Tennis Australia takes down YouTube vids... [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Tennis Australia takes down YouTube vids...

idolwatcher1
10-14-2006, 05:10 AM
Just letting everyone know that Tennis Australia seems to be actively claiming Copyright Infringement of Australian Open clips posted on YouTube... If you posted clips of the Australian Open on YouTube or have added some of those clips as favorites, they have most likely been taken down already, with only a few exceptions... You probably won't be able to add (or watch) any AO vids on YouTube in the future... :sad:

Johnny Groove
10-14-2006, 05:13 AM
Marat-Fed AO 05 :sobbing:

Via
10-14-2006, 05:43 AM
:(

sooner or later we won't be able to post our own AO photos or whatever on public websites

tennis info has not uploaded their wimbly pics for a similar reason, anyone notice?

robinhood
10-14-2006, 07:02 AM
Marat-Fed AO 05 :sobbing:

Oh no!
And Fed's speech from this year, too? :mad:

nobama
10-14-2006, 09:25 AM
I just read a story about this...that Google is going to have copyright trouble with YouTube.

Vass
10-14-2006, 09:33 AM
That's a pity.

Oh well.... Torrents rule...

NATAS81
10-14-2006, 01:29 PM
Downloadable clips also rule.

Kalliopeia
10-14-2006, 02:36 PM
That's so stupid, it's not like they do anything with all that footage.

*Viva Chile*
10-14-2006, 03:55 PM
Oh no, at least me, I upload a clip you Saf-Fed match :sobbing:

jes_021
10-14-2006, 06:25 PM
Well, I guess there goes more than half of the clips I uploaded.
They already took down one of mine.

Frooty_Bazooty
10-14-2006, 07:56 PM
thats so stupid! i could understand if the AO website had clips of the matches up but they dont...

Sunset of Age
10-14-2006, 08:00 PM
Ridiculous, and SAD.
No-one's making any money with YouTube clips, so why bother?

Damita
10-14-2006, 08:13 PM
:awww:
idiots.

chicky841
10-14-2006, 09:19 PM
This sucks. But Im already preparing for the end of youtube as it was. Nothing that good and popular can last. I mean Paris Hilton and P. diddy already have their own channels on youtube :help:

jayjay
10-15-2006, 04:48 AM
Pathetic on the part of TA, by the day it seems more and more youtube content is being taken down. Oh well, at least there is the other tube...:lol:

El Legenda
10-15-2006, 04:52 AM
Ridiculous, and SAD.
No-one's making any money with YouTube clips, so why bother?

well someone is...the owners of Youtube... there are talks of the website getting sold for over a BILLION $ :speakles:

tangerine_dream
01-15-2008, 09:49 PM
I’ve been wanting to post this article for a while so I figured now would be a good time to do it. :)

http://www.tennisweek.com/news/fullstory.sps?inewsid=510209
Tennis On The Tube
Is Youtube A Supporter Or Threat To Televised Tennis?
November 24, 2007

"People don't seem to understand that it's a damn war out there," Jimmy Connors once claimed.

It’s a "damn war" off court too, Jimmy.

Fans of other major sports simply turn on their TVs to watch the team of their choice. Tennis fans on the other hand have to fight to watch matches, often reduced to watching scores slowly change on mind numbing live tickers in the glare of their computer screens in order to follow the progress of their favorite players.

Tennis barely registers a blip on the mainstream media’s radar screen so serious fans of the game now rely on one another for news and pictures of the sport via the internet. Peer to peer marketing sites such as Youtube have particularly proven to be a viable way for fans to share their passion for the game with other fans from across the globe.

Equipped with a basic digital camera or video camera, a fan of Rafael Nadal attending the U.S. Open can upload video images of his practices, warm-ups, and matches on to the internet for other Nadal fans to enjoy that same day. Not only do these fans share their U.S. Open moments, but they help promote and grow the game of tennis, filling a void that traditional TV and media don’t provide.

But as with most good things in life, things aren’t always as simple as they seem.

Fans own the copyright on any pictures or videos taken on tournament grounds. Yet a fan who posts videos of Nadal or other players taken at the U.S. Open online violates the terms of their agreement with the United States Tennis Association as stated on the back of their tickets when they enter the grounds of the U.S. Open.

"By presenting this ticket for admission to the U.S. Open, you hereby consent to ... the prohibition against transmitting or aiding another in the transmission of any description, account, photograph or reproduction of any aspect of the tournament for commercial use or trade use or other use except private home use by the ticket holder."

For the non-attorneys out there in TennisWeek land, that’s legalese for it’s a "no no" to upload your videos taken at the U.S. Open on to sites such as Youtube, Which begs the question: why would the USTA care whether a fan posts their amateur video on the internet?

The answer is quite simple…and understandable. Network and cable television stations pay hefty amounts of money to broadcast events such as the U.S. Open, and they need to protect their investment.

