Way too much pressure on Roger - time to relax [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Way too much pressure on Roger - time to relax

Rogiman
01-29-2006, 05:24 PM
Like most of you, I also found Roger's tears today endearing, but I'm afraid (and I must say I'm not a psychologist or a doctor or anything) it has revealed something deeper - the man could be on the verge of a mental breakdown.

And who wouldn't be...?
For more than two years now this nice and sensitive person has been "Mr. Perfect" for everyone, winning 172 out of 182 matches(94.5%!!!), being the overwehlming favorite to win every tournament he enters (which he's almost always justified), carrying the responsibility for tournament's publication on his shoulders (Shanghai, anyone...?), and worst of all - being reminded of dozens of different records he's seemingly on the verge of breaking by media people.

Now, let's put things in proportions - the guy is a millionaire, he's living our dreams - being rich and famous and overly talented, so it can't be all that bad, but for us fans it could prove costly, as it seemed to me this AO Roger hardly enjoyed playing tennis, it was all business and breaking more records.

Remember Pete Sampras, the guy whose GS record is supposedly Roger's destiny?
Well, he was never near perfect, he could lose matches here and there to lesser opponents and I highly doubt it the media would make such a fuss about it, the aesthetical side of his game was hardly ever discussed, and although he ended up grabbing a monstrous total of 64 titles, maybe once he won double figures in one season.
He was said to be the most driven tennis player ever, but it seems to me Roger has taken that title too...

So, unless Roger is willing to "pull a Wilander" (Mats got bored after his seventh Slam and quit tennis shortly after), I think he should switch to the "Sampras mode", i.e. focus on the Majors, stop being hard on himself, let himself lose occasionally, stop trying to satisfy everyone around him, forget about those silly records (although I admit it makes it fascinating for everyone, me included), try to win his annual Wimbledon, or USO, or both, and relax, so that we will all be able to enjoy him for many more years.


On a totally different note, it looks to me the AO courts are now officially slow - is it just me?
The only player to have mentioned that was Hewitt, but I clearly see how it makes things so much difficult for Roger - it was a huge struggle, he must be so proud of himself for winning the title when the conditions are far from favoring his game - do you think that is a good sign for Roland Garros...?
See...? I already put the pressure on him....

World Beater
01-29-2006, 05:41 PM
if he locks up like today...nadal will make quick work of him...
also i dont know who all these clay specialists are that can threaten roger...
gaudio..nope
coria...nope
nalby...yes

who else...nadal is the main villain.

it will be interesting to see how he slides on the clay with the ankle

NYCtennisfan
01-29-2006, 05:55 PM
You are absolutely right. He has to let go of the idea that he has to win every match at even the little tournaments. Once he realizes to shut out the media and feel OK about not winning every little tournament, it will free him up to concentrate on the Slams. This is what the great Pete Sampras did. He never tanked a match, but there were times when he would not try as hard compared with Wimby or the USO.

World Beater
01-29-2006, 06:14 PM
You are absolutely right. He has to let go of the idea that he has to win every match at even the little tournaments. Once he realizes to shut out the media and feel OK about not winning every little tournament, it will free him up to concentrate on the Slams. This is what the great Pete Sampras did. He never tanked a match, but there were times when he would not try as hard compared with Wimby or the USO.

it seemed to me that he had this mentality at Doha...he was making errors left and right, but didnt seem to perturbed about it.

Dirk
01-29-2006, 07:25 PM
This event was different since he was the huge favorite more so than at Wimbledon. He also was coming off a injury and lost some fitness because of it and because how hard this event was and this final. The Carters and Laver being there had an impact too. Roger's interview doesn't give me any indication he will wuss out like Mats. Roger said he wants to get even fitter.

I think he will take is easier on himself mentally now. He said he didn't like waiting all day for the night final either so that had some effect not to mention how well Baggy was playing.

Roger will get better as the year goes on. A lot has happened to him in the last two months.

Dirk
01-29-2006, 07:27 PM
Like most of you, I also found Roger's tears today endearing, but I'm afraid (and I must say I'm not a psychologist or a doctor or anything) it has revealed something deeper - the man could be on the verge of a mental breakdown.

And who wouldn't be...?
For more than two years now this nice and sensitive person has been "Mr. Perfect" for everyone, winning 172 out of 182 matches(94.5%!!!), being the overwehlming favorite to win every tournament he enters (which he's almost always justified), carrying the responsibility for tournament's publication on his shoulders (Shanghai, anyone...?), and worst of all - being reminded of dozens of different records he's seemingly on the verge of breaking by media people.

Now, let's put things in proportions - the guy is a millionaire, he's living our dreams - being rich and famous and overly talented, so it can't be all that bad, but for us fans it could prove costly, as it seemed to me this AO Roger hardly enjoyed playing tennis, it was all business and breaking more records.

Remember Pete Sampras, the guy whose GS record is supposedly Roger's destiny?
Well, he was never near perfect, he could lose matches here and there to lesser opponents and I highly doubt it the media would make such a fuss about it, the aesthetical side of his game was hardly ever discussed, and although he ended up grabbing a monstrous total of 64 titles, maybe once he won double figures in one season.
He was said to be the most driven tennis player ever, but it seems to me Roger has taken that title too...

So, unless Roger is willing to "pull a Wilander" (Mats got bored after his seventh Slam and quit tennis shortly after), I think he should switch to the "Sampras mode", i.e. focus on the Majors, stop being hard on himself, let himself lose occasionally, stop trying to satisfy everyone around him, forget about those silly records (although I admit it makes it fascinating for everyone, me included), try to win his annual Wimbledon, or USO, or both, and relax, so that we will all be able to enjoy him for many more years.


On a totally different note, it looks to me the AO courts are now officially slow - is it just me?
The only player to have mentioned that was Hewitt, but I clearly see how it makes things so much difficult for Roger - it was a huge struggle, he must be so proud of himself for winning the title when the conditions are far from favoring his game - do you think that is a good sign for Roland Garros...?
See...? I already put the pressure on him....

He won this title in dirtball fashion LOL. Yes it is slower because they are using different balls now but since Hewitt has bitched about it maybe they will go back to the old balls. :) I don't want this event to become a pig sty next year. :tape:

ExpectedWinner
01-29-2006, 07:36 PM
I think winning the AO should take a lot of pressure off his shoulders. It did in 2004. I'm not saying that he'll win 3 Slams again, but he'll play more freely for the rest of the year. Remember, every year when a player wins at least one GS is a great year. Also, he won't have to listen the talk about him going slamless.

ExpectedWinner
01-29-2006, 07:47 PM
but I clearly see how it makes things so much difficult for Roger - it was a huge struggle, he must be so proud of himself for winning the title when the conditions are far from favoring his game - do you think that is a good sign for Roland Garros...?
See...? I already put the pressure on him....

The movement is different at RG.

It was a struggle by Federer's standards. Look at Sampras' scores at the 1994 AO.

makro120
01-29-2006, 07:48 PM
Í agree, he is a human beeing and I think the pressure is too much for him right now, maybe e sould take a long vaccation or something. Not play until indian wells and just relax. He should go out there and enjoy his tennis much more, it doesnt matter if he lose a match here and there. I want Federer to be perfect just like everybody else and the media, but he shouldnt have to carry the burden, it is too much for him right now. I think he must completely stop reading what the media says about him, what experts think he will achieve or the records he can break. I must say I am a little worried about his mental health, he is a very sensitive guy and he wasnt born to be a star like Agassi or Mcenroe.

ExpectedWinner
01-29-2006, 07:55 PM
he wasnt born to be a star like Agassi or Mcenroe.

Thank god, he's not like them. One is a total jerk, and the other is an individual with multiple personalities, craftly tailored to his PR needs.

ytben
01-29-2006, 09:30 PM
I don't know about mental breakdown, but I do agree he has been carrying too much pressure on his shoulder these days. Even from 05 I already noticed his tennis has been a bit different than 04, in 04 he seemed to be enjoying the whole thing more. I don't know maybe it was just because in 05 he was pressured of not having a slam yet for the first half of the season.

I do agree for his longevity sake, he needs to start to focus on slams more and not so much on the other tournaments. It will take a toll on him sooner or later if he keeps maintaining such high standard on every tournaments year after year.

Minnie
01-29-2006, 09:43 PM
I also have been concerned about his mental state - how he carries the burden of expectations heaped upon him I just don't know. There were times during this tournament when I felt he wasn't really enjoying being out there on court - which seemed so unlike him. Everyone would love him to at least get the Career Slam - and I fear the burden of everyone willing him to achieve it at the FO will only increase the pressure.

NYCtennisfan
01-29-2006, 09:43 PM
I think winning the AO should take a lot of pressure off his shoulders. It did in 2004. I'm not saying that he'll win 3 Slams again, but he'll play more freely for the rest of the year. Remember, every year when a player wins at least one GS is a great year. Also, he won't have to listen the talk about him going slamless.

Totally agree. One of the reasons he broke down and cried I think is because he wants so much to continue to be #1 and realized that after some tough tennis over 2 weeks, he would most likely continue to be #1 throughout this year.

If he had lost to Haas or Davy or even Kiwi, he would have to defend EVERYTHING in order to stay comfortably ahead of Nadal. Rotterdam, Dubai, IW, Miami, Hamburg...; now he doesn't have to win EVERYTHING and still stay comfortably ahead.

Puschkin
01-30-2006, 05:31 AM
Like most of you, I also found Roger's tears today endearing, but I'm afraid (and I must say I'm not a psychologist or a doctor or anything) it has revealed something deeper - the man could be on the verge of a mental breakdown.

And who wouldn't be...?
For more than two years now this nice and sensitive person has been "Mr. Perfect" for everyone, winning 172 out of 182 matches(94.5%!!!), being the overwehlming favorite to win every tournament he enters (which he's almost always justified), carrying the responsibility for tournament's publication on his shoulders (Shanghai, anyone...?), and worst of all - being reminded of dozens of different records he's seemingly on the verge of breaking by media people.


I had similar thoughts and I am not a psychologist either ;). While it was a great moment to share, those tears showed the pressure under which Roger must have been throughout the tourney and the relief to have won it with willpower, mental toughness and physical strength, but without the artistic fluidity he had shown elsewhere before.

