News & Articles Part 1 - Yeti Premonitions [Archive] - Page 3 - MensTennisForums.com

News & Articles Part 1 - Yeti Premonitions

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tall_one
03-04-2004, 10:07 PM
okidoki, speaking of Cat, where is she? I havent spoken to her in aaaaaaaaaaaaggggges :( :sad:,
Cat is sick and has been sleeping quite a bit the past couple of days

Kiara
03-04-2004, 10:09 PM
since when are you the thread police :p But you're right... this convo belongs in the Safinettes/Safinous thread.

since I backtracked through on thread and had to go through pages and I mean literally pages of us trashing Andy (Roddick not Andrea, lol) .....ah good times ;).....anyway it was pretty inconsiderate of us at the time, and we totally ruined a perfectly good thread.
Oh and didnt you hear, in your absence I was appointed thread monitor by....me :p

Jessi
03-04-2004, 10:09 PM
awww..i hope she feels better soon.

Kiara
03-04-2004, 10:11 PM
Cat is sick and has been sleeping quite a bit the past couple of days

oh no :sad: I'll send her an e-mail, Ive missed her!

Jessi
03-04-2004, 10:14 PM
since I backtracked through on thread and had to go through pages and I mean literally pages of us trashing Andy (Roddick not Andrea, lol) .....ah good times ;).....anyway it was pretty inconsiderate of us at the time, and we totally ruined a perfectly good thread.
Oh and didnt you hear, in your absence I was appointed thread monitor by....me :p

well, now that i'm back things are gonna change around here missy :p

Kiara
03-04-2004, 10:20 PM
*slap* dont threaten the Thread Monitor :p....

p.s: I have just promoted myself to Forum Monitor :p

maratski
03-04-2004, 10:27 PM
:haha: Kiara

I like that pic too. It's my fave!!!! :hearts:

I hope Cat feels better soon!

Kiara
03-04-2004, 10:31 PM
lol yeah it's a good pic, shame the one with JC came out blurry though, I liked the one of Rainer the best, but I already told you that, it never fails to crack me up!

Jessi
03-04-2004, 10:39 PM
lmao, this was posted by Christine on her forum. Too funny! :haha:

ok this is sooooo funny! I am watching the Tennis Channel, and they have this new segment called "what's in the bag" where players go through their racquet bags and show what's in it. So of course Marat is the first one they show! It literally only lasted like 30 seconds, and I'm sure they had to edit most of it b/c he carries so much crap in his bag, but I will put inside what I remember him pulling out of it, along w/his comments. I will watch for it and record it so I can be sure I tell you all everything. *lol* >>

ok, so first he pulls out 2 racquets, then a little plastic baggie and says "grips, very important", then he pulls out a pair of white CK boxer briefs and says "some underwear, also very important" (lol), then he pulls out a big gray sweatshirt and says "shirt, not mine.. coaches" and throws it at Denis (who they show sitting at a table right across from him), then he pulls out a "lucky charm" (I did not get a good look at what it was! It looked like some sort of silver thing) and then a small plastic container of pills and says "pills, not Viagra" (LOL). Then he pulls out all sorts of money from different countries. A coin from Australia, etc.. he is examining all the money while he is pulling it out. lol.

On the side of the screen they are making a checklist of all the stuff he pulls out. LOL I will look for it again and make sure I didn't forget anything! :)

Jessi
03-04-2004, 10:40 PM
"pills, not Viagra" :haha: :haha:

Kiara
03-04-2004, 10:43 PM
Roflmao @ "pills, not Viagra" , I should visit Christine's site more often!

tall_one
03-04-2004, 11:00 PM
:lol: :haha: :lol: :haha: :lol: :haha: :lol: :haha: :lol: :haha: :lol: :haha: :lol: :haha: :lol: :haha: :lol: :haha:

Catsou
03-05-2004, 04:07 AM
*slap* dont threaten the Thread Monitor :p....

p.s: I have just promoted myself to Forum Monitor :p


Gosh we are now in big problem :haha:

Cos kir= :devil: ;)

Catsou
03-05-2004, 04:09 AM
oh no :sad: I'll send her an e-mail, Ive missed her!

I have been missing you to kir :kiss:

Thx Ilhame and Jessi for your good wish..I'm not feeling so much better...but I should be alright soon LOL

Catsou
03-05-2004, 04:13 AM
Can't wait Kiara! Let me know when your pics are ready and i'll give you my real email, not the hotmail one ;)

I've seen Nicki's pic but i've yet to see Cats or Andreas :sad:

I'll show you mine when you show me yours ;)

But I'm looking far from Claudia and Heidi ROFL :haha:
I think Heidi is much cuter but Claudia has so much class and is a very clever and polite girl...

Oups I'm totally out of topic here..Kiara will kick my butt ;)

Jessi
03-05-2004, 05:35 AM
I'll show you mine when you show me yours ;)

of course, of course. What's your email addy?

Jessi
03-05-2004, 05:39 AM
*gets thread back on topic*

Here are some pics of Marat at YK's b-day party last month.

with YK
http://www.safinator.org/images/ykbday_04.jpg

with Dasha, lol
http://www.safinator.org/images/ykbday2_04.jpg

Catsou
03-05-2004, 05:40 AM
of course, of course. What's your email addy?

Jessi you got mail in your PM ;)

Jessi
03-05-2004, 05:51 AM
Cat, replied :)

Catsou
03-05-2004, 06:03 AM
Jessi, replied ;)

Jessi
03-05-2004, 06:08 AM
Cat, theres nothing in my inbox :sad:

Catsou
03-05-2004, 06:09 AM
What???? I just send it to you ? I reply to your message gosh I hope I didn't send my pics to a weirdo instead ROFL

Jessi
03-05-2004, 06:12 AM
nope, still nothing. Can you send it again

Catsou
03-05-2004, 07:03 AM
Safin eyes top spot yet again
Dubai |By Alaric Gomes, Staff Reporter | 04-03-2004

Marat Safin is hoping to reach the top by the end of the year. ©Gulf News
Former World No.1 Marat Safin has managed to exorcise all the ghosts of the past as he targets his rightful place as the best player, hopefully by the end of the year.

"It's still a long way to go and Roger Federer is one of the players I will have to deal with if I want to get to the top," Safin told reporters after losing to the Swiss World's No.1 in straight sets on Tuesday night.

But to achieve this goal, Safin will have to be patient and allow the results to come after each passing week. "It's still the beginning of the season and we'll see how it is going after a few months," the 23-year-old Russian added.

Dubai was the sixth time that the two players met and Federer currently enjoys a 5-1 win/loss record against the Russian.

"It's just that I did not have the luck in the tie-break. I had my chances earlier on to break him, but I did not make use of the opportunities that came my way," Safin explained.

"It's not that I am struggling with my confidence or something like that. I don't have any problems at the moment," Safin stated.

A year away from the ATP Tour has changed life and the way he thinks about it for the 6.4-foot Russian. "I just kept away from the game for a full year. I did not touch a racquet for a full seven months. I did not feel like it," he said.

"Making a comeback was more mental than physical. But this break helped me as it gave me a chance to think about life. And I am feeling more motivated now than before," he added. But before anything else, the Russian has to concentrate on the present. "There are a couple of tournaments in the US and I hope to do well there," Safin said.

Besides Federer, the Russian knows that he will have to constantly tussle with other top players like Juan Carlos Ferrero, Leyton Hewitt and Andre Agassi, to name a few.

"The tussle will be between Federer and me, and of course the others will also be there," he said. "Federer is a good player. But I have better chances on clay," Safin remarked with a glint in his eyes considering that the French Open is the next Grand Slam on the calendar where they could possibly meet yet again.

However, for the moment, he does not want to think too far ahead. "Yes, the next three months will be crucial. After Wimbledon, will be a good time to have a fresh look and see how it is going," Safin suggested.

http://www.gulfnews.com/Articles/news.asp?ArticleID=112839

Jessi
03-05-2004, 07:29 AM
Thanks Cat. The title says it all...Marat its time to let your racket do the talking.

tall_one
03-05-2004, 11:06 AM
What???? I just send it to you ? I reply to your message gosh I hope I didn't send my pics to a weirdo instead ROFL
:haha: of course you sent them to some weirdo!! and i'm sure he is looking at them right now drooling over you, just wait, you'll get a pic back from him :devil:

tall_one
03-05-2004, 11:07 AM
Can't wait Kiara! Let me know when your pics are ready and i'll give you my real email, not the hotmail one

I've seen Nicki's pic but i've yet to see Cats or Andreas
Do i get to see a pic of you Jessi :)

Kiara
03-05-2004, 12:12 PM
I'll show you mine when you show me yours ;)

But I'm looking far from Claudia and Heidi ROFL :haha:
I think Heidi is much cuter but Claudia has so much class and is a very clever and polite girl...

Oups I'm totally out of topic here..Kiara will kick my butt ;)

As FORUM MONITOR (I put in in bold to add extra authority to my position ;) ) I would ordinarily give you an :topic: warning (fyi, everyone gets three per thread before they get, punished, each punishement will vary and will be decided and issued by the FORUM MONITOR, the FORUM MONITOR doesnt get punished because she is her own boss :p ) anway Cat because it's you I'll let it slide, but dont tell anyone because I dont want them to think the FORUM MONITOR is a softie :p

Shadow
03-05-2004, 12:54 PM
"pills, not Viagra" :haha: :haha:

:haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: hillarious!

i wish i had seen that. he also seems to have a lot of other crap in his bag :rolls:

Shadow
03-05-2004, 12:56 PM
Here are some pics of Marat at YK's b-day party last month.

and a pic of Dasha :)

http://www.eg.ru/LoadedImages/IMG_2004-03-04-safin3.jpg

Shadow
03-05-2004, 12:57 PM
Thanks Cat. The title says it all...Marat its time to let your racket do the talking.

exactly. and when he has done this he can talk.

maratski
03-05-2004, 01:17 PM
Marat is funny as ever :haha:

Catsou
03-05-2004, 07:52 PM
As FORUM MONITOR (I put in in bold to add extra authority to my position ;) ) I would ordinarily give you an :topic: warning (fyi, everyone gets three per thread before they get, punished, each punishement will vary and will be decided and issued by the FORUM MONITOR, the FORUM MONITOR doesnt get punished because she is her own boss :p ) anway Cat because it's you I'll let it slide, but dont tell anyone because I dont want them to think the FORUM MONITOR is a softie :p

Kir= :devil: ;)

Jessi
03-05-2004, 09:25 PM
Do i get to see a pic of you Jessi :)


Sure. PM me your addy. :)

Jessi
03-05-2004, 09:28 PM
and a pic of Dasha :)

http://www.eg.ru/LoadedImages/IMG_2004-03-04-safin3.jpg

Thanks. She looks very cute.

Shadow
03-14-2004, 07:56 PM
an article from 2002, from French newspaper "L'equipe" translated by Josee!

Safin, by his friend

11.22.2002
article by Louis Doucet

Marat Safin, elusive and mysterious, is not only the smashing racket man we see on courts. When we listen to his friends, his inconsistency and his impulsivity are also a way of life. A way to put his international tennis star status in perspective. His manager, Gerard Tsobodian, his ex-coach Marc Rosset and one of his friend Arnaud Casagrande, expresses their feelings about Marat Safin's personality, in which they see appearing a slavic soul (l'ame slave).

Gerard Tsobodian: «He doesn't even want to plan his day».

Marat's temperament is easy to tame?

I'm in a great position with that aspect because I have collaborate for 10 years with Goran Ivanisevic. When a character like Marat comes along, it's a feeling of deja vu and I'm able to manage it. Especially as they are boys who are totally different on the court and in their private life. They are a lot less crazy and unpredictable. The key was to understand the situation they are in and sometimes, to put myself in their place. They are young people who comes from countries where conditions were not easy when they grew up. That explains a lot about their impulsions, their needs, their desires. In my opinion,this is one charactristic of the slavic soul. They have hot blood and sometimes, they hit the wall and after, they realize that we had warned them.

When it comes to business and money, is he very directive?

He has total faith in me but he likes to be inform and he should be. Even though he doesn't want to go through details, I make him realized that it's his money, he has worked hard to earn it and that's important for him to understand all that. Because when he will retire, he will have to manage his life and his money.
Is it the kind of questions he's asking you about?

Yes and recently, he asked me about different possibilities that could be presented to him in the future. Earnings from stock market are not what they used to be. So he asked me : «Gerard, which investments are you and Ion Tiriac are suggesting me, which alternatives I have?»

Is Ion Tiriac a model for Safin?

I think he's a model for a lot of tennis player. He has a good reputation because he has made his mark on the sport, after bringing Boris Becker to the top but also on business, especially in Romania. Every time Marat or other players talk to me about him, it's « What does he do? How much money he makes? »

Safin looks like he put his career in the second place...

I think it's a way for him to be professional. It's mostly a way to take off pressure. He avoids to talk about concrete subjets like « which tournament you want to play next year or how to reach the number one position in the world ». Of course, he's ambitious and he wants to play tennis but he doesn't want anything that resemble a career plan. He doesn't even want to plan his day!

Marc Rosset: « I was like him at his age ».

Is it more easy to be Safin's friend or Safin's coach?

Friend. But anyway, you have to be his friend to work with him. Besides,that goes for a lot of players. To go through all year with somebody, it's almost essential to count on that friendship. Marat is calm, reserved and discreet. He's not always open with everybody, which maybe gives him a recluse side. But his explosion and smashed rackets are normal. Frustration builds up from match and tournament and when you are a little bit impulsive, inevitably there are excesses.

In training, what kind of student he is?

Mostly, he has to believe in what we are telling him. He won't do anything he doesn't want to do. He has opinions and a strong personality which he rely on. When you become famous, everybody wants to give you advice, to get involve in your life and to tell you what to do. But, at 21, you need to make your own proof, to build your own experiences. Personally, I was like him at that age.

Recently, did you talk with him about Davis Cup?

He dislike talking about tennis, he's not a tennis fan and neither am I. He has a lot of interests, he likes to read a lot. So, when we step out of the court, we talk about other things. If I compare him to other players I know, Federer for example is much more in love with tennis than Safin out of the court.

Arnaud Casagrande: « He needs those up and down ».

Marat Safin's character is always as turbulent as it is on the court?

For me, Marat is a «circuit friend». He lives his life between Moscow and Geneva and me, I live in Paris. But when we are in tournaments, we spend a lot of time together. He's an interesting and engaging character because he's at the same time «head or tails». He can give everything when he likes somebody, be very generous and do everything for this person. But in the same time, he's 21 years old, he has lots of money and enjoy partying. So, he's not always serious. It's normal, he wants to enjoy his life.

Is it uncommon to enjoy having parties in tennis world?

No. There is a night life on the tour. We are not in bed at 9 h 30 watching a late nignt show on TV5! But Marat is able to sleep late before the day of his match as long as he can get up late. He can move forward his day like that. It's another philosophy and I like it. It's very rare that he loose a match because he is tired from a late night out. The risk is more about his mental fatigue... to blow fuses. When he's irritated, he really is.

Instead of this, he has an engaging side that seems to make unaminity...

It's his russian side. I know 4 or 5 russian and they are a lot like him. When you become part of their circle, they are really with you, there is an immediate trust. It doesn't matter that I take care of Nico, the competition doesn't exist anymore. The state of mind is: « You're a friend. Period. » It's really honest.

Does he brood during difficult periods?

He asked himself a lot of questions and this is why his off-peak periods can last a long time. But he needs those up and down. He makes them work for him, more that a linear journey would do. Everybody has different objective. For him, it's to enjoy his life because he knows that he only has one.

Does he often talk about Davis Cup?

No, he takes one thing at a time. Of course, this competition has a special meaning for him. It's important and close to his heart and mostly for Kafelnikov. But Marat is a true professionnal. But I didn't start any conversation with him about Davis Cup, even since we know that this final will take place. He never talked about it once.

Shadow
03-14-2004, 08:09 PM
The Safin's double "I"

05.22.2002

At twenty years old, the talentuous Marat search his stability, between his champion's statue and his party's spirit.

The Marat's Safin destiny definitely changes the 10th of September 2000, day of his victory against Pete Sampras at the final of the Us Open. Until there, he's only the most hope of the tennis's world. The night after the final, he becomes a superstar of the game. "Two hours after the final, I took him apart and said to him "Today, you still don't know, but your life has changed" He didn't want to hear about that and said "No, I will never change!" But I knew that he'd be in a vague which will be more stronger than him. The problem is that Marat doesn't want to be a superstar He always says me "Gerald, I don't want to be Agassi or Kournikova." But he doesn't have the choice. Today he lives better the situation because he has accepted it."

Safin is not the first to have staged, to pass from an anonymous life to the glory. One year after his victory, in 1990, Pete Sampras was relieved to abandon his title: too much pressions and solicitations. But the American hd an advantage which permit him to do the career that we know: he doesn't have interest's centers over tennis. Not Safin. As a good Russian influenced by the Spanish culture, he likes parties, sometimes until excess. "I don't know if it's because of his incredible physical, but in his personality, all is excessive, said Arnaud Casagarnde, the coach of Escude and a good friend of Marat. Whatever is his activity, I've the impression that he can't things in a half. When he does party, he completely does it. When he practices, he can works really too hardly. At the table, he can eats very very much. He's never between the two extremes."

The dilemma would be less difficult if Marat would not have conscious of his enormous talent. But in the Atp's world, all is believed. But from Bob Brett to Marc Rosset, everybody agrees: if the guy keeps his feet at earth, he's going to dominate exclusively the tour. A failure would be an heresy , an insult for his talent. Between his pendulum of his desires, the Russian search the Stability's point. "There's a sort of a conflict in himself, explains Tsobanian. On the one hand, he knows that to become the Number one, he must be concentrated on his job and more vigilant on his hygiene's life, and on the other hand, he wants to profit of the life, like all guys who are twenty years old like too. This conflict is difficult. 2001 was an adaptation's year. People found him a little bit arrogant, inaccessible, hard, less smilingly. It's more easy for him this year. He's now more focused on the Events. Between that he can becomes again the young guy that he'd like to be."

The Safin's picture with his blondes at the last Australian Open makes the round of the world. Nothing is better to fabricate a clichй. The truth is surely more finely stunded. " For me, Marat is the James Dean of the tennis. He loves life and can't refrain for profiting about it, even if it means that he burns his wings. He's got a beautiful face, he likes parties and women. But in the same time, he's not a gambler. The thing that he prefers is to be at the table with his friends, to be with with people that he appreciates. He's really nice and generous. There's fifteen days old when I went to Geneva to practice with Nico (Escude), it's him who came to the airport. The evening, we went at the restaurant. Of course, he paid for everybody"

Best friend of Marat on the tour, coach-assistant until a new order, Marc Rosset confirmed these words. He even goes more far than Casagrande: Everybody believes that Marat likes to show off with models in the nightclubs. But the thing he hates the most, except the rules, is to go to the nightclubs and to be call out by everybody of "good advice's". Like me, he's in fact very shy. Since he's in Geneva, he didn't go out a lot. He prefers stay at his apartment, quietly. When I call him, there's nine chances about ten that he's reading on his sofa. In fact, the thing that he loves is to be with three or four friends, in a room, to remake the world. He'd immediately sign to be the number one and to be in the same time unknown."

