fav tactic to defeat a good player [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

fav tactic to defeat a good player

mango
10-10-2005, 12:06 PM
i have a match coming up against a really good player. anyone got any tactics i could use.

and whats ur fav tactic to achieving victory against the odds?

David Kenzie
10-10-2005, 12:18 PM
Good players like to get into a rythm. Don't let him. Feed him some junk by mixing up your shots with slice or topspin. Run down every ball and make no unforced errors.

Domino
10-10-2005, 01:01 PM
My favorite is running them. No matter how good a player is, once his legs are gone, he can't execute his game as well. Just go short angle crosscourt, two forehands, one backhand, one forehand, two backhands, dtl slice, then an inside out forehand. Mix it up often, and keep him corner to corner. Keep the angles as sharp as you safely can, and after the first set (Or even the first four games) he'll be panting, and prime for you to step up your game.

fabolous
10-10-2005, 01:34 PM
yep, running is a good idea. recently i beat a (normally much better) player just by keeping the balls in. i didn't try to make any pressure, just hit every ball back with safety, not risking an unforced error. he got impatient very soon and started to produce unforced errors all over the court. he even tried to serve-and-volley at the end ;)


if that doesn't help, try cheating.

NYCtennisfan
10-10-2005, 01:55 PM
Depends. Do they have a weak area? BH on the run? Midcourt shots? Usually the 2nd serve is attackable. If one is a huge underdog, the I agree with Gouzo: mix in the junk and throw them off of their game. I've seen it work so many times, even on the ATP level with Brad Gilbert and once with Ramesh Krishnan.

prima donna
10-10-2005, 02:41 PM
My favorite is running them. No matter how good a player is, once his legs are gone, he can't execute his game as well. Just go short angle crosscourt, two forehands, one backhand, one forehand, two backhands, dtl slice, then an inside out forehand. Mix it up often, and keep him corner to corner. Keep the angles as sharp as you safely can, and after the first set (Or even the first four games) he'll be panting, and prime for you to step up your game.
Easier said than done.

What makes a good player good, is the ability to turn defense into offense. So much for your strategy of running them around, unless you're extremely efficient (Andre Agassi is a prime example) then I highly doubt that you'd be able to weather the storm of a superior talent/shotmaker.

All of this is good in theory, but realistically very tough to apply against a good player.

In fairness to Domino, there isn't enough information given by the Author of this thread regarding his opponent. If your opponent is an offensive juggernaut, just try to beat him with blue-collar tennis and be consistent. Don't beat yourself. Grinders have a game built to breakdown any player on any day, because if you're off and they're on ... big trouble.

Play contra-tennis with him (David Nalbandian is a prime example), use his pace against him, give him no pace, get in his head, keep the ball in play and don't beat yourself. Your only chance is to outlast him, otherwise you could be blasted off the court if this guy is as good as you say ... depending on your level of play.

El Legenda
10-10-2005, 02:44 PM
20min bathroom break.

Fee
10-10-2005, 02:55 PM
:secret: We need a players' forum...

Peoples
10-10-2005, 03:26 PM
I sometimes have the same problem and haven't figured out what to do... I'm pretty sure that mixing things up but in the same time (and giving priority to) playing extremely safe high % tennis is the right way to go. But I'm an inconsistent player myself and can't manage to change my attacking game without losing all my rhythm. So it simply doesn't work.

MisterQ
10-10-2005, 04:02 PM
I don't know how good a player you're talking about, and what your level is.

But depending on his/her style, trying one of the following approaches might work:

1. CONSISTENCY: Don't worry about being aggressive, just get every ball back in the court and keep your errors down. It's amazing how often this can work.

2. FRUSTRATE THE OPPONENT: Try to mix up pace and junk ball. Vary the amount of topspin, throw in some moonballs, use lots of slices and off-pace shots. Change your return position often to get the opponent overthinking on his/her serve, forcing double faults.

3. AGGRESSION: Attack every ball that you can. Give him/her few chances to get a nice rhythm going in rallies. It's lower percentage tennis, but it may be the only way to put a dent in your opponents' game. If you can't match the opponent's movement or consistency, you can at least go down going for your shots. And a few good shots on your part might put some self-doubt in your opponent, changing the momentum. ;)

4. CHANGE COURT POSITIONING: When all else fails, rush the net. Even if your volleys are terrible, your bluff can force errors. Some players aren't used to dealing with someone at net.

