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Great Read You Will Find Interesting.

angiel
01-05-2006, 10:06 PM
http://www.insidetennis.com/it_img/1104_lansdorp2_300.jpg



NOVEMBER 2004




By Bill Simons

Editor’s Note: IT interviewed Robert Lansdorp just after Wimbledon.

INSIDE TENNIS: Myskina wins the French, Sharapova takes Wimbledon and Davenport puts together a 22-match win streak. It was a heck of a summer for Lansdorp’s ladies.

ROBERT LANSDORP: Before, the players were so bad at giving credit where credit is due — like Tracy Austin [who he also taught], like all of them. Now, who in the world has coached five Grand Slam champions? Tracy gives me more credit than I can handle. After all these years I’m getting credit. It’s nice. Maria is really thoughtful. She’s unbelievable and has good character. She’s a great girl, and it’s nice to have a good relationship, where I’m finally getting credit. Davenport now gives me a lot of credit. She’s talked about what a great influence I was and how without me she probably wouldn’t have been anywhere. Nobody has evolved the little ones into Grand Slam champions [like me]. The only one that came to me when she was older was Myskina, she was No. 58. She stunk. A year and a half later, she’s top 10 and she says her boyfriend [now ex-boyfriend and coach Jens Erlach] did it all. And she says, “Yeah, Lansdorp helped me with my groundies.” Excuse me, what else have you got?

IT: You’ve coached Sampras, Austin, Sharapova, Myskina, Davenport....

RL: Stephanie Rehe, got to be top 10, Eliot Teltscher got to six, Brian Teacher, nine, Kimberley Po, 14.

IT: So it’s obviously all a fluke.

RL: Exactly. I was just lucky.

IT: Does the lack of recognition piss you off?

RL: No, I’m used to it. Nobody has done what I have done, the way I did it. Some radio guy called and said, “You just rent a court? You’re not on some luxurious court at an academy?” But what else do I need? All I need is a basket of balls and a court. I don’t need all the B.S. But I’ve always been the worst PR guy. I never talked. Other guys have PR people. So people say, “How come I’ve never heard about you, you’ve made all these champions.” But I’m feeling good and have a feeling I probably will have one more [champion] in my life.

IT: Let’s say the day comes when you go up to the pearly gates and God says, “Hey, Lansdorp, I’ve heard you’re some kind of coach. So look, I’ll let you in if you tell me the two or three secrets of how you do it.

RL: It’s easy — he’s God, he oughta know, dude! First of all, nothing can be done without discipline. Then it’s motivation and the psychology of bringing kids along, understanding what the kid needs to become better, recognizing what they’re lacking at a very early age, what it is that they have to do to become better. Look at Maria — the only one I knew who had better motivation was Tracy.

IT: Really, more so than Pete?

RL: Oh yeah. Pete looked like he was going to be a great player, definitely. Lindsay looked like she was going to be good, but never [win] Grand Slams. So you look at what they need. And then, you stick to what is going to make them great. My system makes them great.

IT: You’re famous for feeding kids thousands of balls.

RL: It’s the repetition. It’s the ability to make them hit balls that they don’t think they can hit. It’s the work ethic. Since I have a great work ethic, you get the same ethic out of them. It’s a process of several years, molding the person. Of course with somebody like Maria, Tracy or Pete, they have a championship quality within. But you have to give them the tools and the confidence that all their qualities will work. By having Maria hit her forehand over and over again, she’s able to handle it because she’s seen hundreds of thousands of balls come to her at 100 miles per hour. I can hit them out of a basket a foot inside the line, a foot from the baseline, 100 miles an hour, over and over. Then I can change the pace all of the sudden. It’s just constant work and making sure that the drive is clean and through the ball.



IT: Who had the greatest drive and motivation of the five?

RL: Probably Tracy. But they all have it. In terms of showing it, it would be Tracy and Maria. They were the most aggressive in wanting to win. You saw it in the slap of their thighs —- they just can’t wait to win. Pete was a little lax. Sometimes I thought he was sort of throwing a match. Same with Lindsay.

IT: She can get insecure.

RL: That’s just her personality.

IT: How would you compare Myskina’s desire with Sharapova’s?

