Egalite! [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Egalite!

the cat
05-28-2006, 04:24 PM
It's French Open time again and time to hear "egalite" my favorite French word! :tennis: :D ;)

Five
05-28-2006, 05:33 PM
Egalité! :tennis:

*Viva Chile*
05-28-2006, 05:48 PM
If I remember well, you (or someone alse) made the same thread one year ago :p

the cat
05-28-2006, 08:43 PM
Well said Five. ;)

And yes Viva, it was me who started an "Egalite" thread last year as well. :p I've done this for a couple years now at MTF and WTA World during the French Open.

Leo
05-28-2006, 09:01 PM
Einstand.

Sjengster
05-28-2006, 09:05 PM
Parita! And not forgetting the inimitable Iguales.

BTW, has anyone noticed that the French for deuce isn't standardised? Sometimes it's egalite, other times it's quarante... un?? (apologies French speakers, that's me trying to spell it phonetically).

Truc
05-28-2006, 09:09 PM
BTW, has anyone noticed that the French for deuce isn't standardised? Sometimes it's egalite, other times it's quarante... un??Quarante A.
I guess it comes from "40 all" ="Quarante partout" (the chair umpire doesn't say "quarante partout", it's not an official call, but it's in general another way to say "40A" or "Égalité" in French).

Horatio Caine
05-28-2006, 09:09 PM
Parita! And not forgetting the inimitable Iguales.

BTW, has anyone noticed that the French for deuce isn't standardised? Sometimes it's egalite, other times it's quarante... un?? (apologies French speakers, that's me trying to spell it phonetically).

Not sure whether I have spelt it correctly, but it is "quarante-all" i.e. 40/40. I think that is what they say the first time a game reaches deuce, and then any other time after that it is called "egalité"

Still not quite sure why they do that :scratch:

Frenchies are strange :p ;)

vincayou
05-28-2006, 09:09 PM
It's 40A. It means 40-40. We say 30A and 15A as well. Why do we say that? I have no idea. :)
But we keep saying it.

Yappa
05-28-2006, 09:11 PM
"quarante-A"
I dont know if its a rule which only applies to french tournaments but it seems to me that for the first Deuce/Égalité, they say 40 all/quarante-A instead. For the 2nd, 3rd/etc. one they say Égalité.

EDIT:

Damnit, too slow! :sad:

Sjengster
05-28-2006, 09:12 PM
Ah, I getcha. I think a glossary of all tennis scores and umpiring phrases in several languages would come in handy, the umpires themselves must use something similar when they have to go from Rome to Hamburg and suchlike. And as has been mentioned on this board in the past, the ones who chair matches at Polish tournaments really have their work cut out for them....

Actually, scratch that: just a tape recording of Mohamed Lahyani saying those phrases in all the different languages would be enough. You haven't lived until you've heard him say "fifteen-forty!!!" with an obviously mirthful tone.

Geniey2g
05-28-2006, 09:13 PM
Parita! And not forgetting the inimitable Iguales.

BTW, has anyone noticed that the French for deuce isn't standardised? Sometimes it's egalite, other times it's quarante... un?? (apologies French speakers, that's me trying to spell it phonetically).
Yes! I am always highly confused by this inconsistency.

edit:
In fact, I've just realised that it wasn't the "40-A" that was confusing- I already assumed it was an abbreviation of "all". It's the fact that they just pick whichever one they feel like saying at the time that I don't get.

betterthanhenman
05-28-2006, 09:32 PM
Not sure whether I have spelt it correctly, but it is "quarante-all" i.e. 40/40. I think that is what they say the first time a game reaches deuce, and then any other time after that it is called "egalité"
Still not quite sure why they do that :scratch:

Frenchies are strange :p ;)

Am surprised Sjengster that you did not know that.

betterthanhenman
05-28-2006, 09:33 PM
It's French Open time again and time to hear "egalite" my favorite French word! :tennis: :D ;)

Am guessing you don't know too many french words. :)