However, for once, I would not put the blame on the media. I deeply feel it is pressure from within, he himself wants to win all those tournaments and of course the GS, even if he wisely refuses to speak about it in public. And while I adore high ambitions and the determination to achieve them, I wonder what the price might be.Relax, Roger! I think Mirka has some work to do, and that goes far beyond childish girl-friend gossip.

robinhood
01-30-2006, 06:07 AM
Got to win the French sooner rather than later.
That will relieve a lot of pressure off his shoulders for the rest of his career.
Of course if he does it this year, we will go crazy over the prospect of the GS, but what can I say?

Some people talk about Sampras as an example, how he used to focus more on big tourneys and stuff, but I think that's a bit unfair.
Fed's determination and capability to excel at every tournament he enters is what makes who he is, and the fact that he executes it nearly every time is what separates him from other great players, Sampras included.
Besides, Fed winning even on an off-day is not his fault any more.
Other players have got to catch up.

robinhood
01-30-2006, 06:16 AM
If he had lost to Haas or Davy or even Kiwi, he would have to defend EVERYTHING in order to stay comfortably ahead of Nadal. Rotterdam, Dubai, IW, Miami, Hamburg...; now he doesn't have to win EVERYTHING and still stay comfortably ahead.

I wish he would skip one or two of those events and play the Davis Cup instead, all the more now that he's WAY ahead of the chasing pack.
I don't know what other people think on this subject, but it would seem a little selfish to me if he skipped the tie again this year to focus on his schedule.

nobama
01-30-2006, 06:25 AM
Maybe if he cut some of this stuff out...I guess not much time to celebrate his win then... :o

Federer knows no limits
By Darren Walton
January 30, 2006

IF anyone is feeling bleary-eyed and slightly washed up after staying up late the past fortnight watching the Australian Open, spare a thought for Roger Federer.

International Tennis Federation officials were today labelling Federer a welcome freak after the Swiss's extraordinary display of generosity towards the media following his Melbourne Park triumph.

Far from out on the town celebrating his seventh Major victory, Federer spent until the early hours of the morning conducting no less than 17 interviews for TV, radio and newspapers - some of them in three different languages.

Virtually from the moment the world No.1 finished off challenger Marcos Baghdatis, Federer was in hot demand.

While he was only obliged to do interviews with host broadcaster Channel 7 and Swiss-German TV as well as the mandatory post-match press conference - in three languages - Federer, as always, was too nice to turn anyone down.

So after spending almost 45 minutes revealing all in the press conference in English, French and Swiss German, the 24-year-old ventured from room to room answering more questions from various sections of the international media.

In all, he completed at least eight television interviews, five more for radio and two one-on-ones - plus a couple of photo shoots.

He finished up close to 3am, more than four hours after Baghdatis netted a backhand to hand Federer the first grand slam of the year, and all the while never stopped smiling.

Advertisement:
Federer's only request was for one sprite, a Coke and a water.

Aside from his rare on-court talents, the ITF described Federer as a breath of fresh air also off the court.

"In the last few years, Federer has been the most cooperative player in the media and has a real sense of responsibility," ITF executive Nick Imison said.

"He's a one-off."

Even when Federer finally got to bed, he was back out almost as quickly.

The Swiss superstar was committed to an interview with Seven's Sunrise program at 8.30am, followed by an all-in with any other television stations keen to hear from the Open champion and then a photoshoot at Docklands at 9.30am.

He was last seen having one last chat with Swiss journalists before finding some time to celebrate and then hopefully getting back to some sort of normal existence.

Federer admitted his body clock had taken a battering over the past fortnight after the world No.1 was regularly scheduled for the marquee night matches at Melbourne Park.

"The rhythm is just really difficult because the average going to bed was about four o'clock in the morning, the last few nights, waking up at 12 to two in the afternoon," he said.

"It's a really weird schedule I'm going through. I wake up and all I do is rest and hit a little bit.

"If I feel like I need to do some extra stuff, I'll do it, but I didn't have to do it this time because I thought I had to save myself."

Federer's schedule
4pm: Arrives at Melbourne Park to prepare for final
7.30pm: Takes to Rod Laver Arena for showdown with Marcos Baghdatis
10.40pm: Courtside victory speech
11.15pm: Interviews with Channel 7 and Swiss-German TV
11.30pm: interviews with Swiss-German radio, Moma Sport, Radio Suisse, German radio, BBC radio and Australian radio
12.30am: post-match press conference in English, French and Swiss German
1.15am: television interviews with Swiss TV, Fox Sports, Japanese TV and ESPN
2.15am: one-on-one interview with International Herald Tribune and New York Times
8.30am: interview from hotel for Sunrise
8.45am: all-in with remaining TV stations seeking more footage
9.30am: photo shoot at Docklands, Melbourne.

robinhood
01-30-2006, 06:35 AM
I read that article earlier, too.
I guess dealing with the media and the fans is another tournament in itself for Fed, and not surprisingly he's winning it as usual.
I mean, his tourney schedule is not too tight to begin with, isn't it?
But if this duty to perform after each and every one of his match is getting too much out of him, he's got to readjust his schedule.
Maybe even skip one or two TMS here and there.

nobama
01-30-2006, 06:39 AM
I suppose now that he's got this reputation as such a great guy off-court he doesn't want to do anything to tarnish it. But to be up until 3am giving interviews and then to get back up at 8.30 am and do some more is a bit much, I think. I'm sure some would say 'that's the price you have to pay', but other top athletes aren't doing it, and haven't done it to that extent in the past. Luckily he's got a bit of a break now where he can hopefully go home and get some well deserved rest.

prima donna
01-30-2006, 06:56 AM
Roger must be feeling tremendous amounts of pressure, because as a fan, I'm feeling pressure each time I watch a match of his and at times it's no fun.

Even if Roger does win, he's only accomplished what's expected of him. People will give him plenty of credit and call him the greatest of all-time possibly, but amongst the little people (fans), this site being a primarily good example, no one even bothers to acknowledge how amazing it is for someone to win a GS.

I read a post that said, "what was the big accomplishment today" and thought, wow, nothing aside from the fact that he won a GS and it happens to be his 7th one, if Roger isn't breaking some incredible record then it's no big deal.

I would never give up the accomplishments of Roger, but at times enough is enough. Simply tired of hearing people talk about him as if he's a robot, he is the only player that has set the bar high enough for losing a set to be considered failure (in the eyes of some spectators and commentators).

At this rate, who knows when Roger will win another Slam, too much pressure, all that I want is Wimbledon and this stuff about Roland Garros, U.S Open, winning all 4, it's too much, in 2004 it was different - success was new, though he'd gotten a taste of it in 2003 at Wimbledon. If he wins all 4 slams, then great, but what people actually expect someone to accomplish that this day in age - he's great, but human too and this is starting to become borderline ludicrous.

Thanks for listening to me vent, so tired of the media, but then again if they didn't have such expectations he'd be underrated, so where does finding a happy medium come into play?

TenHound
01-30-2006, 07:01 AM
Excellent, all. I particularly appreciated the commenter who said he doesn't seem to enjoy it anymore....I'd lost sight of that.

It'd be wonderful if he & Mirka took the month off, got married & went skiing :)

That said, if he wants to win Paris, this would prob. be the easiest year - before Thugs gets better, and he gets yet more run down. And I would think it would be a lot easier if he spent the winter playing on clay, rather than Eur. Indoors, which sound rather trivial.

Puschkin
01-30-2006, 07:10 AM
he is the only player that has set the bar high enough for losing a set to be considered failure (in the eyes of some spectators and commentators).


I am also sick of commentators moaning about a lost set. But the first part of your sentence is also true, HE has set the standards so high, I feel that a good part from Roger's pressure comes from within and to a large extent he seems to be driven by his own ambitions. If I had been Laver yesterday I would have wispered "relax" into his ears when he cried on my shoulders ;).

prima donna
01-30-2006, 07:25 AM
It's becoming too much, the first sign that I felt (giving off the feeling that it was becoming too much) was 2004, after TMC and I wasn't happy that Roger had triumphed...

I was just thinking, well, soon it will be time for Roger to do it all over again and it just sucked all of the energy out of me as a fan.

Too many expectations from the media and it wouldn't be so bad if everytime you turned on a television you didn't have to hear Roger being talked about as if he's committed some sin over losing a set in a match or not being absolutely perfect.

This is the first GS victory that I've truly enjoyed since 2004 USO against Hewitt, that was the last time I was truly satisfied and felt gratification that the guy won something.

Wimbledon is the most prestigious tournament, but I don't enjoy a single moment of it - because it's like a chore, he has to win.

I'm rejoiced that the clay season is upon us, the pressure and expectations will all be on Nadal and finally for once, time to fly under the radar and go back to enjoying tennis matches.

It's almost like a battle within a battle...
Roger vs his opponent
Roger vs media, expectations and hype
Roger vs naysayers (waiting for anything to stomp on)
Roger vs injuries (see 2005 TMC)
Roger vs human emotion

Basta.

sierra91
01-30-2006, 07:51 AM
So, unless Roger is willing to "pull a Wilander" (Mats got bored after his seventh Slam and quit tennis shortly after), I think he should switch to the "Sampras mode", i.e. focus on the Majors, stop being hard on himself, let himself lose occasionally, stop trying to satisfy everyone around him, forget about those silly records (although I admit it makes it fascinating for everyone, me included), try to win his annual Wimbledon, or USO, or both, and relax, so that we will all be able to enjoy him for many more years.
Wasn't Wilander's steep decline right after he became no. 1 more than boredom. Didn't his father die?

Also, do we know for sure that Roger is trying to satsify everyone around him or is he primarily driven by something within? Having said that, I agree that he should focus more on the majors and stop playing some of the rinky-dink tourneys no matter how much he's getting under the table.

And, finally Rogiman, where the fuck are you and why haven't you emailed me since you got back from your trip? :kiss: :kiss:

http://sierra91.smugmug.com/photos/54449744-S-1.jpg

robinhood
01-30-2006, 08:05 AM
It's becoming too much, the first sign that I felt (giving off the feeling that it was becoming too much) was 2004, after TMC and I wasn't happy that Roger had triumphed...

I was just thinking, well, soon it will be time for Roger to do it all over again and it just sucked all of the energy out of me as a fan.

Too many expectations from the media and it wouldn't be so bad if everytime you turned on a television you didn't have to hear Roger being talked about as if he's committed some sin over losing a set in a match or not being absolutely perfect.

This is the first GS victory that I've truly enjoyed since 2004 USO against Hewitt, that was the last time I was truly satisfied and felt gratification that the guy won something.

Wimbledon is the most prestigious tournament, but I don't enjoy a single moment of it - because it's like a chore, he has to win.

