Why can't Argies hit their serves properly? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Why can't Argies hit their serves properly?

Rogiman
11-18-2005, 10:46 AM
Nalbandian, Coria, Gaudio and Puerta (along with many others) are all talented, successful players, with great ground games and on-court thinking ability.

When it comes to the serve, however, none of them manage to use it to their advantage, as it is (for the most part) a weak, unreliable shot, hence all those double faults on break points etc.

I understand tennis in Argentina has mainly been played on clay, where the serve is of less significance, but isn't it a crying shame that a player like Nalbandian, for instance, whose game is otherwise complete and should have been a multiple slam winner by now, is let down by a single shot his coaches must have neglected?

jazz_girl
11-18-2005, 10:50 AM
Nalbandian, Coria, Gaudio and Puerta (along with many others) are all talented, successful players, with great ground games and on-court thinking ability.

When it comes to the serve, however, none of them manages to use it to his advantage, as it is (for the most part) a weak, unreliable shot, hence all those double faults on break points etc.

I understand tennis in Argentina has mainly been played on clay, where the serve is of less significance, but isn't it a crying shame that a player like Nalbandian, for instance, whose game is otherwise complete and should have been a multiple slam winner by now, is let down by a single shot his coaches must have neglected?
When you start taking lessons, the last thing they teach you is to serve. From my own experience, I only practiced it for five minutes, after every class. They start teaching you the forehand, backhand, volley, etc...The serve is not important for the teachers. However, now they're starting to realise how wrong they are, and I've been told that's beginning to change.

sigmagirl91
11-18-2005, 10:52 AM
Thank goodness for that, Jazz. I don't know why they never considered that in the first place.

jazz_girl
11-18-2005, 10:54 AM
Thank goodness for that, Jazz. I don't know why they never considered that in the first place.
It's considered like a shot just to start a point, and not a shot that can help you build a point. That's a huge difference!

sigmagirl91
11-18-2005, 10:58 AM
It's considered like a shot just to start a point, and not a shot that can help you build a point. That's a huge difference!

OK.....although I personally don't agree with that...but OK.

lau
11-18-2005, 11:02 AM
Puerta´s serve is not that bad....

sigmagirl91
11-18-2005, 11:06 AM
Puerta´s serve is not that bad....

In fact, it was a major weapon in the doubles match against Australia in DC. Puerta didn't lose serve all day.

Hendu
11-18-2005, 11:31 AM
Nalbandian, Coria, Gaudio and Puerta (along with many others) are all talented, successful players, with great ground games and on-court thinking ability.

Puerta has a good serve... Calleri, Chela and Acasuso also have pretty good serves. Zabaleta's isn't too bad either.

When it comes to the serve, however, none of them manage to use it to their advantage, as it is (for the most part) a weak, unreliable shot, hence all those double faults on break points etc.

Gaudio, Nalbandian and Coria (specially after the US Open) have had that kind of problems... and they are our best players. :confused:

isn't it a crying shame that a player like Nalbandian, for instance, whose game is otherwise complete and should have been a multiple slam winner by now, is let down by a single shot his coaches must have neglected?

It is, but I don't think his serve is his main weakness...
I think he could have won a couple of slams with a stronger mind.

Rogiman
11-18-2005, 11:38 AM
It is, but I don't think his serve is his main weakness...
I think he could have won a couple of slams with a stronger mind.
Tough to keep your mind clear when you have to work hard for every point.

Hendu
11-18-2005, 11:49 AM
Tough to keep your mind clear when you have to work hard for every point.

good point, I never related his mental problems with his weak serve.

Although I think that having a bad serve would affect his consistency and that does not explain his lack of motivation in small tournaments and his bad plays in decisive parts of important games.

R.Federer
11-18-2005, 11:52 AM
In the days when Vilas played, the serve was generally not considered something that could earn points (and Vilas was not remembered for his serve), but his ground game was very good and that probably set the trend for focus more on the ground game.
This might be pure BS :)
I am speculating as to one possible reason why there has been a history of focus on the rest of the game (like Jazz has said)

Julio1974
11-18-2005, 11:58 AM
When you start taking lessons, the last thing they teach you is to serve. From my own experience, I only practiced it for five minutes, after every class. They start teaching you the forehand, backhand, volley, etc...The serve is not important for the teachers. However, now they're starting to realise how wrong they are, and I've been told that's beginning to change.