RL: Myskina has come around. She wasn’t the same as Maria when she came to me. She was easily distracted. At Indian Wells, she’s up 6-1, 4-0 over Nathalie Dechy, who then took a bathroom break. Then Myskina fell apart. No way would Maria have fallen apart.

IT: And Myskina was once up 5-0 against Henin at the WTA Championships and she blew that, plus....

RL: She can go “walkabout,” but if she can overcome that, and also handle pace, she’s quick and has a devastating backhand...

IT: We’ve seen Maria’s forehand, we’ve seen Pete’s running forehand — we’ve seen Lindsay’s backhand. Who’s got the sweetest stroke?

RL: It’s a three-, maybe four-way tie. Myskina hits a little different than Maria. Maria, Davenport and Austin drive through the ball. Myskina doesn’t quite drive through, but tags the ball so well she has a lot of pace. Davenport has an unbelievable backhand, which she had at a very early age. Very clean. When she was 12, she could flip the backhand. Maria didn’t rip the backhand. Her father kept telling me, “She missed a lot of backhands.” I kept saying, ‘Yuri, don’t worry. She’s going to have a world-class backhand.” Why? Because then, she didn’t know whether she should be right- or left- handed. She could serve right or left-handed. But since the motion was a little more natural with the right arm, I told him, “You should probably have her play right-handed. But because of the left hand, her backhand is going to be devastating.”

IT: What about Yuri? Tough, tough guy. Really motivated.

RL: He’s an easy guy with me. No problems whatsoever. He believes in me. He took her to me because he figured I was going to be the one who could make Maria hit the ball like Davenport. He never argues with me, he never says a word. All he does is jump down to pick up balls.

IT: Any similarity between him and Mr. Sampras?

RL: Mr. Sampras was never around, so it’s hard to tell. Mr. Sampras would come to the lessons in the beginning, but there was not the involvement that Maria has with Yuri. They have a great relationship. He sometimes sounds a little harsh when he talks to her, and he’s very defensive when you say anything about Maria. You don’t want to get on his bad side, or say something about Maria — like what Nick [Bollettieri] said at Indian Wells, that this other girl [Bulgarian Sesil Karatantcheva] was going to be No. 1. Then it’s a done deal. It’s over. Don’t look me up anymore. But Yuri calls me all the time. I give him advice, he asks me. It’s a great relationship. I trust him because he’s not the kind of guy who will screw you over.



IT: So many of the great champions of recent years either are first-generation Americans — like Agassi, Sampras, or Chang — or they come from Eastern Europe — like Lendl, Navratilova, Hingis, Seles. Now there’s the Russian wave. Do Americans still have that inner drive, even ferocity, to reach the very top?

RL: I don’t think that’s it. To me, a kid’s a kid. When a kid loves to play at a young age, that has to be nurtured a little bit better in this country. It has to come from the parents. If the parents are behind the kid, then you have a chance. I have a couple of kids now that are very, very good. When they came to me, I had a feeling that they felt like I could make them a champion. That helps me to get them more motivated. But maybe the USTA should help. You should look for kids in the U.S. I asked [USTA High Performance chief] Eliot Teltscher a long time ago, “Why don’t you find all the top kids in the state, young ones — let me develop them?” Nothing came of it. You’ve got to start them very young, when they’re six, seven, eight. Once they’re 12, it’s more difficult. Once they’re 14, 15, it’s far more difficult, and once they’re 17,18, it’s almost a done deal. If a girl hasn’t won major tournaments by the age of 16, 17, she’s not going to be No. 1.

IT: You can see talent fairly young?

RL: I can see how they hit the ball. Another thing that’s important is how valuable a point is to them. Do they miss easy? Do they make unforced errors?

IT: Sharapova fights for every point.

RL: Not only that, but when she was 12 she knew the court. She didn’t have discipline, hitting the same ball over and over, but she knew where to put the ball. The same with Austin. They knew how to play, they just had to be developed.

IT: So at Wimbledon, Sharapova went up against Serena, a two-time champ, in the final and the conventional wisdom was that Serena would kick butt. What was your feeling, going in?

