Why do tennis player call it quits around age 30 [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Why do tennis player call it quits around age 30

El Legenda
10-04-2006, 04:14 PM
After they cross that mark...its down hill from there...
almost all other sports age 30 is the time when a player is entering his prime...basketball, baseball, football :p soccer :) , boxing :boxing:

could it be that they start so early and burn out at 30...
but most pro players in any sport start out early...there is a player in baseball who is 48..:eek:
Jordan played when he was 39-40....

:wavey:

Rogiman
10-04-2006, 04:19 PM
Individual sports are tougher, you've got no team-members to share the responsibilities with and/or blame for loses, all the spotlights are on you, you travel alone (or joined by a small entourage), if you get injured you lose ranking points and money (unlike footballers, for instance, whose salaries are secured by contracts and whose teams can still make a run to the championship while they're injured).

Macbrother
10-04-2006, 04:32 PM
The only sports where 30 is "entering" your prime is maybe golf. Most position players in football are washed up at 32, 33; 35 is getting "up there" for a baseball player and certainly is for a basketball player. What makes tennis so bad is that you're playing nearly year-round, multiple games per week, so the body gets much less rest. Add to that the stress playing on hardcourts does to the joints, muscles and bones and you get a recipe for for "old age" at 30.

Tennis Fool
10-04-2006, 04:59 PM
The only sports where 30 is "entering" your prime is maybe golf. .

Also marathoning you're just a baby at 30.


I think a lot of it is psychological in regards to tennis. You look at 30 and think "I'm old." The back that always hurt is hurting a bit more. You see the new teen stars take the headlines. Everyone is asking when you will retire. You are about to be married or have kids and want to settle down.

There are those who have retired way past 30. Agassi, Martina Nav, Jimmy Connors. Tim Henman looks like he'll be around for a while. I somehow doubt Federer will retire at 30.

FerrersLinda
10-04-2006, 05:28 PM
Tennis is really hard on your body. At 30 your average players knees or back or shoulder are protesting.:awww:

boliviana
10-04-2006, 07:48 PM
gotta figure that they've been traveling around the world for the better part of 1/2 their lives . . . aside from dealing with the physical toll of the game they're just pooped! and may even want to do things like have a baby or two and just settle down. I think the big question for these guys and gals is what they do next . . . what is their identity outside of this sport? If their entire identity revolves around being # whatever and they suddenly stop doing that then the transition could be really rough. i.e., if their perception of themselves is measured by how many autographs they sign, etc. I think that professional athletes (and juniors too) should have outside interests that give them pleasure (and even some competence) so their lives are fuller and doesn't completely revolve around THE GAME!

feuselino
10-04-2006, 08:36 PM
Also in Baseball you are standing or sitting around for most of the time... :) Not so difficult to do... :)

And in American Football hardly anyone is doing anything for most of the time... only if the commercials give them a few seconds here and there.

You can see I really don't like these two sports... sorry! ;)

senorgato
10-07-2006, 10:05 AM
The tennis schedule lends itself alot to this trend. Tennis in itself is psychologically and physically more demanding than many other sports. Psychologically, there's alot of focus and concentration that's needed to maintain good results. Physically, there aren't many other sports that require both upper body and lower body strength, dexterity and use. Add to that the fact that the sport is practically a 12-month season, and it takes its toll. And, as someone else had mentioned, hard courts destroy your body.

CmonAussie
10-07-2006, 10:08 AM
The tennis schedule lends itself alot to this trend. Tennis in itself is psychologically and physically more demanding than many other sports. Psychologically, there's alot of focus and concentration that's needed to maintain good results. Physically, there aren't many other sports that require both upper body and lower body strength, dexterity and use. Add to that the fact that the sport is practically a 12-month season, and it takes its toll. And, as someone else had mentioned, hard courts destroy your body.