But it's not easy to be unnoticed with an athletic physical overhung by a beautiful face, and when Marat likes to laugh, to charm his auditory. On the ATP tour, encircled by processionals with boring speeches, Safin stands out clearly by his sense of humor and derision. To a journalist who asked him in Estoril how was his stay in Moscow, he answers with a little smile "The weather was good. But it's normal: in Moscow, it's me who deals with the weather." The famous "Bкte noire" of Marat, Fabrice Santoro, is not the last to profit of his retorts:" After my my fourth or fifth victory against him, whenever he saw me, he took his hands on his head and said "No, please, not him!". He teases me too: "So, Santoro, always there with your smile?" or " Tell me, it's a long time ago, that you're in the tour. Don't you believe it would be the good the time to stop now?". He's a nice guy, and I find that our matches gets closer us.

Even in competition, Safin has some troubles to let the clown who is in him: "I took my best crazy laugh with him, remembers Nicolas Escudй. We played a double in Rotterdam. I played with Rosset, and Marat with Kiefer. On a lob completely missed, Marc has search the difficulty in trying to do backhand smash, who finished at the deep of the net. I looked Marat, and we exploded of laugh. The problem was that it took 10 minutes to stop to laugh. It was impossible to play, so we asked "Cazou"(Arnaud Casagrande) to leave the court. Marat couldn't hit the ball."

The anecdote dates from one year and a half. Now, Safin seems to let his unconcern which was so endearing. "I met him the first time at the beginning of 1999 before he explodes at the high level, explains Tsobanian. It was one year before to work with him. The thing that I liked was his youth, his lightness. We noticed him, because he liked to have fun and to do the clown. That's which miss to him today. I think that he doesn't carelessness. The fact that there's a lots of money in the game, and that he feels to be observed for every facts and gestures blocks him. In private, he has kept this enjoyed personality. In public, he hides it. I think that he's got a lots of qualities that he hesitates to develop, like his charmer side, his sense of the communication. He could be more open. He has so much talent on his face, his smile and his eyes".

Tsobanian shares his time between Safin and Goran Ivanisevic. We can believe that he likes to care about difficult cases: " They have a few commun points. If there was someone who would come from an another planet, who would not know Marat but who would be Goran Ivanisevic, I would tell him :"You see, there's a man who looks like you!" It depends of his mood. One day , his spirit is perfectly aligned on the moon, Mars and Jupiter. Next day, something happens, it changes his universe and doesn't know in which direction goes. He's lost."

For his agent, the comparison with the hero of the last Wimbledon doesn't stop there. There's three years old, at the US Open, Ivanisevic spoke about the three or four Goran who were in himself, which took the power one after other. For Tsobanian, Marat is made by the same wood: "Goran noticed that there were three or four persons who were in himself. Marat still knows that he has two sides: the champion and the guy who likes to do party with his friends. But he will soon see that there' are another sides. And he will discovers them with the time..."

Now, we have to wait to know which of them will take the advantage. The future career of a dominator of the Tour costs that price.

Jessi
03-14-2004, 11:33 PM
Thanks Andrea. Its heartwarming to read Marat's friends talk about him in such a loving way.

Shadow
03-20-2004, 02:14 PM
Download Videos of Marats trip with Paradorn to Beijing, China last year! See and hear him talking to the press, playing table tennis etc

http://www.theguyfromrussia.com/homepage.html

Shadow
03-21-2004, 01:40 PM
bump

Shadow
04-08-2004, 12:52 PM
on Safinator and tgfr.com are rumours that Marat fired Denis as a coach after Miami and that there will be a new "top super" coach in Estoril. I really hope this is true and Marat is finally getting serious about a real coach and neverless Denis and Marat will probably always stay friends so. I`m really excited to see who the new coach will be.
Anyway we can just wait and see until Estoril.

Vass
04-08-2004, 01:21 PM
Who is our agent in Estoril? How many fans from the main sites will go there?

Aurora
04-08-2004, 01:26 PM
Damn, I so hope for a new coach! I'll be real dissappointed if it all stays rumor. Hope everything's ok though with the friendship with Denis.

Ruth
04-08-2004, 01:45 PM
It's no mere rumour - it's 100% official that Denis has gone and Marat is meeting up with a potential new coach in Portugal. The only thing I'm not sure about is whether the 'new coach' is a definite, or they are just in the 'talking' stage still. But whatever happens, Denis is no longer 'coach'.... it's pretty exciting times :D

PennyThePenguin
04-08-2004, 02:00 PM
It's no mere rumour - it's 100% official that Denis has gone and Marat is meeting up with a potential new coach in Portugal. The only thing I'm not sure about is whether the 'new coach' is a definite, or they are just in the 'talking' stage still. But whatever happens, Denis is no longer 'coach'.... it's pretty exciting times :D

well... that's interesting. wonder what will come up next. sorry, haven't been very in tune, who confirmed the news?

Shadow
04-08-2004, 02:07 PM
Hopefully in Estoril will already be the new coach, pretty please.

who made the news official?

maratski
04-08-2004, 02:28 PM
no offense Ruth, but you've given us wrong info before so why do you use the term "100% sure" now?

I'll believe what I'll see in Estoril and till then it's nothing but a rumor IMO.

Vass
04-08-2004, 03:07 PM
When did Ruth give false info? Ilhame you are begging to annoy me by you insults that you throw here and there. ;)

maratski
04-08-2004, 03:09 PM
I don't throw insults here and there ;)

I just remember 2003 that's all ;)

Vass
04-08-2004, 03:12 PM
You mean : "Marat will play next week!"? That doesn't count.

I can totally picture Marat firing Denis, not unexpected at all.

maratski
04-08-2004, 03:18 PM
There was more Vass!

Ruth
04-08-2004, 04:45 PM
It's ok Vass, Ilhame has had a problem with me for a while now (and a few other fans here.. *shrugs*) It's no biggie. I've no idea what the ref. to '2003' is about.... I remember the official info being pretty much correct last year re: injury and confirmed by his later interviews... the only time it's been wrong was when I was told Marat was leaving Argentina during DC and in fact he changed his mind and stayed. That's all I can think of.... and I held my hands up over that one... simple break down of communication...
Anyway, the info about the split was confirmed by 2 members of Marat's management this morning, one by phone, the other by email. One member most fans would know, the other most fans probably wouldn't know *lol*. I could do a screen cap of the Elite email but you'd probably just say I faked it anyway...... *ho hum*

maratski
04-08-2004, 08:43 PM
shrug as much as you like :rolleyes:

I don't think I need to refreshen your memory and I won't. We'll see in Estoril what the real deal is, no need to say more!

Vass
04-08-2004, 08:58 PM
*bump*

maratski
04-08-2004, 09:00 PM
why the bump? ;)

Aurora
04-09-2004, 12:06 PM
I for one am very much looking forward to the future. Bring it on!

Shadow
04-09-2004, 04:53 PM
me too lilly!

Jessi
04-11-2004, 08:51 AM
Wow, a new "top super" coach! I like the sound of that! :D

Oh, please god, let this rumor be true!

Aurora
04-12-2004, 11:55 AM
The air is full of good sports tension for me. Really a new coach? Will Marart rip the clay season to pieces (or just his shirt)? Is Ferrero back full force? When will Justine and Serena finally meet? Can Depor get to the CL-final? Will Portugal finally cash in their talents at home? Will Der Jan be ready to beat Armstrong?
too bad F1 isn't working with me ... ah well :cool:


:bounce:

junekidd
04-12-2004, 01:22 PM
oh……so many questions!
it is really perfect that we have sports in our live!

PennyThePenguin
04-12-2004, 04:07 PM
The air is full of good sports tension for me. Really a new coach? Will Marart rip the clay season to pieces (or just his shirt)? Is Ferrero back full force? When will Justine and Serena finally meet? Can Depor get to the CL-final? Will Portugal finally cash in their talents at home? Will Der Jan be ready to beat Armstrong?
too bad F1 isn't working with me ... ah well :cool:


:bounce:

yeah. F1 isn't working with me either, McLaren, hurry up and fix that car already! neither is CL. bah! and marat better do sth or tennis wouldn't work for me either!

junekidd
04-13-2004, 10:37 AM
F1,ferrari works so well! but I also wish KIMI has more luck! he is potential and still young.

Aurora
04-13-2004, 02:32 PM
Ferrari? excuse me but I just have to :shout: :bs:
sorry

PennyThePenguin
04-13-2004, 02:35 PM
i agree with u on that lilly! go mclaren!

Aurora
04-13-2004, 02:54 PM
I'm a Montoya-girl myself, but I'm basically for anyone who stops Ferrari!

PennyThePenguin
04-13-2004, 03:01 PM
ahh...we'll be in the same camp come the 2005 season then. :)

junekidd
04-13-2004, 03:30 PM
mclaren is a very good team, but I think that KIMI need more confidence and aggressiveness!

Jessi
04-14-2004, 10:12 PM
Article from Tennisweek:

Safin Hires Lundgren As New Coach

By Richard Pagliaro
04/14/2004

Seeking an experienced tennis mind as a mentor, Marat Safin has hired a familiar face — Peter Lundgren — as his new coach. Lundgren, who coached world No. 1 Roger Federer until the Wimbledon winner dismissed him after claiming the Tennis Masters Cup last November, joined Safin in Estoril where the former No. 1 is playing in the Estoril Open.

The 39-year-old Lundgren succeeds Denis Golovanov as Safin's coach. Golovanov, who is Safin's close friend, had worked with the 2000 U.S. Open champion for nearly 18 months — a fairly long tenure by Safin's standards. Though Golovanov lacked experience coaching elite pros and his hiring was viewed by many observers as a case of Safin selecting his buddy rather than a budding tennis mind as his coach, the towering, temperamental Russian did win the 2002 BNP Paribas Masters title and advanced to the Australian Open final in January working with Golovanov.

After a strong start to the season, Safin has stalled a bit, losing five of his next seven matches before scoring a 5-7, 6-2, 6-2, victory over Cyril Saulnier in Estoril yesterday. Lundgren was on hand in Safin's box for that match and his hiring is a sensible selection for a player who is one of the game's most physically-gifted talents, but has been prone to periods of concentration lapses and mental meltdowns in the past.

Lundgren has worked with temperamental talents in the past — he worked with surly Chilean Marcelo Rios before hooking up with Federer — and becomes the second Swede to coach Safin.

Seven-time Grand Slam champion Wilander, who served as Safin's coach during the 2001 season before stepping down because he could not commit to a full-time travel schedule, told Tennis Week.com he believes Safin has the talent to return to the top of tennis — if he can stay healthy — but stressed Safin must be smarter about his schedule and his approach to the sport.

"First of all he needs to get healthy and focus a little more when he plays," Wilander said in an interview with Tennis Week last fall. "Marat's got the right game and he can play and win on any surface. Whether he will do it, I'm not sure. I think with some of today's players, there's a difference in the drive to win and the drive to reach your potential. Some guys are only in it to win whereas they don't always see that growing as a player and developing their game and reaching their potential will actually help them win longer."

In Lundgren, Safin now has a coach who can construct tactically-sound game plans and has had success in helping Federer fulfill his prodigious potential. Both Safin, who has reached at least the quarterfinals of all four majors, and Federer, who holds the Wimbledon and Australian crowns and has won tournament titles on four different surfaces, are among the most accomplished all-surface players along with Andre Agassi.

Since Federer has won five of his six meetings with Safin their clashes can hardly be called a rivalry, but former No. 1 John McEnroe believes the pair can produce exceptional encounters in the future.

"If Safin's new-found dedication is for real, there are going to be some great match-ups in the years ahead, not least with his rival in the men's final of the Australian Open, Roger Federer, who has it in him to be the greatest player who ever lived," McEnroe told the Telegraph. "It's a perfect contrast: the outright power of an unbelievable physical specimen like Safin against arguably the greatest striker of a ball in history in Federer. You watch Federer hit some shots and you wonder, 'How did he even think of that shot?' We're talking about two incredibly talented guys here."

Federer, who has been playing without a coach since parting company with Lundgren, has the mental make-up to maximize his talent. Safin, who has gone through several coaches in his career including Rafael Mensua, Briton Tony Pickard, Wilander and fellow Russians Andrei Chesnokov, Alexander Volkov and Golovanov, is hoping Lundgren can help him get the most out of his game.

Shadow
04-21-2004, 12:45 PM
Information on the Australian Open 2004 gathered by IBM SurfAid Analytics shows:

There were 11 million visits to the official website – 11% higher than for the 2003 event.
1.8 million unique users visited the site.
The largest number of unique visits to the site on a single day was 399,207 on January 29th (Day 11). This day included both women’s singles semi-finals and the 3 hour, 42 minute men’s singles semi-final match between Andre Agassi and Marat Safin.
The largest number of people visiting the site simultaneously was during the men’s single semi-final between Andre Agassi and Marat Safin.
The IBM Real-Time Scoreboard, which provided live scores and statistics from every match in play, was downloaded 1.2 million times.
The most popular women’s singles player profiles on the site were (in order): Kim Clijsters; Justine Henin-Hardenne; Fabiola Zuluaga; Maria Sharapova; Anastasia Myskina; Patty Schnyder; Venus Williams; Daniela Hantuchova; Lisa Raymond and Amelie Mauresmo.
The most popular men’s singles player profiles on the site were (in order): Marat Safin; Roger Federer; Andre Agassi; Andy Roddick; Juan Carlos Ferrero; Lleyton Hewitt; David Nalbandian; Hicham Arazi; Mark Philippoussis and Paradorn Srichaphan.
The largest number of visits to the site were from (in order): United States; Australia; United Kingdom; Belgium; Canada; Switzerland; Netherlands; Germany; France and Japan.
The largest number of visits to the Web site from within the Asia Pacific region were from (in order): Japan; Singapore; Hong Kong; and China.
NetPoll offered visitors to the official web site the chance to have their say on a different tournament related question each day and immediately see the results, using Linux Virtual Services from IBM e-business Hosting.
Scoring and statistics
IBM also provided the scoring system for the Australian Open 2004. Statisticians and speed serve operators tracked detailed statistics which were fed live to the on-court scoreboards, Australian Open intranet, graphics for broadcasters and the website.

But as many tennis fans know, the scoreboard alone doesn’t always tell the complete story of a match. The official web site also provided fans with a richer experience of the tournament and allowed users to see the key statistics behind the scores.

This information included first serve percentage, aces, double faults, unforced errors, winning percentage on first serve and second serve, winners, break point conversion, net approaches, total points won, fastest serve, average first and second serve speeds.

Speed serve and ace leaders

Andy Roddick and Joachim Johansson (both 225 km/h) were the men’s speed serve leaders for the tournament, followed by Taylor Dent (219 km/h), Australian Chris Guccione (217 km/h) and Fernando Gonzalez (214 km/h).
Australian Samantha Stosur and Venus Williams (both 193km/h) topped the women’s speed serve leader board for the tournament, followed by Alicia Molik (also Australian) (183 km/h), Justine Henin-Hardenne and Evie Dominikovic (both 182 km/h).
Marat Safin topped the men's ace leader board with 126 during the tournament, followed by Andy Roddick and Roger Federer (both 68), Australian Wayne Arthurs (62) and Juan Carlos Ferrero (58).
Patty Schnyder topped the women's ace leader board with 28 during the tournament, followed by Justine Henin-Hardenne (26), Lisa Raymond and Amelie Mauresmo (both 22) and Australian Alicia Molik (20).
Source: Event Statistics page www.AustralianOpen.com

Aurora
04-21-2004, 02:33 PM
Belgians on the internet, it's a real plague. Have you noticed that? They're everywhere! :devil:

Shadow
04-22-2004, 12:54 PM
yes i noticed it on wtaworld LOL. Belgians over Belgians... wheter Kim or Justine Fan LOL! :tape:

Shadow
04-22-2004, 12:55 PM
EXCITING NEWS!

theguyfromrussia.com

OFFICIAL MARAT & DINARA WEBSITES

Official News - 22nd April 2004
Official Marat & Dinara websites are being created as we speak! It's a joint project, (but individual sites) aiming to go online in about 1 months time (possibly in time for RG?) The Marat site will have competitions like win dinner with Marat, or 2 all-expense-paid trips to Bangkok tournament to meet Marat and stay at the same hotel! Marat also wants to chat online every 3 weeks (well, that's what he says - whether he will keep it up is a different matter!) The domains have been registered, the sites are being created, so let's wait and see what they come up with - it's exciting news!

Aurora
04-22-2004, 12:57 PM
Marat spending time on fans every 3 weeks? :haha:

cool though, finally an official place too check all the rumours

Aurora
04-22-2004, 12:58 PM
yes i noticed it on wtaworld LOL. Belgians over Belgians... wheter Kim or Justine Fan LOL! :tape:

Justine :rocker2: :rocker2: :rocker2: :rocker2:

Shadow
04-22-2004, 01:07 PM
Marat spending time on fans every 3 weeks? :haha:

whats so funny?

maratski
04-22-2004, 01:28 PM
I don't see him sticking to it Andrea ;)

Shadow
04-22-2004, 01:34 PM
well ok lets wait and see ;)

PennyThePenguin
04-23-2004, 01:55 AM
i seriously doubt he'd stick to it... hehe... but we could hope for it i guess! it'll be nice.

Denise
04-23-2004, 08:04 AM
Marat spending time on fans every 3 weeks? :haha:

cool though, finally an official place too check all the rumours

Marat spending time on fans every 3 weeks? :lol:

Who said that????? how they can prove it????

Oh, you saw smth wrong, Marat will spend time on fans (with chat bla bla) EVERY WEEK! ;)



:haha: I wish so.

PennyThePenguin
04-23-2004, 01:58 PM
hey denise! it's a tentative plan. and when they say tentative, i can assume it's EXTREMELY sketchy.

alita
05-18-2004, 04:16 PM
I found it in one of Marat fan's website
It's said that:

"From my friend Ros (a Nalbandian fan)
I was having a coffee when he walked past me - he was obviously pretty sad and p***** off about the [Melzer] defeat. Suddenly about 10 children came from nowhere and surrounded him - unlike a lot of players he stayed with them for about half an hour - it was cold and trying to rain, & he was very tired, but he signed endless autographs & posed for photos with them: he really made those childrens' day. "

Shadow
05-18-2004, 04:25 PM
Thats Marat :) He is and always has been.

alita
05-18-2004, 04:30 PM
:) nice guy

Anik
05-18-2004, 05:20 PM
4 new Videos

http://dinarasafina.proboards20.com/index.cgi?board=MaratSafin&action=display&num=1082153039&start=60

Vass
05-18-2004, 10:29 PM
4 new Videos

http://dinarasafina.proboards20.com/index.cgi?board=MaratSafin&action=display&num=1082153039&start=60
Thanks!

tangerine_dream
05-22-2004, 02:52 AM
Hi Marat fans :wavey:

I came across this article at The Guardian. Thought maybe you guys would like to read it (if it hasn't been posted already).

Safin will sizzle if only he can keep his cool

Russian must win the head game to answer his doubters in Paris

Stephen Bierley
Saturday May 22, 2004
The Guardian

When Marat Safin talks of trying to be consistent, the tennis world turns its head and tries its best not to laugh. The huge Russian, who as a 20-year-old pummelled Pete Sampras into submission in the 2000 US Open final, has the talent and the power to rush anybody to oblivion. Unfortunately he is every bit as likely to self-destruct with equal speed.

