News & Articles Part 1 - Yeti Premonitions [Archive] - Page 5 - MensTennisForums.com

News & Articles Part 1 - Yeti Premonitions

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Bibir
02-02-2005, 07:38 PM
Lack of Safin successors a worry for Russian chiefs

MOSCOW, Feb 2 (Reuters) - Russian tennis chiefs believe the future is not entirely rosy despite Marat Safin's Australian Open success.

Safin's victory over Lleyton Hewitt on Sunday followed a year dominated by the success of Russia's women players, who won three of the four women's singles grand slam titles in 2004.

"At first glance Russian tennis is successful and we are proud of the victories of our tennis players, but nevertheless ...we are already noticing some problems," Russian Tennis Federation vice-president Dmitry Vikharev told reporters.

He said the main problem was a shortage of boys playing on the junior circuit and therefore a lack of potential successors to Safin.

"If you look at the entrants for the boys' junior Australian Open, there was not a single Russian surname on the list of 64," Vikharev said.

It is not for a lack of interest in the game.

The sport's enormous popularity is creating a shortage of top-class coaches. Many prefer to coach at private tennis clubs where the money is better, forcing Russia's promising youngsters to look abroad for a coach, if they can afford it.

The passion for tennis is a post-Soviet phenomenon, sparked by ex-President Boris Yeltsin's patronage of the game. A lack of tennis courts has sent hire prices soaring, making it accessible only to the better off.

"In some places courts cost $70 per hour...and correspondingly in some towns the situation with the popularity of tennis is worse than in Soviet times," said federation chief Shamil Tarpishchev.


DOMINANT WOMEN

The federation has suggested using a Soviet-style centralised training system and hopes to attract private sponsorship so that children can be coached at special centres in Russia without having to shell out huge sums of money.

Safin's Australian Open win catapulted the Russian men back into the spotlight after an absence of grand slam wins since Safin's U.S. Open victory in 2000.

At number four the 25-year-old is the only Russian in the men's top 10, with Nikolay Davydenko at 15 and Mikhail Youzhny at 16 the next highest ranked.

The federation has set a five-year goal of having at least 10 men ranked in the top 100, four or five in the top 50 and one or two in the top 10.

Bibir
02-02-2005, 07:42 PM
Putin Congratulates Safin, Slutskaya, Plushenko on Victories

Russian president Vladimir Putin has congratulated tennis player Marat Safin on his victory in Australia Open. He also hailed figure skaters Irina Slutskaya and Yevgeny Plushenko for winning the European championships.

Safin won Australian Lleyton Hewitt with 1-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 and received his second Grand Slam tournament title.

Slutskaya and Plushenko won gold in their performances in Turin. Putin quoted by the media said “you have once again demonstrated the highest class and written yet another bright chapter in the annals of Russian sport.”

MariaV
02-02-2005, 07:56 PM
Hi guys! Here's the Russian sports news video on Marat's arrival!!!!!! ENJOY ppl!!!!! :D

mms://video.rfn.ru/rtr-sport/12006.asf

erica
02-02-2005, 08:09 PM
Thanks for the both videos Maria! I couldn´t andorstand a word of them, but it was nice to watch! :)
((and BTW; I was in Tallinn a week ago, and had a great time! I fall in love with it more every time I go there!))

thelma
02-02-2005, 08:16 PM
Thanks Maria! :kiss:

http://sport.guardian.co.uk/tennis/story/0,10069,1403115,00.html

Safin has change of heart on Wimbledon

Phil Casey in Melbourne
Tuesday February 1, 2005
The Guardian

Marat Safin said yesterday he would compete at Wimbledon this year despite his promise never to return to the All England Club.

The Australian Open champion claimed he would not play at Wimbledon again after losing in the first round to his fellow Russian Dmitry Tursunov last summer.

Safin, who reached the Wimbledon quarter-finals in 2001 but in other campaigns has won only two matches there, lost in four sets to Tursunov, then world No70, on court two - known as the Graveyard - and said : "I give up on Wimbledon. It's definitely not the tournament for me," citing his problems in playing on grass courts.

But after his superb victory over Lleyton Hewitt on Sunday, Safin said he would return to Wimbledon, even if he has no great hopes of claiming a third grand slam title there.

"I will play, but not with so many expectations," said Safin. "Every year I'm coming and I'm practising. I'm spending so much time on the practice court and trying to play on that surface. But all of a sudden you play the first round and lose to guys that you don't know how they even get to the main draw.

"I didn't say anything wrong. I didn't say anything bad about Wimbledon. But I'm just feeling that it is not my surface. Some people cannot play on clay. Some people, they cannot play on hard court. It's more psychological, of course."

Damita
02-02-2005, 08:46 PM
thanks Maria :hug:

As expected, Marat seems to have more fans since his victory ;) . I read this on tennis-x.com:

Tennis remains big on the web after the Australian Open as of Tuesday, with the Yahoo! Search Top 20 Sports Leaders including Marat Safin (at No. 7), Serena Williams (8), Maria Sharapova (9), and of course Anna Kournikova (16)...

MariaV
02-02-2005, 09:48 PM
PPL!!!!!! I couldn't really pay attention t'nite but at the Russian tennis Fed press conf @ ITAR TASS I saw on the news there were Shamil T., Zhenya and Alik Metreveli and the vice pres who will be dealing w the new "Team Russia" project. No Marat. Anyone knows re Marat's pressconf? Did he still have one as promised? The Russian web's sooo late! :(

PennyThePenguin
02-03-2005, 12:51 PM
no idea ma'am.....

Shadow
02-03-2005, 01:02 PM
thanks for the articles :kiss:

Kiara
02-03-2005, 05:15 PM
He is indeed very modest person and even deep happiness he keeps inside. Noise, pomposity - this not for him.

I liked this bit the most...

Maria :hearts: thank you!

thelma
02-03-2005, 07:43 PM
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=13884038&BRD=2068&PAG=740&dept_id=387594&rfi=6
Safin, Serena posted popular wins
February 03, 2005

Philadelphia, PA (Sports Network) - The recently-concluded Aussie Open did just that last week with a pair of popular titles by two of the sport's biggest draws.

Feisty Marat Safin, not the mighty Roger Federer, prevailed on the men's side, while former world No. 1 Serena Williams played like a current world No. 1 on her way to a second Melbourne title in three years. The former top-ranked Safin capped his magnificent run Down Under by stunning the currently top-ranked Federer in the semis and overcoming big Aussie crowd favorite Lleyton Hewitt in the marquee final. Safin halted Federer's sizzling 26-match winning streak and prevented the sublime Swiss from corralling a fifth Grand Slam title in seven tries. And his victory over Hewitt kept Australia from getting its first male Aussie champ since 1976, when Mark Edmondson titled on a grass court at Kooyong. Serena headed to Melbourne seeking her first major championship since Wimbledon 2003 and she nailed it down by pasting former world No. 1 Amelie Mauresmo in the quarters, holding off surging Russian star Maria Sharapova in a compelling semifinal, and overcoming her fellow American Lindsay Davenport in an uneventful final. Serena exacted some revenge on Sharapova, who shocked the American superstar in last year's lucrative Wimbledon and WTA Championships finals. Serena also made a little history in Melbourne, as she became only the second woman ever to come from match points down to win two different Grand Slams (the 2003 and 2005 Aussie Opens). Kim Clijsters held two match points on her in an '03 semi in Melbourne, and the powerful American saved three match points in her semifinal victory against Sharapova last week. For Safin, who turned 25 the day he shocked Federer last week, it marked Grand Slam title number two, with his first one coming at the 2000 U.S. Open, where he tattooed the great Pete Sampras in straight sets in the final. Many thought his title in New York would be his first of many Grand Slam wins, but a seeming lack of commitment, injuries and immaturity prevented the ultra- talented Russian from hoisting major championship hardware for another four- plus years. He had since performed in a pair of Aussie Open finals, losing to Swede Thomas Johansson in 2002 and Federer last year. Obviously, the third time was the charm for the towering Russian at this most- recent Aussie extravaganza. For the 23-year-old Serena, Melbourne '05 marked her seventh major title. Aside from her two Aussie crowns, she also owns a French Open title, a pair of Wimbledon trophies and two U.S. Open wins. Since beating her big sister Venus in the '03 Wimbledon final, Serena has been plagued by injuries, wrapped up in a multitude of off-the-court ventures and lost her half-sister Yetunde Price to a fatal gunshot wound, which devastated the Williams family two Septembers ago. The previous five Slams were won by someone other than Serena, who skipped two of the events due to a knee injury which forced her out of the 2003 U.S. Open and last year's Aussie fortnight. But she looked healthy in Melbourne last month, which is good news for tennis fans worldwide, but bad news for the rest of the players on the WTA Tour. Her Down Under success has propelled Serena to a world No. 2 ranking, behind only Davenport, and don't be surprised when she becomes No. 1 again in the very near future. A healthy Serena is just too athletic and too tough for the rest of the circuit right now, with the exception of the 17-year-old Sharapova. FYI, Serena's victory in Melbourne gave the WTA its fifth Grand Slam titlist in the last five events. Safin's huge win currently has him atop the 2005 ATP Race and fourth in the Entry Rankings (the world rankings). I can't guarantee a future top spot in the men's rankings for the big Russian, simply because Federer is still the man to beat and has a sizeable lead on the ledger. In between Federer and Safin rests Hewitt and serve-crazy American Andy Roddick. Federer is obviously great for the game, considering he might be the best tennis talent anyone's ever seen, but, much like his boyhood idol Sampras, he's not exactly the most charismatic of fellows. That's where a guy like Safin comes in. The Russian masher is one of those larger than life characters that needs to hover around the top of the profession for obvious reasons. Safin is now a two-time major champion and will try for a third at the French Open in late-May/early-June. His impressive results have restored his confidence and boosted his outlook for a strong 2005. "It's a huge confidence," Safin said after titling in Melbourne. Serena might be "back," but she'll still have to contend with the likes of Davenport, Mauresmo, Sharapova, Svetlana Kuznetsova and (hopefully) the currently-injured Belgian stalwarts, Justine Henin-Hardenne and Clijsters, this season and perhaps in the coming seasons. Serena will shoot for her second French Open crown in four years in a few months, and at this point she appears to be the early favorite. FYI (again), both Safin and Serena are undefeated in 2005, with identical 7-0 records as the result of their brilliant Aussie runs.


©The Post-Searchlight 2005

thelma
02-03-2005, 09:21 PM
http://www.themoscowtimes.com/stories/2005/02/04/091.html

Friday, February 4, 2005. Issue 3099. Page 24.

Safin May Prove a Hard Act to Follow

By Sonia Oxley

Reuters

Russian tennis chiefs believe the future is not entirely rosy despite Marat Safin's Australian Open success.

Safin's victory over Lleyton Hewitt on Sunday followed a year dominated by the success of Russia's women players, who won three of the four women's singles Grand Slam titles in 2004.

"At first glance Russian tennis is successful and we are proud of the victories of our tennis players, but nevertheless ... we are already noticing some problems," Russian Tennis Federation vice president Dmitry Vikharev told reporters.

He said the main problem was a shortage of boys playing on the junior circuit and therefore a lack of potential successors to Safin.

"If you look at the entrants for the boys' junior Australian Open, there was not a single Russian surname on the list of 64," Vikharev said.

It is not for a lack of interest in the game.

The sport's enormous popularity is creating a shortage of top-class coaches. Many prefer to coach at private tennis clubs where the money is better, forcing Russia's promising youngsters to look abroad for a coach, if they can afford it.

The passion for tennis is a post-Soviet phenomenon, sparked by ex-President Boris Yeltsin's patronage of the game. A lack of tennis courts has sent hire prices soaring, making it accessible only to the better-off.

"In some places courts cost $70 per hour ... and correspondingly in some towns the situation with the popularity of tennis is worse than in Soviet times," said federation chief Shamil Tarpishchev.

The federation has suggested using a Soviet-style centralized training system and hopes to attract private sponsorship so that children can be coached at special centers in Russia without having to shell out huge sums of money.

Anastasia Myskina began Russia's tennis revolution with her win at the French Open last year. Then Maria Sharapova clinched Wimbledon and Svetlana Kuznetsova claimed the U.S. Open.

Fellow Russian Yelena Dementyeva was runner-up in the French and U.S. Opens. The Russian women's team also won the Fed Cup last year and currently there are six Russians in the top 12 of the women's rankings.

Safin's Australian Open win catapulted the Russian men back into the spotlight after an absence of Grand Slam wins since Safin's U.S. Open victory in 2000.

At No. 4 the 25-year-old is the only Russian in the men's top 10, with Nikolai Davydenko at 15 and Mikhail Youzhny at 16 the next-highest ranked.

The federation has set a five-year goal of having at least 10 men ranked in the top 100, four or five in the top 50 and one or two in the top 10.

Five
02-04-2005, 03:30 AM
hope Marat will win at least one more GS title this year ;)
Keep going Marat :bounce:

*Viva Chile*
02-04-2005, 03:53 AM
hope Marat will win at least one more GS title this year ;)
Keep going Marat :bounce:

Yay Marat!!! Go for RG and the USO :bounce:

Shadow
02-05-2005, 11:28 AM
http://www.safinator.com/aussie8_05/capt.mel22901271405.jpg (the picture the author is referring to)

A Picture of Grace by Rohit Brijnath
TODAY newspaper, 3 Feb 2004
[shorter version of article]

Amidst the rapidly blurring memories of a riveting Australian Open, this one moment stands sharp. It haunts me like lines from an old love letter. Yesterday I had to print a copy of a photograph of it to look again. As I type, it sits beside me.

There is seemingly nothing to the picture, yet it holds me in its thrall. It tells of an act of utter simplicity yet one that is clearly uncommon. It is a moment, frozen on film, that tells us more about a man than an entire match.

There is something about Marat Safin, you know, that makes things personal. On Sunday night, he breaks a nation’s heart and then they clasp him to it. Of how many men can we say that?

The photograph is of a moment after the Safin-Federer semi-final, a match replete with stroke-making of startling effrontery and despairing struggles for momentum. The Russian has a way of turning matches into operas, and the Swiss for a while has been in fine song.

When victory is sealed, Safin does not leap for the moon, or gesticulate wildly, or snarl like a scalp-taker in Federer’s direction. In times of exaggerated reactions to victory, like an American football player who mimicked mooning the audience, this is tasteful. More pointedly, from an instinctively theatrical man, given to communicating emotion, this is interesting.

Safin has, by winning the Open, wiped off cobwebs of self-doubt that have accumulated in his mind. It is five years, more or less, since his last Grand Slam title and they have been hard years of insecurity, of an injured back, hurt wrist and wounded psyche.

Yet he remains all respectful restraint. His behaviour after the semi-final suggests he has not conquered Federer but merely beaten him this one time; similarly, in the Final, he has shattered Hewitt and his nation’s dream, and as the pieces lie at his feet, he feels no need to step on them.

On court, he dares to express himself, his agony, his frustration when others do not let a single emotion register. He hurls his racket but it is done without malice; he berates himself yet rarely linesmen like Hewitt does. Always there is a humanness to Safin, and mostly it is fetching.

But it’s also why so many thought he wouldn’t win the Final, because his mind and talent appeared beyond harnessing, because he had forgotten how to win Slams, because this was Australia with 15,000 Australians in the audience cheering on Hewitt. But he did win, and he still did not gloat.

But of all these glimpses into Safin, the photograph tells the most. The match with Federer is over, and the Swiss, for all his heartbreak, embraces Safin at the net, they exchange words and go to their separate seats.

What happens next, usually, is that the loser will exit swiftly for sorrow is best not left on show while the winner will linger and soak in triumph he has bravely constructed. Except this ritual of ages has an abrupt interruption, for the briefest of moments, so brief that people may not really sense its significance, custom is abandoned.

Federer, head bowed, racket bags on both shoulders, is walking out, and as he passes Safin, it is expected they will politely ignore each other, the victor allowing the defeated his ego, the defeated not wishing to look his champion in the face.

But incredibly, by instinct not premeditation, Safin puts out his hand and rests it on Federer’s shoulders.

*click*

It is nothing but everything. I am staggered for I have not seen this before, astonished because grace has become an aberration; this gesture does not fit the modern urge for one-upmanship, it does not sit with the silly vanity of the times.

We cannot say exactly what message Safin’s act is sending. Perhaps it is one simply of solidarity, that he knows, too, how losing hurts; perhaps it is merely an acknowledgement of the sustained battle they have just fought and that so little separated them.

Perhaps it is an act of humility, as if he knew one defeat does not truly end a reign; perhaps it is recognition of each other as human beings, an understanding that while they may play our their hearts in public arenas they know there is life beyond this court.

It is beautiful, it is a gesture of spontaneous decency in a time when we find ways to excuse Hewitt’s petulance, it is a natural moment in a sporting world of artificiality, it is an instinctive sign of respect in an era of stage-managed show biz.

Federer does not shrug him off, or freeze, but puts out his left hand to touch Safin. And for this fleeting of instants, it is a better sporting world.

Vass
02-05-2005, 11:44 AM
Touching article. :)

Thanks Andrea :worship:

PennyThePenguin
02-05-2005, 01:01 PM
thanks andrea.....sweet

chrissiej
02-05-2005, 02:58 PM
great article, thanks andrea :)

atello_7
02-05-2005, 04:50 PM
great post! good luck to Marat Safin!

davai muzhik! :)


Dan,
eurosport 2 - sport forum, chat room (http://www.eurosport2.com)
sportcommunity (http://www.sportcommunity.org)
logo design - web design (http://www.ideasign.biz)

MariaV
02-05-2005, 06:16 PM
THANK YOU SO MUCH ANDREA!!!!!!!! :hug: What a lovely article! :worship: :worship:
That's exactly why I love Marat.

Marat's Princess
02-05-2005, 06:58 PM
yeah...touching article Andrea...thanx for typing it for all of us, u're an angel! :angel: as well as our beloved Marat!

Jennay
02-05-2005, 07:59 PM
Thanks :hug:

Great article, very sweet. :)

thelma
02-05-2005, 08:10 PM
Thanks, Shadow! :kiss:

http://en.rian.ru/rian/index.cfm?prd_id=160&msg_id=5379920&startrow=1&date=2005-02-04&do_alert=0

MARAT SAFIN ON TENNIS, MONEY AND DOPING

2005-02-04 21:03 * SPORT * RUSSIA * TENNIS * SAFIN * INTERVIEW *

http://english.epochtimes.com/news_images/2005-2-4-safin.jpg
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


MOSCOW, February 4 (RIA Novosti) - Marat Safin won the Australian Open, the first tournament in the 2005 Grand Slam. He defeated Lleyton Hewitt, the best Australian tennis player, in the final. In the semi-final, Safin beat World No. 1 Roger Federer from Switzerland. And now Marat has agreed to answer a few questions of the Russian AiF weekly.

When asked whether he believes he is following in the footsteps of the famous Agassi, who was once knocked out of the top hundred tennis players, but then became the leader, Marat said he saw no point in following anyone's line.

"Each of us should find his/her own way and follow it, despite its ups and downs. One needs to make mistakes and gain experience," believes Safin.

As for the rough period of Marat's career, he sees it as some kind of a break that gave him time to understand "what regime and what schedule he should stick to."

"The media reports saying that I had health problems, and engaged in alcohol and even drug abuse, were of course unnerving, but they also made me stronger. The conclusion is that you should not pay attention to nonsense," the tennis player said.

When asked whether he found tennis and doping compatible, Marat said that, in his opinion, "tennis players do not need doping at all, as it does not improve one's skills but can only negatively affect their performance."

The Russian tennis star assigned the recent breakthrough of Russian female tennis players to Anna Kournikova.

"Yes, you may say that she did not win any tournament, but she was the one who gave the second wind to the female tennis," Safin believes.

As for the role money plays in his life, Marat said, "Serious money gives you freedom of choice and action. But money is not a priority for me now - what does it matter how much money I have? Besides, a man does not need much money anyway."