RL: Honestly, I thought Maria had a chance. I told her, you hit the ball hard and you crank it into Serena’s forehand and it might break down. That’s exactly what happened. With somebody like Maria, you’ve got to instill a couple of things in her and then let her play on instinct. She’d never hit a lob, but on two crucial points she hit two unbelievable lobs. Did anybody tell her, hey, when Serena comes up to the net, hit a lob? No. It was instinct. She overpowered Serena’s forehand. Serena got a little shell-shocked and couldn’t believe that this chick was actually beating her.

IT: What coaching job are you most proud of?

RL: The answer is weird. It doesn’t make any difference, because I never looked and said, “Okay, now I’m going to make this one a champion.” I just developed them. The first time Pete won [the Open], I was unbelievably impressed by the way he played, the way he hit his backhand. I said, “Holy moly.”

IT: You weren’t the one who changed it from a two-hander?

RL: I probably wouldn’t have done it, because he had a very good two-hander. Tarango had a terrible two-hander, and when we tried to change it to a one-hander, the one-hander was worse than the two-hander! Pete came to me when he was 16, because he was slicing it. He couldn’t hit his backhand.

IT: And a player who disappointed you?

RL: She was not really a disappointment, but I thought Rehe was going to just set the world on fire.



IT: Talk to me about Alexandra Stevenson, who you’ve worked with and who just had shoulder surgery. I know your heart goes out to her.

RL: She’s really nice. You can’t compete when you’re in pain. Obviously, your confidence dives. She just hasn’t won any matches. She can be more consistent. She moves better than Lindsay, and Lindsay does just fine.
If there’s any advice I can give, it’s make sure that your kid understands consistency first. Once you have consistency, go with placement and then go with power. Maria had consistency all the way. She could hit consistently to one spot. She wouldn’t make an error. That comes from repetition. There’s nothing like muscle memory. If you hit a couple thousand balls in the same spot, the same way, it becomes so natural that you never fear that you’re not going to do it.

IT: An average Lansdorp workout is an hour and a half, two hours?

RL: An hour. Maria does two hours, an hour and a half. It’s rough. I work hard and they work hard.

IT: Everyone says Landsdorp is “the guru of the groundies.” True?

RL: I’m just known for that. Tracy had unbelievable groundies and the biggest suck serve you can imagine. It was worse than Myskina’s. Then, right away, people say, “He knows groundstrokes but [his players] don’t know how to hit a serve.” Sharapova hits a pretty good serve. Lindsay’s not bad. Pete has hit the same serve since he was 11 — never changed it.

IT: Did you teach him the serve?

RL: When he came to me he was nine and hit it so well, I wasn’t going to change it. But I cannot get anyone else to hit it like that. It’s funny, kids come and say, “I’m hitting the serve like Sampras.” They think it looks like Sampras because of the way they’re standing, but their arm doesn’t go the same.

IT: So you teach the serve, but don’t get...

RL: ...the recognition. But I still say that groundstrokes have to be very good, if not the best.

IT: What about Federer? Will he have a Sampras-like career?

RL: I’ll tell you what happened with Sampras. He came to me after he just became No. 1 and said, “It’s so tough being No. 1,” because Becker had recently been No.1 for just six months, Courier was No. 1 for six months. I said, “Listen, man, what’s tough is when somebody has a family and the guy gets laid off —- that’s tough. What you do, that’s not tough at all. You play two hours and then you make millions. So don’t ever come back to me and tell me that life is tough.” But what was great about Pete, was once he became no. 1, he always felt like he was going to win. When Federer plays, I’m always worried that he’s going to disappoint. I would always put my money on Pete.

IT: To wrap up, the one thing that you’d like the world to know about Robert Lansdorp?

RL: I’m really a nice guy.

IT: And the player who was most appreciative?

RL: Sharapova. There better be a Mercedes in my driveway because my neighbor said, “How come your players never give you anything? What do they give you?” And I said, “Nothing”. I’ve never received anything from one player. Not even a $500 gift. They’re all multi-millionaires but I’ve never received one thing. And I’m telling you, if Maria doesn’t put a Mercedes convertible in my driveway, I’m going to shoot myself.