In all probability a Spaniard or an Argentinian, heavily versed in the art of torture by a thousand returns, will drive Safin to distraction at some stage during the French Open which begins in Paris on Monday. And yet Safin, who spent his formative years in the Iberian peninsula, still maintains clay is his best surface, and harbours a belief that he can win the title at Roland Garros.

If only he could get a head transplant. Safin's eyes narrow. "Look, it's my head. It's the way I am. There's no chance that I'm suddenly going to become different. So don't get too excited when I'm winning or too depressed when I lose. Keep it cool." Like a fish in a pool, Marat.

The trouble is, as any of his many admirers will tell you, it is immensely frustrating to see a player of his ability continually underachieve. It might have been different if he had beaten Sweden's Thomas Johansson in the final of the 2002 Australian Open, a title Safin threw away. Victory then, and the Russian might have stepped on the gas and left everybody in his wake.

That same year he reached the last four at Roland Garros, losing in straight sets to the current champion, Juan Carlos Ferrero of Spain. Thereafter all has been mostly downhill until this year's austral summer when, after a long period out with a wrist injury, he reached his second Melbourne final, beating Andy Roddick in the quarters and Andre Agassi in the semis, both victories coming after monumental five-set tussles.

Losing to Roger Federer was hardly a disgrace and everybody was delighted to see Safin back in the mix, although there were the usual digs about his mental frailty and dubious commitment during the US spring hard-court season when, once again, his form deserted him. The "old" Safin, so it seemed, had re-emerged.

He was not having that. "Why do you want to talk about the old Marat? There is no such thing as a perfect player. People can say I could have won five slams already - well, sorry, but I couldn't. Everybody is smarter than me from outside the court."

When everything is going right and his confidence is high, Safin makes the game appear ridiculously easy. Such was the case against Sampras. But to continue at that level demands constant dedication and self-discipline. And Safin loves his millionaire life a little too much to don the monastic hood of a multiple champion.

Recently he has taken on Peter Lundgren, Federer's former coach. "Marat made inquiries last year immediately after Roger and I parted," said Lundgren. "Then I rang Mats Wilander, who had also coached Marat for a while. I'm not going to make any huge technical changes. It's more a case of dealing with his temperament."

No doubt this is why Safin has been talking up the need for greater consistency, which could be interpreted as a greater control of his emotions as far as Lundgren is concerned. But as Roddick said: "People think of Marat and they think temperamental. He's all of those things, but deep down he badly wants to win."

Lundgren may be the catalyst to another slam, perhaps in Paris a fortnight tomorrow. If only it wasn't for all those Spaniards and Argentinians. "OK, it will be difficult, very difficult," said Safin, his eyes twinkling at the thought of it. "But you have to push them and be in control all of the time."

Control. Consistency. Neither of these words is remotely synonymous with Safin. His victory over Sampras was as dramatic as it was shocking, and many people got their signals crossed. Safin was not about to become another Sampras and be the next dominant force. First Lleyton Hewitt swept past him, then Roddick, Ferrero and Federer.

Safin is seeded 20th for the French Open and remains philosophical: "Sometimes you are scared, sometimes you are choking, sometimes you feel confident, sometimes you are too confident. It's sport." He may not survive the first week, but if everything clicks he could just win. Keep cool.

PennyThePenguin
05-22-2004, 03:09 AM
thanks tangy! :banana:

Aurora
05-22-2004, 12:04 PM
Thanks for that interesting article, they've got an insightful point of view. (I've read some good sports articles from the Guardian, seems like an excellent paper - sportswise anyhow)

Hitting the spot:

The trouble is, as any of his many admirers will tell you, it is immensely frustrating to see a player of his ability continually underachieve.

But Marat himself gives the sensible advise:

If only he could get a head transplant. Safin's eyes narrow. "Look, it's my head. It's the way I am. There's no chance that I'm suddenly going to become different. So don't get too excited when I'm winning or too depressed when I lose. Keep it cool." Like a fish in a pool, Marat.

No can do, buddy, no can do! ;)

Vass
05-22-2004, 12:24 PM
Why does the American press should be so non-believing? They focus on these Sapniards and Argentineans, but I'd give them the same share in the article as the fact that he can bagel all of them and win in straight sets. But this author doesn't seem to know what he wants to say: he's not talltally saying that Safin is bad, he's not saying he's good, and he's not saying that he can be good and bad. He's saying all this but in a wrong way.

tall_one
05-22-2004, 02:33 PM
uh out of curosity, how do you know that this was done by an american?

Vass
05-22-2004, 02:37 PM
uh out of curosity, how do you know that this was done by an american?
The Guardian....:scratch: the guardian.... :scratch: English, you mean? :D

tall_one
05-22-2004, 02:40 PM
The Guardian....:scratch: the guardian.... :scratch: English, you mean? :D
not quite, sorry i wasn't more clear in your post above you said

"Why does the American press should be so non-believing?"

So it sounded like you knew this article was by an american, or was that just a random the american press doesn't know anything comment?

Vass
05-22-2004, 02:43 PM
So the guardian is American afterall? Don't confuse me next time. I don't bash no one for no reason. You got me all :o

tall_one
05-22-2004, 02:45 PM
no i don't know, that is why i was asking you, lol

Vass
05-22-2004, 02:49 PM
Guardian is English. Sorry.
Sorry American Press!!! Although, it probably wouldn't be long till I have to criticise you...

merle
05-23-2004, 12:03 PM
Thanks for the article Tangy. I also think Guardian's sports section is pretty good, I'm with you in that Lilly! Tehre's nothing wrong with the article, Vass! KEEP COOL as the author of this article writes!

alita
05-23-2004, 01:02 PM
Thanks for the article Tangerine~

PennyThePenguin
05-23-2004, 03:32 PM
gee... american, english...singaporean even... does it matter? it's the press... :D

Anik
05-28-2004, 08:38 PM
Dostoevsky's man on the tennis court
By Simon Kuper
Published: May 28 2004 18:06 | Last Updated: May 28 2004 18:06


Marat Safin, probably the world's most talented tennis player, smacks an easy ball into the net and pretends to cry. Then he extends a hand and lets it tremble. The Russian is always happy to make his internal state external, even in front of thousands of people. The scoreboard says he is playing the Spanish journeyman Felix Mantilla in the second round of the French Open, but the truth is that for three hours Safin has been playing against himself.


It is 8.30pm on Thursday, a chilly night is descending over Paris, and Safin's volley has stopped functioning. He keeps coming to the net as if sucked there, but keeps missing. Sometimes he strokes the volleys in slow-motion, like a beginner practising, but still they miss. He loses the tiebreak of the fourth set by netting a ball that a Sunday player would have put away. After yet another error, he cries: "So burned out! So fucking burned out!" He says it in English, but Safin is as fluent berating himself in Spanish.

In the endless final set, he flies across court to catch a Mantilla drop-shot, and miraculously puts it away for a winner. While the Spaniard stares at him aghast, Safin, inspired, pulls down his shorts. The crowd cheers - female fans love the goateed 6ft 5in Russian bear - but the umpire penalises him a point. A journalist in the press stand mutters: "He's mad, a nutter." This is how the sports pages normally characterise Safin. In fact, in a sport that produces few Dostoevskian characters, Safin is one.

His background is unremarkable - at least for his generation of tennis players. His mother, Rausa Islanova, was a tennis coach in Moscow. When her son was a toddler, and uninterested in the game, she put him on court. When he was 13, she shipped him off to a tennis academy in Valencia. Mrs Safin remains a presence, sometimes interrupting her boy's press conferences with calls to his mobile. Safin considers himself lucky to have escaped the fate of his sister Dinara Safina, now the 36th-ranked women's player, who was kept at home and coached by their mother.

Yet Mrs Safin's plan worked. Her son became the complete tennis player. Aged only 20 he hammered Pete Sampras in the 2000 US Open final, playing what Sampras called "the tennis of the future". And that was it. Safin has never won another grand-slam title. "Probably it was a mistake to win that tournament," he reflected in Paris this week. "If I had not won the US Open, I would probably have won more grand slams."

Everyone finds it infuriating. Safin on form blasts every shot to the corners of the court, except for his drop-shot, which he could land on an ant without disturbing it. Mats Wilander, one of Safin's many former coaches, says he has the most complete arsenal of strokes of any player ever. Russia's Davis Cup captain Shamil Tarpischev sighs: "He could be as dominant as Michael Jordan was or Michael Schumacher, Tiger Woods. Unfortunately, he has the talent but not the desire to be the world number one."

In fact, Safin seems to wrestle with the question of desire. When I asked whether he had considered quitting tennis, he replied: "Everybody does. Many times in his life. Because the game is so hard, because there is a lot of pressure, because it's a tough job." This, incidentally, demonstrates the cruelty of the tennis tour. You never hear young basketball or soccer players musing about retirement. So why did he return, after a few happy months off last year with a wrist injury? "I could give you a thousand reasons. Because tennis is my job, because I have no life if I don't play tennis, because I am 24 years old and one of the best."

on Friday afternoon he finally disposed of Mantilla, taking the fifth set 11-9, and in today's third round he faces the Italian upstart Potito Starace. For most top players, this would be a routine victory. But Safin won't be playing Starace. He'll be playing himself, a much tougher opponent.

His frequent meltdowns are, he believes, the flipside of his thrilling style. "I'm not consistent because I'm not waiting for mistakes and playing from the baseline and running from side to side," he says. "My tennis, actually, is 90 per cent about risk. And when you have no confidence, it's difficult to push down the line on important points."

Or indeed, on Thursday's evidence, to hit the ball over the net at all. What Safin doesn't add is that tennis is hardest when you think - as he does - about every ball you hit. The great champions, notably Bjorn Borg, inhabit the so-called "zone", where the body seems to do everything on autopilot. Safin is too reflective for that.

"If I don't win in Paris," he said months ago, "in that city that's so special to me, later I won't be able to look back contented on my tennis years." He probably won't win it this time. But the rest of us can enjoy watching his torment.

PennyThePenguin
05-30-2004, 06:27 AM
from June's Tennis Life

The Russian Bear Comes Out of Hibernation
By Bud Collins

An avid Russian hacker named Leo Tolstoy, who also put in time as a scribbler, would have loved his very appealing countryman Marat Safin, whose career has been about inner war and picking up the pieces.

Tolstoy, one of Russia’s earliest players, frolicked on the court he had laid out in 1896 at his country estate Yasnaya Polyana, a drive of about three hours south from Moscow. You can see the space where it was located, and have a word with his grandson, Vladimir Tolstoy, curator of the museum on the property. (He’d like to see the court restored. Any court builders out there who’d like to donate a rectangular slice of history?) Tolstoy had a tennis scene in his novel Anna Karenina. (No, Anna did
not throw herself in front of that train because she and her lover, Count Vronsky, lost a mixed doubles match.)

There were times over the last couple of years, though, when a “depressed” Safin may have been looking for a railroad track himself. That’s when he was acting like the namesake of a character created by the American writer, Washing-ton Irving, “the Headless Horseman.” Or, maybe, Tolstoy’s Pierre Bezukhov in War and Peace, a pleasant chap wandering about in a haze of indecision.

However, the bearish Russian appear-ed to have found his head somewhere along the way to Melbourne and the Australian Open where he became an item again by beating Andy Roddick and Andre Agassi in five-set wowsers—before having his noggin handed to him by Roger Federer in the final. (In the in-terim somebody else may have come across his head, muttering, like Ham-let, “Alas, poor Safin, I knew him” and set it down, hoping that the owner would attach it once more and resume his celebrity.)

Possibly Safin cleared his brain with injections of fresh, mountain air in Yosemite National Park and the Maritime Alps of France. Both locales figured in the rejuvenation of the ex-U.S. Open champ who celebrated his 24th birthday at Rod Laver Stadium by blowing out Roddick’s candles.

Telling himself, “I cannot wait, I must create a situation, this moment may not come again,” he swooped to crush a match point volley against No. 1 Roddick in the quarterfinals, and was smilingly struck by the thought “I’m back!”

Chuckling that he “gave a gift No. 1” to Federer (lifting it from Roddick’s shoulders), Safin was saluted by the Swiss recipient: “We’re glad he’s back because Marat’s a good guy. But we’re scared, too, because we know how well he can play.” Pete Sampras will never forget, looking back to his 6–4, 6–4, 6–3, Safinizing at Flushing Meadow in 2000.

Regardless of losing the Aussie title bout, 7–6 (7–3), 6–4, 6–2—a combination of his weariness (he played more sets, 30, than anyone before him in a major) and Federer’s mastery—this was quite a different Safin from the guy who bungled the same final two years before to Tom Johansson. That was the year of his Bosomy Blonde Squad, which decorated his box, and tales of living higher than his 6'4" frame circulated throughout Melbourne. His alibi: “Then, I had problems with myself. I was 22. I was too nervous.”

This time he was a reclamation project, ranking No. 86, who had played merely 23 matches in 2003 (12–11), losing most of the year to injuries. In preparing he had been driven endlessly like an Alpine goat (much uphill running) in the ranges near his Monte Carlo residence by trainer Walt Landers, a Polish emigrant to the United States.

There was a girlfriend “one” named Olecia. But the other connected female face in the Melbourne throng belonged to Mama: Rausa Islanova, the woman who had put his first racket in his right hand. She had coached him until age 14, then shipped him to Spain to continue his tennis education because she didn’t want Safin teased as too much the Mama’s boy.

But was it Mama’s boy on display, behaving admirably, no pouting no smashing rackets (well, two in the final, gratuitously?). Had she laid down the law of propriety and concentration? “Come on, I’m 24, man,” he said. “A little bit too old to take care of. She’s just here to enjoy the tennis of her son.”

Maybe an occasional look from her was enough. Anyway, she watched and was pleased with her cub, who, determined not to embarrass her, did not. Out of the wilderness of injuries and neglect of his talent—he had talent to burn, and he burned it—Safin was mending a once brilliant career that had unraveled.

At the conclusion of the 3-hour-and-23-minute duel with Roddick, a full-house crowd of 14,623 serenaded his triumph with “Happy Birthday.”

“That was really nice,” he said. “I can’t ask for anything else. Especially the win, beating No. 1 in the world; playing the best since I helped Russia win the Davis Cup at the end of 2002.”

Next was Agassi—lasting 3 hours and blasting 33 aces and 19 service winners in 26 serving games with no double faults against the foremost returner—for whom he had the greatest respect. “I never thought I could beat Andre. He could have won in three sets, he had chances, set points, but I won in five. I have no words...to be on the same court with Andre Agassi.…”

Damaged ligaments and nerves in his left wrist were Safin’s primary indisposition. “I went to Los Angeles [last July] to play,” he said, “but I couldn’t. So then I saw so many doctors and nobody could tell me what was wrong, what to do. They had doubts, they had versions.”

“Finally friends took me to a good sports doctor [Keith Feder] in L.A., who takes care of basketball and hockey players. Also a doctor for the movies. Yes, yes,” he went on in one of his endearing digressions, “yes, because actors, they get injured also. I don’t know. Somehow. Don’t ask me how. The doctor said he couldn’t operate on me. Too tricky. But he said the wrist would heal in a cast. It took a month and a half. I had nothing to do. I was a little depressed.”

But the genuine wilderness beckoned, and they took off for the woods—Safin, his girlfriend and his coach Denis Golovanov. “We went camping. I got a map at the gas station to see where is everything, because,” said the jocular Safin, “my way was going to Oregon. Too far. We went to Yosemite. It was great, beautiful. We went fishing, drink beer, cook what we catch. Just make your mind a little bit relax. Chill out. Think a little bit. No people. You need these kind of things.”

Dame Juliana Berners, an English-woman who wrote one the earliest books devoted to sport, in the late 15th century, had this to say for fishing: “The sport of angling causeth a man to be merry; is for the health of the soul; he shall be well set to God.” Safin would agree. It was an epiphany of sorts for nature boy, who won his first of 11 titles in Boston, the 1999 U.S. Pro. He pondered and decided to make a fresh start.

“I’m really surprised to get to the final,” he said, “because with so much time off you lose completely the game. You don’t see anymore. You don’t feel the moment, what to do, all these things. Basically you have to start from zero. But I did a great job, working hard, day by day, to make everything come back. I was surprised how quick it was. Walt [Landers] was tough, great for me. In a month and four weeks he worked me into shape. My tennis is about fitness, movement.”

These assets were on display as his labors continued in the Aussie. Punching the time clock as well as his volleys more than anyone else, he had no pushovers: three wins in five sets, three in four sets, a total of 21 hours and 6 minutes on court. Federer spent 13 hours and 5 minutes.

“But it was really nice to play long matches,” Safin explained, “to feel the pace of the ball, to read where it’s going, a little bit of feeling of the points.”

Sidelined from Davis Cup last year, Safin returned to the lineup, but couldn’t avoid another long match or help Russia return to the final. Five days post-Federer, and after a lot of air time, he made it to Minsk and lost to Max Mirnyi in a little over four hours, 7–6 (7–3), 7–6 (7–5), 1–6, 4–6, 11–9, the start of a 3–2 defeat by Belarus.

But the main thing is the Russian bear has come out of hibernation with his immense talent intact. He’s stretching with those very long arms and paws for elusive balls the way a grizzly goes after a honey-filled hive way out on a limb or after a darting salmon in a swift river. That awesome reach, blended with speed afoot, overtaking shots that seemed winners and making foes hit too many balls.

Immersed in the uppermost mix again, along with the other holders of major titles—Federer, Roddick, Agassi, Ferrero, Moya, Hewitt, Kuerten—Safin ought to be a standout piece in the most exciting mosaic of the men’s game in years.

Leo Tolstoy might call it the elitists’ war without peace. Safin thinks, “No. 1 will change hands a lot.” It might be in his paws if his head doesn’t get lost somewhere again.

tangerine_dream
05-31-2004, 05:22 PM
From the New York Times ...

Safin Goes From Earth to the Moon
By SELENA ROBERTS
May 31, 2004

WELL-DESERVED raves were directed at Marat Safin after his dare-to-bare moment at Roland Garros on Thursday revealed a spontaneous character among the Stepford guys in the second round, but was this just one of his moon phases?

"I felt like pulling my pants down,'' Safin, the Chippendale Russian, said Friday. "What's bad about it?

"It's like, what, entertaining business. You try to make it fun.''

Then on Saturday, an entranced French Open crowd was thrilled to harass Safin when he called a Band-Aid break for blisters that happened to burst like Jiffy Pop at a tense point in his next match. But can Safin, the social smoker on the club scene, sustain the intrigue he has whipped up?

"You have to wake up and you have to run if you want to survive,'' said Safin, dripping drama after his five-set victory over Potito Starace.

The network that brought the world the soft-lens, sepia-toned Olympics was so tied to the Williams sisters' canned escapades that it couldn't provide more than a brief clip of Safin's matches, but should NBC become emotionally invested in a swinger with commitment issues?

Devotion to Marat Safin is truly complicated. He is an irascible, Technicolor talent who has the ability to polarize tennis crowds desperate for a men's player who will prod their sense of right and wrong.