Meeek
02-05-2005, 08:18 PM
Thanks Thelma!! :worship:

Damita
02-05-2005, 09:51 PM
thanks Thelma and Andrea
Andrea, that artcile is so sweet! thanks a lot :hug: :worship:

junekidd
02-06-2005, 02:31 AM
thanks for the articles, Andrea & Thelma. :worship:
that touching article is really really sweet! :angel: the better we know him, the more we love him. :inlove:

girL_
02-07-2005, 01:25 PM
That article.. about Marat's gesture after his victory over Federer.. It's really TOUCHING. And yes, that's what I love Marat for. Cause in any situation he remains a HUMAN, not an animal always hunting and killing. he is soo humane and sweet... :tears: i'm crying. and these are the tears of happiness. Happiness for Marat and his grace, for Federer, who understood everything in that moment... they didn't need words to express how they felt and, moreover, to let the whole world know what happens in their souls/ :inlove:
and THANKS A LOT for the article, Andrea :wavey:

drf716
02-08-2005, 05:04 AM
CAN SAFIN SPARK A RUSSIAN REVOLUTION?
By Mark Staniforth

Russia's legion of top female tennis players each have their well-documented tale of childhood hardship and long-distance sacrifice to tell.

Young stars led by Wimbledon champion Maria Sharapova are frequently called upon to document the reasons for the hunger which has swept no fewer than 15 Russian girls into the world's top 100.

Until Marat Safin's Australian Open win last week reminded everybody of the exciting if infuriating talent he possesses, Russia's men were being well and truly overshadowed by their female counterparts.

Safin has often appeared uneasy inheriting the mantle of his nation's leading player from the former world number one and double Grand Slam champion Yevgeny Kafelnikov, who has not played on the ATP Tour since 2003.

But perhaps the manner of Safin's triumph, which equalled Kafelnikov's Grand Slam title haul after his initial success at the US Open in 2000, will spark a revolution amongst Russia's boys similar to that undergone by the girls after Anna Kournikova's publicity-seeking era.

Perhaps they need it. Behind Safin Russia numbers just four more male players in the current world top 100, and Kafelnikov's retirement has dramatically reduced their chances of repeating their 2002 Davis Cup success.

The 22-year-old Mikhail Youzhny is yet to fully grasp the chance to join Safin among the true elite, despite his famous come-from-behind victory in that Davis Cup decider against French youngster Paul-Henri Mathieu.

Youzhny, and his compatriot Igor Andreev both know what it is like to experience the rareified air of the fourth round of a Grand Slam, while world number 99 Dmitry Tursunov overcame Safin in the first round of last year's Wimbledon.

But the best prospect might be Nikolay Davydenko, the 23-year-old who began this year in fine style by reaching the quarter-finals of the Australian Open, beating Tim Henman along the way.

All have their typical tales of picking up a tennis racket in their early years and training hungrily to escape the poverty which surrounded them.

Davydenko moved with his family to Germany in his teens, Andreev to Spain while Tursunov seized his chance to base himself in California and is now in the process of applying for United States citizenship.

Tursunov explained: "I think a lot of Russian players preferred to train and travel outside of Russia simply because at that point it was a lot cheaper.

"We had to pay for indoor courts, outdoor courts, we had to pay for a lot of things. Russian salaries don't allow you to pay for these things.

"So my father decided it was best for me to go to California because it was as lot cheaper financially. So that is what I did, and that is why I am here now."

Kiara
02-08-2005, 03:37 PM
Tursunov is applying for US citizenship????? :fiery: damn!

smucav
02-08-2005, 03:39 PM
Tursunov is applying for US citizenship????? :fiery: damn!
He applied a long time ago, but it's been held up for many years. They recapped the whole saga when he was playing Guga at the 2003 US Open. He had already been waiting for several years then.

Kiara
02-08-2005, 03:44 PM
thanks..

thats a big fuck you to the federation for ignoring him in DC so far....Dmitry is a masha american, his english is perfect, he's a funny guy i like him. I dont want him to play for the states, but his life would be a whole lot less complicated if he does. :sad:

MariaV
02-08-2005, 03:45 PM
Yeah, I don't know what's causing the delay though.

I doubt he'll have a huge career in pro tennis anyway. I heard his back is really bad? Any news anyone?

Kiara
02-08-2005, 03:53 PM
I think he could do with the support he'd get from the USTA, if he wasnt injury plagued all the time, he could have a really great career..

I dont know whats up with his back...seems like he's had a million and one back injuries to date, i think he's still suffering from fractured vertebrae or sth, not sure..:sad:

Kiara
02-08-2005, 04:09 PM
"I wish I had Andy Roddick's support system and wild cards from the USTA and wish I didn't have all the injuries.'

:eek:

Russia's loss :sad:

jmp
02-08-2005, 08:29 PM
The first time I saw Tursunov was at USO '03. That's where I learned that he had applied for US citizenship. I didn't know it was being held up. The last time I saw him was when he had to retire from a match in Long Island in 2004 because of his back. I didn't know it was chronic. That's sad. I really like his game. Get well soon. :)

Thanks for the additional information, everyone. :)

Magda
02-08-2005, 09:28 PM
Here's an article about Walt from Polish 'Newsweek'. I made the translation but it was a horror, so forgive me any mistakes.

"The right hand of the Champions"

The emigrant from Płock tortures the biggest tennis stars with no mercy. And they pay him great money for doing that.

Who's the most popular Pole in tennis world nowadays? Not Marta Domachowska, who lost in the 1st round in Pattaya last week. Nor Marcin Matkowski and Mariusz Fyrstenberg, who haven't earned even one point in doubles ranking yet. It's Walt Landres the one who's making a big career. An emigrant from Płock, physiotherapist and masseur of the biggest tennis stars. For two years he's been working with Marat Safin, who thanks to his last week's AO victory earned almost 1 million $. How completely unknown in Poland Landers, called by his friends "Włodek", stepped into tennis salons?

Last year after murderous trainings with Safin, the Russian called him a 'fitness guru'. And this year, during AO turnament, after being asked about Walt's role in his team, Marat Safin called him a great masseur and smiled knowingly. Where's that smile from? Even though Landers's services are being treated with great appreciation, he is like a tournaments mascot (:haha: ). He wears shirts in lurid colours, his hair's like famous violinist Nigel Kennedy, he doesn't mince his words, and sometimes even likes to swear. For some people he's only a weirdo, for others he's a tiring chatterbox. He seems not to fit the tennis world of big stars. But when we look at the list of players who he worked with, it's not right to say that he appeared there by accident.

During his whole life Landers has been trying to help the fate. There's not much said about his past and Walt doesn't even want to say how old he is. He looks like 50-some. We know that he left Poland almost 30 years ago. His mother's second husband was Swede - that's where the name comes from. Before he started working with tennis players he was a physiotherapist in San Francisco and he worked with American cyclists. A dozen or so years ago he applied to ATP, to Bill Norris, who was taking care of players' medical care. Norris invited him for a meeting and that's how it started. Today he's popular among tennis players. He worked with such champions as Crlos Moya or Yevgeny Kafelnikov. During some tournaments he was helping Andre Agassi. For 6 months he'd worked with Andy Roddick. And for seven years he'd worked with Pete Sampras.

Why Landers is so phenomenal? "I didn't invent drugs, but I know the needs of the players. I select proper exercises and massages. Thanks to this they're more fit, they're not overtrained and they don't get injured that often (I hope that's true!! ;))" he says. And tennis stars add that he's able to bring back on form the tired body in a few hours. Four years ago when he worked with Sampras, he nearly made a miracle on the Wimbledon courts. The American had ankle injury and he couldn't train. After one of his matches he was taken to hospital, his leg was being treated with ice and electric impulses. "During the whole tournament I've been massaging him twice a day. Before he was going out on the court he was getting an injection and he was playing. Almost without any training" - remembers Landers. Thanks to this Pete Sampras won Wimbledon for the 7th time in his career.

Tennis stars come to Landers when they need quick effects. In December 2003 he was called to help Marat Safin, who was overweight and had problems with his wrist. "Marat was withdrawing from successive tournaments and when he was trying to come back he was losing. He was broken down. So I went with him to Monte Carlo and we worked together for a month" says Landers. Later Safin called those couple of weeks a horror. But in AO 2004 he eliminated Andy Roddick and he beat Andre Agassi after a 3h and 42 min murderous match. Constantly injured and crashed player suddenly turned into a gladiator and he played one of his greatest matches in his career.

What was Landers doing with Safin in Monte Carlo in December? Safin had trainings twice a day for six days in a week. He was running on the mountain routes, and working in the gym for four days in a week. And he was taking a break from tennis - he played only one hour a week.

Walt is in the tour for 35 weeks each year. He doesn't have a family, a dog, and nobody waits for him in his apartment in Las Vegas - he devoted everything to work with tennis players. He plays the role of a masseur and expert of biological regeneration, but he also takes care of the fitness plans, devises new exercises and sets the diet. Marat Safin pays for Walt's hotels and travels. And he pays him a salary of 100 thousand $ per year. That's why Landers could afford living in a building with 6 cats and a gym.

Even though he sometimes says that he doesn't feel like a Pole nor American, but like a world citizen, it's hard to believe this, because he thinks about Poland very often. In the breaks between tournaments he follows the news in TVN24 (Polish channel like CNN), sets training plans for Karolina Woźniacka, a young Polish tennis player who lives in Denmark. He also discusses with Polish trainers Adam Królak and Leszek Bieńkowski. "Walt looks for contacts with Poles on every tournament. He starts conversations, gives some tips, sometimes he bores with his stories, but at the same time he's a good spirit in the lounge." says Wojciech Andrzejewski, chef of Polish Tennis Association.

However at the same time Walt Landers shows how far from the world Polish tennis is. When he came to Warsaw he decided to watch the trainings of several young, talented players. It was winter, -7 C outside. When Landers entered the court he was speechless. The couch in a cap, players with gloves, and those who didn't play were standing there and blowing in their hands so that they wouldn't freeze. Later Lander only said "Gentleman, either you build Florida in Warsaw or you're going to America. There's no other way to be successful in this sport".

Damita
02-08-2005, 09:44 PM
Thank you Magz!!! interesting article, good work! :worship: ;)

MariaV
02-08-2005, 09:45 PM
THANK YOU Magda dear!!!! :hug: :hug: Too bad msn is down. I hope you're OK.

Magda
02-08-2005, 09:50 PM
you're welcome guys :)

Too bad msn is down. I hope you're OK.
ahhhh so it's down again??!! Damnz I thought it's just my comp and I was about to throw it out of the window. My comp is very happy that you saved it from death! :hug: hug from my comp (and from me too :))

MariaV
02-08-2005, 09:54 PM
Oh Magda, don't kill your comp. :hug: There's some virus problem w the MSN messenger too I read.

Bibir
02-08-2005, 10:30 PM
Thank you Magda for the article. :hug:
I have a stupid question...Walt is a gay masseuse or it was a joke?

Magda
02-08-2005, 10:40 PM
I have a stupid question...Walt is a gay masseuse or it was a joke?
I have no idea Bea. I read in other threads those comments about him, but to be honest I don't believe in that...

foul_dwimmerlaik
02-09-2005, 07:06 AM
Thanks for the translation Magda!

Wednesday Addams
02-09-2005, 07:33 AM
No, Bea, he's not gay. But he IS a masseur.
Thanx for translating the article, Maggie!!!!! :kiss:

maratski
02-09-2005, 12:13 PM
Thanks a lot Magda!

In December 2003 he was called to help Marat Safin, who was overweight and had problems with his wrist.

:haha:

PennyThePenguin
02-10-2005, 10:12 AM
thanks magster!!! *doungle*

and nooo not the computer out the window..we've had this convo before maggie. don't be mean to the comp... remember? without the comp..there'd be no marat and no colourful convos...respect the comp! ;)

Magda
02-10-2005, 08:53 PM
thanks magster!!! *doungle*

and nooo not the computer out the window..we've had this convo before maggie. don't be mean to the comp... remember? without the comp..there'd be no marat and no colourful convos...respect the comp! ;)
LOL yeah but I want my comp to respect me as well :( and it sooooo does not :(. For example right now: it took me ages to turn it on, and it's got viruses agin, and I'm on msn but people actually can't see that i'm online, and when I talk to them they can't see my smileys, this is all so aaaargh!!! :smash: :smash: :banghead: :(

(*sorry I'm just very frustrated :P)

Bibir
02-10-2005, 09:02 PM
In December 2003 he was called to help Marat Safin, who was overweight and had problems with his wrist.

:haha:
He had problems with his wrist! :eek: :eek:
Forgive my dirty mind. :o

Bibir
02-10-2005, 09:08 PM
LOL yeah but I want my comp to respect me as well :( and it sooooo does not :(. For example right now: it took me ages to turn it on, and it's got viruses agin, and I'm on msn but people actually can't see that i'm online, and when I talk to them they can't see my smileys, this is all so aaaargh!!! :smash: :smash: :banghead: :(

(*sorry I'm just very frustrated :P)
:hug: :hug: Magda....Computers think they are more intelligent than us...Poor them. ;)

maratski
02-11-2005, 09:46 AM
He had problems with his wrist! :eek: :eek:
Forgive my dirty mind. :o

Bea my pervertic buddy! :wavey:

Glad to know I'm not the only one who's mind works liked that. :o

Bibir
02-11-2005, 02:08 PM
Marauding Marat's marvel


Everybody hurts some time ... as Roger Federer found out last night against Marat Safin.
http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2005/01/28/main_safin.jpg


As the chief oddball, hedonist and racket-trasher of the tennis world, Marat Safin had always been expected to mark his birthday in some style, but it was an astonishing performance to beat Roger Federer, a man previously considered the untouchable of the Rod Laver Arena.

Safin, 25, could only grope at the significance of it all. Federer had not even dropped a set in the Australian Open in Melbourne before he played the Russian, but Safin's ferocious tennis had the defending champion, usually so restrained, hurling his racket and muttering and cursing into the night. Put in Safin's terms, this was like Federer taking every racket from his kit bag and smashing them in turn against the umpire's chair.

After Federer, Safin was probably the most naturally gifted tennis player of his generation and had been expected to provide the first proper test of Federer's Australian Open - but not to sustain such ferocious hitting for 41/2 hours, not to actually beat him and not to do so in such thrilling, five-set fashion.

Federer had humbled Andre Agassi in the previous round. But Safin possessed huge physical presence, a gargantuan serve and a real sting in his groundstrokes, and on his day - and this was clearly one of those - he could beat anyone he wanted to.

Bibir
02-11-2005, 02:34 PM
Bea my pervertic buddy! :wavey:

Glad to know I'm not the only one who's mind works liked that. :o

Our virtual friendship is one pervertic mind in two bodies. :angel:

Carolinita
02-11-2005, 02:58 PM
Thanks Bibir :hug:

and great pic :inlove:

maratski
02-11-2005, 03:20 PM
Our virtual friendship is one pervertic mind in two bodies. :angel:

It is wonderful! :angel:

ayena
02-11-2005, 05:19 PM
:wavey: everyone!! I'm new here but I want to send an article about Marat wich I find in one of the Polish newspapers and I'm :confused: now. It's from Wednesday.

Marat Safin (25 years old) had won AO and we know who help him. It was his youn country-mate - Daria Żukowa.
Safin was always surrounded by beautiful women. some of them like his charming smile some his money. Now he's dating with with beautiful Daria and he is not worring about his 12 mln dollars earned on tennis courts. Daria is for sure not dating with him for money. She is beloved doughter of one of the richest men in Russia. Marat girlfriend is studing law in LA.
Last year was lot of rumors that they had got married in secret but they both were denying.
Marat and Daria came back together from Melbourne to Moscow. "She is incredibly cute and intelligent. She is not like other models. It seems that Marat has really fell in love" - wrote one of the Russian newspapers after greeting their national hero on the airport.
We don't know where Marat is resting now after his seven matches, which he had won on AO, but we know with who....


First sorry for mistakes in my translation if I made any :rolleyes:
But I want to ask: so waht's his girlfriend name?? Dasha or Daria?? And is it the same girl?? Maybe they were thinking of Dasha?? I don't know now :confused:

foul_dwimmerlaik
02-11-2005, 05:31 PM
Dasha is a diminutive of Daria.

Thanks for the translation, btw.

Kiara
02-11-2005, 05:34 PM
it's the same..Dasha is the pet name derived from Daria..

Magda
02-12-2005, 04:51 PM
thanks ayena.... Which newspaper was that?

ayena
02-12-2005, 04:58 PM
:wavey: Magda!! Nice to see some Polish here :D
I guess it was Super Express.
Thanks for clearing it for me. :hug:

Magda
02-12-2005, 05:04 PM
:wavey: Magda!! Nice to see some Polish here :D
:wavey:


I guess it was Super Express.
that's what I thought............. I knew it must have been 'super express' of 'fakt'..... They like such stories.... ;) Anyway, thanks once again and hope to see you arond more

thelma
02-12-2005, 05:08 PM
:wavey: everyone!! I'm new here but I want to send an article about Marat wich I find in one of the Polish newspapers and I'm :confused: now. It's from Wednesday.



:wavey: Welcome. Thanks for the translation :yeah:

jmp
02-12-2005, 06:01 PM
:wavey: Welcome ayena! Thanks for translating and posting the article. I hope you have fun here. :)

MariaV
02-12-2005, 06:13 PM
Thanks for tranlsating and posting the article ayena!! :wavey:

Meeek
02-12-2005, 08:21 PM
Siema Ayena!!! :wavey: Jak leci? :) That's all the Polish I know ;)

Welcome here!! And thanks for the translation! :)

Damita
02-12-2005, 08:55 PM
Hi ayena :bigwave: thanks for the translation :)

cute avvy btw ;)

RogiFan88
02-13-2005, 02:20 AM
http://www.safinator.com/aussie8_05/capt.mel22901271405.jpg (the picture the author is referring to)

A Picture of Grace by Rohit Brijnath
TODAY newspaper, 3 Feb 2004
[shorter version of article]

Amidst the rapidly blurring memories of a riveting Australian Open, this one moment stands sharp. It haunts me like lines from an old love letter. Yesterday I had to print a copy of a photograph of it to look again. As I type, it sits beside me.

There is seemingly nothing to the picture, yet it holds me in its thrall. It tells of an act of utter simplicity yet one that is clearly uncommon. It is a moment, frozen on film, that tells us more about a man than an entire match.

There is something about Marat Safin, you know, that makes things personal. On Sunday night, he breaks a nation’s heart and then they clasp him to it. Of how many men can we say that?

The photograph is of a moment after the Safin-Federer semi-final, a match replete with stroke-making of startling effrontery and despairing struggles for momentum. The Russian has a way of turning matches into operas, and the Swiss for a while has been in fine song.

When victory is sealed, Safin does not leap for the moon, or gesticulate wildly, or snarl like a scalp-taker in Federer’s direction. In times of exaggerated reactions to victory, like an American football player who mimicked mooning the audience, this is tasteful. More pointedly, from an instinctively theatrical man, given to communicating emotion, this is interesting.

Safin has, by winning the Open, wiped off cobwebs of self-doubt that have accumulated in his mind. It is five years, more or less, since his last Grand Slam title and they have been hard years of insecurity, of an injured back, hurt wrist and wounded psyche.

Yet he remains all respectful restraint. His behaviour after the semi-final suggests he has not conquered Federer but merely beaten him this one time; similarly, in the Final, he has shattered Hewitt and his nation’s dream, and as the pieces lie at his feet, he feels no need to step on them.

On court, he dares to express himself, his agony, his frustration when others do not let a single emotion register. He hurls his racket but it is done without malice; he berates himself yet rarely linesmen like Hewitt does. Always there is a humanness to Safin, and mostly it is fetching.

But it’s also why so many thought he wouldn’t win the Final, because his mind and talent appeared beyond harnessing, because he had forgotten how to win Slams, because this was Australia with 15,000 Australians in the audience cheering on Hewitt. But he did win, and he still did not gloat.

But of all these glimpses into Safin, the photograph tells the most. The match with Federer is over, and the Swiss, for all his heartbreak, embraces Safin at the net, they exchange words and go to their separate seats.

What happens next, usually, is that the loser will exit swiftly for sorrow is best not left on show while the winner will linger and soak in triumph he has bravely constructed. Except this ritual of ages has an abrupt interruption, for the briefest of moments, so brief that people may not really sense its significance, custom is abandoned.

Federer, head bowed, racket bags on both shoulders, is walking out, and as he passes Safin, it is expected they will politely ignore each other, the victor allowing the defeated his ego, the defeated not wishing to look his champion in the face.

But incredibly, by instinct not premeditation, Safin puts out his hand and rests it on Federer’s shoulders.

*click*

It is nothing but everything. I am staggered for I have not seen this before, astonished because grace has become an aberration; this gesture does not fit the modern urge for one-upmanship, it does not sit with the silly vanity of the times.

We cannot say exactly what message Safin’s act is sending. Perhaps it is one simply of solidarity, that he knows, too, how losing hurts; perhaps it is merely an acknowledgement of the sustained battle they have just fought and that so little separated them.

