Playing with two forehands [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Playing with two forehands

Fed=ATPTourkilla
06-07-2006, 03:40 AM
I always hear about how Nadal, at about age 8, made a decision to play with his left hand and not with his right. I think he made the wrong decision. He should have decided to play with both.

The F/H is a better shot than the B/H. More topspin and more power. Imagine if Nadal or Fed had two forehands! Maybe - and I'm not sure about this - one forehand would be weaker than the other. But I don't think the disparity would be as great as the disparity between both Roger and Rafa's F/H and B/H.

If all kids were taught from scratch to play with two forehands - and taught the ability to serve with either arm - the standard of tennis would be much higher. They'd find it easier, as well - kids always have useless backhands. But everyone just sticks with the orthodoxy, stupid though it is.

I'm going to train my little brother two play this way. Two forehands and able to serve with either arm. The other kids will laugh at him at first but they won't laugh when he starts stuffing them.

Fed=ATPTourkilla
06-07-2006, 03:42 AM
I think some woman player tried it once but the difference between women's F/Hs and B/Hs isn't as great as with the men. The men these days are able to generate enormous topspin with their forehands but never quite as much with their backhands. Plus I think it'd make a big difference if you trained a kid up from scratch to play this way.

kensan
06-07-2006, 03:17 PM
I've thought about this too, training a student to hit 2 forehands. The problem might be a) volleys and b) grip.

For volleys are you going to have 2 forehand volleys as well? Maybe you just allow the person to volley conventionally to solve this problem.

For the grip, you can either have them grasp it in a prayer hands-together manner (awkward, not firm) OR conventional. With the conventional grip you'll have to slide the hand down for the backhand side, or hit a forehand with the hand choked up (not as effective).

So point is, set up could be difficult.

betterthanhenman
06-07-2006, 03:23 PM
Yes...genius. :rolleyes:

Scotso
06-07-2006, 03:33 PM
I think it was Koulikovskaya who played with two forehands. On one side she had to hit a forehand very choked up on the racquet.

I don't think it gives you any benefits... if it did, I think there are more players (like Nadal) that would do it.

Kimiko Date also had two forehands, but only used one when she was stretched way out wide.

Xristos
06-07-2006, 03:37 PM
I can play with my righ and my lefy but hey.....Im just talented.

betterthanhenman
06-07-2006, 03:38 PM
I can play with my righ and my lefy but hey.....Im just talented.

I would direct you to my signature.

Jumpman23
06-07-2006, 03:52 PM
this is a stupid idea, I am ambidextrous and can play w/ both my righty fh and lefty fh, it is difficult, the problem arises when you change grips, there is not enough time to do both. When you have time you can do it, otherwise you have to really choke on the racquet, returns are almost impossible. Be proficient at one side, there is a reason nobody has really done this.

Fumus
06-07-2006, 04:20 PM
It takes to much time to switch hands and setup for a stroke on both sides. Also having a backhand brings consistancy to your game because you are using the same hand for everything it's an easier skill to train. That's the main reason people don't do it, you lose so much time if you have to move to the ball, switch hands, re-grip, cock, and fire. Instead of just moving, switching grips, cocking and firing. Also there are angles that you can hit with a backhand that you can't hit with a forehand due to the nature of shot.

Long story short, backhand is just techically more sound and more efficient than a switched hand forehand.

SloKid
06-07-2006, 04:32 PM
I think it was Koulikovskaya who played with two forehands. On one side she had to hit a forehand very choked up on the racquet.

I don't think it gives you any benefits... if it did, I think there are more players (like Nadal) that would do it.

Kimiko Date also had two forehands, but only used one when she was stretched way out wide.
Yes, she used two FHs.
But doing that is really awkward I would think.
Some players can do it on the pressure, like Sharapova, who sometimes plays a FH left-handed.

Jimnik
06-07-2006, 04:37 PM
I always hear about how Nadal, at about age 8, made a decision to play with his left hand and not with his right. I think he made the wrong decision. He should have decided to play with both.

The F/H is a better shot than the B/H. More topspin and more power. Imagine if Nadal or Fed had two forehands! Maybe - and I'm not sure about this - one forehand would be weaker than the other. But I don't think the disparity would be as great as the disparity between both Roger and Rafa's F/H and B/H.

If all kids were taught from scratch to play with two forehands - and taught the ability to serve with either arm - the standard of tennis would be much higher. They'd find it easier, as well - kids always have useless backhands. But everyone just sticks with the orthodoxy, stupid though it is.

I'm going to train my little brother two play this way. Two forehands and able to serve with either arm. The other kids will laugh at him at first but they won't laugh when he starts stuffing them.
Nadal wasn't playing with two forehands, he was playing with two backhands. It was kind of similar to Santoro's game with two-handed off both wings.