© 2004 INSIDE TENNIS All rights reserved. :bigclap: :bigclap: :apumpkin: :apumpkin: :aparty: :aparty:

the_natural
01-07-2006, 09:24 AM
Some of what this guy says sounds like complete Rubbish, as if hes crediting himself with Petes entire career, and the careers of other players too, its so annoying hes so full of himself.

angiel
01-07-2006, 06:19 PM
Some of what this guy says sounds like complete Rubbish, as if hes crediting himself with Petes entire career, and the careers of other players too, its so annoying hes so full of himself.



He his not doing no such thing, and he did coach these players at one time or another, during their career, as a matter of fact he is Sharapova full time caoch, Pete did when to him, younger in his career, he is a specialist coach, so did Austin and Davenport.


He is a very good coach, ask anybody who knows tennis. :wavey: :angel: :worship: :D

the_natural
01-08-2006, 12:03 AM
No I mean this line: He came to me after he just became No. 1 and said, “It’s so tough being No. 1,” because Becker had recently been No.1 for just six months, Courier was No. 1 for six months. I said, “Listen, man, what’s tough is when somebody has a family and the guy gets laid off —- that’s tough

I dont know why but I dont trust him completely because he sounds full of himself throughout the interview constantly talking about how great he is and how much the tennis players owe him right.

But most of all this line, I dont know how anyone can say: IT: Who had the greatest drive and motivation of the five?

RL: Probably Tracy... Pete was a little lax. Sometimes I thought he was sort of throwing a match.

Come on Pete Sampras had the greatest Drive and determination of any player who has ever lived! The 96 USO Alex Corretja Match more than proves that.

Id believe that he was able to make them get good groundstrokes and everything but when he says stuff like that I dont believe everything AS much, If he hadnt thrown in the last line about Sampras and Federer I woulda thought He was someone who got angry because Sampras didnt keep him full time.

Anyways thank you for the article, If U say he is good i believe u.

angiel
01-10-2006, 12:28 AM
No I mean this line: He came to me after he just became No. 1 and said, “It’s so tough being No. 1,” because Becker had recently been No.1 for just six months, Courier was No. 1 for six months. I said, “Listen, man, what’s tough is when somebody has a family and the guy gets laid off —- that’s tough

I dont know why but I dont trust him completely because he sounds full of himself throughout the interview constantly talking about how great he is and how much the tennis players owe him right.

But most of all this line, I dont know how anyone can say: IT: Who had the greatest drive and motivation of the five?

RL: Probably Tracy... Pete was a little lax. Sometimes I thought he was sort of throwing a match.

Come on Pete Sampras had the greatest Drive and determination of any player who has ever lived! The 96 USO Alex Corretja Match more than proves that.

Id believe that he was able to make them get good groundstrokes and everything but when he says stuff like that I dont believe everything AS much, If he hadnt thrown in the last line about Sampras and Federer I woulda thought He was someone who got angry because Sampras didnt keep him full time.

Anyways thank you for the article, If U say he is good i believe u.


Hello natural, :wavey:

And how are you doing :angel: :D

You are welcome my dear - I think pete when to him before he was No. 1 in the world. :rolleyes: :D

angiel
01-10-2006, 09:06 PM
http://www.canoe.ca/SlamTennisImages/sampras_wimbledon97.jpg

Last Updated: Friday, 22 August, 2003, 11:58 GMT 12:58 UK

Wimbledon legends: Pete Sampras


Believe it or not, in his first three years at Wimbledon, Pete Sampras only won one match, losing twice in the first round and one in the second.

It was puzzling to a man who had won the US Open at the age of 19.

Although he had barely played on grass as a junior he thought his serve-volley game would be well-suited to the fast grass-courts of SW19.

But things eventually came right, and in some style.

In the 1993 final he beat the then world number one, Jim Courier, having already dismissed Andre Agassi and Boris Becker in previous rounds.

From then on, of course, 'Pistol Pete' made Centre Court his own.

He may not go for quite the pace of a Greg Rusedski or Mark Philippoussis on his serve, but its accuracy, disguise and above all consistency, make it far and away the best the game has ever seen.

Similarly, Stefan Edberg could claim to have been a better volleyer and Pat Rafter a superior athlete, but no one has ever put it all together like Sampras.

The American also boasted fierce groundstrokes and a will to win that saw him play through injury and sickness on a regular basis.

These are all reasons why Sampras has won more Grand Slams than anyone else and was voted the best player in the history of the Association of Tennis Professionals.

