Graduated players... [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Graduated players...

joseluismb
01-12-2006, 02:23 PM
I was wondering whether you know of any players who went to college or even graduated. It'd be cool to know at what age they graduated and how much it took them to "get into" the tour.

I've read from Brad Gilbert that he won the NCAA thing... so I guess he was one of them.

gooner88
01-12-2006, 02:27 PM
I've read that Florent Serra didin't turn pro until he completed an Economics degree in Bordeaux. He's 24 now and won the Adelaide tournament last week. The French MTF'ers probably know more on this than me.

croat123
01-12-2006, 02:29 PM
did ancic finish law in split?

mopje17
01-12-2006, 04:35 PM
did ancic finish law in split?


I read Mario is in the 3 year of law.

cincy
01-12-2006, 04:54 PM
Sarge Sargsian graduated from Arizona State U. He was NCAA champ in singles at one point.

Bob and Mike Bryan went to Stanford, or some other California University. They were also NCAA doubles champs and one of them was the singles champ.

James Blake: 2 years at Harvard

Can't think of anybody else. There is an American player who is always bragging that he is the "only top 200" player to graduate from university. But he's still wobbling around the minor leagues so I can't remember his name.

El Legenda
01-12-2006, 05:04 PM
did ancic finish law in split?

maybe him and Ivan's wife can open a firm, she is taking her bar test soon :)

prima donna
01-12-2006, 05:08 PM
Mario as a lawyer ? That'd be a perfect profession for him, after all, he works so well under pressure.;) I'm sure that he'd do a great job.

Nathaliia
01-12-2006, 05:17 PM
I've read that Florent Serra didin't turn pro until he completed an Economics degree in Bordeaux. He's 24 now and won the Adelaide tournament last week. The French MTF'ers probably know more on this than me.
no, no. it wasn't a university degree but higschool.he was trying to take a course at the uni (individual) but said he couldn't deal with all of it together.

Nathaliia
01-12-2006, 05:18 PM
I read Mario is in the 3 year of law.
:eek: so he's a year more advanced than me ... never would have thought :speakles: great, Mario :yeah:

Nathaliia
01-12-2006, 05:19 PM
Marcin Matkowski from Poland studies in USA ;) Magnus Norman is at the uni now, too - but he's retired ;)

Saumon
01-12-2006, 07:53 PM
I read Mario is in the 3 year of law.
I think it's 4th year now

Socket
01-12-2006, 07:55 PM
Sarge Sargsian graduated from Arizona State U. He was NCAA champ in singles at one point.

Bob and Mike Bryan went to Stanford, or some other California University. They were also NCAA doubles champs and one of them was the singles champ.

James Blake: 2 years at Harvard

Can't think of anybody else. There is an American player who is always bragging that he is the "only top 200" player to graduate from university. But he's still wobbling around the minor leagues so I can't remember his name.
Paul Goldstein (Stanford)??

Pigpen Stinks
01-12-2006, 08:03 PM
Sarge Sargsian graduated from Arizona State U. He was NCAA champ in singles at one point.

Bob and Mike Bryan went to Stanford, or some other California University. They were also NCAA doubles champs and one of them was the singles champ.

James Blake: 2 years at Harvard

Can't think of anybody else. There is an American player who is always bragging that he is the "only top 200" player to graduate from university. But he's still wobbling around the minor leagues so I can't remember his name.

There are several Americans who have graduated from college. The highest ranked ones are Goldstein (Stanford), Morrison (Florida), and Vahaly (Virginia). I think Delic went to Illinois for 3 years and Reynolds went to Vanderbilt for 3 years, but don't think either of those graduated.

I'm guessing the guy you may be referring to is Alex O'Brien. I think he graduated from Stanford, and may have been the only college graduate in the top 200 during his prime.

tennisace
01-12-2006, 08:11 PM
There are several Americans who have graduated from college. The highest ranked ones are Goldstein (Stanford), Morrison (Florida), and Vahaly (Virginia). I think Delic went to Illinois for 3 years and Reynolds went to Vanderbilt for 3 years, but don't think either of those graduated.