I'm rejoiced that the clay season is upon us, the pressure and expectations will all be on Nadal and finally for once, time to fly under the radar and go back to enjoying tennis matches.

It's almost like a battle within a battle...
Roger vs his opponent
Roger vs media, expectations and hype
Roger vs naysayers (waiting for anything to stomp on)
Roger vs injuries (see 2005 TMC)
Roger vs human emotion

Basta.

I sympathize with you, Lucifer. But in my case, I am excited to watch Wimbledon because he plays his best on grass. It's not so much that he's winning "matches," but that he's giving a performance that should not be missed out on. Again, like you've mentioned, it's another high HIGH standard he's set for himself and for his fans. Well, he's just too good and can't help himself obviously.

But being under a constant pressure is same for every player, isn't it?
Hewitt, Roddick, and Safin, who were supposedly to have formed a three-fourth of the Top 4 last year, it's like "Where Are They Now?"
If anything, I think they are under even more pressure (different sort) than Fed to fulfill their potential and challenge him.

Who knows how long this great run of Fed will last? (Long may it last!!)
I think we should try to enjoy it and take as many positives out of it as possible.
If he stops winning so much, then he will be under just as much pressure to get back his form.
In other words, there is no turning back now, any way we look at it.

And the clay season. Flying under the radar?
If Fed and Nadal both stay healthy upto FO, every article will be about their rivalry, potential rematch, Fed winning that one "elusive" slam, and blah blah blah.
I would rather see him win it this year, so that he doesn't have to hear about his lack of career slam any more. Not THAT drives me so mad.

World Beater
01-30-2006, 08:31 AM
Wasn't Wilander's steep decline right after he became no. 1 more than boredom. Didn't his father die?

Also, do we know for sure that Roger is trying to satsify everyone around him or is he primarily driven by something within? Having said that, I agree that he should focus more on the majors and stop playing some of the rinky-dink tourneys no matter how much he's getting under the table.

And, finally Rogiman, where the fuck are you and why haven't you emailed me since you got back from your trip? :kiss: :kiss:

http://sierra91.smugmug.com/photos/54449744-S-1.jpg

is that you? :D nice picture :wavey:

JustmeUK
01-30-2006, 08:42 AM
I had similar thoughts and I am not a psychologist either ;). While it was a great moment to share, those tears showed the pressure under which Roger must have been throughout the tourney and the relief to have won it with willpower, mental toughness and physical strength, but without the artistic fluidity he had shown elsewhere before.

However, for once, I would not put the blame on the media. I deeply feel it is pressure from within, he himself wants to win all those tournaments and of course the GS, even if he wisely refuses to speak about it in public. And while I adore high ambitions and the determination to achieve them, I wonder what the price might be.Relax, Roger! I think Mirka has some work to do, and that goes far beyond childish girl-friend gossip.

I agree completely. For all the media hype it is Roger himself who pushes himself the hardest. I sometimes wonder if Roger even reads what is written about him any more. Is there any reason to? I doubt anyone gets to number 1 in the world without a huge amount of self-confidence. It is this that sustains him and his desire to leave a mark in history that drives him on most of all.

As for the price he will pay? Well that is for Roger to decide. At some point all the pressure he feels (from within) and from history will/may become too great. Hopefully never though. And he appears to have plenty of coping mechanisms for the pressure at the moment. As long as he can relieve the pressure I think he will continue to do great things but the FO Open this year may be just a little too much.

TheMightyFed
01-30-2006, 08:42 AM
Yeah Fed is close to burn out, mentally and physically. His speech was touching but weird for a seventh title... Sampras was refering to this constant pressure of being Number 1 on a long period, saying he hardly slept one full night during his reign. There are two Rogers IMO, the one very down-to-earth who's ready to lose and keeps things very simple with everybody, and the perfectionist, very demanding with himself. This mix is a dream for a lot of people, promoters, media and fans, because you have here a very talented person that looks like you and me, smiling with everybody, polite and easy-going. Everybody who knows him in Switzerland say "he's remained the same". However, there's a contradiction between these two personalities, because to achieve goals of such calibers (number 1 for x weeks, 10 slams, all 4 slams, etc.), you need to focus on them, and direct all your energy as Sampras, Borg did. Federer can't help being friendly with everybody, but I'm affraid he loses some "mental strength" in the process. And if he breaks down everybody will be on his back and it will be even worse.

SUKTUEN
01-30-2006, 08:50 AM
How to Relax? Sleeping ? Swimming? watch TV?

Puschkin
01-30-2006, 08:52 AM
How to Relax? Sleeping ? Swimming? watch TV?

Why not? :p Doing some thing totally different and not reading too many papers;)

SUKTUEN
01-30-2006, 08:55 AM
Why not? :p Doing some thing totally different and not reading too many papers;)
really ? I also has a lot of pressure, but smaller than Roger's :mad:

nobama
01-30-2006, 11:37 AM
Too many expectations from the media and it wouldn't be so bad if everytime you turned on a television you didn't have to hear Roger being talked about as if he's committed some sin over losing a set in a match or not being absolutely perfect.Let's remember it's not just the media. There was one particular match at AO that wouldn't even get a write-up in the match report thread because it was so "f*cking awful" (or something like that). I think fans as well have come to expect/assume too much from Roger too.

What's funny is I remember reading here (I think it might have been during/after the US Open) some people complaining that Roger was going into "Sampras mode". But now I think after this AO more fans are thinking he needs to go into some sort of "Sampras mode" so he doesn't burn out. I noticed it in that pre-AO interview Roger gave where he said at the end of the year he's so fried that all he wants to do is sleep in a sun lounger and has no energy to walk on the beach or do anything. And then the little dig he had at the media after the Haas match. I think he's finally letting out some of the emotions he's kept inside for so long and we certainly saw that during the trophy presentation.

Puschkin
01-30-2006, 12:10 PM
I think fans as well have come to expect/assume too much from Roger too.


Am I right that there is a difference in English between expect and assume? I am not a native speaker. What I want to say is: While I can imagine Roger to do anything on a tennis court, I don't take his achievements for granted. I was in a strange way pleased, when he lost in Shanghai. I felt it decreased the pressure and I considered it good for him.

As for the "Sampras-mode": My heart wants to see the high-flying conquering Roger of 2004, but may brain knows that he can only survive where he is now when he goes for more percentage tennis.

nobama
01-30-2006, 01:25 PM
This great article sums up everything I've been feeling:

From the Sydney Morning Herald

The force behind the serve … and the tears

He won the battle, not just against the underdog ... and then the dam burst, writes David Williamson.

THE vast world audience who watched the men's final of the Australian tennis open on Sunday night saw an extraordinary spectacle. One of the all-time greats, possibly the greatest player ever, Roger Federer, convincingly and coolly won the title, then broke down and cried.

It was a moving and endearing moment. But what caused it? Men would usually rather admit to an erectile problem than cry in public.

Sure, Malcolm Fraser had tears in his eyes when he was defeated by Bob Hawke in 1983, but that was a defeat, not a victory.

And Hawke cried openly at the spectacle of Tiananmen Square. Some cynics claimed Hawke was crying in sheer wonder at the depth of his own compassion, but I'm prepared to believe that he was genuinely moved. But again that's not tears in response to a victory.

Women's tears don't draw the same surprise or disapproval as men's tears, and men's comparative stoicism has been long put down to social conditioning. Recent brain imaging studies cast doubt on this.

The feeling and compassion centres of women's brains are far more active than men's. The male inability to cry seems to also have a structural and biological basis in the brain.

So what made Federer defy those social and biological restraints and show us his vulnerability?

It could be any number of reasons.

Pete Sampras cried on court in a match with Jim Courier and it was not known until afterwards that he'd just found out his coach had been diagnosed with cancer, so any explanation has to be speculative, but here goes.

Federer, on court, usually convinces us he has no emotions at all. He glides gracefully around the court so casually that it seems as if he's somehow in command of time itself, and can slow it down at will. It's just all too easy.

In sport, whose essence is the drama of not knowing outcomes, predictability is irritating, especially to sports journalists whose pay packet depends on new scenarios.

So it's not hard to understand why they seize on every close contest to try to proclaim that the Federer era is over. While they don't hate Federer, they hate the inevitability that comes as a result of his massive talent. which they try to undermine by highlighting every falter and stumble. It has to eat away at Federer's inner confidence and sense of fairness.

But Federer should take heart. He's not alone. Our greatest racehorse, Phar Lap, was shot at in an attempt to kill him because he just kept winning.

Playwrights who were contemporaries of Shakespeare delighted in vicious attacks which accused him of being a country bumpkin whose style of writing was stuffed with vapid similies and far-fetched metaphors.

The greatest wicketkeeper/batsman who ever played cricket, Adam Gilchrist, had a recent bad run, and the chorus to get rid of him rose to shrill heights. His century in the one-day match on Sunday seems to suggest his talent has not totally evaporated.

It's an iron law of achievement that when one rises too far above the competition the slings and arrows start, and with it the merciless rooting for the underdog.

And what an underdog Marcos Baghdatis turned out to be. Mercurial, voluble and likeable, and as flamboyant as Federer is controlled. With a beautiful young model as his companion, and confessing that spending time with her in bed was a strategy to keep him from stressing out, he was a publicists' dream.

Ranked below 50 and coming from nowhere, Baghdatis was the darling of the tennis world after his heroic five-set win from behind over David Nalbandian.

Federer could surely sense that the vast majority of the world was hoping that Baghdatis would win. From their point of view the new kid on the block had arrived at last, and while Federer could rationally accept that Baghdatis was the new darling of the tennis world, at an emotional level it must have taken its toll. From his point of view he had more than earned his eminence. Why was there such a rabid frenzy of hope that he would be humiliated?

I think that part of the reason Federer broke down was an attempt to show us all that to him his victories are not at all inevitable. That being on top of the pile is in some ways the most vulnerable position it's possible to have. That it's not easy. That from his point of view every match is a contest. As in any sport, confidence and belief are just as essential as talent, and every time Federer plays it's possible that the emotions, which we now know are patently there under the surface, might derail him. We saw it happen at the start of the match. He willed himself brilliantly back into the game, but he knows that if he loses, the baying hounds are out there ready to proclaim an era is over. And that if his confidence is shaken enough, it might well be.

To intensify his emotion the man handing him the trophy was Rod Laver, perhaps the greatest tennis player ever.

If any man was able to understand the very real loneliness at the top, it was Rocket Rod.

Federer broke down because the trophy, handed to him by his all-time idol, meant more to him that any of us thought it could. Every new trophy is another Everest he has to climb.