If any of Sampras' games are forgettable, which many are, it is because he was so far ahead of the rest, they could barely give him a game.

His power may have dimmed over the last year, but his achievements will never be forgotten.

angiel
01-10-2006, 09:39 PM
Duel for the ages; Old rivals Agassi, Sampras to meet for U.S. Open title

Washington Times, The, September, 2002



Byline: Patrick Hruby, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

NEW YORK - They are older, slower, blessed with considerably less hair.

But, as Pete Sampras likes to put it, they can still bring the goods.

Kicking the dirt off their long and storied rivalry, raging against the good night of ubiquitous beer commercials and lousy, extraneous exhibition matches against sketchy German ex-champs, Sampras and Andre Agassi proved once again that nostalgia is better left to living legends who are, in fact, washed up.

The creaky-but-hardly-cranky duo stormed through the U.S. Open semifinals yesterday, with Agassi downing Lleyton Hewitt 6-4, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (1), ...

angiel
01-10-2006, 09:59 PM
Confessions of Pete Sampras

You'd never believe it today, but Tennis Champion Pete Sampras struggled with managing his anger on the courts as a youngster.

Reported in the book Mental Training for Peak Performance by Steven Ungerleider, here's what Pete Sampras shares about his early tennis performances:

"I would lose my composure and sometimes completely blow it on the court. My dad, who was coaching me then, was very strict and basically told me that my tennis career was history if I didn't pull myself together. I also learned early on that having a tantrum on the court was very embarrassing and looks pretty bad. The other part of the emotional control equation was that when I had a flare-up, it was very hard to rebound and get back in the game. My temper got in the way of being in a focused tennis mind; it became very destructive."

Sampras is one of those rare athletes who appears to stay in total conrol on the court, regardless of the situation. But he tells young players that unless they understand the dynamics of their emotions, especially anger, they won't move to the next level of competitive play.

Here are his top tips for emotional control on the courts:

Keep things uncomplicated.
Concentrate
Channel your emotions
Let yourself move on

Tennis is all about concentration and staying focused in the moment.

"I get very upset when I miss a point that is important, but I keep that upset within me," he says. "When I get a bad call by a line judge, my upset goes ballistic, but again, I keep that well contained. In order to play well, you have to learn to channel the emotions, both the highs and the very lows."

But he doesn't reveal what sorts of things he tells himself to think, feel and do in order to contain those powerful angry emotions. Maybe he should share this with John McEnroe.

For sure, you can't separate the powerful interplay of mind and body during tennis, and the distractive power of anger upon control of movements. Sports psychologists everywhere have given up on understanding how McEnroe was able to use his anger to channel his energy and win points. He was unique in this regard.

Posted by dr-patsi on October 18, 2005 at 12:57 PM in 3.2 Brain and Tennis, 7.1 Brain & Anger | Permalink

ragson_83
01-13-2006, 11:07 AM
Hi Angiel, mimi, lee, greg, lalitha, hoang,evelyn,peteslamz..

Happy New Year(a bit late thoguh)... busy these days.. have to make up for the vacation..

Cant wait to catch the australian Open action live..

:wavey: :wavey: :wavey:

Raghu

angiel
01-13-2006, 10:02 PM
Hi Angiel, mimi, lee, greg, lalitha, hoang,evelyn,peteslamz..

Happy New Year(a bit late thoguh)... busy these days.. have to make up for the vacation..

Cant wait to catch the australian Open action live..

:wavey: :wavey: :wavey:

Raghu


Happy to have you back with us, and Happy New Year to you too. :smooch: :hug: :hug:

the_natural
01-16-2006, 06:13 AM
Was Rafter Really a better athlete?? I thought Pete was the greatest tennis athlete of his time?? I was never into tennis until quite recently, never enjoyed the glory of the Sampras era. So Is it true??

almouchie
01-16-2006, 02:36 PM
i loved the article.
i didnt know he coached sampras
rafter had a great pyhsic & was quite athletic but to me sampras was a natural
for him things came so much easier which is why he managed to stay on top for so long. it was his game that carrie dhim through & a very balanced athlete who never had any serious injury

almouchie
01-16-2006, 02:42 PM
i am wondering if I can share it (article) with a few sampras fans I know
i will acknolwedge the site

the_natural
01-17-2006, 01:55 PM
Of course u can dont be silly. Only if u want to though

angiel
01-17-2006, 10:11 PM
Was Rafter Really a better athlete?? I thought Pete was the greatest tennis athlete of his time?? I was never into tennis until quite recently, never enjoyed the glory of the Sampras era. So Is it true??