I'm guessing the guy you may be referring to is Alex O'Brien. I think he graduated from Stanford, and may have been the only college graduate in the top 200 during his prime.

Patty Mac graduated from Stanford. He had to have been ranked, at least briefly,in the top 200 when he was playing.

gooner88
01-12-2006, 08:16 PM
no, no. it wasn't a university degree but higschool.he was trying to take a course at the uni (individual) but said he couldn't deal with all of it together.

Thanks for clearing that up. In the paper I read Economics degree but it didin't mention at what level it was or where he took it; therefore I assumed it was at university.

shotgun
01-12-2006, 08:19 PM
Retired Brazilian player Luiz Mattar studied Civil Engineering for a while before deciding to turn pro at 21.

JuanRodriguez
01-12-2006, 08:27 PM
Gilles Elseneer studied 'economics' at the university of Brussels. After 4 flawless years he graduated and after that he started as a pro in tennis. :yeah:

Pigpen Stinks
01-12-2006, 08:50 PM
Patty Mac graduated from Stanford. He had to have been ranked, at least briefly,in the top 200 when he was playing.

Patrick was actually a very solid player. I think his career high may have only been in the 30's, but I'm sure he spent a good number of years in the top 100, and made the Aussie Open semis once. Of course, best known for his 1st round loss to Connors at 91 US Open that started Jimbo's run to the semis, and for being Johnny Mac's kid brother.

cincy
01-12-2006, 09:11 PM
Vahaly (Virginia).

He's the one I was thinking about. :rolleyes: There was a time when he was in the top 100, then fell to the 200s. The commentators always introduced him as the "only" player in the top[whatever] to graduate from college. Not just American but everybody. I never knew if that was true or not but I really got tired of hearing about how "intelligent" he was. If he's so intelligent he should know he's no good and should know when to quit. :o

I knew Goldstein graduated from Stanford because he was there with Chelsea Clinton. :angel: Didn't know about the others.

Maxpowers
01-12-2006, 09:15 PM
Todd Martin graduated from Northwestern and also played on the team there in around 88.

Pigpen Stinks
01-12-2006, 09:32 PM
Todd Martin graduated from Northwestern and also played on the team there in around 88.

You sure he graduated? I think he only played a year or two for them.

Socket
01-12-2006, 09:44 PM
He's the one I was thinking about. :rolleyes: There was a time when he was in the top 100, then fell to the 200s. The commentators always introduced him as the "only" player in the top[whatever] to graduate from college. Not just American but everybody. I never knew if that was true or not but I really got tired of hearing about how "intelligent" he was. If he's so intelligent he should know he's no good and should know when to quit. :o

I knew Goldstein graduated from Stanford because he was there with Chelsea Clinton. :angel: Didn't know about the others.
Chelsea and Goldstein also attended prep school together, Sidwell Friends in DC.

Socket
01-12-2006, 09:45 PM
You sure he graduated? I think he only played a year or two for them.
I think Martin left early, too (as did Mal Washington, from UMich).

jole
01-12-2006, 09:50 PM
Patty Mac graduated from Stanford. He had to have been ranked, at least briefly,in the top 200 when he was playing.

Umm... I've become aware via this message board that the entire universe thinks Patrick is a joke, but his career was quite solid.

joseluismb
01-12-2006, 11:28 PM
Cool... this totally proves wrong the popular belief that states you have to leave your studies to become a pro.

Glad to know :D:D

ciccio
01-13-2006, 01:59 AM
Sanguinetti has an economics degree

zethand
01-13-2006, 03:18 AM
David Wheaton went to standfor for 2 years I think

Maxpowers
01-13-2006, 03:33 AM
You sure he graduated? I think he only played a year or two for them.