That's true. It's not considered something important for most professors.

Hendu
11-18-2005, 12:05 PM
In the days when Vilas played, the serve was generally not considered something that could earn points (and Vilas was not remembered for his serve), but his ground game was very good and that probably set the trend for focus more on the ground game.

Maybe...

Jose Luis Clerc, which was the best Argentine player after Vilas had a good serve. So I don't know...

I think the answer is in Rogiman and jazz_girl's quotes:

tennis in Argentina has mainly been played on clay, where the serve is of less significance

They start teaching you the forehand, backhand, volley, etc...The serve is not important for the teachers.

alfonsojose
11-18-2005, 12:36 PM
'coz the pills would fell off their pockets :p

DrJules
11-18-2005, 01:05 PM
Physical height. A number of the top Argentinians are shorter than Roddick, Safin and Federer. It is easier for taller people to have bigger serves.

uNIVERSE mAN
11-18-2005, 01:27 PM
Gaudio 5'8 Coria 5'8 Nalby 5'10 Puerta 5'10. There is no player at those heights who has a big serve except Bracciali, who is a freak of nature.

NyGeL
11-18-2005, 07:00 PM
that might be a good reason to. Calleri, Acasuso & Chela, who are tall ppl, have a good serve.

Coria has improve his 1st serve this season... (lets forget about his 2nd serve xD)

But it's true that, when you are young, tennis teachers don't take care about serving 'couse it is not significant on clay courts. And then, I think they take more care in having a good slice or kick in your server than a fast one (for example, nalbys serve).

celia
11-18-2005, 08:02 PM
Nalbandian, Coria, Gaudio and Puerta (along with many others) are all talented, successful players, with great ground games and on-court thinking ability.

When it comes to the serve, however, none of them manage to use it to their advantage, as it is (for the most part) a weak, unreliable shot, hence all those double faults on break points etc.

I understand tennis in Argentina has mainly been played on clay, where the serve is of less significance, but isn't it a crying shame that a player like Nalbandian, for instance, whose game is otherwise complete and should have been a multiple slam winner by now, is let down by a single shot his coaches must have neglected?
their bodies will last a lot longer as a result of their straight up service motion. there isn't as much torquing of the back in the Argie service motion. more and more players are using it. Todd Martin for example, now only uses the Argie service motion.

Grinder
11-18-2005, 09:07 PM
Gaudio 5'8 Coria 5'8 Nalby 5'10 Puerta 5'10. There is no player at those heights who has a big serve except Bracciali, who is a freak of nature.

Grosjean is listed at 5-9 but I've seen him in real life and he's not an inch above 5'6 or 5'7 and he crank his serve into the 130's. I've seen some other short guys that hit some big serves, as you mentioned Daniele Bracciali is one of them. I'm 6'5 and I'm a 5.5 player and I can't hit it past 115 and I've seen some guys that are 5'10 and 6 feet that play on the same level can serve harder than I can.

Jennay
11-18-2005, 09:18 PM
It's considered like a shot just to start a point, and not a shot that can help you build a point. That's a huge difference!
I agree, jazz. Your serve is key on a medium or quick surface. The pace, spins, and placement set up your next shot(s) and keep you in control. That said, I'm assuming most courts in Argentina are slow clay courts, and serve isn't that important.

You live in Argentina, jazz? Are there many hardcourts?

jazz_girl
11-18-2005, 09:32 PM
I agree, jazz. Your serve is key on a medium or quick surface. The pace, spins, and placement set up your next shot(s) and keep you in control. That said, I'm assuming most courts in Argentina are slow clay courts, and serve isn't that important.

You live in Argentina, jazz? Are there many hardcourts?
Yeah, I live in Buenos Aires, and I haven't seen many hardcourts at all! I don't understand why though, they're much easier to maintain :confused:

*Viva Chile*
11-18-2005, 10:31 PM
Gaudio 5'8 Coria 5'8 Nalby 5'10 Puerta 5'10. There is no player at those heights who has a big serve except Bracciali, who is a freak of nature.
Grosjean and Clement too ;)