:wavey:
We should get rid of hard courts;) .... Just play on grass & clay:cool: .....What about indoor carpet-->>> is that OK on the body:confused:

RonE
10-07-2006, 10:20 AM
As was said tennis is an individual sport meaning when the match is on you have to be focused 100% of the time and you can't take 'breathers' and let your team mates make an approach to score the goal/basket.

Add to this the fact that there is no set time for a tennis match unlike the other sports- you can be on court for one and a half hours or five hours. Plus tennis is constant stop and go action- and this is what really wears the joints and limbs down. You need to have this explosiveness only to stop it immediately, turn change direction and explode again.

Jimnik
10-07-2006, 11:56 AM
Maybe Henman can break this trend. ;)

Lee and Gicquel are having career best years at the ages of 30 and 29 respectively.

Also Ljubicic, Stepanek, Blake and Gonzalez all seem to be peaking in their late 20s.

supersexynadal
10-07-2006, 12:02 PM
:wavey:
We should get rid of hard courts;) .... Just play on grass & clay:cool: .....What about indoor carpet-->>> is that OK on the body:confused:


I think so too! The term "hard court specialist" does not exist. Its basically inbetween clay and grass and should only be used for the masters cup to be fair.

Other sports can be learned easily but tennis is a slower build up. Once u have the tactics, technique and fitness and footwork, ur only starting and thats around age 16 MIN.

Jimnik
10-07-2006, 12:17 PM
I think so too! The term "hard court specialist" does not exist. Its basically inbetween clay and grass and should only be used for the masters cup to be fair.
There are loads of players who specialise on hard and carpet courtsand are weak on both clay and grass. Ljubicic, Blake, Haas, Hrbaty, Safin etc.. These players would all be considered weak on both clay and grass. It's not just about the court speed. There are some important similarities between grass and clay, which some players just cannot cope with.

But I would agree that the number of hard court events should be reduced. We need more major grass tournaments at Masters Series and International Series level.

supersexynadal
10-07-2006, 02:23 PM
There are loads of players who specialise on hard and carpet courtsand are weak on both clay and grass. Ljubicic, Blake, Haas, Hrbaty, Safin etc.. These players would all be considered weak on both clay and grass. It's not just about the court speed. There are some important similarities between grass and clay, which some players just cannot cope with.

But I would agree that the number of hard court events should be reduced. We need more major grass tournaments at Masters Series and International Series level.


You have a point...And there are different types of har courts as well but in general, you see more difference between the game on clay and grass. Eventhough there are "hard court specialists" they can be baseliners, good at the volley or have a varied game. Eg. Roddick is great on hard courts but he just cant volley.

~*BGT*~
10-07-2006, 03:27 PM
After they cross that mark...its down hill from there...
almost all other sports age 30 is the time when a player is entering his prime...basketball, baseball, football :p soccer :) , boxing :boxing:

could it be that they start so early and burn out at 30...
but most pro players in any sport start out early...there is a player in baseball who is 48..:eek:
Jordan played when he was 39-40....

:wavey:

You sort of answer your own question right there. :wavey:

gogogirl
10-07-2006, 11:03 PM
All,

I read on Tennis-X.com - I think it was Cedric Pioline - that said - if Rios returned to the pro tour - he could get to number 5. I'm assuming he based it on the fact that Rios is tearing it up on the Senior's tour. I agree - and surely - Rios remembers the bottom dollar line. He would be making some serious bread if he made it to number 5 in the whole wide men's tennis world. LOL!

What think y'all? Could Rios make a comeback?

"COME ON BACK - RIOS"?:wavey:

Checho
10-07-2006, 11:45 PM
I think Pilone get stoned, and he is saying non sense.

Ríos is over, it's a pitty because he was a very talented player, but because the injuries and his way of living he had to retire very young.

He can only be top 5 in: who drinks more wine in 60 seconds!! jajajaja

Aphex
10-08-2006, 12:25 AM
:wavey:
We should get rid of hard courts;) .... Just play on grass & clay:cool: .....What about indoor carpet-->>> is that OK on the body:confused: Yes, good-bye to hardcourts.