"Obviously they are a very significant financial partner of the USTA and the U.S. Open," said Chris Widmaier, Senior Director of Public Relations at the USTA. "Their revenues go a long way in being reinvested back in the game."

Some fans (including this writer) who took videos at the U.S. Open and then uploaded them on sites such as Youtube find out the hard way that they’ve violated the terms of their agreement with the USTA. One day, an unexpected surprise awaits them in their inbox. They receive an email from Youtube informing them that their video has been deleted due to copyright infringement. They may be liable. And if they wanted to fight the removal of their video, they might want to seek the counsel of an attorney. Scary stuff.

"The language on the ticket is very explicit," Widmaier stated.

Indeed.

Despite this, the USTA is aware of the importance of peer to peer marketing sites such as Youtube. The way people view television, including sports, has significantly changed in the last couple of years. On demand video, live streaming, podcasts, and other types of downloads have altered the traditional landscape. These days, fans don’t want their viewing habits dictated to them by television executives.

"We’ve moved into the era of I want what I want when I want it," Widmaier acknowledged.

The opportunities that venues such as Youtube provide to enhance a fan’s experience need to be considered along with rights of CBS and USA Network.

"We are in the process now of reviewing what our relationship with Youtube should be moving forward," Widmaier explained. "How to best service the fans who are excited and full of enthusiasm and want to share what they have seen with others around the world, and balancing that with the current rights as they are prescribed in our contracts with our major broadcasters."

In fact, the USTA has moved towards new media on the U.S. Open site, www.usopen.org. In 2006, they offered a live streaming highlight show with a 20 to 30 minute recap of the day’s activities. The online program, sponsored by American Express, was available for download each evening at 11 p.m. Eastern time.

The show proved to be highly popular, and the USTA hopes to continue to build on its success.

"There is much internal discussion here at the USTA on the role of broadband and the role of video," Widmaier said.

Along with highlight shows, tennis management needs to come up with further ways to allow tennis fans to see their favorite players. Not only do sites such as Youtube allow fans to watch the game, but peer to peer marketing allows fans to creatively participate in the game.

Every sport wants – and needs – fans like Jimmy Fallon’s character in the film "Fever Pitch." The all out fanatic with the apartment that resembles the souvenir shop on Yawkey Way across from famed Fenway Park, equipped with everything from Red Sox posters covering the walls to New York Yankees toilet paper.

Currently, serious tennis fans have no real way to show their passion for the game. They can’t purchase jackets with their favorite players name emblazed across the back. There are no t-shirts that proclaim a fans’ dedication to Novak Djokovic. Walk from one end of the US Open grounds to the far end of the other, and you won’t find a Nadal poster on sale to hang in your kid’s room. And Andy Roddick fans have absolutely no hope of finding Federer toilet paper to demonstrate how they feel about their favorite American’s 1-15 record against the world’s number one. :lol:

If tennis' governing bodies want to grow their sport, the USTA is going to have to come up with a way to keep sports fans who are used to on demand coverage happy. Unreliable live tickers aren’t going to win over many new fans to the sport.

Taking videos and uploading them on to Youtube takes time and effort, but it’s a labor of love for those serious about the sport. Fans should be rewarded when they help promote the game by sharing their passion for particular players by using sites such as Youtube.

Tennis fans, like fans in all other sports, need a way to raise their Fan Flag high.

-----------------------------------

Readers Respond: Tennis On The Tube
ATP Offers Free Youtube video

I have just read with interest the Tennis Week.com article entitled "Tennis on The Tube."

Towards the end of the article it recommends that the powers that be in tennis "come up with a way to keep sports fans who are used to on demand coverage happy" and it is a sentiment that we, the ATP Masters Series, thoroughly support. So much so that in 2006 we introduced atpmastersseries.tv — an on-line media console offering match highlights, player interviews and tournament features from each of the nine ATP Masters Series tournaments and the Tennis Masters Cup — to do just that.

We introduced live streaming in August 2006, and in August this year we expanded the live streaming to feature live action from both televised courts, giving the viewer a choice. At the Tennis Masters Cup earlier this month we also launched a video on demand service that allows viewers to watch a match in its entirety at a time convenient to them, and we will soon be launching a pay-per-download service allowing even greater choice and freedom to watch world class tennis. And there’s not a ticker in sight.

It is also worth mentioning that we have just launched a branded page on You Tube (www.youtube.com/atp) featuring free content, so tennis fans around the world can follow plenty of tennis action – much of it from the North American tournaments of Indian Wells, Miami, Canada and Cincinnati – without getting into trouble.

-- Jonathan Friend

Editor's note: Jonathan Friend works for ATP Media in London.