Perhaps it is an act of humility, as if he knew one defeat does not truly end a reign; perhaps it is recognition of each other as human beings, an understanding that while they may play our their hearts in public arenas they know there is life beyond this court.

It is beautiful, it is a gesture of spontaneous decency in a time when we find ways to excuse Hewitt’s petulance, it is a natural moment in a sporting world of artificiality, it is an instinctive sign of respect in an era of stage-managed show biz.

Federer does not shrug him off, or freeze, but puts out his left hand to touch Safin. And for this fleeting of instants, it is a better sporting world.

Spasiba! Nice article that demonstrates just how much respect Marat :angel:
and Rogi :angel: have for each other! ;)

IN this Russian interview that Marat gave yesterday [the link posted in safinator] he said that Fed, Rodd and Hew are the TROIKA! Cool metaphor, Maratik! I like it!

ayena
02-13-2005, 10:57 AM
Thanks everyone for welcoming me :hug: btw, you can call me Gosia that what my real name is. :rolleyes:

PennyThePenguin
02-13-2005, 12:51 PM
hi gosia!!! :hug:

fangirl
02-13-2005, 01:50 PM
Welcome Gosia! :hug:

Nimomunz
02-13-2005, 03:09 PM
Spasiba! Nice article that demonstrates just how much respect Marat :angel:
and Rogi :angel: have for each other! ;)

IN this Russian interview that Marat gave yesterday [the link posted in safinator] he said that Fed, Rodd and Hew are the TROIKA! Cool metaphor, Maratik! I like it!

Not only do they have respect for each other they are friends off court.... not best buddies like Safin and Rosset but they used to play doubles tog

foul_dwimmerlaik
02-13-2005, 04:49 PM
Not only do they have respect for each other they are friends off court.... not best buddies like Safin and Rosset but they used to play doubles togWon a title, too.

Hi Gosia and welcome! :wavey:

Magda
02-13-2005, 07:10 PM
Siema Ayena!!! :wavey: Jak leci? :) That's all the Polish I know ;)

:eek: :eek: you must be kidding me!!!??? I've spent so many hours to teach you Polish and all you remember now is 'jak leci?' :sad:

Meeek
02-13-2005, 07:29 PM
:eek: :eek: you must be kidding me!!!??? I've spent so many hours to teach you Polish and all you remember now is 'jak leci?' :sad:

:lol: Well...that's all the DECENT Polish I know, remember? ;) I mean...if you want me to welcome someone by saying "kurwa" "spierdalaj" or "ty dupku"...that's fine with me as well :lol: :p ;)

Magda
02-13-2005, 08:50 PM
:lol: Well...that's all the DECENT Polish I know, remember? ;) I mean...if you want me to welcome someone by saying "kurwa" "spierdalaj" or "ty dupku"...that's fine with me as well :lol: :p ;)
lmao!!!! :haha: shhhhhhhhh meek!!!! there are some poles around!!! i don't want them to see what words i taught you :ignore:

:angel: :angel: :angel:

RogiFan88
02-13-2005, 09:10 PM
Not only do they have respect for each other they are friends off court.... not best buddies like Safin and Rosset but they used to play doubles tog

Yep, I know! They won Gstaad once upon a time. ;)

MariaV
02-13-2005, 09:13 PM
Once upon a time........ :haha: :haha: RogiFan!!!!!!!

Jennay
02-13-2005, 09:16 PM
Hi Gosia :wavey: :hug:

Balaenopteramusculus
02-14-2005, 12:34 AM
lmao!!!! :haha: shhhhhhhhh meek!!!! there are some poles around!!! i don't want them to see what words i taught you :ignore:

:angel: :angel: :angel:

lol That's ok. Usualy swear words are the first thing I teach foreigners as well :p

ayena
02-14-2005, 09:09 AM
:eek: :eek:
What a "nice" Polish words you are learning here :devil:

PennyThePenguin
02-14-2005, 12:57 PM
gee mags.....teaching meekiej baaaad words? tsktsktsk

thelma
02-19-2005, 10:26 PM
http://msn.foxsports.com/tennis/story/3397134?CMP=OTC-K9B140813162&ATT=199

Safin most likely to challenge Federer

Dan Weil / Special to FOXSports.com
Posted: 21 hours ago


Marat Safin's victory at the Australian Open last month, which included an epic five-set defeat of world No. 1 Roger Federer in the semifinals, has led tennis experts to speculate that the 25-year-old Russian could battle Federer for the top spot this year.

"I think we got a pretty good answer in Australia," said Patrick McEnroe, who captains the U.S. Davis Cup team. "Safin can certainly challenge him. The big question is can he be consistent enough week in and week out?"

Safin is currently ranked No. 4 behind the 23-year-old Swiss wunderkind, Australia's Lleyton Hewitt, and Andy Roddick. But tennis analysts say Safin has a better chance to challenge Federer than the other two because he has a more complete game.

"I think he's the only one who has enough guns," said Tony Trabert, who won four Grand Slam tournaments in the 1950s. "Roddick has a big serve and forehand, but Federer has proved he can handle that. And Hewitt has to work so hard just to hold his own serve that it takes a toll over a long period of time."

Safin, on the other hand, has enough game to threaten Federer. "He has the size, power, movement and variety in his game, where he can bother a guy like Federer," said Tom Gullikson, who, as U.S. Davis Cup captain, coached Pete Sampras. "He can overpower Federer sometimes, which isn't so easy because Federer has so many skills, including defense."

McEnroe noted that Safin is one of the few players on tour who isn't intimidated by Federer's prodigious talent and unflappable playing style. "A lot of players, after Federer hits one of those ridiculous shots, just say he's too good," McEnroe said. "Safin isn't over-awed by Federer like a lot of players."

Still, the charismatic Russian had to put forth a heroic effort to beat Federer in Australia, staving off a match point in the fourth set.

"Safin had to play his best and still had a match point where he had to play an unbelievable shot to get out of it," McEnroe said. "Now he has to be able to do that consistently. Federer set the bar high in the last 18 months. Game wise, Safin has a big serve and can return well. His mentality will determine how far he will go."

Tennis aficionados expected big things out of Safin after he blitzed through Pete Sampras to win the US Open in 2000. But Safin wasn't ready to stay at the top of the rankings then. At times he showed more interest in the joys of the nightlife and the company of beautiful women than in the rigors of training. He would lose his temper on the court, break racquets and occasionally stop trying.

And in 2003, he was out with a serious wrist injury.

"Nobody knows how Safin is going to respond this time," McEnroe said. "Will he get lax in his training? Will he say he's won another major and everyone can shut up? Last year he did well at Australia (losing in the final to Federer) and then was disappointing until the end of the year. I don't expect that to happen this year."

Gullikson said Safin's coach, Peter Lundgren, who formerly mentored Federer, deserves some of the credit for Safin's more disciplined approach in recent months. The fact that Safin has had a steady girlfriend during the past year — Russian medical student Dasha Zhukova — also helps, Gullikson said. "I think Safin can handle it better now. When he won the U.S. Open, he was so young and immature. He didn't know what he accomplished and then went on a walkabout."

With his newfound maturity, Safin could be a threat at both the French Open and Wimbledon, experts say. Having spent most of his teen years in Spain, he is accustomed to the red clay surface of Roland Garros in Paris. Still, "It's a tougher task for Safin to win seven matches on clay," McEnroe said. "He can't serve or hit his way out of trouble as easily" as on a grass or hard court.

Wimbledon may suit his game better. Though Safin said he hated the surface after losing in the first round last year, "his game is tailor-made for grass," McEnroe noted, with big shots, good movement and strong ability to improvise shots.

Nonetheless, Federer has to be rated a stronger favorite to win both at Roland Garros and Wimbledon, experts agreed. "Federer's the kind of guy that as soon as he lost at Australia, he was setting his sights on the French Open (which begins in May)," McEnroe said. "He's the sort of guy that immediately starts looking toward the next major. The loss will make him hungrier. I think it will motivate him even more. And that's a scary thing for the rest of the field."

Carolinita
02-19-2005, 10:32 PM
Safin The Entertainer

- Big hitting Russian ready for Dubai Men's Open -

Dubai, UAE, February 18, 2005: The Dubai Tennis Championships will feature not just one of the giants of the game, but one of its greatest characters.

Marat Safin believes it is important to give something extra to his fans, and to do more than just go through the motions on court while ignoring those who have paid to watch him. Sometimes, it gets him into trouble, and he has drawn condemnation from some quarters for his on-court antics.

He even briefly lowered his shorts on Court Central at Roland Garros last year. He had some people choking on their caviar, but Marat had hit a good shot and "wanted to celebrate".

"Marat Safin is a larger than life character," said Colm McLoughlin, Managing Director of Dubai Duty Free, owners and organizers of the Dubai Tennis Championships.

"He is certainly a crowd favourite in Dubai and we are greatly looking forward to his return to our tournament this year."

The criticism he sometimes receives is okay with him, though. He has the spectators who have paid their money and want to be entertained, in mind.

"Being on the court opens up the real character, what you have deep inside," he says. "I like to perform, and I understand because I am a person who also used to watch tennis. And I know how people feel and I know what they want to see.
"First of all I'm performing for myself, but in a way I am performing also for the people who have paid money. You have to respect the spectators."

"You can do bad things, you can break rackets, shout, whatever you do, but you have to do it in the right way without hurting the spectator, because he is the one giving you the job opportunity, being on the court and earning some money."

"If nobody watches there is no sponsor, and if there's no sponsor there is no job. So you have to give to the crowd, the spectators. They can tell you to move your legs, whatever, because the spectator's allowed to. But some players don't get it."

In the same way, the fact that he is a celebrity, especially at home in Moscow, might make him beware of what he does when he goes out on the town. People are watching, but it's not going to stop him having fun. There are some players who hide in the shadows to avoid attention, but Marat doesn't care what people might think of him.

"I'm the way I am. I'm not going to change because somebody saw me somewhere and doesn't like the way I am," he insists. "There's no problem. There are enough people that like me the way I am. I like what I'm doing and know what I'm doing, and I'm old enough to decide what is good and what is bad for me. If anyone has a problem with that they should keep it to themselves.
"There's nothing I would change about myself, although I can improve myself. Believe me, there are a bunch of people who tried to change me, and it didn't work."

"When I was 18 they told me that I would regret things when I'm 24, 25. But I don't regret one thing in my life, because I know what I'm doing. I like it, I'm enjoying it, and I don't care about the people who think I'm doing the wrong things. I don't care. I like what I'm doing."

The past year has seen Safin re-establish himself as a top contender, after a 2003 season that was ravaged by injury, particularly to his left wrist. He certainly came back with a bang, beating players like Andre Agassi and Andy Roddick to reach the 2004 Australian Open final. After starting the year at 77 he was able to climb back towards the top of the rankings, and that is one of the proudest achievements of his career.

"The biggest moment of my career was probably winning the US Open, but the second was to come back this past year," he said. "I started the year at 77 and I'm back to the top 10, so that's also not a bad thing. After being injured so long it is really difficult to get back in the top 10."

As for the time he was forced to spend away from the game? Well, there is a life outside of tennis.

"I didn't care. I enjoyed it," he insists. "Players should be able to enjoy being off the court. It's a big part of life, the tennis, everyone understands that. It's a job, but you also have to be able to enjoy life off the court.

"I'm sorry, but when you quit tennis it's over. Now I'm doing the best I can and I'm trying. You have good weeks and bad weeks, but I'm trying. I have no regrets. But I'm having a great time off the court also and that's why I'm happy. I'm a happy person.

"There have been low points, a lot of them, but you have to go through them to appreciate the great achievements of your career. If you don't have low points you can't realise and appreciate the good parts of your job.

"I've had a great career. Hopefully I will have achieved some things that I would like to achieve and I'll look back and say yes, it was a great time and now it's time to move on."

"Just give yourself the opportunity, give yourself the chance. You have to be happy with what you have achieved and don't take any notice if somebody tells you that you should have achieved much more. You have achieved what you have achieved. Nobody can take that away and you have a clear conscience."

Another highlight of Safin's career, of course, was beating Roger Federer to reach the Australian Open final last month, and then winning his second Grand Slam title with victory over hometown favourite Lleyton Hewitt.

Lifting another trophy, so long after he had made his breakthrough by beating Pete Sampras for the US Open crown back in 2000, lifted a monkey off his back.

"Yeah, it's just in a way more of a psychological thing," he said. "I have to forget about the final in 2000 because everything came so easy and it came in the most unexpected way. Then I lost two finals (at the Australian Open), and you start to have doubts with yourself, like could I really do this or not?

"It was the third time in a (Australian Open) final, you're playing against Hewitt, you beat Roger Federer. Basically you have a huge chance to beat him. Then I just got so nervous, so uptight because it was the last match. You understand the situation. It's the last match, you have to give your best, and I didn't want to lose it because then it's like nobody cares about the finalist basically. So, for me, that win was just a kind of a relief."

There had been talk, when he failed to follow up his US Open triumph, that he was wasting his talent. Too much partying, not enough practice. Rackets were smashed as he lost matches by losing control of his frustration when things turned against him.

"The people speak, you listen," he said. "The rumours, once it gets into your head, it's difficult to accept and you really start to believe that maybe it's who I am, you know. I have a talent, I'm a good player, but not good enough to be where I want to be. They say that's who you are, and it's the maximum you can get. It's a little bit disappointing for a person like me to hear that, because I really started to believe that's who I am."

To help him keep on track, indeed to reach another, more consistent level, last year Safin took on the man who had guided Roger Federer to his first Wimbledon title, Peter Lundgren.

"He just told me really to believe in myself," said Safin. "I'd never believed in myself before at all, until I started to work with him. We worked really hard. We communicate really well. He understood who I am and I understood what he wants from me. It took us basically four or five months before the results came. But then once the results came, they are there. They are continuing to come.
"He makes me believe that I can be a good player and I don't have so much doubt about myself, about my tennis. I am a little bit more calm and more confident."

Safin will hope to take over not just Federer's Australian Open crown, but his Dubai Tennis Championships title when play gets underway on Monday.

The Dubai Tennis Championships is owned and organised by Dubai Duty Free and held under the patronage of HH General Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai and Minister of Defence, UAE

mer
02-20-2005, 11:25 AM
Just found some funny thing on dinarasafina.com (piece of old article from 2002)
"Elsewhere in the lounge, brother Marat was perched on the back of a couch, where three buddies of his, looking cranky and unkempt, were sprawled. Among them was the Swiss player Marc Rosset, who looked half asleep. The subject under discussion, in Russian, and also in Spanish, was when-the-hell-are-we-gonna-get-a-court-to-practice-on. Safin, impatient and grim, jumped from his perch and made as if to leave.

"He's a big tiger now," Rosset said calmly, in English. "He just told me that once, ten years ago, when I played a tournament in Moscow, he was my ball boy. Just now, he told me this." The other buddies laughed loudly."
:) :) :)

Shadow
02-20-2005, 05:03 PM
Marat will play the Charity Exhibition



ATP Players to Star in Charity Exhibition Event at Pacific Life Open in Indian Wells

Federer, Safin, Henman among the first players assembled

Proceeds to fund UNICEF and other worldwide tsunami relief efforts

Unique event part of evening’s “Salute to Heroes” activities

The ATP and the Pacific Life Open announced today that the world’s greatest men’s players will unite for a special charity exhibition event during the Pacific Life Open designed to benefit UNICEF and other worldwide tsunami relief efforts. Roger Federer, winner of the 2004 INDESIT ATP Race and defending champion of the Pacific Life Open, was the catalyst behind organizing the event to be held at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden on Friday, March 11.

“In Australia in January, the players were talking about what we could do as a group,” Federer said. “I’m delighted that we will come together to play in this unique event designed to raise funds for tsunami relief efforts. It’s an important cause and the night will be a very enjoyable one for the fans who come watch.”

A portion of proceeds from ticket sales will go to charity. For tickets, call 1-800-999-1585 or log onto www.PacificLifeOpen.com. The event will begin at 6:00 p.m. prior to a Pacific Life Open tournament match.

Federer is working with the ATP Foundation to assemble a cast of stars for the unique first-of-its-kind event. Marat Safin, Tim Henman, Guillermo Coria, Gaston Gaudio and David Nalbandian all will participate. Additional players will be announced later.

The format of the exhibition will include a combination of singles and doubles matches, including a Super-Tiebreak played between Federer and Safin, whose two most recent matches at the Tennis Masters Cup and the Australian Open have ignited talk of an exciting new rivalry. At the Tennis Masters Cup, they played an ATP-record-tying 20-18 tiebreak won by Federer.

Players also will participate in special fundraising activities starting at 5:00 p.m. at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden Village Stage, which will showcase scenes and outtakes from Facing Federer, the ATP documentary filmed at the 2004 Tennis Masters Cup. Players will sign autographs, answer questions and help raise funds. All fans with tickets for the day or evening session will be able to attend the Village Stage activities. The exhibition event will follow the traditional Pacific Life Open “Salute to Heroes” that opens the Friday evening session.

Charlie Pasarell, Tournament Director of the Pacific Life Open, said: “The Friday night session at Indian Wells has traditionally been a ‘Salute to Heroes,’ so this event fits in perfectly with that theme. Everyone has been impressed at how quickly the players and tournaments responded to the crisis in Asia, and we’re pleased to host this special event at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden to help raise additional funds. It should make for a very memorable night.”

Nimomunz
02-20-2005, 06:02 PM
Just found some funny thing on dinarasafina.com (piece of old article from 2002)
"Elsewhere in the lounge, brother Marat was perched on the back of a couch, where three buddies of his, looking cranky and unkempt, were sprawled. Among them was the Swiss player Marc Rosset, who looked half asleep. The subject under discussion, in Russian, and also in Spanish, was when-the-hell-are-we-gonna-get-a-court-to-practice-on. Safin, impatient and grim, jumped from his perch and made as if to leave.

"He's a big tiger now," Rosset said calmly, in English. "He just told me that once, ten years ago, when I played a tournament in Moscow, he was my ball boy. Just now, he told me this." The other buddies laughed loudly."
:) :) :)
Funny!!!

sol
02-20-2005, 08:34 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/afp/20050220/sp_wl_afp/tennisatpuae_050220175934

Safin sulks over media treatment

Sun Feb 20,12:59 PM ET

DUBAI (AFP) - Australian Open champion Marat Safin launched a blistering attack on the international media as he bids to take away another of Roger Federer's titles at the one-million-dollar Dubai Open which starts Monday.

http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/afp/20050220/capt.sge.mgn93.200205175927.photo00.photo.default-282x380.jpg

Safin, who knocked Federer out in the semi-finals in Melbourne before capturing the Australian Open crown, said that he takes strength from a worsening relationship with those who write about him.

"I learnt a lot of stuff," said the Russian as he reflected on a 2004 trying to struggle back to the top.

"I burnt myself too many times. I had this belief that people are good, but then I realise that you can't trust anybody. You have to say you find yourself in the newspapers and sometimes I read articles which are ridiculous.

"I used to say I have to explain everything, and I opened my mouth and explained more than I should. I will not do it any more.

"People try to sell sensation, and claim I said this and that. It's not good but now I know you have to be careful what you say."

Safin has been particularly annoyed at allegations that, during his lengthy spell out of the top 20, he had been indulging in alcohol abuse.

He also denied that, as reports recently claimed, he had been criticising his sister Dinara Safina.

"I only said she had to do it for herself. That is advice, not criticism," he said.

Safin, who is seeded to meet Federer again in the final here next weekend, has a none-too-easy first round against Nicolas Kiefer, the former world number four from Germany.

Federer, the champion in Rotterdam on Sunday, starts against Ivo Minar, a qualifer from the Czech Republic.

Andre Agassi, who has an opening match Monday with Radek Stepanek, the in-form Czech, suggested that at the age of almost 35 he was playing on partly to fund his academy for under-privileged children.

"It is wonderful seeing what a child can do with a bit of opportunity and hope in life, and when someone takes an interest in what they do, to see them dream and think about the future as if it were a reality," he said.

However, Agassi played down his chances after the operation which he believes may have solved his hip problems for good but has left him short of matches.

"I have not been pain-free for a long time and if you don't have confidence in playing matches you can expect to struggle," he admitted.

Meanwhile the draw also threw up a clash between the two leading Britons, Tim Henman, the third seed, and Greg Rusedski, the former US Open champion. The two have not played against each other for more than three years.