Imagine what a perfect foe the self-involved Safin would be for the valiant Andy Roddick, who was last seen pulling a Dudley Doo-Right as he rescued hotel guests from a burning building in Rome. Imagine what a wonderful foil the temperamental Safin would be for the earnest Roger Federer, whose posse includes a pet cow named Juliette but neither an agent nor a coach on his current perch at No. 1.

Meanwhile, Safin is on his seventh coach and fifth entourage in the four years since he won the United States Open at age 20. After he prowled the Manhattan vodka circuit to celebrate his first, and only, major title, Safin ended as the No. 2-ranked player in 2000, fell to No. 11 in 2001, popped up to No. 3 in 2002, then plunged to No. 77 last year.

It's the progress chart for a bucket of crabs - scramble up, fall down, repeat. Over the past week, Safin has, once again, discovered resiliency in his adventures at the French Open.

"If he wants to be a champion again like he was,'' his latest coach, Peter Lundgren, said, "he has to have that even though he says to himself: 'I hate this game. I hate this and this and this.' "

The volatility of Safin ignites and defeats him while also fueling and fooling observers. The latest display of Safin's passion has prompted discussion of how amazing he is for the game, how quickly he could reach the kind of trans-Atlantic pop status of a Boris Becker or a Goran Ivanisevic.

It's not often you can say Pete Sampras was prophetic, but in 2000, he was the soothsayer who outlined Safin's future after Safin unleashed a string of backhand returns at his feet during the United States Open final.

"Safin could be No. 1 if he wants to do it,'' Sampras said at the time. "It's a decision you have to make about your life. You have to decide how much you want to be at the top of the game and deal with the pressures."

Safin can't make up his frazzled mind. That's the trouble with his crowd-pleasing unpredictability and the intrigue of his wild moods swings: it gives rise to his early-round exits.

How can he be good for the Tour when he isn't a regular part of it? Certainly, injuries have sabotaged his attempts at smoothing out the lurches in his career, but his uneven head has done more to harm his potential to be the Tour savior. Safin cannot be a rival for the Roddicks and Federers of the Tour if he doesn't advance far enough to meet them.

The bold act of Safin is only a peep show when he doesn't stick around long enough for an encore. His unabashed style cannot build a following when he doesn't have the legs to extend himself in a major.

This past week, fans have received a delicious taste of what life with Safin could be like. One day, he left them loving him for his moon shot. A match later, they were loathing him during Blistergate.

"You know I had to take time,'' said Safin, who gladly displayed his range of blisters after defeating Starace. "So why do I have to suffer to waste away the three hours that I've been running on the court and can't hit the backhand anymore? Why I cannot take the doctor?

"It was really sad for me that the people, they couldn't understand this simple things.''

It is never simple with Safin - a fact that makes him compelling and confounding and impossible to commit to.

Vass
05-31-2004, 05:25 PM
Thanks Tangerine.

Shadow
06-03-2004, 01:29 PM
Sports Illustrated

June 7, 2004

SECTION: INSIDE TENNIS; Pg. 88

LENGTH: 354 words

HEADLINE: Insane Talent;
Marat Safin's game is brilliant, unpredictable and wildly entertaining--like the first week of the French Open

BYLINE: S.L. Price

BODY:
There is no show in tennis like Marat Safin. He's capable of anything: madness, genius, spontaneous striptease. Last week his persona grew so large that it infected the entire French Open. Defending champions, top seeds and every male U.S. player fell victim to a mesmerizing unpredictability. When, last Thursday, Safin celebrated a wondrous point in his two-day, five-set win over Felix Mantilla by yanking down his shorts, it seemed only fitting. "I don't know why," he said. "I felt like pulling my pants down."

On Saturday night against 202nd-ranked Potito Starace, Safin kept his clothes on but displayed all the other qualities that make him impossible to ignore. The 6'4" Russian ripped sterling backhands, tossed second-serve bombs, flicked forehand passes through nonexistent holes. As usual, he also made things harder than necessary: His hands blistered, and the match became a five-set epic. Safin muttered to his racket, bellowed at the sky. By saving a match point, he sent the crowd into a rapturous chant of "Mar-at! Mar-at!" Then, when he took an injury break after saving a second match point, the fans whistled in rage. An hour later Safin thrust a bloodied fist into the air and walked off the winner. He was booed into the night.

Earlier, after an errant forehand, Safin had summed up his career by screaming, "Why? Why? Why? Why? Why?" No other player is so bewildering. The funny, handsome Safin is charming one minute, a bully the next. He admits that his U.S. Open win in 2000 retarded his progress: too much too fast, with nearly $ 9 million in income since then. Friends struggle to explain him. "He's a masochist," says his agent, Gerard Tsobanian. "He's like a woman," says Anna Kournikova, who first met him in grade school.

Everyone waits for Safin, who was eliminated on Monday by David Nalbandian, to become the champion he was meant to be. But it may be too late. "This is the way I am," he said. "I can't do anything about it." He could be an all-time great, but he's a slave to paradox. Safin loves himself too much, and not nearly enough.

mandy7
06-07-2004, 10:51 AM
didn't know where else to post this.. so....
does anyone know if marat can play at the ordina open (rosmalen/'s hertogebosch)
cause the commentator on eurosport said that he might not play cause of his not too good loking hands :rolleyes:

i really hope he can play, cause he's the main reason i got extra tickets :)

maratski
06-07-2004, 01:59 PM
He's playing Halle this week so I assume his hands are ok then and he won't withdraw from Rosmalen.

mandy7
06-07-2004, 02:35 PM
He's playing Halle this week so I assume his hands are ok then and he won't withdraw from Rosmalen.

phew.. am i glad to hear that *sighs*
thanx! :wavey:

maratgirl
06-07-2004, 03:17 PM
this is so cool marat is coming and now coria also my two fav's :D

Anik
06-14-2004, 10:00 PM
Handful Of Blisters May Hamper Safin's Wimbledon Hopes
By Tennis Week
06/15/2004

A handful of blisters have forced Marat Safin out of this week's 's-Hertogenbosch grass-court event, casting doubt on the former No. 1's fitness for Wimbledon, which begins next Monday.

"The Russian player is still suffering from a hand injury from the French Open at Roland Garros," tournament organizers said in announcing Safin's withdrawal.

Roland Garros runner-up Guillermo Coria, who suffered an opening-round loss at Queen's Club last week, replaced Safin in the draw.

Blisters bursting from both hands hampered Safin in his fourth-round loss to David Nalbandian at Roland Garros. Despite having his hands taped and re-taped, by the end of the match, Safin looked like he had been playing with a grip made of coarse sandpaper that shredded the skin on his hands leaving them raw and red.

"I really suffered," Safin said after the loss to Nalbandian. "I was frustrated. I couldn’t play. It was a great opportunity to fight for another title. It’s a pity. I don’t know why it happened. I never had this problem before. I’m getting old."

A year ago, Safin was forced to withdraw from Roland Garros, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open due to a left wrist injury. The 2000 U.S. Open champion reached the Wimbledon quarterfinals in 2001. Safin has suffered a pair of second-round setbacks and a first-round loss in his three other Wimbledon appearances.

Tennis Fool
06-22-2004, 11:49 PM
Wimbledon-Ex-Soviet ace Metreveli scolds frustrated Safin
Tue 22 June, 2004 17:19

MOSCOW, June 22 (Reuters) - Former Soviet Wimbledon finalist Alex Metreveli criticised Marat Safin for his lacklustre effort in the grasscourt grand slam's first round on Tuesday.

Safin was coasting to an easy victory over compatriot Dmitry Tursunov before his form deserted him and he slumped to a 4-6 7-5 6-3 7-6 defeat.

"He (Safin) was playing like he was doing everyone a big favour by being here," said Metreveli, who is commentating from London for Russian television NTV.

Metreveli, who reached the 1973 Wimbledon final, said that 19th seed Safin should have relished his chance to play at the All England Club.

"He was acting as if he played here every day, it was just ordinary for him," said the former Soviet champion, who is still the country's leader in Davis Cup match wins.

Safin, 24, who returned this year from a wrist injury to reach the final of the Australian Open and the last 16 at Roland Garros, looked in fine form for most of the first two sets before his brittle temperament fractured.

The former world number one broke his racket in frustration in the third set, earning a warning from the chair umpire.

As his game collapsed towards the end of the fourth set, Safin simply gave up the fight, losing the tiebreak 7-1.

"It was totally unprofessional on his part," Metreveli said, summing up Safin's attitude on court two.

maratski
06-23-2004, 10:06 AM
Thanks TF :)

merle
06-23-2004, 02:23 PM
Enjoy your vacation Ilhame!! :D

safinaferrero
06-25-2004, 12:42 PM
Inside the mind of Marat Safin
By Clive White (Filed: 20/06/2004)


Everyone is disappointed about Marat Safin's unfulfilled potential except, it would seem, Marat Safin. Ever since, as a 20-year-old, he had the nerve to whip Pete Sampras in front of his own supporters to win the 2000 US Open - the first time in 16 Slam finals that the grand master had been beaten in straight sets - the tennis world has been waiting for the Russian to assume his rightful place among the modern-day tennis greats.


Frustration: Marat Safin suffers from mental weakness
Many feared that this was a talent that was going needlessly to waste as he repeatedly fell short in following up that success during the ensuing three years: he was too good to be a one-slam wonder. When he appeared at the Australian Open in 2003 with three blondes in his box and then followed up that mediocre effort (on court, at least) by taking the best part of the remainder of that year off, ostensibly to clear up an injury, those fears were all but confirmed.

However, his return at this year's Australian Open was a sporting comeback to rival the greatest when, with almost no preparation and only a minimal degree of fitness, he managed to reach the final. He was like a man on a mission; his aim, perhaps, to prove that even with such a severe handicap, he could take on and beat the best. All it did, of course, was raise the level of expectation all over again.

His return has been welcomed by all and sundry because tennis needs not only talent like Safin's but also personality like Safin's. Articulate and humorous, the media know that however nondescript the play may have been in a match, Safin will invariably come through for them in the press conference. He is all for lightening the atmosphere when the tennis gets too serious, although his methods occasionally go a little too far, like at this year's French Open when he pulled down his shorts and mooned during his second-round match with Felix Mantilla. He was docked a point for that bit of cheek. "Look, nobody else out there complained," was his excuse.

Yet if there is one thing that is guaranteed to raise the Muscovite's hackles and get him all serious, it is the suggestion that he is 'back'. Not that he disputes that he went away, it is just that he resents what he sees as phoney loyalty. "It's like everybody's happy, 'Marat comes back, he's playing great tennis, I'm really happy for you'. Come on.

"Whenever I am losing, it's like, 'It's his fault'. And whenever I'm winning it's like, 'That's us'. That's the team, the people. But when I'm losing a few matches, suddenly 'It's his fault', 'He doesn't want to practice', 'He doesn't need it', 'He doesn't care'. And when everything goes well, there are people coming behind the stone, saying, 'Oh, my God, he's back finally, and I was there to help him out'.

"So it's a little bit annoying, and it's also annoying when the people come to you and try to explain to you and say, 'But if you should do this or do that you will be more calm, you will be much better'. Those people are normally losers because they don't know how much time, how much dedication, how much it takes to be where I am right now."

Fans and media alike tend to live in a fantasy world where sport is concerned. But serious athletes, like Safin, are much better at putting their victories and defeats into perspective. Britain's Tim Henman spoke on this very same subject only recently, saying when he lost in the Wimbledon semi-finals to Goran Ivanisevic in 2001 he thought the media expected him to be "in isolation and crying for a week - but by the next morning I had decided where I was going to play golf and who I was going to play with".

Safin is also philosophical about the criticisms which have been levelled at him, almost throughout his career, with regards to his temperament. Like many tennis players he is mature beyond his years, 24 in his case.

"There is no such thing as a perfect player; it doesn't exist," he said. "It has to be a balance. Because I have this serve or because I have this kind of game, that's why I have this head, and I have to deal with that. I know that's my problem. I cannot change it. Nobody can change it. I can improve it a little bit. But it's my head, it's the way I am. So at the end of the day, I will be who I am and I will win how much I can win. So don't get too excited when I am winning and don't get too depressed when I am losing.

"For example, people come to me and they say I should have won five Slams already. Yeah, but sorry, I couldn't. For some reason, I couldn't. I wish also, but it doesn't work this way. Everybody is smarter from outside of the court. But in the court it is a little bit different. You see different, and you feel, and you play sometimes against yourself. It's really difficult sometimes to push. Sometimes you are scared, sometimes you are choking, sometimes you are not feeling confident, sometimes you are too confident, which is also bad. It's sport."

No one can criticise Safin for lack of effort, at least not since he came back. The number of times he comes through five-setters is a testament to his fighting qualities and he came through a few at the recent French Open. He has a huge heart, as he showed when he almost single-handedly won the 2002 Davis Cup for Russia by beating France in the final on their territory.

After his Australian Open heroics most people expected him to start winning tournaments again almost immediately, but as Safin probably knew, the reality would be something different. In successive tournaments he had the misfortune to come up against Roger Federer, who beat him in the Melbourne final, and Roddick in the opening rounds. But sometimes he is too easily disheartened, as he was in the match with the American, when he fails to meet his own high standards. As he said: "In the second set I felt a little bit frustrated so I didn't play" adding: "These kind of matches they cut your motivation."

That is the kind of mental weakness his new coach Peter Lundgren - formerly with Federer - needs to correct. His problem is he lacks patience sometimes, most noticeably on clay, which is odd since he completed his tennis education on the red stuff in Valencia, from the age of 13 to 19.

Nowadays, he is a resident of Monte Carlo. While there may be a new dedication about him, one thing we know for sure is that he won't be playing tennis, like Andre Agassi, at 34. Consequently, we should just enjoy him while he is.

Shadow
07-15-2004, 01:03 PM
here is the article about Marat from tennismag August issue, on Safinator messageboard

<<

http://on.starblvd.net/cgi-bin/bbsmsg?marat_safin&tr=1659.1

PennyThePenguin
07-15-2004, 03:25 PM
shannon was saying marat's up on the cover for september.

Vass
07-15-2004, 04:18 PM
shannon was saying marat's up on the cover for september.
Christine said in IW that Marat's on the cover somewhere during summer... This is it.

Shadow
07-15-2004, 04:21 PM
Christine said in IW that Marat's on the cover somewhere during summer... This is it.

yeah and i think she said the guy she talked to in IW who made the interview with Marat there will write the article... and thats him. Bruce Schoenfeld.

PennyThePenguin
07-16-2004, 02:15 AM
so yay! guess we could in a way say that he kept his promise?

holagirl56
07-16-2004, 07:34 PM
Yay! I have no idea what you are taking about, some article TENNIS maybe?

RogiFan88
07-16-2004, 10:48 PM
So Marat, time to show what you're made of, in Toronto!!! Davai!!!

PennyThePenguin
07-17-2004, 03:53 AM
Yay! I have no idea what you are taking about, some article TENNIS maybe?

yep! september's issue of TENNIS. go check it out.

sanell
07-22-2004, 11:37 PM
Hy, This Is My Andy & Marat website:
http://tenisz.gportal.hu
Chek It Up!

Shadow
08-28-2004, 01:16 PM
Two Up Front
Tennis: Safin the showman heads for Beijing


Beijing, China: August 27, 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE






He’s wild, wacky and wonderfully talented – Marat Safin is guaranteed to keep everyone entertained when he plays in next month’s China Open in Beijing.



On the court, the man from Moscow is an explosive mix of raw power, brilliant shot-making and racquet-breaking tantrums. Off it, he is witty, unpredictable and often outrageous – small wonder that tennis journalists have voted him the most quotable player on tour.



Mad-cap Marat had fans laughing and cheering at this year’s French Open when he dropped his shorts and bent over to celebrate winning a rally against Felix Mantilla – only for the umpire to dock him a point. “I felt it was a great point for me,” Safin told amused reporters afterwards. “I felt like pulling my pants down – what’s bad about it? Nobody complained. Everybody was OK. It wasn't really bad.”



At Wimbledon, the Russian smashed his racquet, raged at the umpire and yelled at himself during a first-round loss to compatriot Dmitry Tursunov – and all this while one of his biggest fans, former Russian president Boris Yeltsin, watched from the VIP box.



A Safin post-match press conference can sometimes be more entertaining than the tennis itself. After losing to Nicolas Kiefer in the first round of the Tennis Masters Toronto in July this year, Safin was asked if he would consider changing his unconventional approach to the game.



“You know the story of the hippo?” he responded. “The hippo comes to the monkey and says, ‘Listen, I'm not a hippo.’ So, he paints himself like a zebra, but the monkey says, ‘Look at you, you're painted like a zebra but you’re still a hippo.’ So then the hippo says, ‘I want to be a little parrot,’ and he paints himself like a parrot. He goes back to see the monkey who tells him, ‘Sorry, you’re still a hippo.’



“So in the end, you know, the hippo goes back to the monkey and says, ‘I’m happy to be a hippo. This is who I am.’ So, I have to be who I am and he's happy being a hippo!" The story had journalists in stitches.



After one frustrating loss to Max Mirnyi, a reporter asked Safin why he had lost his temper. “"Do you expect me to smile like an idiot on court?” he countered. “Nobody likes to lose – and I can't be relaxed when I see on the scoreboard that I'm losing and making stupid mistakes. That's just the way I am.”



And that’s just how the fans like him. On form, 24-year-old Safin is one of the most talented and exciting players in the world. A physically imposing presence at 6-feet-4, he can serve and volley with the best while still possessing one of the most overwhelming baseline games in the sport.



He demolished Pete Sampras to win the US Open in 2000 and has twice been Australian Open runner-up. He has captured 11 ATP Tour titles so far in an injury-hampered career.



He might get frustrated from time to time, but Safin loves his sport. “Of course I enjoy it – I have been playing it since I was six,” he once said. “It’s better than cleaning the streets of Moscow! When I talk to myself on court, I say, ‘I love you, you're a good guy, but don't miss next time, OK?’”



He will be looking to add to his trophy collection when the inaugural China Open is held from September 10-26. “The launch of the China Open is great news for professional tennis,” he told reporters. “We all know that Asia is the fastest growing market for our sport and I am very much looking forward to playing in Beijing.”



Safin has already visited the Chinese capital, attending last November’s official launch press conference with Asian number one Paradorn Srichaphan. The players toured Beijing’s famous sights, including Tiananmen Square and the Forbidden City, and visited a traditional Chinese opera.



China Open tournament director Lincoln Venancio is delighted to have Safin in the men’s line-up. “Marat is one of tennis’ great entertainers,” he says. “He’s phenomenally talented, he’s explosive, he’s unpredictable. Marat is going to be a huge hit with the Chinese fans.”



And, it is safe to say, a huge hit with the Chinese press. Mainland reporters can expect such gems as, “My friend, there is nothing so sexy as a woman who is angry – perhaps when she is even throwing things,” or, “Regaining your form is like trying to find love. If you look too hard, you don’t find it. When you let it happen naturally, it comes.”



Yet, win or lose, Safin can still smile at himself and make a joke out of his wild-man reputation. After a journalist congratulated him on getting through his opening match of 2002 – against Michael Chang – without breaking his racquet, he responded: “It’s my first day on the job – give me some time!”