Truc
05-28-2006, 09:47 PM
I'm not sure it's a rule, here's what the official booklet from the FFT says:
"Annonces pendant la partie: quinze-zéro, zéro-quinze, trente-zéro, zéro-trente, quarante-zéro, zéro-quarante, quinze-A, quinze-trente, trente-quinze, quinze-quarante, quarante-quinze, trente-A, quarante-trente, trente-quarante, égalité, avantage _______, jeu ________".
http://www.fft.fr/competitions/arbitrage_pdf/250questions.pdf
They don't mention "quarante-A", I think you can also say "Égalité" the first time a game reaches deuce.

betterthanhenman
05-28-2006, 09:51 PM
Lorsqu’un joueur gagne le premier point, on compte quinze pour ce joueur ; lorsqu’il gagne un deuxième point, on compte trente pour lui ; la marque du troisième point est comptée quarante. Le quatrième point gagné par ce joueur lui donne le jeu sous la réserve suivante : si les deux joueurs ont gagné chacun trois points, la marque est comptée quarante A et le point suivant gagné par un joueur est compté “avantage” pour ce joueur. Si le même joueur gagne le point suivant, il gagne le jeu. Si l’autre joueur gagne le point suivant, la marque est comptée “égalité” et ainsi de suite jusqu’à ce qu’un joueur ait gagné deux points successivement après l’égalité. Ce joueur gagne alors le jeu.<...>"

Sjengster
05-28-2006, 10:03 PM
Oo la la, Henman-superior.

David Kenzie
05-28-2006, 10:10 PM
Lorsqu’un joueur gagne le premier point, on compte quinze pour ce joueur ; lorsqu’il gagne un deuxième point, on compte trente pour lui ; la marque du troisième point est comptée quarante. Le quatrième point gagné par ce joueur lui donne le jeu sous la réserve suivante : si les deux joueurs ont gagné chacun trois points, la marque est comptée quarante A et le point suivant gagné par un joueur est compté “avantage” pour ce joueur. Si le même joueur gagne le point suivant, il gagne le jeu. Si l’autre joueur gagne le point suivant, la marque est comptée “égalité” et ainsi de suite jusqu’à ce qu’un joueur ait gagné deux points successivement après l’égalité. Ce joueur gagne alors le jeu.<...>"
That is correct, I guess you got that from the french federation rulebook ;) There is no inconsistency as some of you may have thought. the umpires say "Quarante A" for the first Deuce in a game and "Egalité" for every other Deuce.

betterthanhenman
05-28-2006, 10:12 PM
That is correct, I guess you got that from the french federation rulebook ;) There is no inconsistency as some of you may have thought. the umpires say "Quarante A" for the first Deuce in a game and "Egalité" for every other Deuce.

Exactly.

Nathaliia
05-29-2006, 07:49 AM
I thought this thread was to treat about 'Liberté, egalité, fraternité' :(

Nathaliia
05-29-2006, 08:00 AM
Ah, I getcha. I think a glossary of all tennis scores and umpiring phrases in several languages would come in handy, the umpires themselves must use something similar when they have to go from Rome to Hamburg and suchlike. And as has been mentioned on this board in the past, the ones who chair matches at Polish tournaments really have their work cut out for them....

Actually, scratch that: just a tape recording of Mohamed Lahyani saying those phrases in all the different languages would be enough. You haven't lived until you've heard him say "fifteen-forty!!!" with an obviously mirthful tone.
Nah, it's not the first post of yours when having issues with Polish language. Are you taking lessons and getting confused, or what? :(

Actually this reminds me the most hilarious situation in a tennis match that I witnessed. It was 2003 ATP & WTA in Sopot, the match Coria - Hanescu and Cedric Mourier on the chair. He must have just arrived and not learnt Polish yet (he was holding a card with translations)... The match before, he said wise things like "Równowaga Rosset" (deuce Rosset). In the Coria - Hanescu match, at the beginning of first set (after few games played though) he completely messed the scores, the points were given not exactly to the player who scored them, and the scoreboarder followed the bad example and Hanescu won the game where he won only two balls! People in the stands were laughing like crazy, players didn't seem to know or react about what was going on. We were shouting: "Wrong score, wrong score" and mister Mourier was smiling all the time and didn't realize what was happening I think :scratch: In the next game...... it was Hanescu's serve and he should have won that game but... mister Mourier said: "game Coria". After the match, the umpire gave more autographs than both players I suppose.

