opponents will lose track of their gameplan and attempt to extend rallies and move their opponent around more so may start to play less well than before.

LaTenista
10-16-2006, 05:11 PM
I agree, I think when your opponent is playing poorly (due to lack of form, illness, or injury) it is hard to stay concentrated and execute your game.

I can think of a lot of matches like that, in particular USO 2003 Fish ended up losing to an injured Karol Kucera just because Mardy got so thrown off by it.

Also I think most players hit with a lot of power these days but when they are not at their best they don't as much and the lack of power in shots can trip up their opponent at times. Like players have flat out missed a slow moving ball because they were expecting it to come back faster. :shrug:

That tennis kid
10-16-2006, 05:13 PM
Also see Lendl vs. Chang at RG when Lendl double-faulted because a cramping Chang stood at the service line. Probably a rather extreme example of this but it holds true regardless.

cobalt60
10-16-2006, 05:16 PM
On the other hand, I think some would truly beatdown their opponent. Maybe it is the killer instinct in some players that allows them to win easily in that situation.

disturb3d
10-16-2006, 05:21 PM
I was watching the Madrid matches on the Tennis Channel and the announcers were discussing how hard it is for one player to get into any kind of rhythm when their opponent was playing listlessly. One would think that if one is playing well, an aggressive smart player would try and make quick dispatch of this opponent. But does this apply to every player or not? Does it make sense to think that some players get totally thrown off when their opponent is playing poorly? Thoughts. Thanks.When a player has limited control, and hits with crap technique. It's difficult to read the ball, or even rally.
This implies to Roddick. Who grinds very well, and gives you anonymous unorthodox trash to work with on every second ball.

For a player like Nalbandian, and there is no better example.
Hits textbook groundstrokes, blatant body positioning, and willingness to play an efficient game are part of his inability to win tournaments.
Quality players will find it's only a matter of staying in the point for long enough (which isn't too difficult, because the Nalbandian groundstroke projection is about as varied and imperfect as a ball machine) before he runs out of options.

GlennMirnyi
10-16-2006, 05:29 PM
There's the mental obligation to win, also. You think: "ah, he's injured, now I must win". That makes you wanna try to do things with a less margin of error than you are used to.

Lee
10-16-2006, 09:52 PM
I was watching the Madrid matches on the Tennis Channel and the announcers were discussing how hard it is for one player to get into any kind of rhythm when their opponent was playing listlessly. One would think that if one is playing well, an aggressive smart player would try and make quick dispatch of this opponent. But does this apply to every player or not? Does it make sense to think that some players get totally thrown off when their opponent is playing poorly? Thoughts. Thanks.

I believe most professional players get totally thrown off when their opponent is playing poorly. And the result depends on 'for how long'. Mostly mentally tough players will recover soon and either let his/her opponent commit a million UEs or get back to his/her own rhythm and finnished his/her opponent off.

Norrage
10-16-2006, 10:02 PM
Gaudio vs. Coria final RG...Gaudio should have finished Coria off easely after Coria got the cramps, but allowed Coria to even get matchpoints just because Gaudio changed his gameplan or perhaps was getting the nerves..

J. Corwin
10-17-2006, 12:51 AM
If the player is mentally weak then he/she could start wondering when their own errors will come and how they can still choke it all way.
Been there, done that. :(

Deboogle!.
10-17-2006, 01:05 AM
I can think of countless times when this happened, look at Ginepri/Murray in Cincinnati, Fish/Massu at the Olympics, in addition to what others have mentioned.

I've also seen it distract people for short periods of time even if it may not disrupt the actual outcome. Lots of players get distracted for a little while when their opponent takes a time out.