PennyThePenguin
08-28-2004, 02:34 PM
thanks andrea! where did u get this?

Bibir
09-16-2004, 01:00 PM
Russian men cannot match women, Safin says
Thu 16 September, 2004 12:07

BEIJING, Sept 16 (Reuters) - Russia cannot not hope to produce top male players in the near future, despite the success their women have had in 2004, Marat Safin said on Thursday.

While Russian women have won the last three grand slam singles titles, Safin lamented that it would be a long time before the men emulated them.

"There is no-one coming through," the former world number one said after reaching the quarter-finals of the China Open.

"There is not one person who we can say is the potential for the future."

Svetlana Kuznetsova beat compatriot Elena Dementieva in the U.S. Open final this month to match the achievements of Anastasia Myskina in Paris and Maria Sharapova at Wimbledon.

Safin, who has not won a title for two years, paid tribute to all four women.

"You can't compare (the men and women)," said Safin, who was the last Russian man to win a grand slam, at the U.S. Open in 2000.

"The girls are much better than the guys. I'm really happy for the girls. The guys don't have the same ambition as the women have so it will be very difficult."

The now-retired Yevgeny Kafelnikov won the 1996 French Open, the 1999 Australian Open and the 2000 Olympic gold medal.

PennyThePenguin
09-16-2004, 03:21 PM
weird......either the chinese reporter got it wrong...or reuters got it wrong.... it's definitely the same marat, after the same match...so...how come the two conflict? to actually understand what i'm talking abt, u have to read the china open thread. oopps.... soorrryyy...

then again, it might be the same marat, but a different brain.

casillas_girl
09-18-2004, 10:25 AM
Hey,
I have a question,
Is marat still togetter with that Dasha or something or has he already gor someone else?

:) :p :)

tall_one
09-18-2004, 11:54 AM
he is still with Dasha :)

moonlight
09-19-2004, 05:11 PM
Marat Safin wins China Open tennis title with victory over Youzhny

Stephanie Hoo
Canadian Press


Sunday, September 19, 2004

BEIJING (AP) - Marat Safin won the China Open on Sunday, beating fellow Russian Mikhail Youzhny 7-6 (4), 7-5 to claim his first title in two years.

Safin, a former U.S. Open champion, has struggled to return to form following an injury-plagued 2003. His win Sunday lifted him to No. 8 in the world, three points ahead of Andre Agassi, and increased his chances to qualify for the Masters Cup.

Humble in victory, he expressed hopes that his win in Beijing would give him the confidence to return to the top tier. "It's not the last (win), hopefully," he said.

While the fifth-seeded Safin triumphed in straight sets over Youzhny, his victory was nonetheless hard-won.

He got off to a slow start by losing his very first service game and initially seemed puzzled by his younger countryman's varied shots. Earning a break point of his own at 3-4, Safin pounced - winning the point to level, and later cruising through the first set tiebreaker with four aces and five points in a row.

Safin also fell behind in his first service game of the second set, saving a break point with yet another ace and ultimately winning the game. Youzhny inexplicably crumbled at 5-5, losing his service game with a double fault. Safin served out the match to win 7-5, slamming home an ace on the final point.

"The way he was returning, I had to serve very well," Safin said. "He had nothing to lose and he's been playing incredible tennis."

Safin had been without a title since April 2002, when he won the Paris Indoor Open. But he sailed through the China Open, not losing a single set - even while playing five matches in just four days after heavy rains postponed his early contests.

The unseeded Youzhny defeated a field of higher-ranked players on his road to the final, including No. 4 Rainer Schuettler of Germany and Thailand's Paradorn Srichaphan, who was seeded sixth.

"This week I played pretty good," he said. "I know now what I can do to improve my game."

Youzhny said he made too many errors in the final.

"If I start to play more matches at this level and play in more finals, maybe I don't have these mistakes," he said.

In the men's doubles final, No. 2 seeded Justin Gimelstob and Graydon Oliver of the United States defeated fellow Americans Alex Bogomolov Jr. and Taylor Dent, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (6).

The China Open women's tournament starts Monday and will feature American Serena Williams and Wimbledon champion Maria Sharapova of Russia.

moonlight
09-19-2004, 05:12 PM
Safin clinches his first title of the year at China Open

BEIJING, Sept. 19 (Xinhuanet) -- Fifth-seeded Russian Marat Safin survived an attempted Center Court mugging as he surpassed his compatriot Mikhail Youzhny 7-6 (7-4), 7-5 to lift his long-waited first title of the year here on Sunday.

The match started with Mikhail Youzhny breaking Marat Safin in the opening game with the bounce and net chords falling in his favor to appall the fifth seed.

High-spirited Youzhny got a quick pace in the first set and seemed can do anything with accurate landing points and wonderful saves, but Safin soon recovered from one game down to blast powerful serve and heavy hitting, which proved too strong for Youzhny, who was kept running a lot to suffer an energy draining.

With the diminish of power, Youzhny's unforced errors came up. Safin took the chance to return a break in game eight after 2 deuces to level the score 4-4 and compelled a tiebreaker. Safin waked up his big serve by firing four consecutive aces out of total nine to collect his first four points, ending the tiebreaker 7-4.

The second set also proved to be a rock-versus-stone collision with both players holding their serves until Safin broke in game eleven taking the advantage of Youzhny's double faults to pack his first title the year.

Safin walked around the court to express thanks for the crowd's thunderous applause holding the trophy.

"My serve was great. My serve helped me to win the first set. Mikhail was a tough player, but my serve and baseline help me a lot," said Safin. "It was two years for my last title. It's great feeling to win again today and it won't be the last hopefully. I hope to come here next year,"

"I'm surprised the crowd is so kind to me. The title surely help me to reach the Masters Cup and it won't be my last title in China," the Russian No. 1 added.

The loss did not like to bother Youzhny, who attended the press conference with full smile. The runner-up became the first person to say congratulations to Safin.

"If you want to beat a player like Marat, you can not play only baseline. You need to play slide, volley and everything you can control," said the 32-ranked Youzhny. "Marat played better than me. His serve was good. He could play great serve, good baseline and also volley."

"If I could play more finals, I think it will do good to me. I didn't feel regret for the loss, I know I was close to him. I played good today, but it's not my best," added Youzhny.

Safin, the former world number one and 2000 US Open winner, lifted his last title in November 2002. He has had a lackluster recovery following an injury-plagued season in 2003, falling in the first round of US Open.

After beating Andy Roddick and Andre Agassi on his way to the Australian Open final, Safin was looking to enjoy a successful year, but after reaching the semi-final at the Monte Carlo Masters, his form suffered a slide.

maratski
09-19-2004, 06:38 PM
Spot the mistake in the first article moonlight posted if you're a knowledgeable fan ;)

Shadow
09-19-2004, 06:47 PM
Safin had been without a title since April 2002, when he won the Paris Indoor Open.


it was November 2002 ;)

maratski
09-19-2004, 07:09 PM
Very good! ;)

-sOfia-
10-23-2004, 09:24 PM
sorry if this was already posted..

It's from this month's Tennis Magazine

PennyThePenguin
10-24-2004, 06:18 AM
thanks sofia. hadn't seen that

chocc0
10-24-2004, 06:30 AM
thanx sofia
the drawing with the article is good

BelgianWaffle
10-24-2004, 11:43 AM
sorry if this was already posted..

It's from this month's Tennis Magazine


...by Dr. Allen Fox

wow.. an expert :eek: :p

Bibir
10-27-2004, 06:13 PM
Safin finds his way

Russia's Marat Safin is learning more and more about himslef thanks to his new coach Peter Lundgren who coached Roger Federer last year. The recent Madrid Masters winner thinks he has become more mature and hopes to prove it in the weeks to come.

A great tennis player often needs a key moment to boost his career and Safin is one of them. We could have thought Safin's victory over Agassi at the Madrid Masters would be crucial but it wasn't meant to be despite he's straight sets win over the American.

Safin's win over Luis Horna in the quarterfinals was the one.

The Russian was leading the encounter 5-4 and was serving for the match when the empire called a foot fault on his second serve. A month ago Safin would have burst and smashed his racquet but on Friday he stayed focused despite saveral arguments with the empire. This mental improvement is due to the hard work he has done with his new coach Peter Lundgren.

The former Swedish player has had the luxury of helping players to claim the top spot: First it was Chile's Marcelo Rios, then Roger Federer became he's student and since April it's Marat Safin's turn to have a taste of Lundgren's training skills.

"Marat is more reactive than Roger," says Lundgren " When I ask Safin to work on a new shot, he will say yes or no at once. Roger listen, reflects on it then gives his answer. As all gifted players, Marat has a problem that Roger used to have: He has so many options that sometimes he misses his shot. But now I think he has learned more about himself."

After undergoing a strong physicall work last fall Safin thought he would beat everyone but he's temper was still up and down and that's why the 24-year old decided to hide Lundgren as coach.

"I needed 6, 7 tournaments to get to know him better. Now my work is based on the mental aspect . I have to be assured he is happy and focus on his game. I don't like when he's creticising himself too much, that's why he's going down ." Says Lundgren.


TOUGH TO FIND THE ZONE


Safin's inconsistency is due to his 2000 U.S Open triumph where he crushed Pete Sampras. That was a reference match in the Moscow native's career and today he can look back and explain what happened after his outsdanding win:

"It's true I played too well on this day. Then I couldn't put in mind the fact that I could win not playing as well. During the 2002 and 2004 Australian Opens finals I was too nervous, I put too much pressure on myself. You can't win if you fight against yoursef."

The Madrid Masters winner thought he had to fight his opponent across the net and, like 2001 Wimbledon champion Goran Ivanisevic, his own mind:

"Goran and I are perfectionists. We don't know how to play when we are bad. You have to learn how to know yourself and your game better. It took Ivanisevic's whole career to understand that but I think I've learned this in time."

THE NEW SAFIN

Safins's new coach Peter Lundgren has two main goals: To make Safin understand that being mad is not a way of winning, and to reduce his schedule: " He's much more mature on a court, more focused. I also think he played too much. He needs regular breaks in order to be ready when he's entering a tournament."

After the U.S. Open Safin took two weeks off and cameback winning his first tournament in two years (Since 2002 Paris Masters) in Beijing.

With a better mind, a better service and a better forehand Safin is back to his best and will become one of the man to beat.

Eurosport - glanzenberg@eurosport.com 27/10/2004

Aurora
10-27-2004, 10:05 PM
Ok, everything the man has said in that article is why I'm gonna have to kneel down for him when I get near to worship him like a god. I think that by the time I'll get the chance to do that, results will have made we're all gonna do that.


Maybe that's my hope speaking.
Thinking ... hoping :shrug: what's the difference? ;)

Vass
10-28-2004, 07:50 AM
There's no such thing as "new" Marat. Atleast at the moment. Now when he's playing a tie break with Peya.

chocc0
10-28-2004, 08:49 AM
ireally hope marat pics up it's great to see him winning again!

Bibir
10-28-2004, 09:40 AM
There's no such thing as "new" Marat. Atleast at the moment. Now when he's playing a tie break with Peya.

step by step...

I know he wants to play well in his country...but he's surely tired now.....and Bercy begins in four days :(

Aurora
10-28-2004, 11:34 AM
I don't want a new model (I don't believe it can be done), just a remodeled one. with improvements.

btw what's the update on the tb-record? I think with his current tempo, he's slowly getting it even, no?

Vass
10-28-2004, 02:28 PM
btw what's the update on the tb-record? I think with his current tempo, he's slowly getting it even, no?
In 2004? He won more of them than lost. In career it's about 60% winning record.

Bibir
10-28-2004, 02:52 PM
"After Madrid " TB uptade:
In 2004 he played 41 TB...he won 19...but unfortunately lost 22 :(

Shadow
10-28-2004, 02:54 PM
In 2004? He won more of them than lost. In career it's about 60% winning record.

in 2004 his tb record is negative..until now (surprising :rolleyes: )

junekidd
10-28-2004, 03:35 PM
compared with a positive TB records, I prefer the less TB playing... :rolleyes:

I am glad that peter has done sth with Marat. it seems he is shaping one more successful player other than an excellent player.(to some extent, they are different, I think.) maturity needs some price. wish Marat need not to pay much on it.

Bibir
10-28-2004, 04:03 PM
Here we go...some stats

2000
TB........52
won......32
lost.......20

2001
TB........44
won......23
lost.......21

2002
TB........43
won......24
lost.......19

2003
TB........5
won......2
lost.......3

2004
TB......41
won....19
lost.....22

junekidd
10-28-2004, 04:26 PM
thanks bea! ;)
he is a real TB addiction! :o

gabnouwop
10-30-2004, 12:43 AM
Marat again on my schol's paper, the first time cause he was in the list of the sexiest guys and this week because he won in Madrid!!! :yeah: here it is:

Jessi
11-07-2004, 07:58 PM
Interview with Marat's manager Gerard Tsobanian

Tsobanian: "There is something about Marat"


Paris - 07/11/04

s Marat Safin’s agent, Gérard Tsobanian is naturally very close to the Russian champion. He gives us here his insight on Safin’s recent blossoming, as well as on his relationships with his coach Peter Lundgren.

How do you explain Marat Safins excellent end of season?
It's the result of the hard work he started with Peter Lundgren already last April. And if the good results have only materialised now, it's because Marat needed a certain time to get to discover Peter and understand him. You know, he went through so many coaches in the past, that naturally, he was a little sceptical at first. Then he realised that Peter was easy to get along with, since he is very sincere, and Marat appreciates that.

Lundgren is both coach and friend to Safin.
That's right. Marat needs more than just a coach who after work would tell him good bye, see you tomorrow. He likes having someone with whom he can go and have a beer, and talk about things totally unrelated to tennis. He likes to joke around, and he can do just that with Peter who knows very well what's acceptable and what's not. He knows how to mix work and fun.

It seems that with Safin, the key is the ability to motivate him. Many times in the past, he has seemed to lack this motivation. Do you agree?
I don't know if it's a question of motivation. I would rather say that on those occasions, it was rather the frustration of not being able to play as well as he wished. We saw that at Wimbledon and the US Open. Motivation was there, because he had worked very hard for those events. But when he saw that he wasn't playing as well as he hoped for, he lost is composure.

We have the feeling that he seems now able to compete with Roger Federer for n°1. When he's playing his very best tennis, Safin looks almost as good as Federer, doesn't he?
He is as good. The players themselves say it. When Marat plays his best tennis, he is the best player in the world, and he can definitely challenge Federer. But in my opinion, it's not all to be n°1 on the court. Tennis needs personalities like Marat who give them more than just beautiful tennis. Tennis is part of show business, and people who watch matches on TV have to really enjoy their time. I think that Marat brings them this little extra which makes the difference. He is different, and tennis needs a n°1 like him.

(Georges Homsi)

Shadow
11-07-2004, 08:19 PM
thank u for that interview!

very great. Its nice that Marat and Peter get along so well, also in the off court part... as he said its very important for Marat.
And i totally agree with Gerard about Marat beeing the personality tennis needs :yeah:

Aurora
11-07-2004, 09:22 PM
Good stuff!

Damn, I'm getting so freaking excited about the future! :bounce:

chocc0
11-07-2004, 10:19 PM
Great interview it's great that Marats finding his from again we get to see more of him :)

Jessi
11-09-2004, 07:56 AM
Tennis: Safin hits cruise control
The giant Russian makes the final in Paris with a convincing straight-sets win over Guillermo Canas. Barry Flatman reports

As tennis fans go, Houston’s Jim ‘Mattress Mack’ McIngvale is very rich, extremely forthright, exceedingly patriotic and unflinchingly Republican. He will undoubtedly be celebrating one victory this weekend after family friend George W Bush was successfully returned to the White House, but must already be viewing the potential events of two Sunday’s time with much trepidation. ‘Mack’ has made an immense fortune selling beds and other furniture to the good people of Texas, and is quite prepared to donate a sizeable proportion of that wealth back into bankrolling the imminent Masters Cup, which will be played at his own Westside Tennis Club for the second year running. He’d just be much happier if the champion was guaranteed to be a citizen of the United States, and positively choked on his own ‘American Pie’ 12 months ago when forced to present the trophy to Switzerland’s Roger Federer. So just imagine the angst of this child of the Cold War years, whose normal day to day attire is a tennis shirt emblazoned with Stars and Stripes, if the new champion is a Russian. ( :devil: )

While Federer may already be mathematically certain of finishing 2004 as the world’s No 1 player after winning three of the year’s four Grand Slam titles, and Andy Roddick, back in Austin and ready to make the 100-mile drive along Highway 71, the McIngvale choice to become the first ever American winner of the Masters Cup, there can be no denying Marat Safin is the player in form.

When did he last play this well? “A long time ago, a very long time ago,” he answered after beating Argentina’s Guillermo Canas 6-2, 7-6 to extend his Masters Series winning run to nine matches. “I just hope I can manage to stay this well until the end of the season. This is the sort of form I have been searching. I want to play like this and I have the motivation now. I started the year ranked 89th in the world, I want to finish it in the top four.” Today in the familiar subterranean surroundings of Paris’s Palais Omnisports de Bercy, the 24-year-old Muscovite will bid to become the first ever player to win back-to-back indoor Masters Series titles. A fortnight ago in Madrid he was imperious as he dropped just one set on his five-match course to victory, and this week he’s been equally commanding.

It will be the third time Safin has lifted the strange tree-like trophy that has been the property of Tim Henman for the past 12 months, and only Boris Becker can claim as many triumphs. Not bad for somebody who was so disenchanted with tennis just a couple of months ago that he questioned whether it should remain his vocation for the foreseeable future.

Much credit should go to the diligence of coach Peter Lundgren who this time last year was preparing Federer to ascend to the summit of the game, blissfully unaware he would soon figure in Sweden’s unemployment statistics. Safin quickly realised that Lundgren was not a man who could be jobless for too long. “Peter has just tried to get me focused on not being so crazy on the court and to swallow my anger when I want to get annoyed,” said the notoriously temperamental Russian.

The fruits of such new serenity could be exhilarating. Federer has not played for five weeks since winning the title in Bangkok, Roddick only returned to action this week after a similar hiatus and looked badly in need of competitive match practice he will not get before action commences in Houston, and Hewitt, a man who loves to work towards a target, makes no secret of the fact his immediate ambition is to win January’s Australian Open. Safin’s chances of taking the Masters Cup seem to get even better when the remaining four contestants are added to the equation: Carlos Moya hasn’t won a match since the US Open, Guillermo Coria hasn’t even played since shoulder surgery in early August, French Open champion Gaston Gaudio can boast no form on any surface other than clay, and of course there’s finally Henman, who for reasons including magnesium depletion has looked well below par of late.

The reservations about his chances largely centre around Safin’s ability to transport his indoor form to Houston where influences such as sun and wind will be an influence. Traditionally the two tournaments that amalgamated to form the Masters Cup — the ATP’s World Championships and the ITF’s Grand Slam Cup — were both played indoors, and until the competition was taken to Texas a roof was a prerequisite.

“I don’t know why they are staging it outdoors,” questioned Safin. “The Masters always used to be indoors but for some reason they have changed it. I don’t see any logic in that decision but there must be a huge reason.”