Nobody can ever play with two forehands.

Dixon
06-07-2006, 04:54 PM
I'm going to train my little brother two play this way. Two forehands and able to serve with either arm. The other kids will laugh at him at first but they won't laugh when he starts stuffing them.Good idea, I think I`m going to teach my little brother to play also with his feet, I`ll lengthen his toes. So instead of a normal, boring service he`ll make something like a frontflip hitting the ball with his right or left foot.

Pigpen Stinks
06-07-2006, 05:04 PM
As others have noted, I'm afraid it's impractical from a grip change perspective. One player that did serve from both wings effectively was USA Network's own Luke Jensen.

vincayou
06-07-2006, 05:26 PM
I'm going to train my little brother two play this way. Two forehands and able to serve with either arm. The other kids will laugh at him at first but they won't laugh when he starts stuffing them.

Maybe they will laugh at him at last as well. :tape:

MisterQ
06-07-2006, 05:35 PM
It takes to much time to switch hands and setup for a stroke on both sides. Also having a backhand brings consistancy to your game because you are using the same hand for everything it's an easier skill to train. That's the main reason people don't do it, you lose so much time if you have to move to the ball, switch hands, re-grip, cock, and fire. Instead of just moving, switching grips, cocking and firing. Also there are angles that you can hit with a backhand that you can't hit with a forehand due to the nature of shot.

Long story short, backhand is just techically more sound and more efficient than a switched hand forehand.

Are you allowed to play with two rackets? That would solve the hand-changing problem. :tennis: :lol:

NyGeL
06-07-2006, 09:00 PM
until 9/10 years old I used to play with two forehands, but then when rallies become faster it is very hard to keep playing like that. Also, if you have a good and strong forehand you will have a strong backhand and easy control of it.

SwissMister1
06-08-2006, 01:26 AM
Interesting idea- but it would only work if you were Goro.

perfect_spy
06-08-2006, 01:55 AM
I think it was Koulikovskaya who played with two forehands. On one side she had to hit a forehand very choked up on the racquet.
Her grip was really choked up, it was wear very her hand was in the ready position. She also did not have to much success on the tour her high rank was only 91. I find it funny how you think the backhand is a lesser shot, but their are larger alot of players wh o play double handed backhand and done very well for them self, well their is only one player who played double side FH, and had had a mediocre career.

fenomeno2111
06-08-2006, 01:59 AM
What are you talking about buddy...it is good to learn to play with both hands because if you develop your non-dominant part of the brain you dominant part will do way better but playing two forehands is not plausible in any way. It just wouldn't work. I do recommend you to teach your younger brothe to play with his non-dominant hand in practice because it'll make him a better player.

Fed=ATPTourkilla
06-08-2006, 02:18 AM
I don't agree with this grip change thing. In a rally, there's plenty of time to change hands. I tried playing with two forehands myself, against some who hits the ball hard. I didn't have any problem changing hands, although I did have the problem that my left handed forehand sucked. But that won't be a problem if a junior is trained up from scratch.

Returns - I'm sure a double handed backhand block would be pretty easy to learn for the quick serves.

To the people who say "it just wouldn't work" - why not? People can play fine with their non-dominant hand in most sports, once they practice.

Why haven't people done this before? Because they're all trained up as juniors to hit the backhand, even though (especially for the men) it's a weaker shot with less topspin. It's too late for me to change but it wouldn't be too late for a young junior.

fenomeno2111
06-08-2006, 02:21 AM
I don't agree with this grip change thing. In a rally, there's plenty of time to change hands. I tried playing with two forehands myself, against some who hits the ball hard. I didn't have any problem changing hands, although I did have the problem that my left handed forehand sucked. But that won't be a problem if a junior is trained up from scratch.

Returns - I'm sure a double handed backhand block would be pretty easy to learn for the quick serves.

To the people who say "it just wouldn't work" - why not? People can play fine with their non-dominant hand in most sports, once they practice.

Why haven't people done this before? Because they're all trained up as juniors to hit the backhand, even though (especially for the men) it's a weaker shot with less topspin. It's too late for me to change but it wouldn't be too late for a young junior.
WHAT!? Plenty of time??? Have you seen how fast the juniors play now?? It's hard for some players changing to their BH grip never mind changing your hand.

Fed=ATPTourkilla
06-08-2006, 02:25 AM
Which juniors do you play against? Christian Sampras?

Fed=ATPTourkilla
06-08-2006, 02:28 AM
And if it's true that changing grips isn't possible (which I don't believe - it can be done very quickly) then you could retain the lefty forehand as an attacking option for when you do have time.

fenomeno2111
06-08-2006, 02:49 AM
Well, with your stubborn behavior all I can tell you is try it and see if it works....Good luck.