Henman, who has won five of their seven meetings on the tour and has not lost to Rusedski for six years, played down the significance of the clash, but Rusedski felt differently about it.

"Both of us on the day will be very determined to win because there will be a lot of pride at stake - it will be very focussed and intense because this is a big tournament," he claimed.

Meeek
02-20-2005, 09:01 PM
Thanks Sol :yeah: :smooch:

foul_dwimmerlaik
02-21-2005, 06:53 AM
So, he didn't say what he said in that press-conference? I am confused.

On the unrelated note: go Andre!

PennyThePenguin
02-21-2005, 10:39 AM
new take on "even when i lie i tell the truth"

"it wasn't me who said it..it was the voice in my head"

BelgianWaffle
02-21-2005, 11:29 AM
"I used to say I have to explain everything, and I opened my mouth and explained more than I should. I will not do it any more. "

:sad:

Bibir
02-21-2005, 11:39 AM
You can't fight your nature Marat! You said it.

You speak too much...you can't change it :o

What's bred in the bone will come out in the flesh. ;)

PennyThePenguin
02-21-2005, 11:50 AM
"I used to say I have to explain everything, and I opened my mouth and explained more than I should. I will not do it any more. "

:sad:


marat..... talk all u want..we'll kill the journos for u :o

we like to hear u talk :p

foul_dwimmerlaik
02-21-2005, 12:14 PM
new take on "even when i lie i tell the truth"

"it wasn't me who said it..it was the voice in my head"LOL, Penny, that might be it.

Marat :rolleyes:

Wednesday Addams
02-21-2005, 12:43 PM
Yeah, another waffle from Marat. :rolleyes:

sol
02-21-2005, 12:57 PM
another links:

http://www.smh.com.au/news/Tennis/Safin-gives-media-a-serve/2005/02/21/1108834706203.html?oneclick=true

Safin gives media a serve
February 22, 2005

http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2005/02/21/msafintat.jpg

Australian Open champion Marat Safin launched a blistering attack on the media today as he bids to take away another of Roger Federer's titles at the $1.27 million Dubai Open.

Safin, who knocked Federer out in the semi-finals in Melbourne before capturing the Australian Open crown, said that he takes strength from a worsening relationship with those who write about him.

"I learnt a lot of stuff," said the Russian as he reflected on a 2004 trying to struggle back to the top.

"I burnt myself too many times. I had this belief that people are good, but then I realise that you can't trust anybody. You have to say you find yourself in the newspapers and sometimes I read articles which are ridiculous.

"I used to say I have to explain everything, and I opened my mouth and explained more than I should. I will not do it any more.

"People try to sell sensation, and claim I said this and that. It's not good but now I know you have to be careful what you say."

Safin has been particularly annoyed at allegations that, during his lengthy spell out of the top 20, he had been indulging in alcohol abuse.

He also denied that, as reports recently claimed, he had been criticising his sister Dinara Safina.

"I only said she had to do it for herself. That is advice, not criticism," he said.

Safin, who is seeded to meet Federer again in the final here next weekend, has a none-too-easy first round against Nicolas Kiefer, the former world number four from Germany.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/4283581.stm

Safin mauls international media

Australian Open champion Marat Safin has launched a withering attack on the international media ahead of the Dubai Tennis Championships.

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/40849000/jpg/_40849945_safin203.jpg

The Russian is particularly annoyed by allegations he abused alcohol during his lengthy spell out of the top 20.

Safin said: "I had this belief that people are good but then I realise you can't trust anybody.

[/I]"People try to sell sensation and claim I said this and that. Sometimes I read articles that are ridiculous." [/I]

Safin, who knocked world number one Roger Federer out in the semi-finals in Melbourne, is seeded to meet the Swiss in the Dubai final next weekend.

Safin will play Germany's Nicholas Kiefer in the first round while Federer, who won the World Indoor Tournament in Rotterdam on Sunday, faces Czech qualifier Ivo Minar.


http://www.news.com.au/story/0,10117,12320792-1702,00.html

http://foxsports.news.com.au/story/0,8659,12320155-23210,00.html

.....:rolleyes:

alexa18
03-02-2005, 11:52 PM
On the safinator forum, someone who lives in Russia posted that Marat is engaged!! :sobbing: :eek: Maybe it's just a rumour but I want to know what you all think!! Please note: I did not make this up if you want to check look on the safinator forum!!

tall_one
03-03-2005, 02:20 AM
don't pay attention to it Alexa.

when people run russian articles through bablefish girlfriend seems to turn to fiancee.

This has been happening for years now.

Until some can cite a real source and not some bablefished tabloid article it is best just to ignore it

MariaV
03-03-2005, 08:11 AM
Thanks Nicki for answering. LOL, the yellowest Russian paper really had a headline "Safin to get married" *major :rolleyes: And then it's of course only that Volkov was joking at the DC training. OH DEAR I am tired of all this! *expecting another wave of teenie screaming* And I have a headache! Good that I don't set my feet @ Safinator, soon I'll be completely out of tgfr too. I thought you girls were overexaggerating (as I wasn't reading any of the stuff) but well, my patience has hit the limit now too. Sorry for the rant.

Shadow
03-03-2005, 11:47 AM
On the safinator forum, someone who lives in Russia posted that Marat is engaged!! :sobbing: :eek: Maybe it's just a rumour but I want to know what you all think!! Please note: I did not make this up if you want to check look on the safinator forum!!

dont trust russian tabloids, thats all i can say.

but i hope u wont be crying your eyes out if Marat will get engaged and marry in some years, because it will happen anyway and its great.

Shadow
03-03-2005, 11:49 AM
Thanks Nicki for answering. LOL, the yellowest Russian paper really had a headline "Safin to get married" *major :rolleyes: And then it's of course only that Volkov was joking at the DC training. OH DEAR I am tired of all this! *expecting another wave of teenie screaming* And I have a headache! Good that I don't set my feet @ Safinator, soon I'll be completely out of tgfr too. I thought you girls were overexaggerating (as I wasn't reading any of the stuff) but well, my patience has hit the limit now too. Sorry for the rant.

i feel with you Maria :hug:

Shadow
03-03-2005, 11:53 AM
http://www.utro.ru/articles/2005/03/03/413500.shtml

There is a new russian interview from Marat.
The news is that Marat is one of the founders of sport charity fund. He`ll obtain funds by his professional activity. This fund will help sport veterans to receive good treatment.

mer
03-03-2005, 01:07 PM
http://www.utro.ru/articles/2005/03/03/413500.shtml

There is a new russian interview from Marat.


Another intervew to russian press. It seems like Marat and russian media have agreed on truce for the time of DC. They don't tell lies about him and Marat makes up for his silence after AO.
:) :)

MariaV
03-03-2005, 01:32 PM
http://www.utro.ru/articles/2005/03/03/413500.shtml

There is a new russian interview from Marat.
The news is that Marat is one of the founders of sport charity fund. He`ll obtain funds by his professional activity. This fund will help sport veterans to receive good treatment.

Thanks dear Andrea!!! :hug: I still have a terrible headache and loads of work to do so maybe someone else will take to translate the whole text if you're interested. The charity foundation wants to help former Russian athletes mostly to have orthopedic surgery they need after their sports careers. Marat says he feels he needs to do this fundraising thing and wants to do it. :) And Marat says he still hasn't decided yet what he's gonna do after quitting as a pro. He says he's gonna play till 30 (as he said before already). Nothing earth-breaking new.

Shadow
03-03-2005, 02:50 PM
there is an very interesting post on tgfr.com i thought i share with u all:

Just wanted to raise a few questions and share some thoughts about Safin, and I figured this was the right place to do so
First, afew days ago, I intended to write a note about the fact that I thought he was in denial. What I mean is that Marat‘s talent has been ackowledged for many years now, as well as his warm personnality. Thus, contrary to his fellow tennis player, he never jumped on the bandwagon. For example, just to name a few: Federer has a charity foundation, and is all over the place with interviews and so on. Same thing for Roddick. It is different for Hewitt certainly because he is not the nicest of guys ( not that I have any problem with him ). Ferrero even has a tennis academy. And the thing is, none of these players achieved before Marat: he was the 1st one. The most popular is Federer, with Safin equal or even just before ( we will know very soon, once the ATPtennis.com most liked players results come out ). So we may wonder why Marat doesn’t get the coverage he deserve.
Safin doesn’t even have an official website, which is a little “strange”, considering is position and his rank on the Tour. We can assume maybe that he doensn’t control nor use his public image.I know he’s always said that he’s not a star, just a tennis player, who wants to live his off-court life like a normal guy.We all accept that. It’s jsut that some of his decicions sometimes almost seemed like he wanted to be “forgotten”.
This may be true, but I think that last year, when he came back on the Tour he realized that many things had changed. Learders and winners of the Tour, were players youger than him, with some of them not as talented as him. Maybe that’s when he realized he hast to step up. He tried to last year, but I think that we have to remember that him and Peter Lundgren were adjusting.
I don’t know why, but I have this feeling that he really matured there. It’s not just about his on-court behaviour, but I think he is now well aware that time has passed. With the year he lost in 2003 because of his injury, I think that’s when you really understand all you can do with that time. He was abscent one year. When he came back, Federer, Ferrero, and Roddick had all won a slam. Since then, Federer seems to have totally changed too.
That’s why I think he is more focused now.Because he knows he won’t be a tennis player for ever.
Safin is not about winning all the time. I don’t think that he’ll ever be about that. He is about achieving what HE wants. He won the AO because he wanted it so bad. I think wherever he will go with that attitude, he will win.That’s why I think he says he is focused on slams. Because he is not the kind of guy to have that motivation all year long.
Just to go back to what I was saying about maturity, so many signs keep coming on and on. I would firts go with his relationship with his coach.He found a way to stick to Lundgren, even if the start was slow. They are still working, so I expect results to keep coming. Second, his response to the press. He is such a kind person, it was really time to say the truths he wanted to say. He was always like ‘I don’t care what people think about me’, and it was just eating him up inside.Now he may face some grudge from the russian press or any other press, but it seems like he has got the mental strenghts to do so. Third, there is this “foundation” he is involved in. This russian interview evokes it (http://www.utro.ru/articles/2005/03/03/413500.shtml ;http://on.starblvd.net/cgi-bin/bbsmsg?marat_safin&tr=2833.1.1.1.1.1 ; I don’t speak russian myself, I used an online translator to get the general sense). He is readyto endorse some responsabilities now, and help people, saying it out loud.
It’s not about trying to be a celebrity. I think he has understood that by controlling his image and even using it, he can not only do good, but also still have a private life. Anyway, I have the feeling that’s what he’s trying to do.
4th, the Indian Wells charity event. The Super Tie Break he is going to play against Federer puts him right under the spot and actually claims him as Federer’s rival, before Roddick and Hewitt, both ranked better than him.5th, the fact that maratsafin.com belongs to his management team now. The site may not have been launched yet, but still if it is one day, this suggests more interaction with his fans. 6th, his rivalry with Federer, even if he keeps saying everywherer that Federer is the best player ever. I think Federer brings the best out of Safin. And I think Marat knows this. Roger has shown him what he could achieve himself. And that achieving all this had not really changed his personnal life. So, Marat wants his share. It must be very challenging to be compared to Federer and to play against him. Marat has always been good in these situation where people don’t expect him to wim. It’s the same thing here. Everybody knows he can do it, but not many really think he will win or Federer lose. So he has not much to lose.
I definitely think this year is going to be interesting. He didn’t win much last year (at least until September) but still managed to finish 4. until September, he can win points almost everywhere (especially Wimby and US Open). He’s been on the Tour for 7 years. He has a few years on top left. There hare many young guns out there who know how to play also ( Nadal...). He wants more slams. So I guess he knows what he’s got to do.
And we also know what we’ve got to do: support and enjoy.

Basically I just wondered what do you think we can expect?
(gotta talk about something during tournaments, right? Am I right?)

tall_one
03-03-2005, 08:08 PM
Good that I don't set my feet @ Safinator, soon I'll be completely out of tgfr too.
actually Christine got sick of it too and screamed at everyone who kept doing it :lol: not sure if it will help, but atleast she can delete any threads that annoy her :p

PennyThePenguin
03-04-2005, 01:54 PM
Thanks Nicki for answering. LOL, the yellowest Russian paper really had a headline "Safin to get married" *major :rolleyes: And then it's of course only that Volkov was joking at the DC training. OH DEAR I am tired of all this! *expecting another wave of teenie screaming* And I have a headache! Good that I don't set my feet @ Safinator, soon I'll be completely out of tgfr too. I thought you girls were overexaggerating (as I wasn't reading any of the stuff) but well, my patience has hit the limit now too. Sorry for the rant.


:hug: :hug:
i konw what u mean..and i saw the little "discussion" *ahem* on tgfr.... that's why we have our secret hiding place ma'am! and i'm SO GLAD once again that u joined us here

PennyThePenguin
03-04-2005, 01:58 PM
actually Christine got sick of it too and screamed at everyone who kept doing it :lol: not sure if it will help, but atleast she can delete any threads that annoy her :p

i wish i could ban ppl that annoy me..there are a few on my hit list right now :p

MariaV
03-04-2005, 04:53 PM
i wish i could ban ppl that annoy me..there are a few on my hit list right now :p

Aww, glad I'm not one of them. ;)
But seriously, yeah, it's become pretty annoying at tgfr.

chrissiej
03-04-2005, 04:58 PM
Aww, glad I'm not one of them. ;)
But seriously, yeah, it's become pretty annoying at tgfr.

tgfwhere...? ;)

PennyThePenguin
03-05-2005, 01:37 AM
awww chwissiej....good question :D

alexa18
03-05-2005, 03:39 AM
I'm sorry that I brought up the engagement rumour :banghead: the girls on safinator forum were just going crazy :o and I just wanted to know what was happing. Sorry if I annoyed anyone :awww: :awww:

meena
03-11-2005, 06:01 AM
I was just wondering if someone who spoke russian could translate this article. It is about Marat's F1 appearance in Moscow. Here's the link

http://eg.ru/Publication.mhtml?PubID=6570&Menu=&Part=16

Thanks a lot.

mer
03-11-2005, 07:41 AM
I was just wondering if someone who spoke russian could translate this article. It is about Marat's F1 appearance in Moscow. Here's the link

http://eg.ru/Publication.mhtml?PubID=6570&Menu=&Part=16

Thanks a lot.

Another repulsive tabloid article :(
Nothing interesting, only one line about Marat "...new Safin's girlfriend Dasha was watching in anger Marat talking habitually to some shabby blondies"

PennyThePenguin
03-11-2005, 01:14 PM
Another repulsive tabloid article :(
Nothing interesting, only one line about Marat "...new Safin's girlfriend Dasha was watching in anger Marat talking habitually to some shabby blondies"


geeeeeee.............. another one of those...:ras:

Magda
03-11-2005, 02:36 PM
:hug: :hug:
i konw what u mean..and i saw the little "discussion" *ahem* on tgfr.... that's why we have our secret hiding place ma'am! and i'm SO GLAD once again that u joined us here
too bad the secret hiding place became quiet :sad:

tgfwhere...? ;)
:lol: :smooch: ;)

PennyThePenguin
03-11-2005, 02:38 PM
well it wouldn't be quiet if ppl would TALK instead of lurk :sad: just post anything! like we used to on WHAT DO YOU SAY!

Magda
03-11-2005, 02:43 PM
well it wouldn't be quiet if ppl would TALK instead of lurk :sad: just post anything! like we used to on WHAT DO YOU SAY!
well.... okay i'll try my rambling then...
But people even stopped coming there...... :sad: like Meeksy and Anita.... :sad: Anita is studying so she's got excuse.... But Meeksy....... :smash:

Nimomunz
03-11-2005, 02:47 PM
Personally if i was Dasha i would find those snide tabloid comments amusing! :)

PennyThePenguin
03-11-2005, 02:49 PM
BAAADDD MIEKOS....BAAAADDD BAAAAAAADDD MIEKOS... you should come miekos...so u'd know what's going on and not say that u don't get what's going on and thus have nothing to say :sad: :sad: :sad: but i'm off topic of course...once more the tabloids have done it again.....wonder whether the PTs will go berserk now.

Meeek
03-11-2005, 04:23 PM
Tuttuttut...I see you guys can't live without me eh?! :p ;)
Alright already, I'll make my grande re-entrence soon. I shall try to think of something to post. I just hardly ever feel like reading all the 238173876321 pages that are written, like in the beginning when I came every other day. :lol:

Buuuuut I luv you guys (girls) too :smooch: :hug:

Nimomunz
03-11-2005, 06:12 PM
Aww, glad I'm not one of them. ;)
But seriously, yeah, it's become pretty annoying at tgfr.
I like tgfr, i like Ruth and she's doing her best to control the Marat and Dasha thread. She keeps telling people to read wat was written before so they dont post stuff on the 52nd page like "So wat nationality is Dasha?" "I like her hair in pic 1 as oposed to pic2"etc I had a good rant on that thread :( bout useless posts that just repeat everythin that has already been written and got some support from Marcela, me and Ruth :wavey: but alas tis still going on!
Dont boycott tgfr just cause of overzealous fans from AO! Ruth does so much work and she's such a fan that she's using her time to devote a website to an athlete she respects!!!! :angel:
Dunno much bout safinator so ......

maratski
03-11-2005, 06:22 PM
tgfr :tape:
ruth :tape: :o

BelgianWaffle
03-11-2005, 06:29 PM
tgfr :tape:
ruth :tape: :o

I don't like to diss someone that puts a lot of effort in maintaining a website (besides sometimes I read there too) but I have to admit that the
Dasha-thread is working on my nerves. It's the longest thread on the board :tape: and mostly it's just jealous talk of teenage girls.

Also, fanfiction is just :o
What if Marat would actually read it. I'd be embarrased that I put that smut on my site :o

Shadow
03-11-2005, 06:30 PM
tgfr :tape:
ruth :tape: :o

I second that! ;) (no words)

maratski
03-11-2005, 06:34 PM
I don't like to diss someone that puts a lot of effort in maintaining a website (besides sometimes I read there too) but I have to admit that the
Dasha-thread is working on my nerves. It's the longest thread on the board :tape: and mostly it's just jealous talk of teenage girls.

Also, fanfiction is just :o
What if Marat would actually read it. I'd be embarrased that I put that smut on my site :o

I won't diss people here, but got a very clear opinion on the board, thread, person who posted more shit in it then anyone. :tape:

Meeek
03-11-2005, 08:01 PM
tgfr :tape:
ruth :tape: :o

Ah yes, I second that as well.
From the moment she said I had no manners for calling those psycho teenies "pathetic". Basicly, she felt offended herself I guess...

Aargh, I won't start again :tape:

BelgianWaffle
03-11-2005, 08:19 PM
Aargh, I won't start again :tape:

Yes, let's not ;) :hug:

chrissiej
03-11-2005, 08:20 PM
Ah yes, I second that as well.
From the moment she said I had no manners for calling those psycho teenies "pathetic". Basicly, she felt offended herself I guess...

Aargh, I won't start again :tape:

sssh ssshhh miek, we don't want to get you all worked up over this again ;)

maratski
03-11-2005, 08:21 PM
Yes, let's not ;) :hug:

you know we don't want to! ;)

Nimomunz
03-11-2005, 09:05 PM
Still trying to defend Ruth here......well when she locked the thread she got loads of emails bitching and whining :hysteric: bout that so wats a gal to do???? :confused:

Bout fanfiction....... I agree but there're many more people who like them so who are we to say they cant enjoy! I'm a liberal-minded person if two men wanna marry, go ahead, if teen girls (or guys-see how openminded i am) wanna lust over Marat on their keyboards, let'em go at it!!! :baby:

tall_one
03-11-2005, 09:21 PM
Still trying to defend Ruth here......well when she locked the thread she got loads of emails bitching and whining :hysteric: bout that so wats a gal to do???? :confused:
defending Ruth here is a waste of time and effort, there are things that happened between her and people here years ago. You aren't going to change anyone's mind about her, atleast not on here.

MariaV
03-11-2005, 10:37 PM
Anyone can update me re Ruth? I don't read the teenie spam there. I only go to Tournament thread so... Please enlighten me.

RogiFan88
03-12-2005, 01:02 AM
If you haven't seen this yet:

An interview with:


MARAT SAFIN

THE MODERATOR: Questions for Marat .

Q. What do you think about the rivalry between you and the other three in the Top 4 right now? Looks like it's starting to materialize into one of those kind of special rivalries amongst four guys.