No way was Rafter the better athlete, that is just the British nonsense, Rafter can never walk in Pete's shoes, never. :o :eek:


And yes my dear, he is the Greatest tennis athlete of his time :worship: :worship: Just last year he was voted the GREATEST by Tennis Magazine :angel:

Did you know that he is one of the 50 greatest athletes in North America, and not just in tennis, but all of sports, that was by ESPN. :worship: :worship:

angiel
01-17-2006, 10:15 PM
i loved the article.
i didnt know he coached sampras
rafter had a great pyhsic & was quite athletic but to me sampras was a natural
for him things came so much easier which is why he managed to stay on top for so long. it was his game that carrie dhim through & a very balanced athlete who never had any serious injury


You are so right almouchie, he was a fantastic athlete ( PETE) not just a tennis player, Rafter can never walk in his shoes, never in a million years :eek: :mad:


Now a days, look how many injuries are on the ATP tour, not in Pete era you find so much injuries. :worship: :angel:

angiel
01-17-2006, 10:18 PM
i am wondering if I can share it (article) with a few sampras fans I know
i will acknolwedge the site


Post all the articles you want almouchie, please. :wavey: :cool: :D

angiel
01-19-2006, 12:35 AM
PETE SAMPRAS - a little titbit about him.

* Voted 48th athlete of Top 50 Greatest North American Athletes of ESPN's SportsCentury (also youngest on list).



http://216.194.87.192/tournagrip1.JPG

almouchie
01-19-2006, 09:10 PM
thanks mates
btw my name is rola
i have found a huge amount of pete pics here that i havent seen b4 & i have a pete scrap book so that explains my excitment when i log in here
thanks for all u do on the pete forum

angiel
01-20-2006, 09:42 PM
thanks mates
btw my name is rola
i have found a huge amount of pete pics here that i havent seen b4 & i have a pete scrap book so that explains my excitment when i log in here
thanks for all u do on the pete forum



Hi there almouchie, how doing my friend. :wavey: :wavey:

angiel
01-21-2006, 07:41 PM
Great Pete Sampras!

Monday, 3. October 2005, 05:37:39

Agassi, Pete Sampras

An article "Mind Over Net" described that "Blessed with the ability to reinvent himself, Agassi was soon on his way up. Just as Bradman¡¯s career can¡¯t be weighed without Bodyline, Agassi¡¯s has to be juxtaposed with Sampras¡¯ rise. But it would be an exaggeration to call it a rivalry ¡ª perhaps a long-running feud, yes. Sampras won an unprecedented 14 Slams, finished No.1 six years on the trot, and spent a record 286 weeks atop and alone. He was a leviathan on the lawns of Wimbledon, stringing seven titles over eight summers. He and Agassi brought out the best in each other, but Agassi beat him just once in a Slam final ¡ª at the 1995 Australian Open. "

angiel
01-21-2006, 08:13 PM
http://www.moveablefeast.org.uk/images/beer.jpg



FOLK & ROOTS, BBC RADIO SOMERSET


"MOVEABLE FEAST had come in at a relatively late stage to replace Bluegrass Etc. Stand-ins? Naw, these guys were stand-outs. Manic Belgian fiddler Raphael Radoux-Rogier joined Ricky Edwards on flute/sax, David Warner on accordion, Stuart McGerty on drums, Jo Oulton on a double bass that’s twice her height and Mitch on guitar and vocals to produce a really high-class set.


From cajun stompers, beautiful harmonies, through to the Flamenco finale Bailar Bajo El Sol (Dancing in the Sun) it was great stuff. I’d like to hear more of them. The wonderful Forgive My Sins was for me the best song of the whole night. Backstage a soaking Mitch looked like he’d been in a five-setter with Pete Sampras."
THE SHETLAND TIMES (Festival Section) April 2000