I remember McEnroe mentioned that he graduated. I looked at their website and they have his picture and list him among notable graduates.

http://www.ugadm.northwestern.edu/counselors/facts/alumni.htm

McEnroe also mentioned someone else, but I forgot his name.

CooCooCachoo
01-13-2006, 06:35 AM
He's the one I was thinking about. :rolleyes: There was a time when he was in the top 100, then fell to the 200s. The commentators always introduced him as the "only" player in the top[whatever] to graduate from college. Not just American but everybody. I never knew if that was true or not but I really got tired of hearing about how "intelligent" he was. If he's so intelligent he should know he's no good and should know when to quit. :o

I knew Goldstein graduated from Stanford because he was there with Chelsea Clinton. :angel: Didn't know about the others.

Don't be so harsh. Brian's career is ruined by injuries :wavey:

mongo
01-13-2006, 07:03 PM
Recent NCAA national champions
Amer Delic-Illinois (2003)
Jeff Morrison-Florida (1999)
Bob Bryan-Stanford ( 1998 )
Sargis Sargsian-ASU (1995)
Cecil Mamiit-Stanford (1996)
Chris Woodruff-Tennessee (1993)
Jared Palmer-Stanford (1991)

helen phillips
02-11-2006, 08:02 AM
Scrolling through old threads. Paul Haarhuis did his freshman & sophmore years at an NCAA Division 2 school (Armstrong State College) before being recruited to a Division 1 school for his Junior and Senior years (Florida State University). He graduated with a degree in Economics in the spring of 1988 at 22 (he would have turned 23 in Feb of 89). I think he went home to play Club tennis before turning pro at the start of 89. He won his 1st Challenger and qualified for 2 Slams (the only two he played and the only two he would have to qualify for in his career) by the end of 1989 and was ranked 66. He had 10 straight top 75 finishes 89-98 (including back to back top 20 and 25 finishes in 95 & 96) before retiring from singles in 1999 after the US Open.

Thought of as a Doubles Specialist he had a solid singles career before (back to back top 40 finishes in 91 & 92) and after he and Jacco Elting teamed to be a top doubles team in 93. By his own admission he wasn't an impressive Junior, his game was really honed during his college years. His game still holds up, he won the Championship of the Senior's tour last year and the over 35 Doubles at Wimbledon at 39.

binkygirl
02-13-2006, 03:00 AM
Patty Mac graduated from Stanford. He had to have been ranked, at least briefly,in the top 200 when he was playing.


He was an Aussie Open semi-finalist, so indeed he was in the top 200. He didn't have his brother's talent, but he could play. I felt sorry for him having to be in that shadow, because if he'd been anyone else, he would've been recognized for his own talents.

binkygirl
02-13-2006, 03:05 AM
Umm... I've become aware via this message board that the entire universe thinks Patrick is a joke, but his career was quite solid.


Patrick also was a good doubles player and won a French Open title with Jim Grabb, I think.

helen phillips
02-13-2006, 03:11 AM
He was an Aussie Open semi-finalist, so indeed he was in the top 200. He didn't have his brother's talent, but he could play. I felt sorry for him having to be in that shadow, because if he'd been anyone else, he would've been recognized for his own talents.

Patrick's highest ranking in singles was 28.

*Viva Chile*
02-13-2006, 03:27 AM
I read Mario is in the 3 year of law.
And when Mario have/had time to study a career like that??? :eek:
In Chile, law needs a full time dedication so I don't imagine how Mario is/was studying something like that... maybe for correspondence??? :p

R.Federer
02-13-2006, 03:40 AM
John Macenroe went to Stanford (at least for a few years, don't know for sure if he has graduated ever from there)