Jimnik
10-08-2006, 12:44 AM
All,

I read on Tennis-X.com - I think it was Cedric Pioline - that said - if Rios returned to the pro tour - he could get to number 5. I'm assuming he based it on the fact that Rios is tearing it up on the Senior's tour. I agree - and surely - Rios remembers the bottom dollar line. He would be making some serious bread if he made it to number 5 in the whole wide men's tennis world. LOL!

What think y'all? Could Rios make a comeback?

"COME ON BACK - RIOS"?:wavey:
If Rios tried to come back he might have made the top 20 but it would have taken one hell of an effort to get him back into the top 5. If Sampras were still playing, he'd probably be in the top 10.

Agassi made the come back through a lot of determination and hard work, which Rios doesn't have. It would be interesting to see how well Agassi could do on the Seniors Tour now. I'd love to see him play Rios.

star
10-08-2006, 02:01 AM
Tennis is really hard on your body. At 30 your average players knees or back or shoulder are protesting.:awww:

Plus, exploive speed (needed in tennis) deteriorates with age. Marathoning is not the kind of running needed in tennis.

Also reaction time goes down.

Actually there aren't very many sports where 30 is the prime. It's only the great players who can outrun time.

World Beater
10-08-2006, 03:16 AM
Plus, exploive speed (needed in tennis) deteriorates with age. Marathoning is not the kind of running needed in tennis.

Also reaction time goes down.

Actually there aren't very many sports where 30 is the prime. It's only the great players who can outrun time.

if you consider jonas bjorkman to be a great singles player....or david sanguinetti? there are quite a few players having their best seasons as their careers have progressed towards supposed retirement...its not just the great players like agassi who can do it.

JW10S
10-08-2006, 03:32 AM
if you consider jonas bjorkman to be a great singles player....or david sanguinetti? there are quite a few players having their best seasons as their careers have progressed towards supposed retirement...its not just the great players like agassi who can do it.

Bjorkman was ranked #4 in the world in singles 10 years or so ago and is now #46, so you cannot say he is having his best season. In the case of Sanguinetti, he did reach his career high ranking of #42 just last year. He is now #79.

In the '50's, '60's and '70's it was not at all uncommon to see players over 30 ranked among the top 10. But the game is much faster now and players hit much harder. As someone else stated the explosiveness needed to compete diminishes as one gets older even though the endurance may remain.

World Beater
10-08-2006, 03:58 AM
Bjorkman was ranked #4 in the world in singles 10 years or so ago and is now #46, so you cannot say he is having his best season. In the case of Sanguinetti, he did reach his career high ranked of #42 just last year. He is now #79.

In the '50's, '60's and '70's it was not at all uncommon to see players over 30 ranked among the top10. But the game is much faster now and players hit much harder. As someone else stated the explosiveness needed to compete diminishes as one gets older even though the endurance may remain.

okay for the bjorkman one it is true...but my point was that he could still play well into his 30's and achieve good results -semi at wimby. i wasnt clear enough w/regards to him. I was replying to the poster who said that only "great" players could play well into their 30's....a very good singles player in bjorkman could still achieve good results.

atpSUPERMAN
10-08-2006, 04:02 AM
Repetition sports will probably lead to early retirements. If you looks at tennis and the repetitive movements of the serve and the forehand you can see the same muscles are used over and over again in exactly the same directions.

Whereas a sport like basketball features more random movements and the arm is moved in different angles depending on where you are in relation to the basket. All lay-ups are different, and even the jumpshot can vary depending on your point of release or how high you jump depending on the defense. Only the free-throw is 100% repetitive.

I'd be interested to see the reasons certain players give for the retirements, maybe serve-volleyers get back injuries from bending down over and over. Or powerful servers retire with shoulder injuries. Baseliners hip injuries etc.