MARAT SAFIN: Hopefully will become classics, you know. This is probably the goal of every generation. Of course, Roger , he made -- he put the tennis on the higher level, much higher level. So like basically three of us were behind him. We've been there for a long time already, and we adjusted to his game so basically we can compete with him.

Everybody who wants to be in this top five, in top group of tennis needs to adjust himself to Roger . So basically he's leading the group. But I think it's good for tennis because tennis improve -- has improved so much that any guy who is in top hundred can play great tennis.

Q. What have you done to adjust your game to Roger's ?

MARAT SAFIN: Improve a lot of things. Improve being more professional, being more consistent, I guess, was not my case, but I'm getting there. But I think everybody who wants to be there needs to be consistent throughout the year.

Of course, there are going to be ups and downs and nobody can avoid this. But especially has to be as close as possible.

Of course, I need to have a complete game to be able to compete at a top level.

Q. How do you see Roddick and Hewitt ? What kind of adjustment did you see them make?

MARAT SAFIN: That's completely different styles of games. But there are basics on what they do. Of course, Roddick , he has a huge serve. He has probably best serve on the ATP Tour . Hewitt has the best legs and the best fighting spirit in the world. So that's why they are there.

Q. What improvements did they make to close that gap between them and Roger ?

MARAT SAFIN: Yeah, if you -- I mean, if you follow tennis for last couple of -- last five years, Hewitt improved a lot his serve, his forehand, his volley. He can volley. Of course, return was his best shot. And also the fighting spirit that he's always fighting, he is always there.

Roddick improve his volleys. I mean, it's incredible. He's moving much better. He became much smarter, of course. All of us, we have much more experience than before. Of course, we are growing. It's already enough. You can't improve much more.

Q. You've been No. 1 before. You spent a lot of effort during the few months after you won the US Open by getting to that No. 1 spot. To get to No. 1 again this year, there's so much distance between you and Roger . How much is it going to take from you physically and mentally to get to that position again?

MARAT SAFIN: Well, it's a little bit too early to speak about, speculate about who going to be No. 1 in the world, what it will take and everything.

Of course, everybody has an opportunity because, as we know, there is a race. Race eventually at the end of the year becoming a real ranking, which is basically the old ranking. There's two systems, right? One is like Roger is No. 1, and another one is Roger is No. 1, but another one is a race. At the end of the year, it's real.

So basically it's who going to make more best results throughout the year will become No. 1 in the world. And everybody has a chance because we're starting from zero points.

Q. And you started very well to this year.

MARAT SAFIN: Yeah, but it's only beginning.

Q. You won your two Grand Slams . Obviously, winning Roland Garros would be a great thing for you, I'm sure. Wimbledon is another question. Being No. 1 for a longer period of time - I think you were No. 1 for a couple of weeks.

MARAT SAFIN: 12 (smiling).

Q. Sorry, 12 weeks. But for an extended period, that might be something you desire again. What would it take for you mentally, physically to go all the way up there?

MARAT SAFIN: Like I said before, you have to be consistent, you have to be really committed to what you're doing. It's like day to day, every day it's a work. You don't have -- you have to sacrifice a lot of things, unfortunately, because you can't play tennis and at same time enjoy and everything. But you try. Because if you don't enjoy, you can't play tennis.

So you have to find the right balance, find the right people next to you, around you, just be focused, be ready for anything what's going to happen throughout the year and take every match very serious because everybody going to try to beat you, because basically nobody has nothing to lose against you, as well as against Roger , against Hewitt , against Roddick , against the top guys.

The guys that are behind us, they going to go for it, because for them it's a great challenge and it's a great opportunity to, you know, get the confidence and basically break through, especially in the big tournaments like Masters Series events, Grand Slams , et cetera.

Q. How much has it helped having Peter Lundgren on your team, specifically at the Australian Open ?

MARAT SAFIN: It was really -- it is really important to have a right person in the box that will be able to control your emotions, to work on the things that need to be worked before actually, but eventually it took me like a couple of years, you know, to really realize it and to find the right coach. And, of course, it's difficult to find the right one because all of the right ones are busy, and the other ones that have been great players before, they don't want to travel. And you need to have a right person next to you if you want to achieve something big in tennis.

He did a great job. Like it took us a couple of months to get some results. Eventually they came. Now it's working because we found -- we know each other much better and it's easy to work, it's easy to communicate.

Q. Should the No. 1 rivalry in men's tennis become you and Roger , do you think the American people would accept that and embrace it, because there wouldn't be an American involved? What do you think about that?

MARAT SAFIN: Why? Roddick is there.

Q. But he wouldn't be involved in it. It would be you and Roger . You'd be the two big guys.

MARAT SAFIN: Well, thank you very much for the compliment. But still, you know, is like another top players that they won't let me do this. And also Roger , being in the top of the game, because they want to be also there, because it's the real sweet spot. Everybody wants to get there.

And I think Roddick , he has the potential to be there. That's why he changed the coach. I think he's doing pretty well. He's really, really dangerous at any surfaces. So won't be so easy, unfortunately.

Q. But he wouldn't be involved in this scenario that I just created. It would be you and Roger .

MARAT SAFIN: I'm satisfied with that. For me, it's fine.

Q. Do you think the American people would be satisfied with it, to have a leading rivalry without an American ?

MARAT SAFIN: I have a lot of Russians behind me.

Q. Playing the French team in Moscow in July in Davis Cup , how do you feel?

MARAT SAFIN: For us actually it's a big year in Davis Cup , we have to admit. To be honest, everybody is talking about it because it's the year that basically all the matches we're going to play at home. We want to do really well because it might be the last opportunity for us to do well. Hopefully not. It's a big year. Basically it's a big year for us.

We want to do well. We going to play in front of our home crowd. We going to get to the semifinals. Against the French team, it's easier to play at home than in Paris . But it's a big match for us. It's going to be big match for all the guys, my partners in the team. Because, you know, everybody except me and Youzhny , Davydenko didn't play a lot of matches in the Davis Cup , so it's going to be a huge test for them also.

Q. What did you think when you saw that the US lost at home to Ivan Ljubicic -- I mean, Croatia ?

MARAT SAFIN: They had no chance against us anyway. They were not dangerous this year at all because we will play at home also. There is no chance for them, unfortunately (smiling).

Q. After the Croatians won, they all said that the team they feel is the most dangerous is Russia .

MARAT SAFIN: It's us, of course.

Q. They got it right?

MARAT SAFIN: Yes, they know (smiling).

Q. You talk about the sacrifices to achieve that balance that you probably have learned over the past five years. What are the biggest sacrifices that you've given up?

MARAT SAFIN: Well, you can't -- basically we don't have the regular life of, you know, like the young person. Basically everybody goes to college, to university, then they have a couple of years to decide what they want to do. They go to the shrink, all this stuff. So basically we're already grown-ups. We have to be really professional.

We can't go like, for example, take a week off and go hiking somewhere, you know, go fishing or do whatever we want to do. Traveling, for example, some people do half a year of traveling around the world. We can't do this. We can't have fun sometimes like for three months, whatever, do whatever we want. We can't because we have to be professional. We can't. We can't. We can't.

Q. You said many times in the past that you're not the type of person who can go hotel, tournament, plane every single day, that you need to have at least a little fun, a little outside life. Maybe it's not six months, but one day here, one day there, being a regular person. If you're not enjoying it, right, you can't enjoy your tennis.

MARAT SAFIN: That's what I'm doing. I'm trying to do, trying to squeeze the maximum of my time free. Whenever I have time free, I try to rest as much as I can because really it takes a lot of energy for us, believe it or not, being on the court, especially in the heat. It's a lot of pressure, a lot -- takes a lot of energy, a lot of pressure. You have to be mentally tough. Even maybe sometimes you go for a month and a half outside of home. You don't really see your family. You're actually talks to the people, they don't even speak your language.

For example, in autumn we going to go to Asia . Sorry with all the respect to Asian people, I love to spend there, but for one month and a half, it's a little bit too rough without going home. That's what I mean, sacrifices, because you cannot go there for a week and say, "No, I had enough, I have to leave." No, you're committed to the tournaments. You're committed for what you're doing. It's your job. So you can't. You have to be there. You have to stay for one month and a half and deal with that.

Of course, it's fun when you are winning. But when you are not winning...

Q. It's been difficult for people who follow tennis to predict how you will do at a certain event. When you enter an event, do you have a feeling of how well you might play?

MARAT SAFIN: Of course, every -- well, every tournament that I come, everybody comes, I mean, for sure, everybody feels the same. Everybody wants to do well. And everybody is working hard and practicing and doing everything is possible to be as fit as they can before the tournament.

But it doesn't really -- you don't make sure that you're going to do well. You might have a bad day, you're not lucky. Maybe the linesmen will call out when the ball is in, for example. All kinds of things can happen. You don't really feel good on the court. You don't feel comfortable. You're not feeling the ball. So many reasons that you might lose in the first round, especially the first round is the most difficult one, especially when they coming to the desert, when the ball is flying.

Takes you like five days to really get used to the courts, to the balls, to the crowd, to the air, to the heat, to everything. You might lose.

But, of course, you have to be prepared. And, of course, you're fighting. Of course, you're running. Of course, you're shouting, breaking racquets and everything. You do everything that's possible to win because you didn't fly 12 hours here to lose the first round. You want to do well. Of course, you have to be as confident as you can, to be able to pass the first two rounds, to get used to it. And then, of course, if you got the confidence, the right confidence, they can expect for the good result.

But I don't think first or second round is a great result for any player.

Q. First round is hardest round for you?

MARAT SAFIN: For everybody. For everybody. Because it's the round that everybody -- most of the players are really nervous because they want to do well, of course. Especially when you are playing in desert, have you to get used to it, like I said, heat, everything, all the conditions.

Q. I spoke to Dinara the other day. She gives you a lot of credit for advising her, helping her learn to trust herself on court and not look to other people to help her when she's out there. How proud of her were you when she won the title in Paris ? Talk about your relationship with her.

MARAT SAFIN: Of course, I'm happy that she's -- whenever she does well, I'm more than happy. What the most makes me feel good is that she really likes tennis, she really enjoying it, and she's happy with that. It doesn't matter -- for me as a brother, it doesn't matter if she going to win all the titles in the world, she going to become the best player in the world. I want her to be happy, just a happy person.

Of course, everybody knows life is too short, you know, to waste time on useless things, being unhappy. She should. Why not? She has all the support, my support, the family support, to be happy. And that's why I'm trying to give all the advices in the world in order for her to be happy. I will never criticize her. I will never complain about her. I just want her to be happy and to make right decisions. Of course, is difficult to explain to the girl that she's 18 years old what is right and what is wrong. But at the end eventually she will make her mistakes in order to be able to improve herself as a person.

Q. Last year we saw three Russian women break through and win slams. You won a Slam . Took you a few years to win your second one. What sort of advice would you give to three young Russians who won Slams as they pursue these titles as defending champions?

MARAT SAFIN: What advice can I give to them when they're going to defend the title?

Q. What advice would you give to someone who breaks through and wins a Slam at a young age.

MARAT SAFIN: Then has to come back and defend?

Q. Yes.

MARAT SAFIN: That they don't have to come back and thinking about defending. They should be coming and thinking about winning it. It's completely opposite way of thinking. Pessimism, optimism. A lot of people, what's happening, they saying, "Oh, I have to defend. What I'm going to do? I wish I could get to the fourth round and then I'm okay, I have no pressure." You don't have to come this way, thinking this way. You should come there, be strong, saying, "I'm coming here to win it. Why not? Why is not possible to win it two years in a row?" Of course, it's possible.

So whatever comes comes. No matter if she No. 4 in the world, she going to win it, if she lose in the first round, she going to be No. 6, big deal. No. 10, big deal. If she has the potential, she'll be there always. Instead of winning Wimbledon , she going to win the French Open . The person who won the French Open , okay, she will make the semifinals here and they're going to win in another tournament there.

But you should come there and feel free and feel like why not, you have a chance to win it.

Q. People don't usually go in with that mentality. How hard is it?

MARAT SAFIN: It's hard. It's hard because everybody knows their weaknesses, as well as I know my weaknesses. It's difficult to deal with them sometimes when you're feeling the pressure. The pressure is the most dangerous thing, most dangerous thing in tennis. Once you get too much pressure on yourself, you can't play, you choke. This is the worst what can happen to any player in any sport, to choke.

Q. Do you feel any different going back on the road after winning the Australian , your second Grand Slam , compared to the US Open ?

MARAT SAFIN: I forget already that feeling, you know, five years ago. Because you start to look at the things a little bit different way. You have much more experience than I used to have five years ago. I had no clue basically. It happened to me, was fun, was cool. Basically also I became No. 1 in the world. I didn't know what to do, what else to do. That's basically for the player.

I don't know, Roger , how he's still playing. It gets to a point, for him it's even tougher because for him it's so, so simple, tennis, he wins all the Grand Slams he wants, whenever he wants. Okay, he had bad luck against me. But he's No. 1 in the world. So for him it should be boring playing tennis. People should admire him. To come back and back, come back to the tournaments and play, everybody wants to beat you, and you can't -- you almost touching the roof. You touch the roof. Is difficult to come back and play.

But my -- you know, I still have many goals. I hope I will achieve much more than what I did before. This is my goal. I have something to climb up, way to climb up.

Q. Do you have any superstitions about playing certain tournaments that you do well at? In Bercy , you do well, you won it a few times.

MARAT SAFIN: Yeah, here, for example, I never pass the second round.

Q. Hopefully you'll do better.

MARAT SAFIN: I hope so also. Not much you can do. Just need to be -- you have to be prepared. Whenever you have bad luck, bad luck. Is not my best week, for sure. There's like some tournaments I really never did well. Every year you come back and you try to do something different, work a little bit harder, less, do something fun. You know, like try to change a little bit so in order to maybe this year, because you have the expectation, maybe this year. This year maybe is going to be the one that I'm going to pass, I don't know, at least two rounds I'm going to win.

Q. Do you think it affects you mentally when you go to the tournament, you never get past the first or second round? Does it affect you the next year?

MARAT SAFIN: No, because you already know. You know this feeling. Basically you have nothing to defend. It's already you have no pressure, which is a good thing, good start.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports

http://www.pacificlifeopen.com/en/players/interviews/interviews/05_safin5.asp

As always, interesting comments fr Marat!

Nimomunz
03-12-2005, 01:18 AM
defending Ruth here is a waste of time and effort, there are things that happened between her and people here years ago. You aren't going to change anyone's mind about her, atleast not on here.
Oops didnt know bout that!!!
:smooch: Thanks tall one!

Thanks for the article Rogiman!!!!

RogiFan88
03-12-2005, 01:47 AM
i'm not rogiman... ;) but you're welcome anyway!

Aurora
03-12-2005, 02:03 PM
didn't know where to put this, but you can download a few matches from Marat here:

http://tennis.fisma.net/download/Masters/

Masters semi against Federer
Madrid semi against Agassi
Monte Carlo quarters against Coria.

Those are huge files with I think the whole matches (I've downloaded the Fed match but haven't watched it yet)

also the AO final from last year, but seeing the size of the file (325 MB) I don't think it's the whole match

http://tennis.fisma.net/download/Grand%20Slam/AustralianOpen/

junekidd
03-12-2005, 02:44 PM
thanks Hanneke. :worship:

it is a little bit weird... I clicked the " 2004 Madrid Safin-Agassi.avi" link. it began to download without asking anything... shouldn't it ask me if I would "save as..." or sth else? :scratch: it is really big and my comp is so slow now... I will try again tomorrow. it won't be deleted quickly, will it?

Nimomunz
03-12-2005, 03:14 PM
i'm not rogiman... ;) but you're welcome anyway!
hehehe guess i'm going a little dyslexic!!!!
ALL THE BAD SPELLERS OF THE WORLD UNTIE!!

foul_dwimmerlaik
03-12-2005, 04:32 PM
Very interesting interview, thanks RogiFan88!

Aurora
03-12-2005, 04:45 PM
it won't be deleted quickly, will it?don't think so. Lady told me it breaks down sometimes, but it's always back quickly.

Damita
03-12-2005, 09:30 PM
thanks Rogifan88 for the interview. Interesting. I love the way he speaks about their DC team.... very optimist and self-confident ;)

Hannecke, thank you so much for those links!!!! :hug: oh, i'm gonn atry to dowload the match vs Andre right now! :bounce:

Aurora
03-12-2005, 10:02 PM
:wavey: report how it goes and if it's any good.

Damita
03-12-2005, 10:37 PM
i can't even open the page :sad: i've tried witout my firewall, but it still didn't work :rolleyes:

drf716
03-14-2005, 01:29 AM
March 13, 2005

Safin Uses His Charm to Mitigate Any Harm
# Russian has a winning personality to smooth over rough spots in his winning tennis game.

By Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer

Who needs handlers and spinners if you are Marat Safin?

"Write nice things about me," he says, smiling.

It's not an order. Well … maybe not.

This is a guy who won't allow his personality to be airbrushed by operatives. The 25-year-old Russian has always done his own retouching, and quite successfully, at that. Few are better at softening an outrageous quote or action with a wink and a smile.

He tosses a racket or breaks one, and there's soap-box talk that he's hurting the game. The best example came when Safin dropped his shorts at the French Open last year, receiving almost as much attention for that in some quarters as he did for winning the 2000 U.S. Open.

There was no fine for the moon moment over Paris. Randy Moss pretends to drop and gets hit with a $10,000 fine from the NFL.

"There's no such thing as bad press. It's a press and they write about you, it's already a good thing," Safin said in an interview during the Pacific Life Open in the players' lounge at Indian Wells Tennis Garden.

The tilt has been pro-Safin, and then some, in 2005. He shook off the heavy specter of the one-Slam-wonder tag, finally winning No. 2 in spectacular fashion in Melbourne at the Australian Open in January.

In the semifinals, he beat defending champion Roger Federer of Switzerland in a five-set epic, fighting off a match point, and ended Federer's 26-match winning streak. Instead of faltering at the finish line because of exhaustion — the way he did in the 2004 Australian Open final — Safin got across it, fighting off Lleyton Hewitt of Australia and an expectant nation with the help of Federer's former coach, Peter Lundgren.

Safin has been thinking about the Federer match, probably because he is often asked about it. Federer had been carrying an aura of invincibility, having won three of the four Grand Slam tournaments in 2004 and not lost to a player ranked in the top 10 since the fall of 2003.

"You want this match to be a classic like [Boris] Becker-[Stefan] Edberg. Safin-Federer," Safin said. "Different generations. Win or lose, you are really having fun and enjoying it. No matter how hard it is, you remember the feeling on the court. And I'm still remembering.

"These kind of matches, you can't forget the feeling. I remember when I played against [Pete] Sampras five years ago. It was such a special feeling. It's like for the people to win an Oscar when they did a great movie. For example, if you ask Robert DeNiro, or Marlon Brando — well, you can't ask him — but what was the experience when you did 'The Godfather'?"

Safin admired the way Federer responded in defeat.

"If you are a loser, you have to accept that somebody beat you and that somebody beat you fairly, and show your face," Safin said. "And he did. He looked in the eyes. It's very important for people to look in the eyes after they finish the match."

That doesn't always happen. Safin used a colorful expletive to describe what he thought of players who look away and offer a half-hearted handshake.

"It shouldn't be this way," he said. "Whenever you lose, whatever, 'Well done.' "

Safin's victory has changed the landscape at the top of men's tennis. He has forced Federer to respond, and the Swiss player has won two tournaments since then. Federer and Safin could meet in the semifinals here at Indian Wells. They both will play their openers today: Federer vs. Mardy Fish and Safin vs. Jarkko Nieminen of Finland.

"It's not like I lost in straight sets and had no chance against Safin," Federer said. "Then you could wonder. But the way the match turned out, for me it was quickly forgotten."

Not by his other colleagues on the tour. Andre Agassi was asked the other day about trying to catch up to the four at the top of the game: "Andy Roddick, Roger Federer, Lleyton Hewitt and whatnot."

Agassi smiled, saying: "The 'whatnot' would be Safin, right?"

Safin had been viewed as the wild card in the bunch. Supremely talented, something of a simmering volcano. He was capable of playing any shot, at any time. Or saying anything, anywhere. The words "no comment" aren't part of his vocabulary, in any language, and Safin did not disappoint in a couple of a wide-ranging interviews last week.



• On using line-calling technology: "Why not? It's the right direction. Because a lot of close calls, they change a lot of matches. One day you are a little unlucky and you lose the match. If you would have won that match you would have won the tournament. It is a matter of centimeters. Two centimeters can change whole life."