Every time he comes to centre court now he has to do battle with the world's huge expectations and with their hope that the underdog will win.

Federer showed us that he's vulnerable, that victory matters very much for him, and that it's very hard work. That was what moved us.

The playwright David Williamson savoured the moment.

fightclubber
01-30-2006, 02:19 PM
i LOVE THE DISCUSSION HERE AND iM NOT SURE IF i HAVE A LOT TO ADD.
I think Roger cried cos he won, even if the road was longer than xpected and with stones in the middle, cos Australia is the land of Carter, his family was there, Roche was there, Laver was there and gave him the emotions.
Look what he said at the press conference
Q. Is there any added significance to winning here in Australia, given that Peter Carter worked with you at the beginning of your career, and his family was here with you tonight and celebrated afterwards?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, absolutely. It's always very emotional, you know, winning here, because of Peter, then Tony. It's very nice to share the moment with them, you know, obviously. So I think it means a lot to them, too. Very happy that they still enjoy watching tennis after how much he was into tennis, too. They could just walk away from the game and say, "Look, we'd rather not face it anymore, you know, because of how much he loved the sport." But I'm happy they come out and they really, really support me. It's very nice.

......
I think. I think it's especially nice from Rod, you know, to come out and do it, you know, because he doesn't need it. He doesn't live in Australia at the moment. It's a long way, you know. He's not the youngest anymore, so we really appreciate the players. Very disappointed, you know, not to have seen also Ken Rosewall last year in the finals, at the trophy ceremony.
But I've seen him, you know, many times now at Tony's place. I know him well. But it's nice, you know, to finally met Rod. It means a lot to me.

You know, I don't expect anything like a court named after me. I'm not playing the game because of that, but obviously it would be nice (smiling).

I was surprised to read he was thinking he did not meet Rosewall at last year final... not saying a word about winning but to meet him.

He is a guy with motins that covers some while he is on court, but off court, he is a normal guy, that enjoy life as much as we do.
Will he collapse? I would not even think about it. All the big ones have ups and downs. And Im most worried for his tennis, I think he feels a bit insecure and feels the pressure of winning everything, than for his tears. I think its a way to discharge emotions, it happens to me every week, yes... yes I admit, I cry a lot, but helps a lot when Im frustated or too happy.

Maybe he did not expected to win? And when he relaxed started to cry?
No idea.
I do agree Roger need to play more clay before RG instead of indoors but I have a BIG feeling, I had this dream, that he wins RG this year.
I do hope i comes true as on of my other dreams...
I think he can. He has to be himself.

Kisses
Silvy

yanchr
01-30-2006, 02:50 PM
Great article Mirkaland. And Great thread by Rogiman and other posters.

First of all, the last article about Roger's schedule for the final day scared me a bit. What is it all about when it's actually time to totally relax himself after such a tough-on-the-body, emotionally and physically drained day? I even doubt if Roger's gonna celebrate it deep in his heart. Because I feel, like someone else here, it's absolutely more relief from him than happiness, a relief that he finally lived up to everybody's expectation especially himself, that he finally could shut up those who are ready to make satisfying dramas on his possible loss, a relief that he finally got his job done here (I mean just playing tennis, not even winning the tournament) in Australia and could go back home now. I feel for him. But all the media thing is really up to himself. He sets up himself as such a nice guy, but he has to learn to say NO, more often than not NOW, to save himself, because there are more than enough things, other than this, to already wear him out.

And I think, it is actually not the media or whoever, but HIMSELF who puts the heaviest pressure on him. I believe he has got extremely strong self-pride in him which really gets into his head not so positively. He cares about a lot of things too much. For example, he doesn't tend to tell the truth until way later esp regarding some sensitive things, like his real feelings after a tough, like the condition about his injury, etc. He is too sensitive. Life will be easier for him if he can take some things lighter. But, I guess one's personality is hard to change. He is born to be like that. Hard to change now.

As for RG, I actually don't expect much from him. I hope he is not sticking his eyes on that. Wimbledon is always more pleasing. He should hold an attitude like, if I win it, fine, if not, still fine. It's not a must, like almost everybody is saying.

This Australian Open is the toughest slam for him, the awarding ceremony very reflective. It's time to think about things a little bit, rather than just to go on with business, cuz there is no end with business. Sometimes I'm confused. What is he actually thinking about?

Puschkin
01-30-2006, 03:05 PM
But all the media thing is really up to himself. He sets up himself as such a nice guy, but he has to learn to say NO, more often than not NOW, to save himself..?

It might be difficult to grasp, but I am convinced that Roger takes something out of being in the limelight, too. It suits his taste of being a role-model. Role models have to be seen and heard. If Roger really wanted to, he could cut his press and media events shorter by now, I am rather sure about that. But he also loves the admiration and attention behind his modest surface;).

Sometimes I'm confused. What is he actually thinking about? That will for ever remain his secret. But if we knew there would be nothing left to speculate on this board;) :wavey:

RogiFan88
01-30-2006, 03:15 PM
Rogi is smart not to include winning RG as one of his goals this year. Staying No 1 and winning Wimby again is pressure enough and I agree w what yanchr and silvy and Puschkin have mentioned.

Every year, no, every time Rogi steps on the court he faces unbelievable pressure that no other player right now can imagine. How many times do the other players feel pressure, even when they're not the favourite [and usually ROGI is THE favourite unless he isn't playing a tourney] and fail in their quest -- that quest being: winning a match -- we're not even talking about winning a title! Yet Rogi has that pressure and expectation to WIN every tournament he plays [as does Rafa]. Not many players could handle that kind of day-in day-out pressure as Rogi does AND still win titles. Since his first slam at Wimby03, he has had to face an enormous weight, which only increases each year. He has been doing this for 2 -1/2 years straight now!

The press get more relentless also -- I am getting a little sick of sensationalist headlines that twist his words or sth someone else said just to make a buck at the newsstand. Then ignorant dorks [who shall remain nameless, ahem... ] latch onto these incomplete, erroneous articles and run away w them, gathering clueless bandwagoners on the way... so much garbaggio out there to sift through before one can find an article or two that actually speak the truth without bias.

Oops, don't mean to rant on... I just think Rogi must know what he's doing and is careful to remain healthy [he repeated that in his press conf] -- as long as he's healthy he s be fine -- not an easy thing to do! He does have to take care of himself, esp his feet... he has to fine-tune his sched to avoid injury and fatigue or he won't last out the year. It's ridiculous.

OK, back to work... and thoughts of ROGI our dear CHAMPION!!!!

prima donna
01-30-2006, 03:21 PM
Let's remember it's not just the media. There was one particular match at AO that wouldn't even get a write-up in the match report thread because it was so "f*cking awful" (or something like that). I think fans as well have come to expect/assume too much from Roger too.

What's funny is I remember reading here (I think it might have been during/after the US Open) some people complaining that Roger was going into "Sampras mode". But now I think after this AO more fans are thinking he needs to go into some sort of "Sampras mode" so he doesn't burn out. I noticed it in that pre-AO interview Roger gave where he said at the end of the year he's so fried that all he wants to do is sleep in a sun lounger and has no energy to walk on the beach or do anything. And then the little dig he had at the media after the Haas match. I think he's finally letting out some of the emotions he's kept inside for so long and we certainly saw that during the trophy presentation.

You've stolen my thoughts.

fightclubber
01-30-2006, 03:23 PM
And I think, it is actually not the media or whoever, but HIMSELF who puts the heaviest pressure on him. I believe he has got extremely strong self-pride in him which really gets into his head not so positively. He cares about a lot of things too much. For example, he doesn't tend to tell the truth until way later esp regarding some sensitive things, like his real feelings after a tough, like the condition about his injury, etc. He is too sensitive. Life will be easier for him if he can take some things lighter. But, I guess one's personality is hard to change. He is born to be like that. Hard to change now.


Why do you think he do not tell the truth about injuries? I think he was quite honest with the ankle one. And I got really good info about it.;)
I think most players specualte if they are going to play or not but Im sure is just for the Business. Cos a director of a tourney would not be happy if Federer, agassi, nadal, nalbandian , or any top 10, dropp off long before the tournament. The will sell less tickets... So the idea ( is whay I understood .. it took me a couple of years...) is to announce they wont play the last day or 2.. as late as possible,

About personality is hard to change.. I bet, yes, more at his age and the level he reached, mean the choices he took and has to take. You have to be strong... Im not sure other players would say Bye bye to IMG at the time he did it... It has some benefits.. I think he wants to have control of his life, 100 percent... but tennis control lot of his life......

Silvy

fightclubber
01-30-2006, 03:27 PM
It might be difficult to grasp, but I am convinced that Roger takes something out of being in the limelight, too. It suits his taste of being a role-model. Role models have to be seen and heard. If Roger really wanted to, he could cut his press and media events shorter by now, I am rather sure about that. But he also loves the admiration and attention behind his modest surface;).

Im 100 percent agreed. I think He really enjoys it, I thin k he said soemthing like when he got the number one position, he got lots of media atention and he enjoys being number 1...I cannot imagine, better, maybe we cannot imagine and will never know, all the UNKNOW benefits he gets just for being a number 1 player. (apart from tennis and money;) )
silvy

TheMightyFed
01-30-2006, 03:30 PM
I cannot imagine, better, maybe we cannot imagine and will never know, all the UNKNOW benefits he gets just for being a number 1 player. (apart from tennis and money;) )
silvy
You mean like getting easily a table at the restaurant ? ;)

RogiFan88
01-30-2006, 03:39 PM
Rogi's speech was the way it was because he was overwhelmed by emotion... mostly in the realization at what he had just accomplished and by being handed the trophy by one of THE greats of all time, Rod Laver, for whom he has enormous respect! Nothing more or less... it's not that he didn't prepare a speech. If he had, it flew out the window when he became emotional. It was touching and sweet and showed that he HAS feelings, emotions [maybe not the ones most boring, ho-hum people want...]. Rogi respects his opponents [even misbehaving guys like Kiwi], the "legends", the game of tennis and tennis history. Every title means a lot to him and he has respect for every tournament, whether slam or "bunny". I don't see a lot of THAT from other players, esp the top guys...

yanchr
01-30-2006, 03:49 PM
It might be difficult to grasp, but I am convinced that Roger takes something out of being in the limelight, too. It suits his taste of being a role-model. Role models have to be seen and heard. If Roger really wanted to, he could cut his press and media events shorter by now, I am rather sure about that. But he also loves the admiration and attention behind his modest surface;).
I'm sure about that too. He enjoys so much the good feeling of always being on the core of attention and loved by so many. To tell the truth, I would enjoy it too. But the media stuff is not always positive like just to put him in the limelight, give him praise or sth. I just hope he knows it when it is enough and he knows it consciously that it may wear him out one day, which I'm not quite sure of.