The fact that Americans, such as Roddick and last year’s runner-up Andre Agassi, would name an outdoor hard court in an equable climate such as that found in south Texas at this time of the year could be a reason. “I don’t want to say that,” countered Safin in an uncharacteristic attempt at diplomacy. “I don’t want to bring it up.”

He proved equally adept at overcoming the sort of agonising fall that turns the stomach of anybody brave enough to watch the instant replay. Trying to change direction, he lost his footing on exactly the same square yard of carpeted court that caused Canas to fall in his quarter-final a day earlier, and felt his right ankle buckle underneath him.

For several seconds he lay motionless before being helped back to a courtside chair by his opponent and umpire Romano Grillotti. When both trainer Per Bastholt and tournament doctor Bernard Montalvan rushed onto court, Safin’s chances of completing the match, let alone boarding the flight to Houston, looked bleak. Yet, amazingly, his injury was nothing worse than a twisted ankle, and soon he was back pounding his way to victory over Canas.

chocc0
11-09-2004, 08:21 AM
great article Jessi:)

chocc0
11-09-2004, 08:22 AM
Federer still man to beat, says Safin
Monday, 08 November , 2004, 09:21
Paris: Reborn Russian star Marat Safin basked in the glory of clinching his third Paris Masters title but insisted that world number one Roger Federer is still in a league of his own and is on his way to becoming one of the greatest players of all time.

The 24-year-old Safin will finish 2004 as the world number four, having started the year at 86, and has transformed himself into one of the tour's hottest players adding the Paris crown to the Beijing and Madrid Masters titles he has won since September.

But, he insists that Federer, the current holder of the Australian, US Open and Wimbledon titles, will remain the man to beat in 2005. "Nobody looks forward to playing against Federer under any circumstances," said Safin, who beat Czech qualifier Radek Stepanek 6-3, 7-6 (7/5), 6-3 here on Sunday to add the 2004 edition to his Paris wins of 2000 and 2002.

Only Boris Becker - in 1986, 1989 and 1992 - can boast a similar record. "The way Federer is playing right now is just too good. He is very solid, stable and this year he has just been so much better than other players - much, much better."

Safin lost in straight sets to Federer in the final of the Australian Open in January - one of five career defeats he has suffered at the hands of the Swiss ace against just one win which came two long years ago.

Even world number two Andy Roddick has yet to find the key to unlocking the Federer secret - the American has lost eight of his nine career meetings with the world number one, including all three in 2004.

"Roddick has improved a lot," said Safin. "But even he couldn't do much against Federer. He beat him quite easily this year. To beat Roger, you have to be in really good condition. Next year, I will try and do my best to compete with him. It will be quite an effort for me and a challenge.

Safin does have a secret weapon in his armoury in the shape of Peter Lundgren, who coached Federer to his breakthrough Grand Slam victory at Wimbledon in 2003. Safin admitted that the calming influence of Lundgren is beginning to have an effect on his occasional timebomb temper.

Jessi
11-09-2004, 08:49 AM
thanks sarah :kiss:

junekidd
11-09-2004, 01:41 PM
thanks a lot all! :kiss: :)
I love the below best:
But in my opinion, it's not all to be n°1 on the court. Tennis needs personalities like Marat who give them more than just beautiful tennis. Tennis is part of show business, and people who watch matches on TV have to really enjoy their time. I think that Marat brings them this little extra which makes the difference. He is different, and tennis needs a n°1 like him.

I cannot agree more! :yeah:

Denise
11-09-2004, 03:49 PM
Marat again on my schol's paper, the first time cause he was in the list of the sexiest guys and this week because he won in Madrid!!! :yeah: here it is:

thx gadnouwop! marat on your school paper?! that's so great ;) very funny the part of the sexys y ganadores! LOL!

Jessi
11-10-2004, 05:40 AM
Safin Regains Dominant Form
Tuesday November 09, 2004 3:10pm


(Sports Network) - Roger Federer might be in a league of his own right now, but Russian star Marat Safin appears to have regained the form that delivered him a U.S. Open championship four years ago.

The mighty Safin is freshly poured steel hot, having just won his second Tennis Masters shield in a three-week span this past weekend in Paris. Just two weeks earlier he captured the Madrid Masters by beating legendary American Andre Agassi in the semis and fierce Argentine David Nalbandian in the final at Rockodromo.

Safin's lucrative win in Paris came when he overwhelmed Czech qualifier Radek Stepanek in the title match, but his week also featured a key victory over his fellow former world No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt in the quarters. He also cooled off hot Argentine Guillermo Canas in his round-of-four matchup before exacting a bit of revenge on Stepanek, who stunned the powerful Russian in his native Moscow just three weeks earlier.

Safin's popular Parisian run gave him career title number 14, pushed his '04 on-court earnings to just under $2 million and sent his career prize money over the $10.5 million mark. He also joined the legendary Boris Becker as the only other three-time winner of the Paris Masters.

The 6-foot-4 Safin also titled in Beijing in September, which means he's won three of his last six events and improved to 3-2 in his quintet of '04 finals.

The up-and-down Safin overcame a dismal stretch during the summer portion of the season, when he dropped four straight matches at one point, including three straight opening-round setbacks, one of which came at the hands of fellow Russian Dmitry Tursunov at Wimbledon. He would go on to suffer a second-round loss at the Athens Games and a first-round stunner against seemingly-washed up Swede Thomas Enqvist at the U.S. Open.

But following the loss to Enqvist in New York, Safin roared back to rattle off nine straight wins, including his title in Beijing, before succumbing to Andy Roddick in Bangkok. And since that "Big Apple" loss against Enqvist, the formidable Russian is 22-3, including all three of his '04 crowns.

The 24-year-old Safin will be seeded fourth at next week's season-ending Tennis Masters Cup event in Houston, where he'll carry in a five-match winning streak and a 12-1 record over his last 13 outings.

Safin stamped his place on the tennis map four years ago when he pasted American great Pete Sampras in the final at the 2000 U.S. Open. It appeared as though the sky was the limit for the big Russian, but he's struggled with injuries and immaturity over the past few years and failed to live up to the lofty expectations brought on by his wealth of tennis talent. He, of course, is no stranger to an occasional smashing of the racquet and an argument with a chair umpire.

But 2004 has marked a resurgence for the charismatic star, who's piled up a 50-21 record and a trio of titles this season, his best one in two years -- but one that's still a far cry from his brilliant breakout campaign in 2000, when he went 73-27 and led the ATP with seven titles on his way to finishing No. 2 in the world.

After dropping all the way to No. 77 by the end of last season (12-11 with nary a title), Safin has since climbed to No. 4 in the entry rankings, trailing only Federer, Roddick and Hewitt.

Since his run at the 2000 U.S. Open, Safin has failed to nail down a Grand Slam title, corralling a pair of runner-up finishes at the Australian Open in 2002 and earlier this year. But he seems to have regained that form that can produce a major title result, if he can get past Federer, who whipped the Russian in January's Aussie Open finale. Federer is a dominant 5-1 lifetime against Safin, including a perfect 2-0 versus the Russian this year.

Is Safin closing the gap between himself and Federer? Maybe we'll find out next week in Houston, where the exclusive eight-player Masters Cup field will also feature the Wimbledon runner-up Roddick, the U.S. Open runner-up Hewitt, Carlos Moya, French Open runner-up Guillermo Coria, Tim Henman and Roland Garros titlist Gaston Gaudio. The remarkable Federer is the reigning Masters Cup champ and gathered three quarters of this year's Grand Slam hardware (Aussie Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open).

In all fairness to Yevgeny Kafelnikov, Safin is probably the best Russian player we've ever seen, he just needs to add to his Grand Slam trophy case, where he still only holds one piece of hardware (2000 U.S. Open) to Kafelnikov's two (1996 French Open and 1999 Aussie Open). Kafelnikov, for what it's worth, also secured an Olympic gold medal in 2000.

Safin went a respectable 9-4 at the Slams this year, but ended on a sour note by incurring losses in his last two outings, at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open.

It's hard to get inside Safin's mind, but my guess is he's looking forward to a strong 2005 season, with the first major of the year coming in Melbourne in just two months.

Jessi
11-10-2004, 07:45 AM
SAFIN NOT THE OUTDOOR TYPE
Marat Safin may have been basking in the glory of a Masters Series victory in Paris this week.

But his reception at the lucrative, season-ending Masters Cup tournament in Houston next month may be a little more lukewarm.

The controversial Russian has wasted no time in berating ATP organisers for choosing to hold the competition outdoors.

Safin fell short of backing up the claims of some of his rivals that the decision was made to aid the chances of American success.

But he believes it is ludicrous to expect the world's top players to change course after two months on the European indoor circuit.

Safin said: "I don't know why they are making it outdoors - it has to be indoors.

"There is no logic in it at all because the players are used to playing indoors. It is stupid."

Safin has already hit the headlines for his blunt opinions of this year's Wimbledon.

After crashing out to compatriot Dmitry Tursunov, Safin said: "It was a nightmare - I got bored, I completely lost motivation and I gave up.

"I give up on Wimbledon. I hate it. I'm not going to waste my time on it knowing I will not play well."

But Safin's conditioning coach Walt Landers says Safin's grumpy public image could not be further from reality.

Landers believes Safin uses his reputation to hide a fierce hunger for success which surpasses that of many of his rivals.

Landers said: "I started working with Marat in Monte Carlo last year and I have always been surprised by his commitment and desire to do more.

"The thing about Marat is that when he wants to work he may be the most professional person I've worked with."

That is high praise coming from Landers, who has worked with players such as Boris Becker, Andre Agassi and Lleyton Hewitt.

But since teaming up with Landers and Roger Federer's former coach Peter Lundgren, Safin has finally begun to look like finally fulfilling his enormous potential.

Safin said: "This has been an incredible year for me because I started at 89 in the ranking when I played in Australia.

"I was injured for six months of the year and just to win any matches was a surprise.

"I lost confidence and it was hard to start playing well again. But on the whole it has turned out to be a great year and I am looking forward to being amongst the eight best players."

chocc0
11-10-2004, 07:48 AM
Thanx Jessi! Your good at finding all of these articles:)

drf716
11-10-2004, 08:16 AM
SAFIN NOT THE OUTDOOR TYPE
Marat Safin may have been basking in the glory of a Masters Series victory in Paris this week.

But his reception at the lucrative, season-ending Masters Cup tournament in Houston next month may be a little more lukewarm.

The controversial Russian has wasted no time in berating ATP organisers for choosing to hold the competition outdoors.

Safin fell short of backing up the claims of some of his rivals that the decision was made to aid the chances of American success.

But he believes it is ludicrous to expect the world's top players to change course after two months on the European indoor circuit.

Safin said: "I don't know why they are making it outdoors - it has to be indoors.

"There is no logic in it at all because the players are used to playing indoors. It is stupid."

Safin has already hit the headlines for his blunt opinions of this year's Wimbledon.

After crashing out to compatriot Dmitry Tursunov, Safin said: "It was a nightmare - I got bored, I completely lost motivation and I gave up.

"I give up on Wimbledon. I hate it. I'm not going to waste my time on it knowing I will not play well."

But Safin's conditioning coach Walt Landers says Safin's grumpy public image could not be further from reality.

Landers believes Safin uses his reputation to hide a fierce hunger for success which surpasses that of many of his rivals.

Landers said: "I started working with Marat in Monte Carlo last year and I have always been surprised by his commitment and desire to do more.

"The thing about Marat is that when he wants to work he may be the most professional person I've worked with."

That is high praise coming from Landers, who has worked with players such as Boris Becker, Andre Agassi and Lleyton Hewitt.

But since teaming up with Landers and Roger Federer's former coach Peter Lundgren, Safin has finally begun to look like finally fulfilling his enormous potential.

Safin said: "This has been an incredible year for me because I started at 89 in the ranking when I played in Australia.

"I was injured for six months of the year and just to win any matches was a surprise.

"I lost confidence and it was hard to start playing well again. But on the whole it has turned out to be a great year and I am looking forward to being amongst the eight best players."
funny article title :haha:

merle
11-10-2004, 08:35 AM
Yeah, thanks for the articles Jessi! And well, we'll see how he'll perform outdoors in Houston! :D

PennyThePenguin
11-10-2004, 11:37 AM
our marat not the outdoor type? where was he fishing last year then? in an indoors swimming pool?

li'l red
11-10-2004, 11:47 AM
our marat not the outdoor type? where was he fishing last year then? in an indoors swimming pool?

:lol:

Jessi
11-12-2004, 07:56 PM
Safin Seeks Glory at Masters Cup
Tennis
BY TOM PERROTTA
November 12, 2004

Since Marat Safin announced himself to the tennis world by bludgeoning Pete Sampras in the 2000 U.S. Open final, the Russian has shown himself to be a man of multiple personalities.

There's the Marat Safin who plays brilliantly from all corners of the court, as he did in two consecutive five-set victories against Andy Roddick and Andre Agassi at this year's Australian Open. That Safin serves as well as any man alive, and takes on the look of a tight end as he bullies his way through overmatched opponents.

Then there's the Safin who seems to fall asleep on the court, as he did in the first round of Wimbledon, or the Safin who tosses his racket around in anger. Instead of pumping his fist to celebrate a great point at the French Open, the silly Safin drops his tennis shorts. And as you might have seen last week in the final of the Paris Masters, there's also "Safin the Bored," who takes commanding leads and then nearly lets weaker opponents back into matches as his mind wanders.

For all his physical gifts - and Safin is often given credit for having as much or more talent than any man on the tour - the rugged Russian has yet to put together a stretch of impeccable play that returns him to the top of the game, where he sat just four years ago. When the Tennis Masters Cup kicks off this weekend in Houston, Safin will have his best chance yet to prove that he can break the habit of poor concentration that plagues him.

Like the year-end tournament for the women, the men's Masters pits eight players against each other in two groups of four. The players face each group member once, and the top two in each group take a spot in the semifinals. Losing a match in round robin means nothing if a player can right himself and reach the semifinals.

The top seven ranked men qualify for the Masters, along with the highest ranked Grand Slam winner who is not ranked in the top seven. This year, that player is French Open champion Gaston Gaudio, and the odd man out is Andre Agassi.

The ranking system denied Agassi his fifth straight appearance in the year-end tournament since it was renamed in 2000, though he has himself to blame, too. Agassi could have qualified with a strong showing at the Paris Masters, but he backed out at the last moment with a recurring hip injury, angering officials there who were already facing a tournament without the injured Roger Federer.

Agassi's absence is a certain blow for television ratings next week, and it might also be detrimental to the competitiveness of the tournament. Gaudio plays exceptionally well on clay, but he has not won more than one match in any hard-court tournament this season. He'll likely be out of the running early against a lineup of superior hard-court players.

Federer leads the pack, of course, but the game's greatest finds himself hampered by a thigh injury that's caused him to miss the month of October. If he's at his best, he and Safin or Roddick could produce wonderful matches as the tournament progresses. No matter how he fares, Federer has the no. 1 ranking wrapped up for the year.

Roddick, on the other hand, will have to fend off Lleyton Hewitt and Safin for the no. 2 spot. After winning the U.S. Open last year, Roddick has enjoyed a consistent 2004 but doesn't have a Grand Slam to show for it. Roddick has beaten Safin twice in a row, but he's beaten Federer only once in eight career chances and has lost three straight finals to him. A win here would highlight his season - unless he and his American companions win the Davis Cup against Spain next month.

Hewitt churned his way to the U.S. Open final and seems to have recovered from the burnout that caused him to fall in the standings last year. His steady game can often neutralize bigger hitters like Roddick and Safin, but he's at a disadvantage in the round robin portion, where each match is only two of three sets (only the final is best of five).The longer his opponent has to stay on the court, the better for Hewitt.

Rounding out the field are Carlos Moya, Guillermo Coria, and Tim Henman. Coria is also injured, and a withdrawal by him or Federer could open the door for Agassi or David Nalbandian. Henman has put together a fantastic season despite recurring back problems, but is still in search of his first Grand Slam title. A win at the Masters - as unlikely as that is - might count for just as much. And if any man wins the tournament without losing a match, he'll take home the largest single-tournament prize in tennis: $1.5 million.

With Federer's health uncertain, Safin stands a great chance. He can also thank Federer for deciding (rightly, it turns out) that he no longer needed a coach to succeed; after the world no. 1 parted ways with Peter Lundgren, Safin snatched him up.

Lundgren, once a solid tour player who lacked physical gifts, is proving so far to be a fine influence, and Safin recently credited him as the biggest reason for his recent successes. If Lundgren can keep it up, perhaps his latest pupil will yet catch up to his former one.

maratski
11-12-2004, 08:43 PM
Safin the Bored, great name for him ;)

merle
11-12-2004, 09:23 PM
Yeah, Safin the Bored. :lol:

Jessi
11-15-2004, 07:10 AM
Safin finally finds secret to success

Russian learns to control temper, focus his energy
By DALE ROBERTSON
Copyright 2004 Houston Chronicle

Before Roger Federer, there was Marat Safin. It was Safin, the Russian bear, who was supposed to be what Federer has become. It was Safin who first hoisted the burden of being the greatest player of generation-next, the emergent champion of tennis' new millennium.


At the age of 20, he played the perfect match when he beat Pete Sampras to win the 2000 U.S. Open. Ever since, though, his career has been decidedly imperfect, a litany of injuries, racket-splintering tantrums, late-night bacchanals and myriad uninspired matches.

This year, after an impressive run to the Australian Open final, where he lost to Federer, and a solid effort at Roland Garros, he had been drifting downward again, a descent that included a first-round loss at Wimbledon followed by yet another at Flushing Meadow.

From dismantling Sampras in 98 minutes to getting bounced out on his ear by the Swedish journeyman Thomas Enqvist 48 months later — not exactly the trajectory the tennis world had expected from Safin.

"I was a bit angry, a bit (peeved) at myself, that I couldn't do better in such an important tournament," Safin said of how quickly the Open door was shut. "For me, it was a huge thing, and I had a lot of expectations. But then I decided, 'OK, whatever. I have to really understand the situation. It's not my time right now.' But I was doing the right things."

He wasn't kidding himself because his tennis following the flameout in Queens has been the most consistent of his career, lifting him from Masters Cup afterthought to a fourth seed in the ATP's season-ending championship that begins today at Westside Tennis Club.

Only in his native Russia, where expectations conspired with distractions to cause regressions, has Safin not delivered his best.

With 22 match victories since New York — only six fewer than he managed from January through early September — he has almost equaled the number accumulated by all of his Masters Cup peers combined.

Outside of Russia, where he failed to live up to his top seeding in Moscow and St. Petersburg, he has lost only to Roddick, dropping a three-tiebreaker semifinal to the No. 2-ranked American in Bangkok. What changed? He recalled the trip to China, where the renaissance began.

"(It was the) middle of the week," Safin said. "I didn't really play incredible tennis, but I was fighting. I was trying. That's when I started to get better and better.

"Not every time you have to play really good to be able to win. You just need to fight, to be there, to take your chances. If you will be able to do that, then your confidence comes. Then everything becomes much easier."

Safin didn't adjust his game to land a spot in the Houston field. He fixed his brain. He settled himself. He focused his energy.

He again became the player he knows he's supposed to be, the player he grows so tired of being told he should be.