• On Federer's excellence: "He wins all the Grand Slams he wants, whenever he wants. OK, he had bad luck against me. But he's No. 1 in the world. So for him it should be boring playing tennis. People should admire him. To come back and back, come back to the tournaments and play, everybody wants to beat you … you touch the roof. Is difficult to come back and play.

"I still have many goals. I hope I will achieve much more than what I did before. This is my goal. I have something to climb up, way to climb up."

mer
03-14-2005, 08:54 AM
http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-tenmen14mar14,1,204649.story?coll=la-headlines-sports&ctrack=1&cset=true

Safin Gets Past All Obstacles
Russian fights off the elements and two match points to beat Nieminen at Indian Wells.

By Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer


The enemies were everywhere Marat Safin of Russia looked on Sunday at Indian Wells.

Swirling winds, sand and a tricky left-hander — in no specific order. About the only thing in his favor was that the left-hander across the net was not his nemesis, Fabrice Santoro of France.

But Jarkko Nieminen of Finland was doing his best to drive Safin to distraction and nearly drove him straight out of the Indian Wells Tennis Garden. Twice Nieminen held match point, both in the 10th game of the third set, and twice Safin responded by forcing the issue by coming to the net, fighting off the second with a backhand volley.

The fourth-seeded Safin won the second-round match at the Pacific Life Open, 4-6, 6-1, 7-5, in 2 hours 4 minutes, hitting 40 winners and 46 unforced errors.

"Today is not really the day to enjoy tennis, actually," Safin said. "Even for the spectators, is a little bit freezing. It's not really like the day you really enjoy tennis….You need to survive. You need to just hang in there, wait for your opportunities and just win the match ugly, which also counts."

So what was going through his mind on the two match points against him?

"I was really disappointed because I was starting to play well," Safin said. "Actually, second set I played pretty good for that kind of conditions. And to lose this kind of a match, because if you're playing bad and you lose, it's OK. But when you're trying to play well and you lose, it's a little bit bad, especially in a big tournament.

"I was pretty disappointed with myself, with everything, with the weather, with myself, the way Jarkko was playing."

He wasn't the only one in survival mode in the second round. Tense matches were the norm on the men's side: Safin was one of three players to win after facing at least one match point.

Jan Hernych of the Czech Republic fought off one match point to defeat Vince Spadea, 6-2, 1-6, 7-6 (6), and Santoro managed to escape three match points, defeating No. 11 Joachim Johansson of Sweden, 4-6, 6-2, 7-6 (6).

Safin could sympathize with the Swede. He has been there before, and then some, against the crafty Santoro, beating him once in eight matches, and oftentimes, generally losing it.

"He drove me crazy for many years. I'm his client," Safin said. " … But he's still there. He is a great talent of making people crazy on the court…. He knows how to play. He has a lot of years of experience. You can see that even Joachim Johansson, he's in great shape, and he's playing really great tennis and serving well, forehand, backhand, there is nothing wrong with his game. He manage to lose to Santoro."

Safin has never gone past the third round at Indian Wells in six previous trips here. He will try to break the desert jinx against Taylor Dent of Newport Beach. Dent's place in the third round appeared in serious doubt when he lost the first set against Cyril Saulnier of France, 6-1, and received a code violation.

"I'd been threatening to break that [racket] all the first set," said Dent, who won the second-round match, 1-6, 7-6 (1), 6-2. "I said, 'Just do it, get it off your mind.' You know, I did it. A couple of points later, I realized, 'I'm going to have to really fire myself up here.' "

Dent took some ribbing in good humor when someone asked him who had been playing for him in the first set.

"Well, it felt like my little brother was out there playing," he said, smiling. "My little brother probably would have made a better show of it."

His brother is 9 years old.

"He's going to be a monster," Dent said. "His feet are already like Shaq."

Not all the matches were marathons. Defending champion and top-seeded Roger Federer of Switzerland made it 5-0 against Mardy Fish, winning, 6-3, 6-3, and in an all-Spanish encounter, No. 7 Carlos Moya defeated Juan Carlos Ferrero, 6-3, 6-4. And in a night match, second-seeded Lleyton Hewitt of Australia beat Robby Ginepri, 6-2, 7-6 (2).

Federer had the advantage of playing before conditions grew more difficult. Though the temperature dropped and the winds started picking up in the second set, Federer, who has lost only one set in five matches against Fish, hardly looked ruffled.

"It was tough from then on to really get some good rallies going," Federer said. "But I was always ahead. Made it easy."

drf716
03-21-2005, 02:39 AM
Safin on rise with latest coach

BY CHARLES BRICKER

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. - (KRT) - It was one of those training session crescendo rallies with Marat Safin and Alex Bogomolov firing at each other Sunday on the stadium court, three days before the start of the Nasdaq-100 Open.

It started with Bogomolov at the net and a couple of light touches of the ball when Safin's ground strokes took on more and more pace and Bogomolov's volleys more and more sting - until the two were slamming reflex volleys at each other from point blank range.

Safin finished it with a backhand, they smiled at each other and, as they took a break, Safin joked, ``On the practice court, I'm No. 1 in the world.''

He's again taking on the aspect of a No. 1 in the rankings, too, after defeating Roger Federer in the semifinal of the Australian Open and racing out to a 10-2 record this season.

No one has doubted Safin's physical gifts since he crushed Pete Sampras in the 2000 U.S. Open. But it has taken affable coach Peter Lundgren, 4 1/2 years later, to bring some order to Safin's mentality, which once seemed to be flying in five directions at once.

``First of all, you have to get the respect from the player,'' Lundgren said.

``And it took a while for us to get to know each other. But maybe that's my strength. I can feel his mood because I was a player myself.''

Safin, ranked No. 4, had been through a succession of coaches when he hired Lundgren at the Italian Open in May 2004.

They didn't get off to a good start as he won only 12 of 22 matches from there through a first-round loss to Tommy Enqvist at the U.S. Open. And then, bingo.

Safin won three titles, two of them Masters Series events, at Beijing, Madrid and Paris, then blazed through the Aussie Open in January and is 25-5 since the loss to Enqvist.

Safin is 25 now and Lundgren used a well known argument to get his client to commit himself fully to his tennis, pointing out that he had perhaps five good seasons left and did he want to look back on a wasted career, wondering how much he could have accomplished had he applied himself with the zeal of Federer or Pete Sampras.

Things are going well now, but it's still too early in the Safin-Lundgren relationship to predict it will continue on this positive course.

Safin's performance through the entire year will be a better test.

Safin arrived here after losing in the third round to Taylor Dent at Indian Wells and is well into his preparation for the Nasdaq.

``The whole thing is to not practice too much but to focus on what he should focus on,'' Lundgren said.

The win over Federer at Melbourne was especially delicious for Lundgren, who was fired by Federer after the 2003 season. He was asked if he had any particular wisdom to impart to Safin about Federer tendencies, if there are any.

``Yeah, a few things,'' said Lundgren, smiling.

Wednesday Addams
03-21-2005, 10:14 AM
Nice article, thanx! :hug:

Shadow
03-21-2005, 10:57 AM
thanks for the article. good to know that marat is practising in Miami!

PennyThePenguin
03-21-2005, 12:25 PM
good to know marat's working hard. lets see how things go this week!

MariaV
03-21-2005, 02:49 PM
Thanks for the article! :)

Damita
03-21-2005, 08:49 PM
:wavey: Thanks for the article

Safin's mentality, which once seemed to be flying in five directions at once. lol, five only? ;)

Nimomunz
03-22-2005, 01:04 AM
:wavey: Thanks for the article

lol, five only? ;)
Well lets be modest... :)

jmp
03-22-2005, 03:03 AM
Thanks for the articles, everyone. :) The Miami article sounds very encouraging. I think Peter and Marat are doing all the right things. If they stick to it, it's going to pay off. I'm hoping for a better run in Miami. Come on, Marat! :)

foul_dwimmerlaik
03-22-2005, 05:41 AM
Please ignore

~EMiLiTA~
04-02-2005, 01:41 PM
hi guys, this is an article from The Australian...hope it hasn't already been posted..

MARAT TORTURED BY GREATEST SUCCESS

Marat Safin still punishes himself with self-doubt two months after his Grand Slam win in Melbourne

There are those who believe that Marat Safin is the most sublime of tennis talents and the player best equipped to wage a serious threat to the imperious Roger Federer.

Others genuinely fear for the Russian's sanity, so often does his inner psyche suffer peaks and troughs that don't affect his peers.

Both schools of thought hoped that his triumph in the Australian Open, which included a truly epic semi-final victory over Federer followed by an emphatic win over Lleyton Hewitt to capture a long overdue second major title, would finally exorcise the demos that have tormented Safin for so long.

Two months on from his Melbourne victory, however, such expectations seem to have been blown away. A first-round exit in Dubai has been followed by disappointing third-round exits at the prestigious Masters Series events in Indian Wells and Miami.

Are those wondrous few days at Melbourne Park really still so fresh in the memory? Listening to Safin's lament, it seems as though it all happened an age ago.

"Everything is becoming more difficult," Safin moans with the hang-dog look of a man struggling to recollect what it's like to win a match, let alone lift major prizes.

"It's difficult to go out there on court without the confidence, but it's almost inevitable. After Australia, there was always going to be a period when I went downhill again,"

Less tangled minds than Safin's would have sat back for a week or so after winning the year's opening major event, savoured every aspect of what he had achieved and then used it as a platform of self-esteem from which to build. But not this young man; he is almost using the trophy as a weight to drag himself down in self-doubt.

"I am not like Roger (Federer)," insisted Safin, apparently paying no heed to the five-set victory he scored against the Swiss. "He's way too high and has all the skills. Even when he is not playing well, he has enough feeling and talent to cover it up. Me, when I'm not playing well, I just suffer a little bit more and my game sinks because most of the time it's a risk."

Unlike Federer, who was utterly pragmatic after his loss in Australia and has regrouped superbly to collect successive titles in Rotterdam, Dubai and, most recently, Indian Wells, a handful of post-Melbourne defeats were all that was required to wreck Safin's poise.

Like many artists before him, Safin seemed to be set on a course of self-depreciation. "I'm a perfectionist," he claimed. "It's really difficult for me, you know, to admit or to accept that I'm not playing really well."

Had his Miami Masters opened against Irakli Labadze ended in another defeat instead of the extremely close 6-4 2-6 7-6 win, there is no telling how much Safin would have sunk. After all, he was facing the world's No. 105-ranked player, a man who really does have problems; Labadze has a kidney stone that regularly demands the strongest of painkillers, not to mention a subpoena from an Austrian court on the issue of possible match-fixing.

Safin, despite winning his first major title at the 2000 US Open, has long struggled with simply existing in America.

He has never progessed past the third round in seven attempts at Indian Wells, and apart from once making it the quarterfinals, he has been similarly ineffectual in Miami.

Repeatedly he has tried different approaches to overcome his alien feelings. Hotels have varied, along with the size of his travelling entourage. This year Safin was attempting to prove the more the merrier.

In an attempt to get back to family values, he has his girlfriend, his mother, Rausa, and his younger sister Dinara (a competitor on the WTA Tour) along for company, as well as coach Peter Lundgren and fitness trainer Walt Lammers (I think they mean Landers...and i thought he wasn't working with him anymore???)

"Everybody's here on my shoulders because I need the support," he said. "There are times when you bring people you know to carry you, and that's what I'm trying. If that doesn't work, next time I'll try something different again."

Yet all the regular hallmarks of the 25-year-old's frustrations have been there to see. He mangled two racquets after losing his temper in one match, and then ripped his shirt down to the line of his breast-bone before tugging it off his shoulders and tossing it away on the court in disgust. Of course he received the obligatory warning for his behaviour; it wouldn't be a true Safin struggle without a little enforced discipline thrown in.

The continuing disapppointment is that he needs to resort to such indiscretions. We hoped that Australia would represent a new dawn for this undeniably hugely talented individual. Sadly, that doesn't seem to be the case.

BelgianWaffle
04-02-2005, 02:00 PM
... and what a joyful article it is :eek:

~EMiLiTA~
04-02-2005, 02:42 PM
yes, that's what i thought too :rolleyes:

foul_dwimmerlaik
04-03-2005, 05:44 AM
Thanks for the article. Very depressing. :)

Action Jackson
04-03-2005, 08:04 AM
I read that article, maybe he just doesn't like playing the US too much and is more comfortable in Australia and Europe.

Marat's an enigma, but we all knew that and Em thanks for typing this article, so I didn't have to do it.

Bibir
04-03-2005, 10:00 AM
Marat doesn't like playing in US, that's a thing...but he was very erratic during the last year clay season in Europe too ...And he gave one of his more depressive itw after Hamburg. :sad:

I know he had personal problems..but it's still really difficult to understand his feelings..he's so easily bothered.

But if everything goes his way...

junekidd
04-03-2005, 10:17 AM
ohhhhhhhhh... bea, you mentioned that itw after Hamburg... I got crazy after reading that. :fiery: :banghead: but soon I realized that it was just the abreaction after a loss. no one could enjoy a loss, right?

I hold Marat could do better in Europ. he did not bad on clay before. let's hope at least there is no blister this year. *fingers crossed*

thanks for the article typing Emily. :)

Action Jackson
04-03-2005, 11:27 AM
Marat doesn't like playing in US, that's a thing...but he was very erratic during the last year clay season in Europe too ...And he gave one of his more depressive itw after Hamburg. :sad:

I know he had personal problems..but it's still really difficult to understand his feelings..he's so easily bothered.

But if everything goes his way...

Marat is more comfortable playing in Europe and Australia than the US. However that counts for nowt if the head isn't at the right place, he might be easily bothered or hypersensitive.

The thing I think with Marat is that he sometimes expects to play at the standard of the 2000 US Open final day in and day out. He needs to find a balance that suits him and suits him only, so he can do himself justice in relation to his tennis.

MariaV
04-03-2005, 12:21 PM
The thing I think with Marat is that he sometimes expects to play at the standard of the 2000 US Open final day in and day out. He needs to find a balance that suits him and suits him only, so he can do himself justice in relation to his tennis.

George, Marat himself has admitted that being the case. Although he understands he cannot play every day like he did in that USO final. So far he still hasn't been able to find the balance. :rolleyes:

Action Jackson
04-03-2005, 12:37 PM
George, Marat himself has admitted that being the case. Although he understands he cannot play every day like he did in that USO final. So far he still hasn't been able to find the balance. :rolleyes:

Marat's enigmatic if he wasn't, then I doubt he'd have half the fans that he has. Well he has mood swings that's him I mean he is not someone who has the Hrbaty or Muster like work ethic. I mean he has a top notch coach, but he has to do it for himself, if that means something like yoga to help his flexibility and keep him calm on the inside then do it, if it means going out all the time when he is away from tennis, then they might be it, but he needs to take responsibility.

PennyThePenguin
04-03-2005, 02:21 PM
thanks em...

tall_one
04-03-2005, 08:14 PM
Marat doesn't like playing in US, that's a thing......
huh?! what makes you think that? He has won the USO & Boston and made it to the final of Indianapolis. I don't think Marat cares (with the exception of Wimby) where he is playing

Bibir
04-03-2005, 08:30 PM
Yeah, but that was long time ago (in Marat's head)...and he said himself (last year I think) that the conditions in US were a little tough for him..
He's a very delicate person you know. ;)...That's why I supposed he didn't like that much playing in US.

tall_one
04-03-2005, 09:07 PM
:rolleyes: i think you are making excuses for him, he doesn't have a problem playing in the US

BelgianWaffle
04-03-2005, 09:11 PM
If he has than it's all in his head imo
The crap about not being able to play in IW and Miami.. :rolleyes:

Wednesday Addams
04-03-2005, 09:14 PM
If he has than it's all in his head imo
The crap about not being able to play in IW and Miami.. :rolleyes:
I know. Somebody better get that outta his head before it becomes pavlovian and turns into a Wimbledon-type blocage. :rolleyes:

BelgianWaffle
04-03-2005, 09:19 PM
Yep. sometimes peter should kick his ass because it's all his imagination that he can not do well in those tournaments. He apparently refuses to believe this. You don't see Hewitt or Roddick lose in the first two rounds of tournaments, unless they're injured or having an off-day. And even then they're usually scraping through.

BelgianWaffle
04-03-2005, 09:21 PM
Hmm this is actually the main thing that annoys me about Marat. He's charming and can always talk his way out of things but sometimes he should be more honest.

Wednesday Addams
04-03-2005, 09:26 PM
Yep. sometimes peter should kick his ass because it's all his imagination that he can not do well in those tournaments. He apparently refuses to believe this. You don't see Hewitt or Roddick lose in the first two rounds of tournaments, unless they're injured or having an off-day. And even then they're usually scraping through.
That has always been an ongoing issue with Marat. Combine his stubborness with his weird all-or-nothing-that's-life mentality, add a few mood swings and the word 'luck' and tadaaaaa....... he can't play in IW/Miami/Wimbledon.

BelgianWaffle
04-03-2005, 09:29 PM
Lol indeed.. well as long as you don't let it bother you too much it's fine. At least my life doesn't end when he looses a match, unlike some really obsessed fans ;)

BelgianWaffle
04-03-2005, 09:30 PM
oh btw I've been wanting to ask you for a week now, what does "savvy" mean ;)

Wednesday Addams
04-03-2005, 09:34 PM
Hmm this is actually the main thing that annoys me about Marat. He's charming and can always talk his way out of things but sometimes he should be more honest.
Being honest about yourself is very hard. And talking abt yourself in an honest way to the media is probably even harder. That's why I don't really mind (I let it slide) when I see him waffleing out of an issue in an interview by making a joke or talking nonsense. He's clearly avoiding being completely honest abt some things. And I can't blame him, 'cos I'd be doing that too if I were him.

BelgianWaffle
04-03-2005, 09:38 PM
Yep I always imagine what it must be like if I had to defend myself in front of a bunch of journalists and tv cameras after a really bad exam :lol:

Of course it's not easy being honest but :shrug:
Ah well I don't know the solution myself so I'll just shut up :p

Wednesday Addams
04-03-2005, 09:39 PM
oh btw I've been wanting to ask you for a week now, what does "savvy" mean ;)
lol It means 'Get it?'/'Understand?'/'Ya dig?'
HBO is showing 'Pirates of the Carribbean' like crazy these days and Johnny, as captain Jack Sparrow, says that a lot. And I absolutely love pirate expressions!! :worship:
Argh, ye scurvy dogs!!! :lol:

maratski
04-03-2005, 09:39 PM
Hmm this is actually the main thing that annoys me about Marat. He's charming and can always talk his way out of things but sometimes he should be more honest.

You raise a good point. The reason why I get so upset after certain losses is because of what Marat says. Take last year for instance. I really had no expectations last season, even not when he reached the AO final. After such things he starts talking about his form, goals, etc. Listening to Marat say he's fit, confident, etc. you believe him when he says he can do well. After saying such things he fails to deliver...Why say that you want something if you know you can't do it or aren't willing to make the effort. That's why I made some wonderful *cough* *cough* posts last season. ;)

I wish he would just shut up and do something instead of saying what he wants to do and fail. Better for him in the end and for us ;)

maratski
04-03-2005, 09:41 PM
Yep I always imagine what it must be like if I had to defend myself in front of a bunch of journalists and tv cameras after a really bad exam :lol:

Of course it's not easy being honest but :shrug:
Ah well I don't know the solution myself so I'll just shut up :p

I like honesty in people. I do know that you shouldn't be too honest, like me, but still...

Wednesday Addams
04-03-2005, 09:44 PM
Of course it's not easy being honest but :shrug:
Yeah, you're right, sometimes the bullshit is too much and I wish Marat had more nerve to just say it like it is and screw everybody, but..... I guess it's easy talking abt it, actually doing that must be harder. Dunno. :shrug: So I guess I'll shut up too. :)

BelgianWaffle
04-03-2005, 09:45 PM
You raise a good point. The reason why I get so upset after certain losses is because of what Marat says. Take last year for instance. I really had no expectations last season, even not when he reached the AO final. After such things he starts talking about his form, goals, etc. Listening to Marat say he's fit, confident, etc. you believe him when he says he can do well. After saying such things he fails to deliver...Why say that you want something if you know you can't do it or aren't willing to make the effort. That's why I made some wonderful *cough* *cough* posts last season. ;)

I wish he would just shut up and do something instead of saying what he wants to do and fail. Better for him in the end and for us ;)

Those three words I put in bold caught my attention. That's the point. We believe him and that makes it difficult to keep sympathising (is that a word lol) with him the next time he goes on a rant about luck and how it wasn't his day and he didn't feel confident.
He says when he doesn't feel confident nothing goes right and his game falls apart because it's by nature a risky game. Surely there are other top players that have an equally risky game. But you don't see them loosing in round 2. The point is that even when he doesn't play well he should sometimes still win.