To be nice is good, but it's not your responsibility to be nice all the time just to please others, which I feel what Roger is doing now.

:wavey:

Dirk
01-30-2006, 03:59 PM
Roger has over 20 days off until Roasterdamn. He will chill until his body recovers from that evil RA and then get fitter and get back to killing. He knows when to step away from it all (summer break) so I am not worried about burn out and he will deal with trying to win all the events in the near future I am sure.

He is feeling much better heading into the year with Oz under his belt than last year so maybe he will play more freely and work harder on the Roche tactics.

yanchr
01-30-2006, 04:04 PM
Why do you think he do not tell the truth about injuries? I think he was quite honest with the ankle one. And I got really good info about it.;)
No, he is absolutely not being honest at the moment of eg, the injury, but probably he will admit long later which he didn't at that moment. For example, now I'm pretty sure his injury is much more serious than he had told in Shanghai and I've imagined. And just today, I read that he was also not telling the truth about his ankle here in Australian Open. He told us that it's completely healed and the protection wrap he wore is no more than a precaution, which is not the truth, revealed by an Aussie paper. And back to last year AO, he told us he recovered from that semi final loss quite quickly which is also not the truth. He said in Shanghai he was mentally hurt after that match, and admitted here in Australia that he had doubts last year until after Wimbledon. I can give more examples. I think generally he is a very honest guy, but when it comes down to a possible showing of his vulnerability, he becomes very defensive. I think his extreme self-pride is playing a huge role there.

ExpectedWinner
01-30-2006, 04:30 PM
And back to last year AO, he told us he recovered from that semi final loss quite quickly which is also not the truth. He said in Shanghai he was mentally hurt after that match, and admitted here in Australia that he had doubts last year until after Wimbledon.

Are you kidding? If he starts complaining about his mental state in official interviews, he'll go on the court 0-4 down each and every time before the match starts.

Guess why NHL guys rarely reveal the place where the real injury is. That's because players from other teams will hit them directly into this area.

ExpectedWinner
01-30-2006, 04:33 PM
The press get more relentless also -- I am getting a little sick of sensationalist headlines that twist his words or sth someone else said just to make a buck at the newsstand. Then ignorant dorks [who shall remain nameless, ahem... ] latch onto these incomplete, erroneous articles and run away w them, gathering clueless bandwagoners on the way... so much garbaggio out there to sift through before one can find an article or two that actually speak the truth without bias.



:yeah::yeah::yeah:

ExpectedWinner
01-30-2006, 05:10 PM
For example, now I'm pretty sure his injury is much more serious than he had told in Shanghai and I've imagined. And just today, I read that he was also not telling the truth about his ankle here in Australian Open. He told us that it's completely healed and the protection wrap he wore is no more than a precaution, which is not the truth, revealed by an Aussie paper.

I don't read Aussies newspapers. But I'm not surprised. If anything, I'm surprised with a huge number of ignorant people who think that it's really possible to go from crutches to the highest level of tennis/fitness in a matter of 2 weeks. :eek: If he came out from Shanghai without any further significant damage to his foot, then he's a winner, imo.

Now, what do you think he did after Shanghai? Definetely,you don't practice on the court with an injured foot. Like it's not enough, the off court preparation had to be changed as well. I'm guessing he did more biking/swimming than usual. But I can assure you that he did not bother with running and foot speed exercises. As a result, his fitness/court sharpness most probably weren't on the desirable level for this GS.

But, of course, he's not going to talk about his injures and submit his bone scans to the media. First of all, it gives an intangible advantage to the rest of the tour. Secondly, it's not fair to complain if you decided to compete ( tell this to Clijsters and and uncle Tony).

yanchr
01-30-2006, 05:13 PM
Are you kidding? If he starts complaining about his mental state in official interviews, he'll go on the court 0-4 down each and every time before the match starts.

Guess why NHL guys rarely reveal the place where the real injury is. That's because players from other teams will hit them directly into this area.
Of course I'm not kidding. I know he has to keep this kind of stuff from his opponents. But that makes me confused too. I can't tell what is true what is not. And it's such a worrying factor. I used to believe, or better say, would like to believe what he told us, to make things easier for me. It won't work any more.

ExpectedWinner
01-30-2006, 05:17 PM
Of course I'm not kidding. I know he has to keep this kind of stuff from his opponents. But that makes me confused too. I can't tell what is true what is not. And it's such a worrying factor. I used to believe, or better say, would like to believe what he told us, to make things easier for me. It won't work any more.

LOL. You must be very young. Don't worry, this " disease" will pass by very quickly. :)

yanchr
01-30-2006, 05:31 PM
LOL. You must be very young. Don't worry, this " disease" will pass by very quickly. :)
Very young is how young for you ;)

When you get yourself too involved in sth, you are not able to look at it objectively. That's what happened to me. Maybe you won't understand :p

ExpectedWinner
01-30-2006, 05:40 PM
Very young is how young for you ;)



Well, hopefully you've already graduated kindergarten ( jk). ;) Usually I'm not arguing with kiddies.

ExpectedWinner
01-30-2006, 05:57 PM
However, for once, I would not put the blame on the media. I deeply feel it is pressure from within, he himself wants to win all those tournaments and of course the GS, even if he wisely refuses to speak about it in public..

I agree. While he has ears and can't shut down the press completely, the most pressure comes from within.
Unfortunately, this new ranking system and the absence of quality points doesn't allow him to go into the " Sampras mode" completely. Sampras could skip/lose early at some TMSes and make up for them at small tornaments if he needed. No such luxury now.

yanchr
01-30-2006, 06:00 PM
Well, hopefully you've already graduated kindergarten ( jk). ;) Usually I'm not argueing with kiddies.
Unfortunately...Sorry to make you feel humiliated arguing with me :lol:

Well, hope we are not hijacking this great thread. I think Roger'd better not play DC (which I believe he won't, sorry to Swiss fans), and skip either Rotterdam or Dubai, skip one of Indian Wells and Miami, skip one of the three clay TMS, skip one of Toronto and Cincinatti, skip one of Madrid and Paris, of course not because of injury. And give himself an easy time not aiming for winning every single tournament he enters but just stay a bit focused. Not set RG as a definite goal. And go on enjoying his hopefully still long career.

Kiddie is gonna to find Mom now :D :wavey:

nobama
01-30-2006, 06:09 PM
Ok, just because some Aussie paper reported on his injury that means Roger is lying about his injury? Good grief. :rolleyes: His injury maybe/have been more serious than he let on, but just because something is reported in a newspaper doesn't mean it's the gospel truth.

I like what Matt Cronin recently said about Roger:
But at age 24, Federer is a much more aware player now, and in a five-set contest, he knows that momentum switches will come and go and that as long as he manages to catch the biggest wave and not get sucked into the pipeline, that he'll come out of the tube with a big grin on his face.

nobama
01-30-2006, 06:19 PM
It might be difficult to grasp, but I am convinced that Roger takes something out of being in the limelight, too. It suits his taste of being a role-model. Role models have to be seen and heard. If Roger really wanted to, he could cut his press and media events shorter by now, I am rather sure about that. But he also loves the admiration and attention behind his modest surface;).

That will for ever remain his secret. But if we knew there would be nothing left to speculate on this board;) :wavey:Oh I agree totally. It's his choice to do all this press/media related stuff. You don't hear about Tiger Woods staying up till 3am doing media after he wins a slam. And I agree, I think it makes him feel good when people talk about him, not just as a great tennis player, but a great human being and role model. I think he takes a lot of pride in that, pride in knowing how much he is respected in the sports world.

I hope he can get to a point where he isn't putting so much pressure on himself. But who knows when/if that will happen. In the new years message he left on his website he said he would try to win every tournament he plays. Yes it's admirable that he cares so much but I don't think it's possible for him to continue at this same pace for years to come. But only he can change that.

Dirk
01-30-2006, 07:06 PM
Of course Roger was bugged by his tight Oz loss in 05 but if he had let it affected him he wouldn't have won all the titles made his first RG semi before Wimbledon. Just because something bugs him doesn't mean he lets it gets to him, last year it inspired MAJOR PAIN ON THE REST OF THE TOUR, then after he won Wimbledon he took a nice break, came back and LAID OUT MAJOR PAIN AGAIN until after Bangkok when the tour was spared due to his injury. :)

1sun
01-30-2006, 08:00 PM
Roger has over 20 days off until Roasterdamn. He will chill until his body recovers from that evil RA and then get fitter and get back to killing. He knows when to step away from it all (summer break) so I am not worried about burn out and he will deal with trying to win all the events in the near future I am sure.

He is feeling much better heading into the year with Oz under his belt than last year so maybe he will play more freely and work harder on the Roche tactics.
totaly agree. he'll be fine, hes just an emotonial man. this aussie title is a huge pressure release and when roger is relaxed, hes at his best.

1sun
01-30-2006, 08:03 PM
ps dirk, the last laugh was a joy ;)

RogiFan88
01-30-2006, 09:10 PM
Perhaps when Rogi arrived in Melbourne [or in Oz to begin w] his ankle was fine. But he HAS played quite a lot of tennis this fortnight... more than he usually plays and I'm not surprised if it is swollen now. He does have to be careful and take care of himself. If that means skipping DC [as Lleyton is not playing R1 anyway in SUI], so be it. That's the least of his worries -- it's not just Rogi winning it, it's the whole SUI team. Let Stan be the hero and prove that he can win as well as Rogi [he was betting on Marcos vs. Rogi anyway]. Perfect platform for the other guys to show their worth [just like when Rafa won't be playing in Minsk altho indoor carpet is hardly his best surface despite winning on indoor h/c in Madrid].