R.Federer
02-13-2006, 03:44 AM
alex kim also attended Stanford university

artlinkletter
02-13-2006, 03:47 AM
And when Mario have/had time to study a career like that??? :eek:
In Chile, law needs a full time dedication so I don't imagine how Mario is/was studying something like that... maybe for correspondence??? :p
I think he was born in '84...how on earth can someone be done 3 years of law at that age, while playing tennis full time? Here, people do their undergrad, then go off to law school, which is another 3-4 years. By the time you graduate, the average person is about...26. Then you have to go do your articling for another two years. Something smells fishy.

helen phillips
02-13-2006, 03:57 AM
John Macenroe went to Stanford (at least for a few years, don't know for sure if he has graduated ever from there)

J. Mcenroe didn't graduate from Stanford.

lau
02-13-2006, 04:11 AM
I think he was born in '84...how on earth can someone be done 3 years of law at that age, while playing tennis full time? Here, people do their undergrad, then go off to law school, which is another 3-4 years. By the time you graduate, the average person is about...26. Then you have to go do your articling for another two years. Something smells fishy.
You can be a lawyer at 24 here (6 years career)...., if you don´t loose any time. Of course a lawyer without any experience :p If he started at 18 he might be in 4th year..., although I admit it sounds a quite impossible considering he travels around the world most of the year and plays pro tennis. ;)

artlinkletter
02-13-2006, 04:14 AM
I heard that in England, to become a certified doctor, it is only a 4 year program!! That is unbelievable. No wonder there are so many doctors there.

helen phillips
02-13-2006, 04:20 AM
Don't be so harsh. Brian's career is ruined by injuries :wavey:

Valhaly won a Challenger last year. I cam remember a piece in Tennis a few years ago when he was doing well about him hiring a coach to travel with him. What??? I've seen Valhaly play - what does he need a travelling coach for? Big surprise it all fizzled out and his ranking dropped like a stone. A one dimensional player like Brian should focus on coaching in his off weeks it isn't like he was ever going to push through to the top 30. He should of taken a page from his compatriot Amy Frazier and lowered his overhead to maximize profitability.

lau
02-13-2006, 04:21 AM
I heard that in England, to become a certified doctor, it is only a 4 year program!! That is unbelievable. No wonder there are so many doctors there.
:lol: I don´t understand other countries university system :p
Here, when you study to be a lawyer, you study that from the first day. No "undergrad" or nothing like that :lol: and it is like that with all the careers (except careers such as medicine for example, where you have to do a residence to be an specialist like in any or most parts of the world. But you can still work as a doctor if you don´t do a residence).
When you obtain your diploma, you are a "lawyer" and you can work as one (of course, rarely happends because they usually have very little experience).

artlinkletter
02-13-2006, 04:25 AM
:lol: I don´t understand other countries university system :p
Here, when you study to be a lawyer, you study that from the first day. No "undergrad" or nothing like that :lol: and it is like that with all the careers (except careers such as medicine for example, where you have to do a residence to be an specialist like in any or most parts of the world).
When you obtain your diploma, you are a "lawyer" and you can work as one (of course, rarely happends because they usually have very little experience).
Your system makes a lot more sense, that's for sure. For college, in Canada, it follows your system more so. Careers like nursing, mechanics, technicians etc, at college, you learn from day on and end up with a diploma, not a degree like you would with University education. In University, is where you do undergrads, and go on to grad school depending on what your field of study is.

*Viva Chile*
02-13-2006, 04:31 AM
:lol: I don´t understand other countries university system :p
Here, when you study to be a lawyer, you study that from the first day. No "undergrad" or nothing like that :lol: and it is like that with all the careers (except careers such as medicine for example, where you have to do a residence to be an specialist like in any or most parts of the world. But you can still work as a doctor if you don´t do a residence).
When you obtain your diploma, you are a "lawyer" and you can work as one (of course, rarely happends because they usually have very little experience).
In Chile, when you finish law (I think you can finish in 6 years if you don't have to repeat any assignature) you only have the licenciature in laws, after doing the grade exam... for to be a lawyer, you need to do the "title exam" in front of Supreme Court of Justice ministers, the only instance for having the title of "lawyer"

artlinkletter
02-13-2006, 04:35 AM
In Chile, when you finish law (I think you can finish in 6 years if you don't have to repeat any assignature) you only have the licenciature in laws, after doing the grade exam... for to be a lawyer, you need to do the "title exam" in front of Supreme Court of Justice ministers, the only instance for having the title of "lawyer"
How many more years does that take? Or does it even take years?