Savvy? :p :p

Bibir
04-03-2005, 09:46 PM
Liar...Liar...But the worst for me (as Ulrike said) is how he uses his charming side.

Sometimes I'm very angry after a bad loss..and then I look at his poor face, his quite charming ass and read his funny itw...and I forgive everything. :fiery:

BelgianWaffle
04-03-2005, 09:52 PM
Liar...Liar...But the worst for me (as Ulrike said) is how he uses his charming side.

Sometimes I'm very angry after a bad loss..and then I look at his poor face, his quite charming ass and read his funny itw...and I forget everything. :fiery:

Exactly. because he can seem so genuinely upset, you just want to :hug: the poor guy.
now that brings me to my next question (i'm in the mood for a good discussion :o ).
I've always believed that much of his charm flows from his sometimes clumsy use of the english language. Some of his expressions are just funny and he can be very endearing going on a rant trying to explain something but not quite getting there ;)
So my question is to the russian speakers: is he as funny in russian? Sometimes I get the sneaking suspicion if I understood russian I might not be as fond of him :o

maratski
04-03-2005, 09:54 PM
Those three words I put in bold caught my attention. That's the point. We believe him and that makes it difficult to keep sympathising (is that a word lol) with him the next time he goes on a rant about luck and how it wasn't his day and he didn't feel confident.
He says when he doesn't feel confident nothing goes right and his game falls apart because it's by nature a risky game. Surely there are other top players that have an equally risky game. But you don't see them loosing in round 2. The point is that even when he doesn't play well he should sometimes still win.

Savvy? :p :p

Winning ulgy is sometimes necessary...Wish Marat would realise that.

Wednesday Addams
04-03-2005, 09:54 PM
Those three words I put in bold caught my attention. That's the point. We believe him and that makes it difficult to keep sympathising (is that a word lol) with him the next time he goes on a rant about luck and how it wasn't his day and he didn't feel confident.
He says when he doesn't feel confident nothing goes right and his game falls apart because it's by nature a risky game. Surely there are other top players that have an equally risky game. But you don't see them loosing in round 2. The point is that even when he doesn't play well he should sometimes still win.

Savvy? :p :p
Aye. :p
And you're right. *sigh*

maratski
04-03-2005, 09:55 PM
Liar...Liar...But the worst for me (as Ulrike said) is how he uses his charming side.

Sometimes I'm very angry after a bad loss..and then I look at his poor face, his quite charming ass and read his funny itw...and I forgive everything. :fiery:

I can get really mad after some losses, but like you said, the poor face, etc. make me forget.

Off to sleep now!

Wednesday Addams
04-03-2005, 09:56 PM
Winning ulgy is sometimes necessary...Wish Marat would realise that.
It's not a question of realising it anymore. He has realised it, he just doesn't manage to do that very often.

Wednesday Addams
04-03-2005, 09:57 PM
Off to sleep now!
Nighty night! :kiss: :wavey:

Bibir
04-03-2005, 09:57 PM
Me too! :zzz:

Good night everyone! :wavey:

BelgianWaffle
04-03-2005, 09:58 PM
he should read that book by Brad Gilbert :tape:

Time to go to bed.. almost midnight
Night! :wavey:

Wednesday Addams
04-03-2005, 10:15 PM
I'm off to bed too! :wavey:

junekidd
04-04-2005, 05:41 AM
Why say that you want something if you know you can't do it or aren't willing to make the effort. That's why I made some wonderful *cough* *cough* posts last season. ;)as Dora said, it is really hard to face tons of journalists and answer so many cruel and stupid questions after a loss. I realize his not very honest as self-protection. and he might not be unwilling to do it or make less effort. it is easy to say something but hard to do. having no good result doesn't always mean that one doesn't make effort. ;)
I wish he would just shut up and do something instead of saying what he wants to do and fail. Better for him in the end and for us ;)I wish he would keep saying what he wants and really do it! (illusion?) :D

foul_dwimmerlaik
04-04-2005, 11:45 AM
So my question is to the russian speakers: is he as funny in russian? Sometimes I get the sneaking suspicion if I understood russian I might not be as fond of him :oIn a word: no. But I never understood why English speakers call Marat funny and witty. For me, whatever bits they consider funny, sound mostly goofy. Sometimes he just translates some russian sayings in English literally and peole also think he's being terribly funny.

In russian his expressions are precise and he can be very sharp indeed, but he doesn't come off nearly as humorous and affable as in English. Myself, I like his Russian-speaking "persona" better - he's more... masculine that way, for the lack of better word.

mer
04-04-2005, 12:23 PM
In a word: no. But I never understood why English speakers call Marat funny and witty. For me, whatever bits they consider funny, sound mostly goofy. Sometimes he just translates some russian sayings in English literally and peole also think he's being terribly funny.

In russian his expressions are precise and he can be very sharp indeed, but he doesn't come off nearly as humorous and affable as in English. Myself, I like his Russian-speaking "persona" better - he's more... masculine that way, for the lack of better word.

I didn't hear Marat speaking russian much, but he really seems to be more humorous in English than in Russian. Though I would't attribute it only to the literal translating of russian sayings. It's like he is just used to joke in English more. I even suspect that sometimes it's easier for him to speak english or spanish than russian...From what I read and heard I find him witty and sharp ... and sometimes goofy indeed :)

Anyway bad english itself doesn't make anybody funny or charming. Other players whose english is not perfect don't seem funny. Marat is charming even when he keeps silent. I think charm is just the part of him. It's in the way he moves, smile, smirks, responds, loses his temper..etc etc etc.
I know, I'm very very biased, don't tell me ;)

junekidd
04-04-2005, 12:39 PM
thanks, Tanya and mer. :)
I even suspect that sometimes it's easier for him to speak english or spanish than russian I take this point in this way: when he speaks in Russian, he is more serious or considerate. when he speaks in English, he might be more relaxed.
just my opinion. I know it is really subjective cos I am not good at English and don't know Russian at all.

AnnieNik
04-04-2005, 12:42 PM
Hello, everyone :)

since the topic is Marat's language skills ;) I would like to ask you, am I right with my observations? Here is a preliminary note: I'm not fluent in Russian (not anymore....*crying*), and I don't speak Spanish...so my observations are that:

1) Marat speaks English with Russian accent (that's understable ;)
2) Marat speaks Russian with Spanish accent (now, don't kill me, please :) I have seen just few interviews in Russian and the way he "eats" some words reminds me of Spanish)

My questions is - am I right, or I had too much sun and/or Marat lately :) LOL

Annie

mer
04-04-2005, 12:47 PM
2) Marat speaks Russian with Spanish accent (now, don't kill me, please :) I have seen just few interviews in Russian and the way he "eats" some words reminds me of Spanish)Annie

He has a slight accent when he speaks russian (don't know whether it english or spanish). May be not quite an accent, but intonations are not russian.

mer
04-04-2005, 01:15 PM
It seems to me that his humour is very "russian". Probably sometimes what non russian-speakers take for a joke is just a way we used to talk to each other in Russia ;)
But it's only my guessing, I may be very wrong.

Vass
04-04-2005, 01:30 PM
In a word: no. But I never understood why English speakers call Marat funny and witty. For me, whatever bits they consider funny, sound mostly goofy. Sometimes he just translates some russian sayings in English literally and peole also think he's being terribly funny.

In russian his expressions are precise and he can be very sharp indeed, but he doesn't come off nearly as humorous and affable as in English. Myself, I like his Russian-speaking "persona" better - he's more... masculine that way, for the lack of better word.

Somehow I laugh out loud from what Marat says in English as well. Not the translated Russian bits, but the original stuff. In Russian he doesn't joke yeah... When he's in Russia, for the public he appeares to be a serius guy. But I don't think it's "masculine"... Or else we'll have to use the same word for Myskina, Zvonareva, Dementieva because they have teh exact same serius tone in Russian interviews. I guess it has to do with the setting of such interviews: they are more formal than English interviews. Joking would be hard in those...It's so much easier to be silly/witty when there's an english guy infront of you...

Btw. i prefer the English version of Marat. I hate Russian interviews in general, plus it would have been so much easier for me to approach Marat if i didn't have to speak Russian to him. Speaking Russian meant talking with serius Marat for me and having a serius conversation with a 'stranger' (especially if he's a busy celebrity) is not an easy task. But that's just me...

mer
04-04-2005, 01:38 PM
Somehow I laugh out loud from what Marat says in English as well. Not the translated Russian bits, but the original stuff. In Russian he doesn't joke yeah... When he's in Russia, for the public he appeares to be a serius guy. But I don't think it's "masculine"... Or else we'll have to use the same word for Myskina, Zvonareva, Dementieva because they have teh exact same serius tone in Russian interviews. I guess it has to do with the setting of such interviews: they are more formal than English interviews. Joking would be hard in those...It's so much easier to be silly/witty when there's an english guy infront of you...

Exactly!! :)

PennyThePenguin
04-04-2005, 01:58 PM
Liar...Liar...But the worst for me (as Ulrike said) is how he uses his charming side.

Sometimes I'm very angry after a bad loss..and then I look at his poor face, his quite charming ass and read his funny itw...and I forgive everything. :fiery:

me too! :hug: seems like we're all too easily fooled :o :hug:

PennyThePenguin
04-04-2005, 02:02 PM
on the funny/not funny marat topic...

could it also be that when marat speaks in english, because he's possible less proficient in it than in spanish or russian, a lot of what he says have lots of gray areas about them...like..u could interpret it in many different ways. so in a way, because of the various interpretations available, they just seem funnier somehow?

foul_dwimmerlaik
04-04-2005, 02:57 PM
Somehow I laugh out loud from what Marat says in English as well. Not the translated Russian bits, but the original stuff. In Russian he doesn't joke yeah... When he's in Russia, for the public he appeares to be a serius guy. But I don't think it's "masculine"... Or else we'll have to use the same word for Myskina, Zvonareva, Dementieva because they have teh exact same serius tone in Russian interviews. I guess it has to do with the setting of such interviews: they are more formal than English interviews. Joking would be hard in those...It's so much easier to be silly/witty when there's an english guy infront of you...
Hi Vass!

Well, I did say, "for the lack of better word". More precise maybe, less amorphous. And he jokes in Russian (when he doesn't spew out banalities required for the officiall press-conferences, that is), but better command of the language allows him to be more subtle and sharp than in English.

foul_dwimmerlaik
04-04-2005, 03:02 PM
on the funny/not funny marat topic...

could it also be that when marat speaks in english, because he's possible less proficient in it than in spanish or russian, a lot of what he says have lots of gray areas about them...like..u could interpret it in many different ways. so in a way, because of the various interpretations available, they just seem funnier somehow?
Possibly. I mean sometimes reading his english itws I just sit here sometimes and wonder what the hell was he trying to say. Maybe he couldn't quite express his ideas in English in such cases or probably was just saying whatever rolled off his tongue to get rid of the journo. I dunno.

maratski
04-04-2005, 04:02 PM
He has a slight accent when he speaks russian (don't know whether it english or spanish). May be not quite an accent, but intonations are not russian.

Intonations can change when one speaks different languages. I know that when I came back from Paris I'd say so many things wrong in arab. I didn't speak arab for months, just french, english and sometimes dutch. I'm not saying it's the same with Marat, but could be.

maratski
04-04-2005, 04:04 PM
Btw. i prefer the English version of Marat. I hate Russian interviews in general, plus it would have been so much easier for me to approach Marat if i didn't have to speak Russian to him. Speaking Russian meant talking with serius Marat for me and having a serius conversation with a 'stranger' (especially if he's a busy celebrity) is not an easy task. But that's just me...

So it's a russian thing that interviews aren't always funny...

MariaV
04-04-2005, 04:33 PM
Somehow I laugh out loud from what Marat says in English as well. Not the translated Russian bits, but the original stuff. In Russian he doesn't joke yeah... When he's in Russia, for the public he appeares to be a serius guy. But I don't think it's "masculine"... Or else we'll have to use the same word for Myskina, Zvonareva, Dementieva because they have teh exact same serius tone in Russian interviews. I guess it has to do with the setting of such interviews: they are more formal than English interviews. Joking would be hard in those...It's so much easier to be silly/witty when there's an english guy infront of you...

Btw. i prefer the English version of Marat. I hate Russian interviews in general, plus it would have been so much easier for me to approach Marat if i didn't have to speak Russian to him. Speaking Russian meant talking with serius Marat for me and having a serius conversation with a 'stranger' (especially if he's a busy celebrity) is not an easy task. But that's just me...

Aww you serious Vass, but well, in general I've noticed that too i.e. that he's more serious in the Russian interviews. Might partly be because of the setting and partly because he knows it's not good to joke around with the Russian press. And it can be more about serious issues like his charity work, his training regimen, the future of tennis in Russia than in the press conferences or interviews in English is not discussed, the interviews in English aren't that in-depth perhaps.

mer
04-04-2005, 04:47 PM
Intonations can change when one speaks different languages. I know that when I came back from Paris I'd say so many things wrong in arab. I didn't speak arab for months, just french, english and sometimes dutch. I'm not saying it's the same with Marat, but could be.

Sure. Almost all russians living abroad acquire non-russian intonation.

BelgianWaffle
04-04-2005, 05:04 PM
because he knows it's not good to joke around with the Russian press.

.. why not? :confused:

It's natural to pick up on a different accent or start using other intonations, even within the same language. I speak dutch, pretty much without an accent (my parents insisted that I speak what is know as "general dutch", what you would see on tv) but in Flanders there are many accents. One of them is the accent spoken in West-Flanders. After five years of living with four students from that area some of their words have sneaked into my language. Also I started to speak a little bit different, shorter and "eating" syllables. (lol, I just realise only Hanneke will know what I'm talking about here)
I actually don't like it but it's inevitable.

MariaV
04-04-2005, 05:21 PM
Ulrike, because the Russian press would eat him alive, they diss him and write lies about him, more so than the English-speaking papers, the English-speaking papers write rubbish sometimes but they're not THAT interested in all the dirt about him like the "own" Russian papers. OK, I'll shut up now. :tape:

BelgianWaffle
04-04-2005, 05:34 PM
oh dear :scared:
What "dirt" might there be on Marat. He's not even in Russia for half of the year. He's had the same gf for the last 2 years and the 4 years before that so no scandals in that direction.
So he goes out occasionally, big deal. He's young. You should see some of the pigs that study at the universities. And they turn out ok, most of the time anyway ;)

mer
04-04-2005, 06:33 PM
oh dear :scared:
What "dirt" might there be on Marat. He's not even in Russia for half of the year. He's had the same gf for the last 2 years and the 4 years before that so no scandals in that direction.
So he goes out occasionally, big deal. He's young. You should see some of the pigs that study at the universities. And they turn out ok, most of the time anyway ;)

russian press doesn't need any special reason to pour mud on it's victim...

BelgianWaffle
04-04-2005, 06:41 PM
that's.. erm.. sad.
(not that it doesn't happen elsewhere but it must be pretty bad then)

:hug:

foul_dwimmerlaik
04-04-2005, 06:43 PM
russian press doesn't need any special reason to pour mud on it's victim...
I think the same can be safely said about the press in general. :)

Vass
04-04-2005, 07:20 PM
Intonations can change when one speaks different languages. I know that when I came back from Paris I'd say so many things wrong in arab. I didn't speak arab for months, just french, english and sometimes dutch. I'm not saying it's the same with Marat, but could be.
His Russian is perfect. He pretty much speaks it everyday, no matter where he goes. Even if there's no Russian player around him, he still has his phone, which he also uses quite a lot.

Tennis Fool
04-14-2005, 05:06 AM
They finally posted the correct interview on the MC site. Enjoy. Marat talks tanking...

M. SAFIN /H.T. Lee

6‑0, 7‑5

An interview with:

MARAT SAFIN

THE MODERATOR: Questions for Marat , please.

Q. It seems to me that you could have beaten Lee with a much easier score. Do you feel sometimes you don't try hard enough in certain games? I mean, it kind of affects your career, but when you really need to win some important points, you do; but when it's not that necessary, you kind of let it go. Do you think that's true?

MARAT SAFIN: There is ‑‑ it is not exactly the truth because, first of all, it's the first match on clay court. It's difficult really to play great tennis straightaway because you need to get used to it, you need to get used to the clay, especially you know that, you know, it's not his best surface. So you try to play your ‑‑ try a lot of different things. So sometimes, you know, some games you go just for a little bit too much because you want to try something new just to adapt yourself to the clay.

Then when you need to win, of course you try. But just you experiment a lot because you need to get the feeling. The more you try, right now, it's better for me. Otherwise, you cannot try in the semifinals or just whenever we getting closer and the opponents are getting much tougher. For example, if you play against a clay court player, you cannot do the stuff that I was doing today, you know, risk it for so much.

Q. Is that a dangerous tactic to have, though, you're trying and trying...

MARAT SAFIN: Yeah, but you need to. You need to. It's the first match on clay. You need to experiment. You need to try. Because the last time I played on clay was in French Open last year. So you need to bring back the feeling. You need to try new things. You need to work on it, because it's different kind of game than the hard court. It's better to do it right now in the first round than to do it in a semifinal and it cost you much more than now.

Q. Do you find the switch from the hard court to clay the most difficult? What surface to go to which surface is most difficult for you?

MARAT SAFIN: I got used to it, you know. Because at the beginning, it was really costing me a lot of time, you know, just to get used to from hard to clay because the points are longer, you know. Many things.

But now it's easier because you know what you need to do, how to work, what kind of exercise you need to do. So basically one week is enough.

Q. You're the only one who beat Federer this year. Do you think you would rather play him on hard court or on clay? I mean, what is the most convenient surface to play against Federer for your type of game?

MARAT SAFIN: I mean, we played twice also on clay, but they were not my greatest matches. One time was a long time ago in 2001 in Rome . Basically, I had to win, and I lost 7‑6 in the third. He played great tennis in Hamburg final, and I didn't really ‑‑ I couldn't do anything, I didn't feel comfortable on the court.

But, you know, doesn't really matter because he plays great on all surfaces, as well as me. Just different game, a little bit different. But not much different than hard.

Q. But if you had to pick the surface, you say, "I want to play Federer ," where would you play him?

MARAT SAFIN: I prefer on clay.

Q. Labadze said that the Russian mentality is to, before a match, if you don't feel like playing a match, you just don't really try hard.

MARAT SAFIN: Excuse me. Labadze said what?

Q. He said that the Russian mentality is that sometimes before coming to a match, if you don't feel like playing, you just don't really bother. Do you think that's true?

MARAT SAFIN: It's Labadze . He's Georgian (smiling). It's Labadze . He's a different case. I mean, with so much talent, so much talent that he has and he couldn't really get anywhere closer than Top 50, that's quite sad.

But, you know, like he's speaking for himself, basically. He's giving excuses to himself.

But of course, you know, you get to the stage we're already playing for so many years on the tour that there is no more time to waste it on useless things. Every time you go to the court ‑‑ because you do, you're making money. It's business at the end of the day. It's our work. So it's like you cannot just, you know, because you're not feeling like playing, come on the court and just tank it. You do these things when you are young (inaudible).

Q. I'm just saying because sometimes I've seen Davydenko kind of not really trying, I've seen you...

MARAT SAFIN: It looks like we're not trying. It looks like that. But we do, because we play tennis very easy (smiling).

Q. You struggled after Melbourne . Have any explanation?

MARAT SAFIN: Just lost some confidence.

But anyway, for the past three years I didn't make anything special in these tournaments that I have been playing, you know, like after Melbourne . Dubai , last three years I was ‑‑ I never pass the second round; Indian Wells , the same thing; Miami , the same thing. Nothing special for me. Just the kind of months that I cannot play.

Q. Why?

MARAT SAFIN: I don't know why. No matter how much you try, no matter how much you practice, how much you dedicate yourself, you try to do as many different things as you can, you know, just not to think about it, or practice a lot, or not practice, it doesn't work. It just for some reason doesn't.

Q. When did you lose your confidence? You were in Melbourne ?

MARAT SAFIN: No, just because I had a break before Dubai . I had a really long last season. Always I played one year well and then I was getting injured all the time. So I'm trying to take my time because I can break myself very easily.