Rogi has to pace himself and we'll see just how his 2006 pans out... hey, Rogi, the Barcelona tourney has a weaker than usual field! Are you interested? When it was stronger, it didn't frighten someone like Lleyton fr playing it!! ;)

MY dream w be for ROGI to win RG but he blew his chances before last year when the Nadal hurricane swept thru and will most likely continue to "dominate". Doesn't mean Rogi won't ever win it but it will become tougher and tougher and it is the most difficult slam to win. I believe real heroes are made on the clay of Paris. Mind you, Rogi's 5-setter and the fact that he dropped sets in QF, SF and F are all a good test. Now he has a better idea of what it's like to "suffer" thru a slam and win it, vs. the odds. I think that most slam winners, esp of RG, suffer thru some kind of trial in order to "earn" the RG salad bowl. So, Rogi, go to RG expecting not to win and let the press put the pressure on Rafa y compania. Oh, and win MC instead of Hamburg for a change. You need some different TMS titles this year, like Madrid and you better come to TORONTO as you were sadly missed in Montreal last year. I can't be without seeing you for more than 2 years at a stretch... ;)

RogiFan88
01-30-2006, 09:12 PM
;) totaly agree. he'll be fine, hes just an emotonial man. this aussie title is a huge pressure release and when roger is relaxed, hes at his best.


Very true, Rogi himself said that when he wins the first slam of the year, it does take the pressure off... which is perfect for him cos it simply gets more gruelling each year.

nobama
01-30-2006, 11:02 PM
There are three masters series events on clay. Why does Roger need to play more than that as prep for RG? I know last year he didn't play Rome but this year he mentioned Tony possibly coming with him to Rome, so barring an injury I'm sure he'll play there.

Dirk
01-31-2006, 04:59 AM
ps dirk, the last laugh was a joy ;)

Oh it was. I am glad Baggy did what he did because it sent some fans of a partical player back to square one crying. :)

Mrs. B
01-31-2006, 08:01 AM
interesting discussion here. my two cents on this would be the enormous pressure he had to regain the title he lost on a silly shot on match point at the semis last year (that made all the difference, didn't it), plus playing an underdog who's won the hearts of millions, the hard matches he's played on his way to the title, the what might have been had Baggy won that second set as well...
and the nonstop bickering from the hatas would continue...Mirka should tell Roger to stop reading GM on MTF. :devil: Time to chill out, Roja.

thought i'd post this brilliant article here posted by ToanNguyen at the other thread :

The force behind the serve … and the tears

He won the battle, not just against the underdog ... and then the dam burst, writes David Williamson.

THE vast world audience who watched the men's final of the Australian tennis open on Sunday night saw an extraordinary spectacle. One of the all-time greats, possibly the greatest player ever, Roger Federer, convincingly and coolly won the title, then broke down and cried.

It was a moving and endearing moment. But what caused it? Men would usually rather admit to an erectile problem than cry in public.

Sure, Malcolm Fraser had tears in his eyes when he was defeated by Bob Hawke in 1983, but that was a defeat, not a victory.

And Hawke cried openly at the spectacle of Tiananmen Square. Some cynics claimed Hawke was crying in sheer wonder at the depth of his own compassion, but I'm prepared to believe that he was genuinely moved. But again that's not tears in response to a victory.

Women's tears don't draw the same surprise or disapproval as men's tears, and men's comparative stoicism has been long put down to social conditioning. Recent brain imaging studies cast doubt on this.

The feeling and compassion centres of women's brains are far more active than men's. The male inability to cry seems to also have a structural and biological basis in the brain.

So what made Federer defy those social and biological restraints and show us his vulnerability?

It could be any number of reasons.

Pete Sampras cried on court in a match with Jim Courier and it was not known until afterwards that he'd just found out his coach had been diagnosed with cancer, so any explanation has to be speculative, but here goes.

Federer, on court, usually convinces us he has no emotions at all. He glides gracefully around the court so casually that it seems as if he's somehow in command of time itself, and can slow it down at will. It's just all too easy.

In sport, whose essence is the drama of not knowing outcomes, predictability is irritating, especially to sports journalists whose pay packet depends on new scenarios.

So it's not hard to understand why they seize on every close contest to try to proclaim that the Federer era is over. While they don't hate Federer, they hate the inevitability that comes as a result of his massive talent. which they try to undermine by highlighting every falter and stumble. It has to eat away at Federer's inner confidence and sense of fairness.

But Federer should take heart. He's not alone. Our greatest racehorse, Phar Lap, was shot at in an attempt to kill him because he just kept winning.

Playwrights who were contemporaries of Shakespeare delighted in vicious attacks which accused him of being a country bumpkin whose style of writing was stuffed with vapid similies and far-fetched metaphors.

The greatest wicketkeeper/batsman who ever played cricket, Adam Gilchrist, had a recent bad run, and the chorus to get rid of him rose to shrill heights. His century in the one-day match on Sunday seems to suggest his talent has not totally evaporated.

It's an iron law of achievement that when one rises too far above the competition the slings and arrows start, and with it the merciless rooting for the underdog.

And what an underdog Marcos Baghdatis turned out to be. Mercurial, voluble and likeable, and as flamboyant as Federer is controlled. With a beautiful young model as his companion, and confessing that spending time with her in bed was a strategy to keep him from stressing out, he was a publicists' dream.

Ranked below 50 and coming from nowhere, Baghdatis was the darling of the tennis world after his heroic five-set win from behind over David Nalbandian.

Federer could surely sense that the vast majority of the world was hoping that Baghdatis would win. From their point of view the new kid on the block had arrived at last, and while Federer could rationally accept that Baghdatis was the new darling of the tennis world, at an emotional level it must have taken its toll. From his point of view he had more than earned his eminence. Why was there such a rabid frenzy of hope that he would be humiliated?

I think that part of the reason Federer broke down was an attempt to show us all that to him his victories are not at all inevitable. That being on top of the pile is in some ways the most vulnerable position it's possible to have. That it's not easy. That from his point of view every match is a contest. As in any sport, confidence and belief are just as essential as talent, and every time Federer plays it's possible that the emotions, which we now know are patently there under the surface, might derail him. We saw it happen at the start of the match. He willed himself brilliantly back into the game, but he knows that if he loses, the baying hounds are out there ready to proclaim an era is over. And that if his confidence is shaken enough, it might well be.

To intensify his emotion the man handing him the trophy was Rod Laver, perhaps the greatest tennis player ever.

If any man was able to understand the very real loneliness at the top, it was Rocket Rod.

Federer broke down because the trophy, handed to him by his all-time idol, meant more to him that any of us thought it could. Every new trophy is another Everest he has to climb.

Every time he comes to centre court now he has to do battle with the world's huge expectations and with their hope that the underdog will win.

Federer showed us that he's vulnerable, that victory matters very much for him, and that it's very hard work. That was what moved us.

RonE
01-31-2006, 09:38 AM
All my deepest thoughts, fear/expectations some of them conscious some of them unconscious were put to words by other people here already.

I wanted to add:

1. I felt at stages of the event particularly in the Davydenko match that he wasn't moving as well as he did before and I am wondering if the Haas match maybe had something to do with the ankle becoming a bit tender after a long match. I too am concerned with this injury and it seems to be long term and not something he can just brush off. The fact that he is still wearing the ankle support is plenty evidence foor that IMHO.

2. As much as I want to see Roger lift up the RG trophy desperately, I just don't see it happening. It is not only Nadal but also the constant emergence of younger hungry players every year especially players who grew up playing on clay. If Roger does not win it in the next two years tops I don't see him winning it ever. And even the next two years don't look too good in that aspect.

3. I wish Roger would withdraw from both Rotterdam annd Dubai and play only the 5 TMS events between now and RG. I would especially like to see him win either MC or Rome in preparation for RG.

Puschkin
01-31-2006, 10:13 AM
I don't see it happening. It is not only Nadal but also the constant emergence of younger hungry players every year especially players who grew up playing on clay. If Roger does not win it in the next two years tops I don't see him winning it ever. And even the next two years don't look too good in that aspect.


OMG, RonE, you allowed your worries to go too far. Who knows what will be in two years in the rapidly changing world of tennis? The clay court season has not even started, we have no clue who will be on fire by end May/early June, and why shouldn't it be Roger? ;)

yanchr
01-31-2006, 10:57 AM
As much as I want to see Roger lift up the RG trophy desperately, I just don't see it happening.
Maybe this will be more convincing if you say it two years later, if RG still eludes him, but now it seems still widely open. I'm not saying it will happen for sure, but absolutely I can expect. But I hope the thought of winning RG won't get to him. It should be a bonus rather a must.

fightclubber
01-31-2006, 11:14 AM
No, he is absolutely not being honest at the moment of eg, the injury, but probably he will admit long later which he didn't at that moment. For example, now I'm pretty sure his injury is much more serious than he had told in Shanghai and I've imagined. And just today, I read that he was also not telling the truth about his ankle here in Australian Open. He told us that it's completely healed and the protection wrap he wore is no more than a precaution, which is not the truth, revealed by an Aussie paper. And back to last year AO, he told us he recovered from that semi final loss quite quickly which is also not the truth. He said in Shanghai he was mentally hurt after that match, and admitted here in Australia that he had doubts last year until after Wimbledon. I can give more examples. I think generally he is a very honest guy, but when it comes down to a possible showing of his vulnerability, he becomes very defensive. I think his extreme self-pride is playing a huge role there.
Guess I missed some articles/news... I cannot read all! haa haa
What are the rumours about his ankle??
Anyone can copy them here? Thanks
Silvy

nobama
01-31-2006, 11:18 AM
I agree that he should probably withdraw from Rotterdam annd Dubai (especially if his ankle is still bothering him) but to already start writing off his chances on the dirt? I think that's a bit much.

nobama
01-31-2006, 11:19 AM
Guess I missed some articles/news... I cannot read all! haa haa
What are the rumours about his ankle??
Anyone can copy them here? Thanks
SilvyThere was something reported in the Aussie press about his ankle still being an issue. And supposedly Roger told Swiss media that his right ankle still isn't the same as his left.

nobama
01-31-2006, 11:26 AM
But I hope the thought of winning RG won't get to him. It should be a bonus rather a must.I agree, and that's why I don't want him to change around his schedule (i.e., playing more on the dirt, like in South America) just in pursuit of RG. The last thing he needs is to give the imression he is obsessed with winning RG. And, unlike Sampras, I think he can win there. It won't be easy, but he can do it. And this year might be as good as any since who knows what form Nadal will be in.

ExpectedWinner
01-31-2006, 05:19 PM
1. I felt at stages of the event particularly in the Davydenko match that he wasn't moving as well as he did before and I am wondering if the Haas match maybe had something to do with the ankle becoming a bit tender after a long match. I too am concerned with this injury and it seems to be long term and not something he can just brush off. The fact that he is still wearing the ankle support is plenty evidence foor that IMHO.



The ankle support is not the evidence for anything, but I agree with the rest.