"Because I played such a match against Sampras," Safin said early in the year, "I feel like every time I'm in a final, every time I have a difficult match, I should play the same way. If I'd lost to him that day, it would have changed everything. I wouldn't get so frustrated with myself now and say, 'How the hell? I'm playing so (shoddy).' "

For the moment, such negative thoughts have been flushed from his thought process. He comes to Westside full of positive vibes and lofty aspirations. He thinks he can beat anybody, Federer included.

"I want to finish the year very well," Safin said. "(But) basically there is no pressure because I did my job. I started the year (ranked) 89 and I have a chance to finish No. 4.

"So it's a great season. No matter what I do, I'll be happy."

So will his rackets. He hasn't bashed one to smithereens in a while, for which Denis Golovanov — his sixth coach since he won the Open — gets much of the credit.

"I'm working to control (my temper)," he said. "I have a good coach who is controlling me, trying to keep me quiet. I have to shut up in my matches to be able to win them, and that's why I am winning them."

Jessi
11-15-2004, 07:35 AM
Hewitt, Safin and Roddick work on mental game for ATP Masters Cup

HOUSTON, United States : Attitude adjustments will be crucial for Lleyton Hewitt, Marat Safin and Andy Roddick here this week at the ATP Masters Cup as they compete to become world number one Roger Federer's top challenger.

None of them can catch the Swiss triple Grand Slam champion in the year-end rankings, but all three could conclude the season second by winning the 3.7 million-dollar showdown of the year's eight top players that opens Monday.

Australia's third-ranked Hewitt plans to put his passion on display. Russia's fourth-rated Safin is working on anger management and second-ranked American Andy Roddick has adopted a relaxed attitude.

Such differing strategies could launch one of them into a starring role at January's Australian Open.

Federer defeated Safin in this year's Aussie final. Safin slumped after that but bounced back to win at Beijing in September, Madrid in October and Paris earlier this month, a recovery he credits to control of his often fiery temper.

"I'm trying to control it. That's why I'm starting to win matches, because I'm able to control it," Safin said.

Safin's anger analysis is less aboutg personal development than it is about finding a way to win.

"I'm not deep in psychology. I just like to win," Safin said. "If I have to shut up and keep quiet inside to win, that's what I'll do."

Hewitt is taking the absolute opposite approach, giving himself over to his emotions and enjoying the freedom of not having to chase for the top ranking.

"I don't have to be under the pressure to finish the year as number one. I can go out and enjoy myself," Hewitt said. "I just worry about going out there and being myself. I just get pumped up and show some enthusiasm out there."

Hewitt went 65-16 this year and won titles at Washington, Long Island, Sydney and Rotterdam. But the 23-year-old from Adelaide was ousted by the eventual champion in all four Grand Slam events.

Federer beat Hewitt in the fourth round at Australia, the Wimbledon quarter-finals and the US Open final as well as a Hamburg semi-final while Argentina's Gaston Gaudio ousted him in the French Open quarter-finals.

Hewitt, the 2001 and 2002 Masters Cup winner, was a Paris quarter-final loser to Safin. But the speedy Aussie takes some comfort from a solid effort.

"Even though I lost to Marat in the quarter-finals, it was more like a final there. Hopefully that will hold me in good stead," Hewitt said. "I've performed well in Masters Cups in the past and I look forward to a good week here."

Roddick, 2003's year-end number one, just plans to take whatever comes as he prepares for a rest. Since they are in differing groups, he might not even face Federer here.

"I'll go out and give it my best shot and maybe walk away surprising a few people," Roddick said. "I'm not worried about Roger. If I get him out there, fine, but I have Tim Henman on Tuesday and that's what I'm worried about."

- AFP

PennyThePenguin
11-15-2004, 01:09 PM
great articles. thanks jessi!!! :hug:

EternalFlame
11-15-2004, 02:05 PM
He sounds motivated. Good to know that :yeah:

junekidd
11-15-2004, 02:24 PM
thanks a lot, jessi!!! :worship:
two more reading practice for me! ;)

Carolinita
11-15-2004, 04:19 PM
thanks jessi :hug:

Bibir
11-15-2004, 05:28 PM
Thank you! :worship: ... Jessi...ca?

For the moment, such negative thoughts have been flushed from his thought process. He comes to Westside full of positive vibes and lofty aspirations. He thinks he can beat anybody, Federer included.


he thinks he can beat anybody!...I'm so happy to heard that...positive finally! :bigcry:

gabnouwop
11-15-2004, 09:01 PM
thx gadnouwop! marat on your school paper?! that's so great ;) very funny the part of the sexys y ganadores! LOL! denise_v :wavey:

wow Jessi nice articles :yeah:

Jessi
11-15-2004, 09:38 PM
you're welcome everyone! :) Here's something from Jon Wertheim's mailbag today.

Marat Safin wins the Paris Masters. Not too shabby for a "head case," huh? Why don't other players who throw rackets, like Guillermo Canas or Andy Roddick, get labeled similarly?
-- Gloria Sens, Platteville, Wis.

This issue came up at least a half dozen times this week. Something may have gotten lost in the semantics. By my definition, "head case" isn't pejorative. In fact, it's almost a term of endearment, used to describe a talented, inexplicably mercurial player. But this label isn't about Safin throwing his racket or arguing calls; it's about his wildly erratic results. Check out his 2004. We're talking about an absurdly gifted player who wins multiple TMS events and beats Andre Agassi in a flawless match to reach a Grand Slam final. We're also talking about a player who lost in the first round of both Wimbledon and the U.S. Open and has succumbed to the likes of Michael Llodra, Marc Lopez and Jonas Bjorkman (twice).

Let's be clear about this: Safin is terrific for the sport, a beacon of candor, a witty guy, an XL personality who looks like a model, speaks four languages and -- when he's on -- can approach Roger Federer's level of virtuosity. Sure it would be nice if he were less erratic, but that's half the fun with him.

=========

I'm claiming the last paragraph for my sig :armed:

Jessi
11-15-2004, 09:40 PM
Btw, for anyone who gets Deuce magazine, Marat is on the current cover along with Henman and Roddick. Going to my local Chapters tomorrow to pick it up.

PennyThePenguin
11-16-2004, 12:12 PM
COOL!!! tell me if it's worth buying jessi! thanks!

Bibir
11-16-2004, 05:40 PM
Marat in on the cover of the french tennis magazine "Court Central"...of course after Bercy! :D
nothing new inside...Paris likes Marat...He's such a personality...bla bla bla...but I like the title "Marat the Savior" :angel:

Mihret
11-16-2004, 08:28 PM
Marat is also on the cover of the French Magazine: Tennis Magazine. Are there any French fans that could post the article on this site, pretty please? There's also an article on Gael Monfils who played great against Hewitt in Paris, si c'est pas abusé, il y aurait pas moyen de scanner les deux articles pour une super fan de ces deux joueurs qui habite en Ethiopie et aui ne peut avoir accès à ce magazine?

brazuca5copas
11-17-2004, 01:37 AM
I hate Jim McIngvale . He hates Marat .... so I hate him !!!!!!!!!!!!

Jim McIngvale, la vergüenza del tenis

El millonario no es otro que Jim McIngvale, todo un personaje de Texas, republicano declarado al que hace pocos días se pudo ver en la residencia de la familia Bush celebrando la victoria electoral de George W. Igual que el año pasado, en Houston, en su club, donde cada año se celebran los Campeonatos de EEUU sobre Tierra Batida, se le puede distinguir con su gorra en cualquier zona de la pista, con las autoridades o en la parte más alta de la grada, según le apetezca guardar más o menos las formas, celebrar con más o menos aspavientos los puntos de Roddick.

Porque McIngvale no se imagina que otro extranjero le vuelva a estropear la fiesta. Si el año pasado fue el suizo Federer, aún más favorito en esta edición, el magnate no quiere saber nada de una posible victoria de Marat Safin, el jugador que tras sus victorias en Madrid y París llega en un excelente estado de forma: "No se me cruza por la cabeza, pero de suceder sería desastroso para mi país ver a un ruso quedarse con la gloria y los dólares de Texas".

Todo lo que sale por su boca cuando habla de tenis en público provoca risa, lástima o desprecio. El gran Marat, sin embargo, prefiere ignorarle. "Yo haré mi trabajo y si llego a ganar nos veremos frente a frente en la entrega de premios". El ruso prefiere centrarse en lo que de verdad importa, la organización de un circuito que, según él, "corre peligro de muerte". El rey de este otoño bajo techo no comprende cómo es posible "adaptarse a jugar al aire libre después de hacer toda la temporada 'indoor'. No entiendo por qué cambian, es algo estúpido. El Masters siempre se jugó en 'indoor'".

gabnouwop
11-17-2004, 03:18 AM
poor Jim McIngvale, it will win the best player, he should agree on that, doesnt matter if the winner is from anywhere, why americans are so nationalist??? or maybe its xenophobia?

Kiara
11-17-2004, 06:11 AM
: "No se me cruza por la cabeza, pero de suceder sería desastroso para mi país ver a un ruso quedarse con la gloria y los dólares de Texas" .


O.M.F.G what the fuck is wrong with this guy, racist piece of crap! What a jingoistic,flagwaving freak, that was waaay out of line.

:fiery: :fiery: :fiery:

Jessi
11-17-2004, 06:13 AM
what did he say? :confused:

Jessi
11-17-2004, 06:17 AM
COOL!!! tell me if it's worth buying jessi! thanks!


didn't get a chance to pick it up today but yeah, i'll let you know :)

Kiara
11-17-2004, 06:29 AM
I dont have time to translate the ntire article but basically he doesnt want to think about the possiblilty that Marat (or any "foreigner") might spoil the celebrations after bush winning etc etc by winning in houston because it would be disasterous for his country to see a russian run off with the glory and dollars of Texas ....wtf?!?!?!?!!!!!!!!!!!

chocc0
11-17-2004, 06:30 AM
O.M.F.G what the fuck is wrong with this guy, racist piece of crap! What a jingoistic,flagwaving freak, that was waaay out of line.

:fiery: :fiery: :fiery:

I heard he was a communist hater because he lived during the height of the cold war or some crap! I really hope Marat win's then he can shove his trophy in that old mans face!

Bibir
11-17-2004, 06:32 AM
Thanks Jimbo! :yeah:...Marat needs that kind of motivation!;)

Interview after match


November 16, 2004



Q. You asked to change the ball. What happened?

SAFIN: They were a little bit different. They were from the same can, but completely different. They were a little bit-- they had no pressure, air pressure. So that's why I changed it, I wanted to change it.

Q. Obviously, a good start; important in this Round Robin format. How pleased are you to start with a win?

SAFIN: It's good. It's really important to start well. The first match is the most important one, the most difficult ones. I was quite good. He couldn't serve really hard. It was not his best with his serve.

But otherwise he was playing good match. I mean, like for a person who has been out for such a long time, he was running really good and he had a couple of chances, small chances.

But the serve just, this kind of serve, it's little bit difficult to achieve anything here.

Q. Do you think he'll manage to play the rest of the matches in the group?

SAFIN: I don't know. I don't know what his plans are. But maybe he has no confidence, he is a little bit scared of his injury, and he's just saving him a little bit more than usually. But now maybe he'll have more confidence in the second match, in the third one. I don't know.

Or maybe he will stop, I don't know.

Q. You won a couple of indoor tournaments already. So what is your feeling, just about changing from the indoor to outdoor season again?

SAFIN: It's a little bit -- of course little bit difficult to get used to the courts - outdoor court, especially when you're playing for two months indoors.

But we had one week in between. The people, they tried to get used to it. But personally, just it got a little bit better, better. So I was practicing a lot, serving a lot, and trying to get used to the conditions. And it's getting better and better, especially I won the first match, so it's already you have more confidence. Second match will be a little bit easier to play with these conditions.

Q. You seem to be in very good form at the moment. Are you confident about of the prospect of returning to world No. 1 in 2005?

SAFIN: Yeah, but I am playing right now very well. But if I want to fight for No. 1, I will definitely would have to play the same way during all the year, like Roger did this year, and he achieved. To be able to compete with him, you have to be really consistent and play at your best for a very long time. So it's quite difficult.

But we'll see next year. But it's not my main goal, to be No. 1 in the world. But if I have the opportunity of doing that, I'm going to be there, definitely.

Q. What do you think about Yevgeny becoming a professional poker player?

SAFIN: Good luck in this one.

Q. Sorry?

SAFIN: Good luck in this one, because this kind of things, they can cost you a lot of money.

But from what I heard, he won a tournament and he made 330,000 Euros, so basically it's not bad.

You always have luck when it's the first time. So then you have to be really good. So I hope he will be lucky - yeah, lucky.

Jessi
11-17-2004, 06:55 AM
I dont have time to translate the ntire article but basically he doesnt want to think about the possiblilty that Marat (or any "foreigner") might spoil the celebrations after bush winning etc etc by winning in houston because it would be disasterous for his country to see a russian run off with the glory and dollars of Texas ....wtf?!?!?!?!!!!!!!!!!!



OMFG!!!! :fiery: :fiery: :fiery: The guy is out of his frickin mind :cuckoo:


DIE Mattress Mac DIE!!! http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/fighting/1/fighting43.gif

Jessi
11-17-2004, 07:01 AM
thanx bea for the interview :kiss:

junekidd
11-17-2004, 07:13 AM
thanks for the interview, bea! :kiss:
jessi, ur last smiley is :scared: but really suits Mac! :yeah:

Wednesday Addams
11-17-2004, 10:18 AM
Mac was at Marat's match with Coria, and boy, was he looking depressed!!!!!!!
I hope Marat gives him an ulcer this week! (by beating Roddick and winning TMS :devil: )

PennyThePenguin
11-17-2004, 02:13 PM
i thought i saw mac hanging out with bush sr during rogi's prize presentation;. he wasn't looking too happy and though he was clapping...he was doing it like... oh yeah. let's just clap cos the cam's on us and we're supposed to be polite.

EternalFlame
11-17-2004, 03:29 PM
I dont have time to translate the ntire article but basically he doesnt want to think about the possiblilty that Marat (or any "foreigner") might spoil the celebrations after bush winning etc etc by winning in houston because it would be disasterous for his country to see a russian run off with the glory and dollars of Texas ....wtf?!?!?!?!!!!!!!!!!!

what the..?
:mad: :mad: :fiery:

It will be too good if Marat beats the Duck and then win the Masters Cup ! :devil:
C'mon Marat You can do it. Just start with beating Andy!

tall_one
11-17-2004, 04:30 PM
why americans are so nationalist??? or maybe its xenophobia?
not all of us are, so please do not group me in with him.

Bibir
11-17-2004, 05:29 PM
Marat is also on the cover of the French Magazine: Tennis Magazine. Are there any French fans that could post the article on this site, pretty please? There's also an article on Gael Monfils who played great against Hewitt in Paris, si c'est pas abusé, il y aurait pas moyen de scanner les deux articles pour une super fan de ces deux joueurs qui habite en Ethiopie et aui ne peut avoir accès à ce magazine?

Je ne l'ai pas encore vu chez mon libraire! Je veux bien faire un résumé mais je ne ne pourrais pas le scanner...mon scanner a rendu l'âme! :sad:

Mihret, tu es d'origine ethiopienne? :wavey:

gabnouwop
11-17-2004, 11:24 PM
not all of us are, so please do not group me in with him.
ok you are right not all, but most of them are will be interesting know why

PennyThePenguin
11-18-2004, 02:00 AM
not all of us are, so please do not group me in with him.
awww :hug: :hug:

Mihret
11-18-2004, 11:36 AM
Salut Bibir!

Ouais, je suis Ethiopienne mais je ne vis que depuis peu en Ethiopie. Je suis née et j'ai vécu la majeure partie de ma vie en Belgique puis j'ai fait une partie de mes études en France.

Merci pour le résumé, c'est déjà sympa de proposer de le faire.

Et toi, t'es français(e)?

Kiara
11-18-2004, 11:47 AM
Salut Mihret ;) :wavey:

Kiara
11-18-2004, 12:05 PM
I hate Jim McIngvale . He hates Marat .... so I hate him !!!!!!!!!!!!

Jim McIngvale, la vergüenza del tenis

El millonario no es otro que Jim McIngvale, todo un personaje de Texas, republicano declarado al que hace pocos días se pudo ver en la residencia de la familia Bush celebrando la victoria electoral de George W. Igual que el año pasado, en Houston, en su club, donde cada año se celebran los Campeonatos de EEUU sobre Tierra Batida, se le puede distinguir con su gorra en cualquier zona de la pista, con las autoridades o en la parte más alta de la grada, según le apetezca guardar más o menos las formas, celebrar con más o menos aspavientos los puntos de Roddick.

Porque McIngvale no se imagina que otro extranjero le vuelva a estropear la fiesta. Si el año pasado fue el suizo Federer, aún más favorito en esta edición, el magnate no quiere saber nada de una posible victoria de Marat Safin, el jugador que tras sus victorias en Madrid y París llega en un excelente estado de forma: "No se me cruza por la cabeza, pero de suceder sería desastroso para mi país ver a un ruso quedarse con la gloria y los dólares de Texas".

Todo lo que sale por su boca cuando habla de tenis en público provoca risa, lástima o desprecio. El gran Marat, sin embargo, prefiere ignorarle. "Yo haré mi trabajo y si llego a ganar nos veremos frente a frente en la entrega de premios". El ruso prefiere centrarse en lo que de verdad importa, la organización de un circuito que, según él, "corre peligro de muerte". El rey de este otoño bajo techo no comprende cómo es posible "adaptarse a jugar al aire libre después de hacer toda la temporada 'indoor'. No entiendo por qué cambian, es algo estúpido. El Masters siempre se jugó en 'indoor'".


brazuca5 can you tell me where you got this from cos I cant find it anywhere :confused: great title though.

brazuca5copas
11-18-2004, 03:01 PM
brazuca5 can you tell me where you got this from cos I cant find it anywhere :confused: great title though.

sure !!! This is the link

http://elmundodeporte.elmundo.es/elmundodeporte/2004/11/16/tenis/1100600271.html

Mihret
11-18-2004, 03:05 PM
Salut Kiara

Bibir
11-18-2004, 05:40 PM
Salut Bibir!

Ouais, je suis Ethiopienne mais je ne vis que depuis peu en Ethiopie. Je suis née et j'ai vécu la majeure partie de ma vie en Belgique puis j'ai fait une partie de mes études en France.

Merci pour le résumé, c'est déjà sympa de proposer de le faire.

Et toi, t'es français(e)?

T'as pas mal voyagé dit donc! :yeah:

Oui, je suis française...mes parents sont russes mais je suis né à Paris et je me sens almost completely french (99%)! ;)

Kiara
11-18-2004, 06:18 PM
sure !!! This is the link

http://elmundodeporte.elmundo.es/elmundodeporte/2004/11/16/tenis/1100600271.html

thanks sweetie :kiss:

"No estamos unidos ni somos solidarios, y en las cosas importantes nunca estamos de acuerdo. El mejor ejemplo es que es una estupidez ir a Houston a jugar al aire libre porque al millonario organizador se le ocurre que es mejor para su negocio o para los tenistas de su país sin pensar en el resto de los jugadores".

woah! :eek:

Nella
11-19-2004, 01:53 AM
i'm a little bit upset by the match, but I still love him, so let's see the next match.. he will play agaisnt Henman, right?
I don`t know if anyone already post this interview.... anyway this is after the match agaisnt roddick

An Interview with Marat Safin

November 18, 2004

Q. You were very close today to win the first set, to win the second set. What went wrong?

SAFIN: I couldn't beat him here. Can you imagine if I beat him here, what's gonna happen (smiling).