Last year I asked Mohamed Lahyani what's his opinion about Poland and he replied: "trzydzieści - czterdzieści" (30-40). Once when Monfils fell on the court, he said "ręcznik" (towel). He got a standing ovation. Monfils actually stood on his legs very quickly and was already ready to play, but Lahyani repeated (with laughter): "rrrrrrrręcznik!!!!" Of course the players didn't know what was going on, and the kid responsible for giving towels didn't bring one as she was too concentrated on laughing. The umpire got a standing ovation once again.

Geniey2g
05-29-2006, 08:39 PM
Exactly.
Yes, but why???

Neely
05-29-2006, 10:13 PM
At first, many years ago, I found it extremely irritating that the scores at the French Open are only announced exclusively in French, and not in English too, as it is done in most other tournaments. But since a few years it doesn't bother me anymore and I take it as a welcome change. But even a better word than egalité is 'jeu décisif'; I mean it's quite interesting to call it this way, namely a deciding game and not a tie-break. A phrase such as "Six jeux partout, première manche. Jeu décisif." is just unbeatable :inlove:

David Kenzie
05-29-2006, 11:33 PM
Yes, but why???
Why? Because that's how the french have always done it. Egalité (Deuce) comes only at 4 points all. It's like 30-All: it is the same as deuce (both players are two points away from the game) but it has a different name.
30-A is 2 points all
40-A is 3 points all
Egalité is 4 points all or more.
All these scores have the same consequences but a different name. It just adds more information to the score.

George_Hanson
05-30-2006, 12:05 AM
Egalite rules

fadou
05-30-2006, 07:12 AM
At first, many years ago, I found it extremely irritating that the scores at the French Open are only announced exclusively in French, and not in English too, as it is done in most other tournaments. But since a few years it doesn't bother me anymore and I take it as a welcome change. But even a better word than egalité is 'jeu décisif'; I mean it's quite interesting to call it this way, namely a deciding game and not a tie-break. A phrase such as "Six jeux partout, première manche. Jeu décisif." is just unbeatable :inlove:

yeah but you know the 3 others GS are in english
with this GS, you could learn some words in another language, so it's original,no?

Dusk Soldier
05-30-2006, 02:25 PM
Parita! And not forgetting the inimitable Iguales.

BTW, has anyone noticed that the French for deuce isn't standardised? Sometimes it's egalite, other times it's quarante... un?? (apologies French speakers, that's me trying to spell it phonetically).
It is standardized. The first one is Quarante-A, every deuce after is egalite.

the cat
05-30-2006, 11:56 PM
Yes betterthanhenman, I don't know too mnay French words even though I took abnd passed French in College. But that was a long time ago. ;)

I've noticed that too Sjengster. As Dusk pointed out the French say 40 all for the first duece then egalite after that.

Thanks for the info Truc.

scoobs
05-31-2006, 12:19 AM
Sorry to butt in but I noticed today in a couple of matches the umpire was calling egalité when it first got to deuce, not quarante-A - I think in the Murray match.

Ma foi, moi, j'aime bien le jeu décisif

Gonzalo81
05-31-2006, 09:23 PM
I like "Filet" better ;)

the cat
05-31-2006, 11:51 PM
Filet is a pretty good French word G81. But it's not as classy sounding as egalite. ;)

There is no need to be sorry scoobsuk. I didn't notice that but I'll take your word on it. If I was the chair umpire I would say egalite from the first duece on.