Somebody has to tell him that this injury will become a career ending one if he doesn't stop neglecting it. :smash: :smash: :smash:

1sun
01-31-2006, 08:53 PM
Oh it was. I am glad Baggy did what he did because it sent some fans of a partical player back to square one crying. :)
lol, exactly! loved it.

Dirk
01-31-2006, 09:54 PM
Let's trust Roger to do that right thing. I think he didn't come back too soon to the Cup, he had doctor's advice that it was ok and he played. He rehabbed his ankle some more than train for Oz and won it. If it is bothering him again, I believe he will stay out until it is 100% because he can always do some other training excerises on the side to avoid doing damage to ankle.

Dirk
01-31-2006, 09:56 PM
lol, exactly! loved it.

Yes it was because had Daveed made the finals and lost (which he would have done and likely easier than Baggy did in the final) then all of his fans would be saying "David is a huge star, he is a contender, he just made the final and lost to Roger" Now they can't say that. Daveed couldn't put away a cramping youngster :rolls:

Sunny, love the siggy ;)?

nobama
02-01-2006, 12:43 AM
I don't understand your sig about Nalbandian having an asterisk next to his name after the Shanghai win. It was Roger's choice to play knowing he wasn't 100%. Nalbandian beat him fair and square. I don't see why that isn't a legitimate win. :shrug:

RogiFan88
02-01-2006, 03:52 AM
The ankle support is not the evidence for anything, but I agree with the rest.

Somebody has to tell him that this injury will become a career ending one if he doesn't stop neglecting it. :smash: :smash: :smash:

Surely, Rogi knows that... ;) He may have 4 titles in a row to defend starting w Rotterdam but it's better not to defend them than to spend the rest of the year off the tour recuperating fr persistent injury. I feel this ankle/feet business will trouble him for the rest of his career and it's not getting any better. :sad:

SUKTUEN
02-01-2006, 04:11 AM
I think sleeping and eating is most good way to relax :devil:

Dirk
02-01-2006, 05:55 AM
Surely, Rogi knows that... ;) He may have 4 titles in a row to defend starting w Rotterdam but it's better not to defend them than to spend the rest of the year off the tour recuperating fr persistent injury. I feel this ankle/feet business will trouble him for the rest of his career and it's not getting any better. :sad:

We don't know anything specific so stop being gloom about it all. Roger will take care of this ankle first and foremost now.

We need to stop acting like Roger is a dope for god sake.

Dirk
02-01-2006, 05:56 AM
I don't understand your sig about Nalbandian having an asterisk next to his name after the Shanghai win. It was Roger's choice to play knowing he wasn't 100%. Nalbandian beat him fair and square. I don't see why that isn't a legitimate win. :shrug:

I will side with the former number one and four-time slam champion on that issue. You can go ahead and be nice about it all. :lol:

Puschkin
02-01-2006, 06:06 AM
We don't know anything specific so stop being gloom about it all. Roger will take care of this ankle first and foremost now.

We need to stop acting like Roger is a dope for god sake.

:yeah:

ExpectedWinner
02-01-2006, 06:24 AM
Like all the athletes who suffered premature career ending injures were idiots. :rolleyes:

Puschkin
02-01-2006, 06:41 AM
Like all the athletes who suffered premature career ending injures were idiots. :rolleyes:

Nobody said that. But I find it rather strange to muse about carrer-ending injuries, when we have no reliable information about it. And an Aussie-paper (like any other paper) is not what I call sound information.

ExpectedWinner
02-01-2006, 07:03 AM
Nobody said that. But I find it rather strange to muse about carrer-ending injuries, when we have no reliable information about it. And an Aussie-paper (like any other paper) is not what I call sound information.

Nobody says it's a career ending injury right now. But it'll be if he doesn't give it a chance to heal. Don't tell me that 2 weeks from crutches till the TMS were enough for that. I'm not sure that it's healed completely during off season as well. I have my own eyes and he was a bit slow in some matches. I'll be glad if the "information" from the Aussie newspaper and some Swiss sources are just rumors, but I'm not sure. I'd have been in better spirits if he'd never played TMC.

Dirk
02-01-2006, 07:59 AM
Expected, Roger will be fine. He will take care of this. There is no need to rush back for smaller events. Roger won't chance it now. Let's all just take it easy until Roger comes back and let's us know how he is feeling.

SUKTUEN
02-01-2006, 08:24 AM
Roger go out with Mirka also can relax very much~! :devil:

Rogiman
02-01-2006, 01:50 PM
Mirka seems to feel some of the pressure too, having gotten slightly overweight lately... :o

RogiFan88
02-01-2006, 04:09 PM
We don't know anything specific so stop being gloom about it all. Roger will take care of this ankle first and foremost now.

We need to stop acting like Roger is a dope for god sake.

Who's acting like Rogi's a dope around here??

I am just being cautious for Rogi's sake and I did say that Rogi knows what's best for him -- already deciding not to play DC is the first step. ;)

nobama
02-01-2006, 06:05 PM
Did Roger say he's not playing DC?

etiage
02-01-2006, 10:45 PM
the dc list for switz is out and roger is not on the list
they can, however, still change it

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/4669874.stm

i for one am happy about it. with hewitt out and on clay, they should do fine

PamV
02-02-2006, 03:19 AM
I think with Roger he would feel there was no point to enter a tournament if he was just going to let himself lose.

Regarding your opinion that he's headed for a mental breakdown.....I don't think so. I think he's a lot smarter than you give him credit for. Sure he was nervous at the USO 2005 final and AO 2006 final but he got over the nerves during the matches and won them both. Furthermore......in every case he was facing an opponent who was playing great tennis. It's not like Roger was giving the match away. Cut him some slack. All players have some kind of flaw.....so maybe the fans are the problem with over reacting about these things. I think he's going to get used to these big record breaking matches very soon and he will conquer the nerve issue.

As for Sampras concentrating only on majors.....was that after he was #1 for 6 years? I know at the end his ranking slipped and he was just trying to add to his major win record. At Sampras peak he won 3 MS titles and two majors in one year as I remember. I don't think Roger can really just focus only on majors because he still wants to stay #1. It seems too early in his career to say it should just all be about majors and nothing else.

PamV
02-02-2006, 03:47 AM
thought i'd post this brilliant article here posted by ToanNguyen at the other thread :

The force behind the serve … and the tears

He won the battle, not just against the underdog ... and then the dam burst, writes David Williamson.

THE vast world audience who watched the men's final of the Australian tennis open on Sunday night saw an extraordinary spectacle. One of the all-time greats, possibly the greatest player ever, Roger Federer, convincingly and coolly won the title, then broke down and cried.

It was a moving and endearing moment. But what caused it? Men would usually rather admit to an erectile problem than cry in public.
.
.
.

I think that part of the reason Federer broke down was an attempt to show us all that to him his victories are not at all inevitable.
.
.
.
Every time he comes to centre court now he has to do battle with the world's huge expectations and with their hope that the underdog will win.

Federer showed us that he's vulnerable, that victory matters very much for him, and that it's very hard work. That was what moved us.

I don't agree where the writers says that that Roger broke down as an attempt to show that his victories are not all inevitable. The tears were spontaneous and not an attempt to show something to the crowd.

I also disagree with his premise that all men world wide are so embarrassed about crying in public. What do you say Mrs. B? I know that Latin men for example don't really like to cry in public but they don't feel particularly bad about it. It's just an honest emotion and no big deal.

I've heard Roger talk causually about the crying and he admits that it has happened quite a few times. He said about the Wimbledon 2003 tears that the tears didn't surprise him becuase it had happened before. He cried in his courtside chair after he beat Sampras. I don't know how many other times there were but in each case.....it really only makes Roger look more attractive, more genuine and like a sweet guy. I guess I don't feel that the tears at AO were so shocking as other do. I've seen Roger cry about 4 times now and I am used to it.

I don't know about the entire rest of the world but everyone I knew was rooting for Roger to win the final. I don't know how the writer can be sure that everyone wanted Baghdatis to win. Maybe it appeared that way because of the high population of Greeks in Melbourne. However, I think a lot of the world likes to have a hero to look up to and they like that hero to always win. I don't see people hoping Tiger Woods will lose. Maybe the writer was just projecting what he himself wanted on the rest of the world?

In any case Roger said that the Greek crowd in Melbourne was nothing compared to the USO fans during the 2005 Final with Agassi. For him they weren't an issue. Actually....I think Roger is pretty level headed all around. When he has lost a big match he is able to shake hands and pat the winner on the back and look OK and give a good interview afterward. He is able to put the lose into perspective and grow from it.

nobama
02-02-2006, 05:56 AM
I don't think it was Roger's intention to get up on the podium and start crying. But I don't think it was JUST because Laver was up there. I think all his emotions from the past two weeks came out at that moment. To me it showed that he doesn't take anything for granted, and in that sense is telling people that he does work very hard for these victories and it's not as easy as people think or the media leads people to believe.

nobama
02-02-2006, 06:02 AM
Here's an article to piss people off...

http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000039&refer=columnist_soshnick&sid=az2C.FZL7ceg

Federer Fandango

The question is whether the homeless will be pushed out along with the fancy TV when the game is over.

The effort to remake reality is so pervasive it's hard to know what's genuine.

The duality of the persona of tennis ace Roger Federer was on full display this past weekend.

Eighteen months ago the seven-time Grand Slam champion wore his hair in a ponytail. His apparel of choice was a sweat suit, while his four-person management team included his mother and his girlfriend.

The 24-year-old Federer last year hired International Management Group, the same firm that represents golfer Tiger Woods. Since then Federer's hair has gotten progressively shorter and he's shown an affinity for Prada suits.

Which Federer is the real one? Sadly, the extreme makeover calls into question the tears he shed after winning the Australian Open on Jan. 29. Was Federer really overcome with emotion or did some marketing whiz at IMG suggest a few tears might play well on TV?

The Aussie Open celebration rekindles the memory of a scene in the movie ``Broadcast News,'' where the reporter played by William Hurt fakes a good cry after someone suggests that it might make for a more compelling interview. Of course there will always be cynics out there, but this guy doesn't even have his facts straight. Roger cut his hair and was wearing designer suits well before he re-signed with IMG. And I guess he must not have caught Roger's Wimbledon victories because there were tears involved there too. I can't believe this guy actually thinks someone at IMG told Roger if he wins to get up on stage and start crying. :rolleyes: He must not have watched the same thing I did, because those were not fake tears. That was 100% real emotion. Something this guy doesn't seem to know anything about.

Puschkin
02-02-2006, 06:10 AM
Here's an article to piss people off...