R.Federer
01-15-2008, 09:59 PM
Is Youtube A Supporter Or Threat To Televised Tennis? :scratch:

That seems a misplaced question. It isn't that YouTube wants to offload tennis videos. It is the USTA and Australian Tennis and other such governing bodies that are to be blamed, because they're the ones that are so stingy about sharing a little bit of coverage for free and will sue YouTube for hosting.

Blame Tennis Australia and the USTA (and whatever else follows suit).

Lee
01-15-2008, 10:11 PM
Fans own the copyright on any pictures or videos taken on tournament grounds. Yet a fan who posts videos of Nadal or other players taken at the U.S. Open online violates the terms of their agreement with the United States Tennis Association as stated on the back of their tickets when they enter the grounds of the U.S. Open.

"By presenting this ticket for admission to the U.S. Open, you hereby consent to ... the prohibition against transmitting or aiding another in the transmission of any description, account, photograph or reproduction of any aspect of the tournament for commercial use or trade use or other use except private home use by the ticket holder."

For the non-attorneys out there in TennisWeek land, that’s legalese for it’s a "no no" to upload your videos taken at the U.S. Open on to sites such as Youtube, Which begs the question: why would the USTA care whether a fan posts their amateur video on the internet?

The answer is quite simple…and understandable. Network and cable television stations pay hefty amounts of money to broadcast events such as the U.S. Open, and they need to protect their investment.

"Obviously they are a very significant financial partner of the USTA and the U.S. Open," said Chris Widmaier, Senior Director of Public Relations at the USTA. "Their revenues go a long way in being reinvested back in the game. The language on the ticket is very explicit,"

Despite this, the USTA is aware of the importance of peer to peer marketing sites such as Youtube. The way people view television, including sports, has significantly changed in the last couple of years. On demand video, live streaming, podcasts, and other types of downloads have altered the traditional landscape. These days, fans don’t want their viewing habits dictated to them by television executives.

"We’ve moved into the era of I want what I want when I want it," Widmaier acknowledged.

The opportunities that venues such as Youtube provide to enhance a fan’s experience need to be considered along with rights of CBS and USA Network.

"We are in the process now of reviewing what our relationship with Youtube should be moving forward," Widmaier explained. "How to best service the fans who are excited and full of enthusiasm and want to share what they have seen with others around the world, and balancing that with the current rights as they are prescribed in our contracts with our major broadcasters."



IMO, it's really idiotic for networks and USTA putting those "laws" on the ticket. For serious tennis fans, if there's the choice of watching your favourite tennis player playing a match on youtube or on TV, all will choose the sharp, clear, great angles images provided by cable/network companies instead of watching on youtube. They will not skip the network broadcasting because some fans may put a match on youtube taped using their cellphone or handheld digital camera later.

And since the network will hardly show any player practices, what's the harm for those fans uploading theirs on youtube.

All those vids on youtube will only help improve the popularity of tennis which in turn, benefit the network/cable companies and tennis.

Sjengster
01-15-2008, 10:23 PM
Jonathan Friend's response highlights another major problem - the subdivision of viewing rights between the various governing bodies of tennis. All these impressive online download services he mentions only apply to ATP tournaments, so you can forget anything from the Grand Slams or the Davis Cup as they're the ITF's domain. I always find it ridiculous when the ATP programme can't show a single moving image from the Grand Slam final that happened the week before simply because it's beyond their jurisdiction.

case
01-15-2008, 10:23 PM
the masters series isnt all that
great at promoting live streaming. :rolleyes:
its only available for windows- a drm issue:rolleyes:i can only presume.:rolleyes:
i am not giving up my mac because the tournaments worry about old matches:mad: macs are HERE TO STAY!!

and why should anyone care about oOLD matches where the out come is already known?:confused: old clips dont take away live viewers on the networks:o :mad:to cause them to lose money.
:mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad:


it seeems thaqt the atp and the tournaments would rather have me and others watch no tennis than old OLD tennis or or OLDS practices!!!!! how dumb!!! really promotes the game-they dont care about the FANS!!!

VolandriFan
01-15-2008, 11:18 PM
It's not a threat to the television networks when they've already aired these matches.

tangerine_dream
01-30-2008, 10:08 PM
It is also worth mentioning that we have just launched a branded page on You Tube (www.youtube.com/atp) featuring free content, so tennis fans around the world can follow plenty of tennis action – much of it from the North American tournaments of Indian Wells, Miami, Canada and Cincinnati – without getting into trouble.

-- Jonathan Friend
(Editor's note: Mr. Friend works for ATP Media in London)
I love that this guy's name is "Mr. Friend". :lol:

For those who haven't seen it yet, AO's YouTube account is here: http://www.youtube.com/user/australianopentv

I'm glad to see that these people have finally stopped being so aggressive in going after fans who put up videos of matches, players, and whatnot. Last year they were very aggressive in taking all AO fan videos down from YT but not this year. I think they've finally listened to reason. :)