Just a little bit unlucky. It's like I always say, the tiebreaks are a lottery. I had my chances. It could go both, you know, like 7-6, 7-6, to me.

But, unfortunately, just wasn't my day. Was not the day.

I did everything right. I couldn't say that I made a huge mistakes. The volley, yeah, but the volley is also like little bit unlucky, because just maybe one shot.

But I had chances before to break him, and it sucks but...

I'm not sad. I'm not sad. I'm still alive. I still have a chance tomorrow against Tim , and hopefully, the way I'm playing, I'm really glad that I'm playing well. I'm feeling each time better and better. It's a little difficult to play outdoors, tough conditions.

But it's pretty good.

Q. So what would happen if you beat him here?

SAFIN: I don't want to think about it, what would happen. What would happen to the tournament, to the crowd, to the people? I don't know. I don't want to think about it.

Q. Why?

SAFIN: Are you serious?

Q. Very.

SAFIN: (Smiling). I don't want to make him sad. His hometown.

Q. It's my understanding that you didn't want to have the replay being played on the big monitors. Why was that? Is it true?

SAFIN: I didn't mind the replay, but the thing is when you are playing the point and there is -- they are showing the same time the match, it's a little bit, you know, the eyes automatically are going somewhere. So you cannot concentrate basically on the court.

It's kind of difficult a little bit.

But between the points, why not? I don't care. They can put anything they want. Just during the points, it's a little bit disturbing.

Q. Also, you seemed to have played a great match, but it seemed like the short balls gave you a little trouble, or you got a little unlucky on your approach shots.

SAFIN: I didn't really feel comfortable with this. I don't know, like for some reason I couldn't make a decision, you know, what to do. Because is also like on important points I didn't want to risk it, I want to risk it, then I thought that just maybe I should stay back and try to, you know, try to play with him from the baseline because I have more chance to beat him from the baseline than just I think - how you say? - more stable, better on baseline than him. So just keep him on the baseline and try to win the point.

Sometimes I should have gone and I didn't. Sometimes I went. So basically not really consistent, you know. I couldn't make a decision.

Q. Marat , it's been a while since you last played Tim . Is there one of your matches in the past which stands out in your mind?

SAFIN: Which one?

Q. Is there one? Or do you not remember them?

SAFIN: Again, again.

Q. Is there one of your previous matches with Tim which stands out for you?

SAFIN: Not really. No.

Q. Thanks.

SAFIN: (Laughing).

Q. What do you think the key is going to be to tomorrow's game then?

SAFIN: Just who's gonna be more focused and who's gonna be more like -- who have more balls, you know - seriously. It's all about.

Because the match, it's really important match for both of us. Who's gonna win is gonna go to the semifinal. Who gonna go for it. This kind of game, he has a very difficult game, serve and volley all the time, putting pressure. Me, I would have to stay -- try to stay focused and sometimes go for it on the passing shots. Be more, I would say -- just be able to go for it sometimes, because I would have to.

I would not have to try and stay -- and play the points from the baseline. You have to create something, because he can play from the baseline, he can volley. He has pretty good serve. So you have to go for it, play your game, not be scared of missing.

Carolinita
11-19-2004, 04:52 AM
Thanks for the interview Nella :hug:

Carolinita
11-19-2004, 05:32 AM
mmm.... pay attention on this point of the interview:


SAFIN: I couldn't beat him here. Can you imagine if I beat him here, what's gonna happen (smiling)........

.......Q. So what would happen if you beat him here?

SAFIN: I don't want to think about it, what would happen. What would happen to the tournament, to the crowd, to the people? I don't know. I don't want to think about it.

Q. Why?

SAFIN: Are you serious?

Q. Very.

SAFIN: (Smiling). I don't want to make him sad. His hometown.



I think Marat was stopping to guess something about McIngvale and his unfortunate commentaries...ja...Marat is so ironic..and I love it :devil:

PennyThePenguin
11-19-2004, 02:57 PM
marat's the king of quotes i think. but that was a crazy way to cover up hahaha...

Bubble
11-22-2004, 01:39 AM
:angel:

Coach can inspire Safin to master Wimbledon
From Neil Harman, Tennis Correspondent in Houston


IN THEIR minds’ eyes, Tim Henman, Andy Roddick and, perhaps, Marat Safin have seen themselves cradling the most famous cup in tennis. Roddick was perilously close to the Wimbledon title this year, Henman concludes that he will be judged in many quarters by whether he wins it or not and Safin insists it will never happen and there is no point thinking that it could.
As the three men departed this absorbing Masters Cup — Henman having been outclassed by Safin in the final round robin, Safin succumbing to Roger Federer after a tumultuous 20-18 tie-break in their semi-final and Roddick’s brain freezing under a controlled baseline barrage from Lleyton Hewitt — their priorities for the months ahead were beginning to form.



Roddick has a Davis Cup final date next week and if they show the Spaniards a tape of the American losing the final 20 points to Hewitt — no one could recall a player of his repute crumbling so completely — they will believe they only have to show up in Seville to win. If Roddick could steer the United States to victory, it would rank above any of his past achievements. Henman finished in the top ten for the sixth time in his career, and, at No 6, completes 2004 with his highest year-end ranking. Staying in the top pack for another year will be enormous testament to him.

Safin is more complex. As recently as August, he was a picture of forlorn hope, not knowing where his career was going and then chose Peter Lundgren, erstwhile coach to Federer, to join his entourage — and a light was switched on. Lundgren has done far better than a succession of head-shaking motivators who could not get into the Russian’s mind and release the talent that has stagnated since the 2000 US Open.

Safin won the final two Masters Series events this year and played beautifully here. “We will go away and work on his volleys and his forehand especially,” Lundgren said. “I know what Marat has said about Wimbledon but it is an attitude of mind. Maybe he says these things but does not really believe them himself.” As far as the 24-year-old Russian is concerned, there is no point playing on grass in the run-up to the championships because it would be a waste of time.

“I’m not good on the surface, it makes me crazy,” he said. “I shall come to London on the Thursday and practise my three hours a day but I have been completely useless there. I prefer not to waste my nerves. They are more expensive than the money to lose in the first or second rounds.”

What Safin has in Lundgren, though, is a man who made Federer believe enough to win the title in 2003, the launchpad for a period of domination over the sport that shows no sign of diminishing. If he could do the same for Safin, it would be a feather in his cap and finally rid him of the hurt of being ditched by Federer a year ago this week.


Peter, you are the man!
Please convince Marat! :kiss:

jazz_girl
11-22-2004, 12:21 PM
This is a quote from Marat, he talks about Argentina, but I thought you might still be interested ;)
Marat: "Of course it's a fenomenon, it's world tennis power". "They always had a good school. Mancini, Pérez-Roldán, Jaite...It's true that during some years there weren't players, but now a lot are coming out and doing it reall well. Having three players here(Houston) among the 9 is very outsanding". "They have an excellent internal competition, just like as (the russians) with the girls. And with that competence they help each other.
About his favourite player: "I love how Calleri plays..."
"I think they should invest more money, especially to see if there are girls in the top as well"

Carolinita
11-22-2004, 04:17 PM
Thanks Bubble and Jime :hug:

merle
11-22-2004, 05:19 PM
Thanks a lot Bubble & Jimena!! :yeah:
WOW!!!!!! My fave Argie is also CALLERI!!!!! YAY!!!!!!!! I have noticed we have the same taste with Marat in many other things too, amazing!!!!! :angel: :kiss: :hearts: :inlove:

Jimena, I like Nalby, Gaudio, Chela too so don't worry! ;)

jazz_girl
11-22-2004, 05:55 PM
LOL! I like Calleri a lot too Merle! ;)

Aurora
11-22-2004, 11:11 PM
I don't think I've ever seen Calleri play.... :scratch:

Bubble
11-24-2004, 08:59 AM
Henman and Co leave centre stage to the true Masters
By John Roberts in Houston
22 November 2004


Tim Henman is back in London with his wife, Lucy, preparing for the birth of their second child. Marat Safin is taking a holiday in the Caribbean.
Andy Roddick is in Austin, practising on clay for the Davis Cup final in Spain.

All three players have reasons to remember the Masters Cup, having left the stage to Roger Federer and Lleyton Hewitt for the final.

Henman won only one of his three group matches, against Guillermo Coria, of Argentina, who struggled to serve with authority in his first tournament for four months after shoulder surgery.

None the less, Henman finished the season as the world No 6, the highest year-end ranking of his career. He did not win a title, but advanced to the semi-finals at both the French Open and the US Open.

Safin, who defeated Henman, 6-2, 7-6, on Friday night to reach the semi-finals, went on to feature in a record-equalling tie-break against Federer, the world No 1 and defending champion, on Saturday.

Federer prevailed, 20-18, in spite of a questionable call on his third match point, at 10-9, and an over-rule on his fifth match point, at 12-11, to complete a 6-3, 7-6 victory. The Russian, who held six set points, hit a forehand long on Federer's eighth match point. The 38-point shoot-out lasted 26 minutes and 38 seconds.

"Unfortunately, I was a little bit nervous," Safin said. "I was rushing too much. But I didn't make any huge mistakes." Safin, the winner of both the Madrid Masters and the Paris Masters en route to Houston, ended the season at No 4 in the world - 85 places higher than he stood in January.

Roddick, the third player to hit more than 1,000 aces in a season since the ATP Tour started in 1990, was swatted by Hewitt, 6-3, 6-2, after only 58 minutes, the Australian winning the last 20 points in a row.

The American, whose net play had drawn admiration in his three group matches, resorted to panic volleys to knock Hewitt off his stride, but nothing Roddick did could staunch the flow of points against him.

So severe was the beating that many observers wondered if Roddick was carrying an injury, but no mention was made of an ailment. "It's plain and simple: I didn't play well," Roddick said. "Lleyton makes you play at a certain level to beat him, and I feel far short of that today."


Enjoy the sun Marat :cool:

chocc0
11-24-2004, 09:03 AM
Man i wish i was in the carribean
I haven't been anywhere that is more than 1km away from my house!!

PennyThePenguin
11-24-2004, 09:21 AM
oooooohhh caribbean...beats studying for exams pfffft. lucky guy.

junekidd
11-24-2004, 02:06 PM
poor me...Marat has vacation while I have to do my best to prepare the exams in next Jan... :(
anyway, have fun in Caribbean, guy! :angel:

Kiara
11-24-2004, 04:01 PM
Marat needs to pack US off for a holiday in the Caribbean for all the siezures he's given us this year ;)

Shadow
11-24-2004, 04:02 PM
i love Caribbean! Have a great time Marat :D

PennyThePenguin
11-24-2004, 04:11 PM
Marat needs to pack US off for a holiday in the Caribbean for all the siezures he's given us this year ;)


all in favour say AYE!!!


AAAAYYYYYYEEEEE!!!!

Aurora
11-24-2004, 04:37 PM
AYE!!!

good point Kiara!:rolleyes: naughty boy, ending the year with a killer tb and not even winning it :rolleyes: I've only now recovered...

merle
11-24-2004, 05:40 PM
AYE AYE Jiat! Good idea Kiara! :lol:

Bibir
11-24-2004, 06:14 PM
AYE!!!

good point Kiara!:rolleyes: naughty boy, ending the year with a killer tb and not even winning it :rolleyes: I've only now recovered...
:lol:
That's Marat...He makes us smile and cry at the same time! :crazy:

Shadow<<<< Knudell..is it you?;) :D

maratski
11-24-2004, 07:21 PM
Marat needs to pack US off for a holiday in the Caribbean for all the siezures he's given us this year ;)

I'm free as a bird right now so I agree ;)

I've got three nice bikinis lying in my closet :angel:

merle
11-24-2004, 08:10 PM
[QUOTE=bibirShadow<<<< Knudell..is it you?;) :D[/QUOTE]

May I answer for Andrea? :o Yes, Bea, Andrea aka Knuddel aka Сафин changed her nick again! And the flag!

JuanChuffy007
11-24-2004, 08:25 PM
Marat Safin is taking a holiday in the Caribbean.

I wish I was there too... it's so cold here...
Enjoy Marat! :D

PennyThePenguin
11-25-2004, 12:32 AM
May I answer for Andrea? :o Yes, Bea, Andrea aka Knuddel aka Сафин changed her nick again! And the flag!

thankfully, she kept the avvy or we'd have some trouble finding her ;)

Shadow
11-25-2004, 01:07 PM
thanks merle for answering ;)

Yes hello im still Andrea :wavey:

Bibir
11-25-2004, 01:31 PM
thanks merle for answering ;)

Yes hello im still Andrea :wavey:
I know...I was kidding! :)

Shadow
11-25-2004, 01:54 PM
I know...I was kidding! :)

i know, me too :)

Bibir
11-25-2004, 02:33 PM
we are too funny! ;)

Kiara
11-25-2004, 02:57 PM
I'm free as a bird right now so I agree ;)

You have no idea how envious I am of you right now! I barely have time to write this post (primarily because I used up my quota of free time reading up on the whole "Marc Rosset Is Tall was banned" debacle :( ) I should be doing something constructive with my time - like the 4 assignments I have due before the end of next week but that was just too good to pass up, I love the hypocrisy by the mods on this board. Looks like mtf is taking the wta route to hell.
I dont even have time to see what happened on the duck forum after I started a fight and left in the middle of it. tsk. :D

oh, and I have a date with a guy I dont like and I dont want to go - Im in a hermitical, antisocial-bitch mode and everyone is pissing me off:( I try to be as sullen and as unfriendly as can be to eveyone I meet, because in my current mood it gives me a perverse pleasure to make others feel as miserable as i do.

boy, what a treat I am :D

I hate the holidays :(

Happy thanksgiving to the Americanos :kiss:

I owe you a long e mail, I have many things to tell you. I shall do it when I have IT class or sth ;)

ciao babies :kiss:

maratski
11-25-2004, 06:45 PM
:hug: Kiara

Good luck with your assignments. I know you'll do well once you set your mind to them.

I am supposed to be looking for jobs now. It's not easy and I actually don't even want to. My life is just in it's most boring phase ever and finding a job won't make it more interesting so I don't even bother looking for one. My mom does nag all the time cause I can't stay at home and do nothing.
I wanted to study, but the university I want to go to is too far from home and I can't go and live there for two years. I also can't work in Paris. that's what I want in life at the moment, I can't get it and don't know what else I want. That explains why I spend too much time on the net. ;)

WX is changing and it sucks. In the future you have to pay $12 to post there, if you don't want that you can post for free, but can only make 10 posts a day. Michal set up a new board elsewhere, but I it sucks. It's slow and ugly. I still have the tenniscult though where people are ALWAYS nice.

That's the end of my rant ;)

Aurora
11-25-2004, 09:19 PM
:hug: I'm in the same place, Ilhame. Stuck home, supposed to be looking for a job, but I'm not doing that properly. I also don't have a clue what I want to do (except for nothing).

The cult? is that the board in Rebecca's sig?

maratski
11-25-2004, 10:12 PM
:hug: the world economy really sucks! I just spent some time looking for vacancies and found one that sounded ok. The job description was nice, but if only I knew what kind of business they're in. I don't know what bromine is and it sounds like it has to do with physics or science and I sucked at that. I do speak my languages though, which the company will appreciate. ;) I'll google it tomorrow before sending them a letter.

The link to the cult is indeed in Becca's sig.

We can usually be found in non-tennis, but do talk tennis there as well ;)

Aurora
11-25-2004, 10:24 PM
ah I see, I remember visiting it some months ago and it seemed quite dead. But of course i only went to the tennis section :angel:

the one thing I really really hate in job ads is how the always ask "experience", I get rejected time and time again, how do they want me to get some experience? aaaah, I understand them, but for me it's a neverending cycle

sorry for going really off topic

maratski
11-25-2004, 10:25 PM
you need to be you AND have experience. That's impossible and those companies know it :rolleyes:

PennyThePenguin
11-26-2004, 03:56 AM
it's not ezackly te right place to rant about school huh? one last exam to go... hopefully i don't mess it up.

now we'll see how "balancing" work and the internet has paid off ;)

Kiara
11-26-2004, 06:17 AM
:hug: Kiara

Good luck with your assignments. I know you'll do well once you set your mind to them.

I am supposed to be looking for jobs now. It's not easy and I actually don't even want to. My life is just in it's most boring phase ever and finding a job won't make it more interesting so I don't even bother looking for one. My mom does nag all the time cause I can't stay at home and do nothing.
I wanted to study, but the university I want to go to is too far from home and I can't go and live there for two years. I also can't work in Paris. that's what I want in life at the moment, I can't get it and don't know what else I want. That explains why I spend too much time on the net. ;)

Thanks sweetie, but im over my mood, they never last long anyway. I managed to finish 2 of my 6 billion assignments so things are looking up.

If you dont mind me asking, what's stopping you from getting a job in paris?you've worked there before right?

:hug: welcome to the world of the lost and directionless, why do you think im still studying? ;)

WX is changing and it sucks. In the future you have to pay $12 to post there, if you don't want that you can post for free, but can only make 10 posts a day. Michal set up a new board elsewhere, but I it sucks. It's slow and ugly. I still have the tenniscult though where people are ALWAYS nice.
That's the end of my rant ;)

what? :eek: :eek: :sad: I havent been on wx for ages, but that sucks, wx is worth the 12 bucks though, it's a good board.

Kiara
11-26-2004, 06:18 AM
The cult? is that the board in Rebecca's sig?

yes, it's the best place for board gossip, tennis is also discussed there..I think ;)

Kiara
11-26-2004, 06:36 AM
:hug: the world economy really sucks! I just spent some time looking for v
vacancies and found one that sounded ok. The job description was nice, but if only I knew what kind of business they're in. I don't know what bromine is and it sounds like it has to do with physics or science and I sucked at that. I do speak my languages though, which the company will appreciate. ;) I'll google it tomorrow before sending them a letter.

bromine? a compound of it is used in making camera film and a its used in making dyes and stuff i think.

chocc0
11-26-2004, 06:47 AM
:hug: welcome to the world of the lost and directionless, why do you think im still studying? ;)




I am the essence of the lost and directionless... i have noidea what i want to do

Kiara
11-26-2004, 06:53 AM
I do- I want to be filthy rich, I just dont know how to go about it :sad:

chocc0
11-26-2004, 09:58 AM
I do- I want to be filthy rich, I just dont know how to go about it :sad:

Same i wish you could be paid for being lazy...that would suit me perfectly

Aurora
11-26-2004, 10:46 AM
Sarah, get in line! But I'm first in that line, being the most experienced and able in laziness. Proof: my excessive posting the last 3 months. :p :p :p

chocc0
11-26-2004, 10:55 AM
Sarah, get in line! But I'm first in that line, being the most experienced and able in laziness. Proof: my excessive posting the last 3 months. :p :p :p
Lol i basically live on these forums although i am going to a wedding or something tomorrow...i really don't want to go, i'm too lazy