Mirkaland, just ignore this kind of crap. The writer has no clue about anything. It is not even worth to get upset about him. :wavey:

bokehlicious
02-02-2006, 06:32 AM
I don't think it was Roger's intention to get up on the podium and start crying. But I don't think it was JUST because Laver was up there. I think all his emotions from the past two weeks came out at that moment. To me it showed that he doesn't take anything for granted, and in that sense is telling people that he does work very hard for these victories and it's not as easy as people think or the media leads people to believe.

Yes, I agree. Aslo the huge pressure he had on his shoulders this time, as an overwhelming favorite, also helps to make him nervous. If he had lost the final the press headlines would have said that the dominance of Federer was falling down... The tears definitely are not only because of Laver...

TheMightyFed
02-02-2006, 07:32 AM
In Switzerland everybody cried with Roger...
I think ROg is a bit under pressure, because crying for the second AO title is kind of weird. For first Wimby OK, or for RG like Agassi after a tough 5-setter and reaching a career slam, but 2nd Australian Open... I'm missing something there, and I have to admit there's a part of Roger's personnality I don't catch totally... but I still admire him...

yanchr
02-02-2006, 08:41 AM
Was Federer really overcome with emotion or did some marketing whiz at IMG suggest a few tears might play well on TV?
I seriously suggest the author a visit to the doctor, to see if there's any big problem with his heart, maybe it would be found to be not made of flesh, maybe ice or iron or whatever solid rubbish...

SUKTUEN
02-02-2006, 03:39 PM
Please don't Push Roger to play DC~ he is so tired~ :sad:

ExpectedWinner
02-02-2006, 03:48 PM
I'm missing something there, and I have to admit there's a part of Roger's personnality I don't catch totally... .

Don't try. The moment of victory is a drug (affects everyone differently). You can't figure it out sitting on the couch and writing thousand garbage messages on this board (no personal offense is meant).

SUKTUEN
02-02-2006, 04:11 PM
Drug????????? :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:

ExpectedWinner
02-02-2006, 04:22 PM
Drug????????? :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:

:haha::haha:

Calm down. A legal one.

SUKTUEN
02-02-2006, 04:39 PM
:haha::haha:

Calm down. A legal one.

what is legal? :confused:

tonia9
02-02-2006, 04:50 PM
I don't think it was Roger's intention to get up on the podium and start crying. But I don't think it was JUST because Laver was up there. I think all his emotions from the past two weeks came out at that moment. To me it showed that he doesn't take anything for granted, and in that sense is telling people that he does work very hard for these victories and it's not as easy as people think or the media leads people to believe.

I think the same :)

Roger's Wimbledon victories because there were tears involved there too

I call it Wimbly syndrome ;) Huge happiness with a sort of disbelief maybe and feeling that the pressure is off now.

SUKTUEN
02-02-2006, 04:54 PM
toina9 ~what is legal?

tonia9
02-02-2006, 05:01 PM
what is legal? :confused:

Winning is legal so victory is a legal drug. :)

SUKTUEN
02-02-2006, 05:03 PM
oh , thankyou

Minnie
02-02-2006, 10:20 PM
I had a good laugh at the article written by the :retard: who thought the emotion/tears were somehow part of a "bigger plan". Who, in their right mind would willingly get up on a podium and start weeping in front of 15,000 people and millions of TV viewers? Not Roger I suspect!!

nobama
02-03-2006, 12:25 AM
I had a good laugh at the article written by the :retard: who thought the emotion/tears were somehow part of a "bigger plan". Who, in their right mind would willingly get up on a podium and start weeping in front of 15,000 people and millions of TV viewers? Not Roger I suspect!!Yep, this sure is the face of a poser, someone with fake tears just to get good press. :rolleyes:

http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a377/jsnash/rf_cry.jpg

nobama
02-03-2006, 12:40 AM
Here's another one that's good for a laugh. And notice the silly picture that went with the article. It would be easy to laugh these off if they weren't so patently false. Roger didn't start dressing smartly and cut his hair because of an IMG overhall. He did that well before IMG was ever in the picture. :rolleyes:


http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a63/godlygirl/fedt.jpg
Federer makeover
By Brian Miller

January 27, 2006

TIGER Woods has it. Maria Sharapova, too.

Now, Roger Federer is hungry. Hungry for a slice of that huge endorsement pie.

He has seen the millions pour in for Woods and Sharapova. Likewise, former No. 1s Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi. He must know that his time has come. But they're simply not coming to him, the sponsors with the big bucks.

With eyes on the seventh Grand Slam title just a few days away, Federer is on top of his game. Yet, he trails the field in that area of sponsorship.

If he doesn't watch it, it could be 'game over', which is why he has sought the help of IMG - the image makers of the stars.

Federer was with them in his junior days. But he broke away in 2003. A new company, Roger Federer Management was formed and a lawyer, a financial adviser and his mother at the helm. While they garnered sponsors, none matched the deals Woods and Sharapova were signing.

IMG worked hard. Look at how captivating Sharapova has turned out to be. It's like she attended some Goddess classes.

Federer? He is still the frumpy player. No rock star grunge, no pop star groove.

The commentators say he's cool. Wrong. He's just unruffled. Bjorn Borg was cool and there was chilling authority in his coolness.

Federer? he's just cold. And that's why he has gone back to IMG. He wants an image overhaul. He wants to be seen as fashionable while he's still at his fighting best. Only then can he attract the big international sponsors.

Hence, and with the help of IMG, the new man in Federer has been slowly emerging.

A Bloomberg report quoted a partner in a sports marketing firm as saying: 'Federer's probably the most under-appreciated athlete worldwide as far as marketing's concerned.'

According to Forbes magazine, although Federer topped the men's Tour with US$6.1 million ($9.9m) in prize-money last season, his sponsorships and winnings totalled US$1m less than the US$15m Sharapova got in endorsements alone.

IMG want it to change. They want to make Federer a better candidate for global opportunities.

According to the Bloomberg report, he struts around in Prada and his once-flowing locks now have as much bounce as a tennis ball. He is, in a nutshell, doing the sponsor thing.

Will it work? It should.

After all, behind the blandness, there have been signs of an emerging Olympian persona.

His style on court is liquid as it is lyrical. And amid the homogenised, neatly-packaged young phenoms who hit balls on outside courts at all Grand Slam events, Federer is an original in thought, style and voice - no strings attached.

All he needs is for someone to bring out the positives in him. That, plus some operatic panache on court.

If he can do that. If IMG can get him to morph, he will fill any stadium. Then, he will conquer the world. After all, he is the best there is. Better than Borg ever was, better than Agassi and Sampras.

So much better that he deserves the best deal.

Fedex
02-03-2006, 12:46 AM
The movement is different at RG.

It was a struggle by Federer's standards. Look at Sampras' scores at the 1994 AO.
Oh, yes. While the Oz courts may be as slow as RG(though I dont think they're that slow) you cant compare the two because the movement on clay is so different. Just because he won this, it does not mean he will do well at RG.(though I hope he does.)

Skyward
02-03-2006, 01:20 AM
http://bestsmileys.com/puking/1.gif at these articles.

If he can cry by the request of IMG, he should quit tennis and start a new career in Hollywood. Big http://bestsmileys.com/money/3.gif are awaiting for him there.

SUKTUEN
02-04-2006, 08:46 AM
if it is his plan, he can get the best artist ib Oscar :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

lsy
02-05-2006, 12:54 PM
Interesting discussion here.

I do believe there are few reasons why he got so emotional here :

1) Relief. To come through this tournament esp when there had been battles for him past few matches. Not to mention everybody EXPECTS him to win (esp when Safin, Nadal not here) but only himself knows it's really not that easy and anything can happens. When he finally met the "expectation", imagine the relief.

2) The very positive attention Marcos had gotten from the medias/fans. I watched the post match interview of Rogi on aussie Channel 7 I think? He talked about that too. I think Rogi sort of felt like there are certainly many more people who would like to see Marcos win than him as it would almost be like a fairy tale ending. Not that he can't understand why but it's gotto be still tough for him mentally. Esp when you know you had given so much for the game (be it on or off court), but still they would speak about the "new" faces like that's what the tennis needs ;) . If Rogi is a little bit less sensitive, this wouldn't have been too much a factor, but after following him all these while. I think he cares, and I just wish he would stop reading too much into the media and care a little less ;) .

3) Obviously the mention of him being the 3rd guy to win 3 slams in a row after Laver and Sampras, not to mention he got the trophy from Laver certainly is emotional. He love this game and isn't only fully aware of its history but would love to be part of it as well one day.

4) Of course to win the AO trophy (especially with a come back) infront of his coach Tony, the greats Laver and not to mention the Carter's families adds on to all the emotions boiling inside him

I also agree with those who mentioned most of these pressures come from within but it's only coz you want to be "perfect"...you can almost expect that from a Leo ;).

I sort of stand between the title of this thread, yes to relax a little as in you don't have to win everytime or cares so much of what others think of you but no as in continues to feel the pressures coz that's what makes you improve and wanting to be the best :p

lsy
02-05-2006, 01:15 PM
Also...although I feel for Rogi obviously when I watched him cried like he did but honestly I'm not going to keep saying oh poor Rogi...too much pressures all these, as I had said in the other thread, it's the price you have to pay to be the best and you will surely get rewarded for it.

I'm sure even for us...the "normal" people :lol:, you must have gone through some circumstances be it at work or school, when you're assigned some tough projects etc which at times you think, oh god I don't want to take this task, give it to others, it's too much pressures...but when you finally took on the pressures and complete it with the best effort you could, you couldn't have felt more satified. That's the reward ;)

Winners take on the pressures, others avoid it and be contented with not having the extra "glamour" which of course means less pressures as well. It's all about choices. As far as Rogi is concerned, I know he wants to make the best out of his career and he knows there's probably only 10 years or so for him to do that. I admire that and main reason why I would spend that much effort cheering for him (of course the cute smiles adds on to the motivation :p ).

Having said all these, he could of course make his life easier for not wanting to be the best in every aspect ALL the time...which I'm sure as times goes by he will come to accept it with more ease ;) (after all he had called the media crap in public finally...a good start :haha: )

SUKTUEN
02-05-2006, 01:42 PM
very hard working lsy

Sjengster
02-05-2006, 02:05 PM
LOL at that article above. I can't wait to see the "rock star grunge" that IMG is going to imbue Federer with once they've finished marketing him. And what a shame it'll be, eh, when he looks back on his multiple Slam-winning career and realises that he was never a fixture in American gossip magazines!