lau
02-13-2006, 04:36 AM
In Chile, when you finish law (I think you can finish in 6 years if you don't have to repeat any assignature) you only have the licenciature in laws, after doing the grade exam... for to be a lawyer, you need to do the "title exam" in front of Supreme Court of Justice ministers, the only instance for having the title of "lawyer"
Here it is not called "licenciatura", you are "lawyer" when you recieve the diploma. Of course, you have to make some "paper work" (don´t know what that includes...) to have the national and/or provincial "matriculation" to work as a certified lawyer, but I never heard that was to hard to do :shrug:

EDIT: on the other hand, when you study 5/6 years to be a "psychologist", you recieve the diploma of "Licenciado en Psicología", and, like in this kind of professions, you have to obtain the national and/or provincial matriculation to work and you have to be part of a "Colegio de Psicólogos", but that´s not hard to obtain and it doesn´t require exams (but there are certain requirements...).

helen phillips
02-13-2006, 05:40 AM
alex kim also attended Stanford university

He went for 4 years including one after he won the NCAA Championships so I would guess he graduated.

Kristen
02-13-2006, 08:07 AM
There is an American player who is always bragging that he is the "only top 200" player to graduate from university.
Brian Vahaly is the one I was thinking about. There was a time when he was in the top 100, then fell to the 200s. The commentators always introduced him as the "only" player in the top[whatever] to graduate from college. Not just American but everybody. I never knew if that was true or not but I really got tired of hearing about how "intelligent" he was. If he's so intelligent he should know he's no good and should know when to quit. Ok, well that makes much more sense than him bragging about it. He's not the type, he's one of the sweetest players/guys out there. Without a doubt my favourite American (although I follow Jim Thomas more closely :lol: )

I can't help but feel I should be talking about Mario or law :tape:

*Viva Chile*
02-13-2006, 07:32 PM
How many more years does that take? Or does it even take years?
The approbation for the Supreme Court of Justice, depends how prepare are you for give the exam :p

And Lau, yes... In Chile, for other careers happened something similar as you said ;) First you finish like "licenciado" and then you have to habilitate, and that process is easy and not take much time. And for to be colleged (colegiado) here in Chile isn't necessary for all careers. For example I finish dentistry in one more year, but I don't collegiate too early... (además que el colegio de dentistas no hace mucho que digamos, a diferencia del colegio médico para los médicos) :p

Lou_Lou_Ferrero
02-13-2006, 11:08 PM
I read Mario is in the 3 year of law.

an all round rennaissance man..... :worship: :hearts: :hearts: :worship:

helen phillips
02-16-2006, 02:22 AM
I was wondering whether you know of any players who went to college or even graduated. It'd be cool to know at what age they graduated and how much it took them to "get into" the tour.

I've read from Brad Gilbert that he won the NCAA thing... so I guess he was one of them.

These are the guys I could confirm. I'm pretty sure Gilbert didn't win the NCAA Championships. Most of the players already listed in the thread attended but didn't graduate.

Alex O’Brien, Stanford, Class of 92

Patrick Mcenroe, Stanford, Class of 88

Paul Haarhuis, Florida State, Class of 88

Alex Kim, Stanford, Class of 01

Byron Black, USC, Class of 91

Mikael Pernfors, Georgia, Class of 85

Rick Leach, USC, Class of 87

Brian Vahaly, Virginia, Class of 01

Paul Goldstein, Stanford, Class of 98

Jeff Morrison, University of Florida, Class of 00