As we can see, all the seasons are very long. Some of the people, they are playing even Davis Cup in December, so there is no time to recover and prepare for a new season.

There is a time after Australia where you have three weeks just to rest, just ‑‑ you know. And then it takes a little bit of time, you know, to get used to the courts, and basically I lose the confidence.

Q. Need the rest.

MARAT SAFIN: It can happen.

Q. With those bad results after the Australian Open , did you kind of look forward for the clay court season to begin?

MARAT SAFIN: Yeah. Because I was ‑‑ it's my favorite surface, actually. Really, it's much more chances to come back, you know. For example, in the matches, you have much more opportunities to break other people, the serve and everything. It's much more opportunities to, when you are losing, to come back. On hard court the matches can be really fast. And one, two mistakes, and basically the match is gone.

So clay court season, it's a tough one, but I prefer this way.

Q. Now you play Saulnier . You know this guy. You had two tough matches against him. What do you think?

MARAT SAFIN: He's really talented, also a player who has been on the tour for a long time. He has great wins. He won his first match, so he must be playing well on clay. We'll see.

I mean, like, also let's see with what he gonna come up.

Q. Do you still have time to enjoy your life apart from tennis? Do you go out, do something, or not?

MARAT SAFIN: Why you so worried about... (smiling).

Q. I just found out that you were in Paris last week.

MARAT SAFIN: Yeah. Why not?

Q. I just ask. Are you happy?

MARAT SAFIN: Of course. Life is too short to waste the time.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

Vass
04-14-2005, 06:26 AM
Thanks TF


MARAT SAFIN: There is ‑‑ it is not exactly the truth because, first of all, it's the first match on clay court. It's difficult really to play great tennis straightaway because you need to get used to it, you need to get used to the clay, especially you know that, you know, it's not his best surface. So you try to play your ‑‑ try a lot of different things. So sometimes, you know, some games you go just for a little bit too much because you want to try something new just to adapt yourself to the clay.

Did he really try new things? Or was he doing what the interviewer asked him about: playing too relaxed at times?


Because the last time I played on clay was in French Open last year. The Polish people from Sopot should never forgive you Marat. Did you tank it so hard that you don't even remember playing? Or is this one of those cases of bad memories being repressed? ;)

junekidd
04-14-2005, 07:23 AM
thanks TF.

I saw the 2nd set of Marat-Lee match. Marat tried a lot to go to net. I don't know why did he do that. on clay it is not a wise tactic to go to net TOO MUCH. and his net skills... :help: IMO, he could make some drop-shot but doesn't need to go to net a lot. plus, he often stands too far beyond the net. that is too easy for opponent making passing shot.

BelgianWaffle
04-14-2005, 08:30 AM
The Polish people from Sopot should never forgive you Marat. Did you tank it so hard that you don't even remember playing? Or is this one of those cases of bad memories being repressed? ;)

:haha:

Vass
04-14-2005, 08:58 AM
thanks TF.

I saw the 2nd set of Marat-Lee match. Marat tried a lot to go to net. I don't know why did he do that. on clay it is not a wise tactic to go to net TOO MUCH. and his net skills... :help: IMO, he could make some drop-shot but doesn't need to go to net a lot. plus, he often stands too far beyond the net. that is too easy for opponent making passing shot.
His net skills are well above the " :help: level". His backhand volley is NOT AT ALL bad in my opinion. In general I like when he comes to the net. But he has to be smart about it.

mer
04-14-2005, 09:07 AM
His net skills are well above the " :help: level". His backhand volley is NOT AT ALL bad in my opinion. In general I like when he comes to the net. But he has to be smart about it.

I hope he was just testing himself in the first two rounds trying to adjust his game and will be more careful today with the volleys.

Vass
04-14-2005, 10:00 AM
I hope he was just testing himself in the first two rounds trying to adjust his game and will be more careful today with the volleys.
So he was 'careless' in the first two rounds? I've heared contradicting opinions...

mer
04-14-2005, 10:01 AM
So he was 'careless' in the first two rounds? I've heared contradicting opinions...

Well, I guess only Marat knows the answer...

Shadow
04-14-2005, 11:49 AM
I also think its a good idea to come to net more often, because he actually HAS the net skills, although he plays sometimes a bit too sloppy at the net(lazyness), but its a good thing to keep points short.

Curls
04-14-2005, 12:08 PM
Is this why he's continuing to play doubles as well ... to try and hone some of his net skills? Otherwise wouldn't it just be distracting and tiring?

Given Federer's net skills are pretty good (along with everything else, unfortunately), maybe the whole coming to the net thing is a Lundgren initiative. The commentators were saying in the Lee match that Lundgren has told him to try and finish the points sooner, rather than enter into rallies ... (I guess coz many of Marat's shots (UE's) seem to be having a love affair with the net cord lately!).

also, on a totally separate topic, Federers status is now 33-1 ... how boring that must be for his fans ... we like a bit of spice, a bit of reality, not a frickin' robot! (sorry!)

Shadow
04-14-2005, 12:15 PM
Is this why he's continuing to play doubles as well ... to try and hone some of his net skills? Otherwise wouldn't it just be distracting and tiring?

No, he doesn´t play doubles for that, but maybe it helps to get some routine in the net play, anyway. He actually doesn`t care so much for doubles, thats why they always lose in doubles... he said its just for communicating and money ;)
His net skills are good, and i guess training is enough.

Given Federer's net skills are pretty good (along with everything else, unfortunately), maybe the whole coming to the net thing is a Lundgren initiative. The commentators were saying in the Lee match that Lundgren has told him to try and finish the points sooner, rather than enter into rallies ... (I guess coz many of Marat's shots (UE's) seem to be having a love affair with the net cord lately!).

it probably comes from Lundgren and its actually smart. But it also came from Marat`s other coaches. Marat goes to the net a lot more since already some years, and he plays a great all around game, the second best allround game after Federer.
Although it depends on each match how much he attends the net. Probably depends on his mood and the opponent, and of course he has a lot of options so he can play different in different matches.

Curls
04-14-2005, 12:19 PM
r u able to watch the match today, shadow?

Shadow
04-14-2005, 12:29 PM
:sobbing: no. I dont have coverage from the Masters Series tourneys at all :fiery:.

PennyThePenguin
04-14-2005, 02:06 PM
The Polish people from Sopot should never forgive you Marat. Did you tank it so hard that you don't even remember playing? Or is this one of those cases of bad memories being repressed? ;)


tsktsktsk...marat...magsie's going to KILL YOU! she went all the way just to see you. and u don't even remember being there..and she didnt' even get to see u...poor magda :hug:

PennyThePenguin
04-14-2005, 02:08 PM
:sobbing: no. I dont have coverage from the Masters Series tourneys at all :fiery:.

:hug: :hug:

BelgianWaffle
04-14-2005, 03:11 PM
:sobbing: no. I dont have coverage from the Masters Series tourneys at all :fiery:.

Thank god for french television. But he'll have to make it to the semis before I get to see him. You know what to do, Marat :p

Damita
04-14-2005, 07:34 PM
Thanks TF
The Polish people from Sopot should never forgive you Marat. Did you tank it so hard that you don't even remember playing? Or is this one of those cases of bad memories being repressed? ;)omg Vass you're right. If Maggie reads this i think she'll just want to murder him :tape:

Damita
04-14-2005, 07:36 PM
Thank god for french television. But he'll have to make it to the semis before I get to see him. You know what to do, Marat :p
yeah i was hoping i'll see him too this weekend, but that's not gonna happen :sad: anyway, if we have Roger, Rafa, JCF, or Guille on tv i'll be happy :cool:

chrissiej
04-14-2005, 07:43 PM
omg Vass you're right. If Maggie reads this i think she'll just want to murder him :tape:

he better not have forgotten so much he doesn't want to go back :mad:

Curls
04-15-2005, 12:25 AM
Monte Carlo itw ... enjoy!



J. FERRERO /M. Safin

6‑2, 6‑4

An interview with:

MARAT SAFIN

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You showed some frustration on the court. What was wrong today?

MARAT SAFIN: Well, I had my chances and, you know, I didn't take my chances that I had to take. Many breakpoints didn't play right way, the way I really should be playing. I was a little bit rushing. I was a little bit annoyed for the fact that I had so many chances and I couldn't take them.

Q. You told us yesterday that you lost your confidence after Melbourne . You had a long break, and you lost your confidence. Is it the real explanation?

MARAT SAFIN: No, I don't think so, because I was just ‑‑ I'm trying to, you know, get ‑‑ adapt myself to the clay. Basically, I had two matches, you know, basically against the players that are not professional ‑‑ not clay court specialists, and today I had a real match against the clay courter. Even though that I was hitting the ball really well, but just I was a little bit rushing too much.

My confidence is still there, but just I had to play little bit in different way, because tennis is there.

Q. Marat , Ferrero says he's trying to get his confidence back after his injury, chicken pox. How can you judge the way he's playing? Do you think he's close to the level he was before?

MARAT SAFIN: Just it's difficult, you know, like to compare the Ferrero from before and the Ferrero now, because it's already, you know, like he is not anymore a young player, you know, 21 years old that he's playing the way he was playing. He matured. He matured a lot. He is already 25 years old. He was injured. To come back, it's really tough.

I mean, he is trying to get, of course, the confidence, but you cannot compare because he proved he's playing little bit different type. He's trying to improve. He's trying to improve himself, and he's trying to ‑‑ try to come back. But it's going to be tough, really tough for him.

Q. Would you say that you lost more the match than he won it tonight in a way because of the way you were playing and he is playing right now?

MARAT SAFIN: No. The way I was playing today, I was little bit ‑‑ had too many unforced errors. As I said, I was rushing a little bit too much. My chances were there. First set, I had many chances to break him. Second set, I was a break up and just a few stupid mistakes that cost me the match.

Q. Before he was very, very dangerous with the forehand and not so dangerous with the backhand. Do you think he has maybe slightly improved the backhand, and the forehand is not anymore as it was?

MARAT SAFIN: He improve the backhand, definitely. He can play from the backhand to backhand, and he feels comfortable. It's really difficult to put pressure on his backhand. Of course eventually if I will be a little bit stable in the court, then I will be playing, continuing hitting to his backhand, I would overpower him. That's why I was a little bit rushing too much to go down the line. I should have waited a little bit more for better opportunities.

No, it just was tactically a bit wrong, but nothing ‑‑ it's not that he is playing with the backhand that doesn't allow me to do anything with it. I hit there. I choose this way of winning, and it didn't work.

Q. After Melbourne , everybody was expecting you to be able to challenge Roger Federer for the No. 1 spot. How frustrating is it for you not being there?

MARAT SAFIN: I'm not frustrated at all ‑ at all. I can be upset with myself for many other reasons than to challenge Federer .

I don't really ‑‑ I don't really ‑‑ it's not my goal to challenge anybody. I'm trying to be as happy as I can, try to play as better as I can, try to be as consistent as I can. Whatever, if it will help me, and in a way I'm going to be able to compete with him for No. 1, that is great. But if I am not able to do that, I'm also happy with that.

Like I said, it's not my first year, it's not my second year on the tour. I've been playing for seven years. I already achieved quite a lot. So to be upset because I'm not challenging Federer , it's just... it's stupid.

Q. The other day you said that you would rather play Federer on clay than on any other surface. Then Federer came, I told him what you just said. He said remind Marat that I beat him three times on clay: In Rome , in Davis Cup , and somewhere else.

MARAT SAFIN: No, but still Rome , it was ‑‑ I had my match ‑‑ my match was mine, I was set and a break. He was lucky to win it.

He played well in Hamburg . He played well in Davis Cup . Why not?

Of course he is full of confidence. He can ‑‑ he is allowed to say whatever he wants (smiling).

Q. Paris has been a special place for you, Paris Masters . How important would it be for you if you could win Roland Garros this year?

MARAT SAFIN: That's my goal, actually. That's my goal for the whole career. I'm trying, and I will try, try to win it. I always played well there, but for some reason I couldn't ‑‑ I was missing something extra, you know, to win it. I was in the semifinals playing quite well, then I had a terrible match against Ferrero , semifinals. One time in quarterfinals, but I ran out of gas. Last year I had blisters. So it was always a little bit something is missing. That's why I'm going to try to prepare myself as much as I can for the tournament.

It's completely different. You cannot compare ‑‑ you don't compare to Monte‑Carlo and Hamburg ; they're all special in different way. But the French Open is five sets matches, and it's a little bit different game.

Q. What's so special about Roland Garros itself, the tournament, to you?

MARAT SAFIN: The whole thing, the whole scene. I mean, like the Paris atmosphere; the city; people; courts; the way that people, they run the tournament; the way the people, they love this tournament; the city. All these kind of things make it so special.

Q. Is it a perfect tournament?

MARAT SAFIN: Yeah. For me, yes.

Q. When you think that you don't have sometimes patience enough, would you think that it's easier to have patience for a best‑of‑five match, or it's more complicated?

MARAT SAFIN: No, but just it's a little bit wrong, what you're saying. Just it's very difficult to have a patience straightaway after you coming from the hard courts. You still need to adapt yourself, still think that you can win the points in two or three shots. There's no chance.

So that's why, you know, like automatically, it's coming out. Whenever you have a chance, you go down the line, you go down the line, and you miss, of course. Of course you gonna make a lot of mistakes. So that's why you need to be more patient, you know, like make sure that you are there, hit as many balls as you can. If you are uncomfortable, just you gonna go down the line. Because a lot of bad bounces; like today, had many opportunities and the ball, just bad bounce.

So you need to keep on hitting the backhand crosscourt or forehand crosscourt, good, comfortable with the ball. You go down the line, you go to the net, is different story.

I still feel that I am missing a little bit. Because I am hitting the ball quite well. Serving well, you know. I wouldn't say that I'm playing bad, just a little bit wrong.

Q. We are all trained to understand why you can't be so consistent. Have you ever been thinking of working with a mental coach, or is that something that doesn't interest you at all, or it's maybe not a purpose for you?

MARAT SAFIN: You have to be happy with who you are. You cannot change. You can pretend that you can change, but you can't. Nobody's changing and nobody can change you no matter how much you try, no matter how much time you, you know ‑‑ like how much time you put in this. Just you have to live with that.

And bad times will come. And I'm still, you know, not being so consistent, I manage to finish in the Top 10 for four years or five years, so it's...

And I've been No. 1 in the world, so it's not bad. Still working (smiling).

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

Carolinita
04-15-2005, 02:46 AM
thanks Curl :hug:

btw, maybe it's too late but I've been reading your posts about Marat and his languages and...well, I just to say that the first time that I heard him speaking spanish I was absolutely surprised 'coz his spanish isn't good.....but it's excellent, perfect, perfect, perfect. And he's quite funny in this language too. I remember when he won Madrid Masters he said to Nalbandian (the loser).. :lol: ..he said to him: "Siento que no hayas podido ganar...Ojalá no te siga pasando tan seguido" :haha: (something like:"I'm sorry that you couldn't have won...I hope don't continue happening to you so followed" , 'coz Nalbandian had been reaching many finals, but he wasn't winning any of them) ...and then he said to the models: "Sé que no es vuestro trabajo, pero lo habeis hecho muuuy bien" (something like: I know it's not your job, but you have done veeery good) and the whole crowd laughed 'coz he was very flirt...he also smiled ..:lol:

well, that was all :p ...bye :wavey:

PennyThePenguin
04-15-2005, 03:27 AM
he better not have forgotten so much he doesn't want to go back :mad:


chris..your current siggy brings back baaaad memories :p

did i ever mention i hate physics?

Kiara
04-15-2005, 07:25 AM
In a word: no. But I never understood why English speakers call Marat funny and witty. For me, whatever bits they consider funny, sound mostly goofy. Sometimes he just translates some russian sayings in English literally and peole also think he's being terribly funny.

In russian his expressions are precise and he can be very sharp indeed, but he doesn't come off nearly as humorous and affable as in English. Myself, I like his Russian-speaking "persona" better - he's more... masculine that way, for the lack of better word.

thanks for this explanation, ive always wondered if russians found him as entertaining and witty as we do...and if he was as funny in russian as he is in english...:cool:

Kiara
04-15-2005, 07:27 AM
Is this why he's continuing to play doubles as well ... to try and hone some of his net skills?

No. Marat plays doubles for the money, and isnt shy to admit it ;) :cool:

Wednesday Addams
04-15-2005, 02:32 PM
tsktsktsk...marat...magsie's going to KILL YOU! she went all the way just to see you. and u don't even remember being there..and she didnt' even get to see u...poor magda :hug:
Yep..... I was just thinking the same thing..... *shakes head*

Curls
04-15-2005, 02:37 PM
No. Marat plays doubles for the money, and isnt shy to admit it ;) :cool:
is it worth it??

Wednesday Addams
04-15-2005, 02:47 PM
is it worth it??
Um.... when's the last time Marat won a doubles match? :scratch: :o ;)

PennyThePenguin
04-15-2005, 03:18 PM
Um.... when's the last time Marat won a doubles match? :scratch: :o ;)



uhmm...DC? but of course, those don't pay :devil:

chrissiej
04-15-2005, 09:07 PM
:rolleyes: chris..your current siggy brings back baaaad memories :p

did i ever mention i hate physics?

did i ever mention that i do to? and then why did am i taking it at a-level??? :rolleyes: ;)

NINA_BCN
04-15-2005, 09:15 PM
"When Body A exerts a force on Body B, then Body B exerts an equal but opposite force on Body A." - Newton's Third Law

God bless Newton!!! :worship:

PennyThePenguin
04-16-2005, 04:01 AM
:rolleyes:

did i ever mention that i do to? and then why did am i taking it at a-level??? :rolleyes: ;)


i took it A-levels too... got sabotaged by the ministry of education and the medical faculty.

chrissiej
04-16-2005, 11:14 AM
i took it A-levels too... got sabotaged by the ministry of education and the medical faculty.

:lol: i'm just taking it cuz its less writing than history and Nuttall told me i could get an A w/out understanding it :D :o ;)

God bless Newton!!! not really ;)

PennyThePenguin
04-17-2005, 08:45 AM
:and Nuttall told me i could get an A w/out understanding it :D :o ;)




ya know. that IS true. :D

Shadow
04-17-2005, 08:46 AM
Safin just wants to be happy
April 15 2005 at 03:49PM

By Bill Scott

Monte Carlo - After failing to follow up on his January upset of Roger Federer in Melbourne, Australian Open champion Marat Safin is lazily turning his ambitions to the Paris clay.

But with a scratchy third-round loss at this week's Monte Carlo Masters to Juan Carlos Ferrero littering his record, the streaky Russian appears to be avoiding any pressure to step up his game in time for the May 23 start of Roland Garros.

His semifinal defeat of Federer more than two months ago should have been a springboard for Safin - the result still standing as the lone loss so far this season for the super-Swiss.

Safin has failed to impress
But in the interim, Safin has failed to impress, losing in the Dubai first round and going out in the second at both of the Masters in March in the US - which Federer won.

But the Russian who enjoys his social life as well as his tennis insists - he's not out to prove anything.

"It's not my goal to challenge anybody," said Moscow's Big Red. "I'm trying to be as happy as I can, try to play as well as I can, try to be as consistent as I can.

"If it will help me to be able to compete with him for No 1, that's great. But if not, I'm also happy with that."

Safin, who will return to Spanish clay for next week's Barcelona tournament, added: "I've been playing for seven years, I've already achieved quite a lot.

"To be upset because I'm not challenging Federer, it's just it's stupid."

The Russian is starting to show concern about how he's shaping up the shot at a dream Paris title: "That's my goal, actually, that's my goal for the whole career," said the holder of two grand Slam titles (including the US Open 2000).

"I'm trying, and I will try, try to win it. I always played well there, but for some reason I'm missing something extra to win it."

His record in Paris includes a semifinal and quarterfinal; but there have been problems as well, including blisters last year on both feet.

"Something is always missing, that's why I'm going to try to prepare myself as much as I can for the tournament."

Safin said he revels in the unique ambience of what is considered the most civilised of the four Slams.

"The scene, I like the Paris atmosphere; the city; people; courts; the way that people, they run the tournament; the way the people, they love this tournament; the city. All these kind of things make it so special," he said, going so far as to define the clay fortnight as tennis perfection.

Safin admits that his unpredictable nature, his unexplained runs of hot and cold form will always be a part of his character.

"Nobody can change you, no matter how much you try. You have to live with that. The bad times will come.

"I'm still not so consistent, but I manage to finish in the Top 10 for four years or five years. And I've been No 1 in the world, so it's not bad."