Angle Queen
10-10-2005, 04:06 PM
:secret: We need a players' forum...Click here to voice your support:

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=33211

And...not much for me to add here. You've gotten some good advice. Keep the ball in play, try to mix it up and when all else fails, take the 20-minute bathroom break.

Domino
10-10-2005, 04:10 PM
Easier said than done.

What makes a good player good, is the ability to turn defense into offense. So much for your strategy of running them around, unless you're extremely efficient (Andre Agassi is a prime example) then I highly doubt that you'd be able to weather the storm of a superior talent/shotmaker.

All of this is good in theory, but realistically very tough to apply against a good player.

In fairness to Domino, there isn't enough information given by the Author of this thread regarding his opponent. If your opponent is an offensive juggernaut, just try to beat him with blue-collar tennis and be consistent. Don't beat yourself. Grinders have a game built to breakdown any player on any day, because if you're off and they're on ... big trouble.

Play contra-tennis with him (David Nalbandian is a prime example), use his pace against him, give him no pace, get in his head, keep the ball in play and don't beat yourself. Your only chance is to outlast him, otherwise you could be blasted off the court if this guy is as good as you say ... depending on your level of play.


I don't mean to brag, but I consider my strokes very efficient, and I hit my crosscourt angles sufficiently hard enough to prevent most players from hitting offensively off the dead run. I myself am a very offensive player, not a grinder, and from the first ball I try to take initiative, usually with a big serve or return. I find that I can implement this strategy if I believe to be outmatched in shotmaking ability. Otherwise, I play my favorite way, which is winners and net-rushing! :)

Besides, even at the college level, there isn't anyone with the shotmaking ability to consistantly attack from the dead run for a whole match. People get tired, especially at the highschool level, and it is often the best strategy to run players at that level for the first half of a set. If not to wear them down, then to warm up your game. Hell, shot makers use a lot of energy anyway when they go for shots, if you make them attempt a couple extra, they'll wear down, at any level.

prima donna
10-10-2005, 04:37 PM
I don't mean to brag, but I consider my strokes very efficient, and I hit my crosscourt angles sufficiently hard enough to prevent most players from hitting offensively off the dead run. I myself am a very offensive player, not a grinder, and from the first ball I try to take initiative, usually with a big serve or return. I find that I can implement this strategy if I believe to be outmatched in shotmaking ability. Otherwise, I play my favorite way, which is winners and net-rushing! :)

Besides, even at the college level, there isn't anyone with the shotmaking ability to consistantly attack from the dead run for a whole match. People get tired, especially at the highschool level, and it is often the best strategy to run players at that level for the first half of a set. If not to wear them down, then to warm up your game. Hell, shot makers use a lot of energy anyway when they go for shots, if you make them attempt a couple extra, they'll wear down, at any level.

The author simply didn't supply enough information, we don't even know what type of player he is or his opponent for that matter.

Domino
10-10-2005, 04:39 PM
The author simply didn't supply enough information, we don't even know what type of player he is or his opponent for that matter.

The question was still, what is OUR fav tactic, not just what he/she should do. I am just saying that is my favorite tactic. True though, it would be nice if the author gave more info.

prima donna
10-10-2005, 04:43 PM
The question was still, what is OUR fav tactic, not just what he/she should do. I am just saying that is my favorite tactic. True though, it would be nice if the author gave more info.
You gave great advice, but I doubt that someone posting on MTF for suggestions on how to beat an opponent is skilled enough to utilize your suggestions which are really for advanced level players.

In this case, all that I'm saying is your advice was good ... probably TOO good. :worship:

mango
10-10-2005, 04:44 PM
thanks for the advice, every thing in this guys armour is excellent. apart from the fact i heard he is not that tall but his very fast. how do you do you think i can beat that type of guy?

Domino
10-10-2005, 04:49 PM
All the better to run him. A guy who commits to run very fast can be lulled into chasing down all the crosscourt angled shots. The fact that he is not tall means that his reach is limited, thus forcing him to run that much more. My advice would be to throw at least four crosscourt shots, taking him side to side, and then drop shot. If he's still in the point, Lob. Try mixing some moonball points to get the ball over his shoulder, so that his response is weak, and then attack the weak response. And if you're comming to the net, approach with a heavy topspin shot, and not a slice, because he'll have the low center of gravity to pick it up.

Action Jackson
10-10-2005, 04:50 PM
thanks for the advice, every thing in this guys armour is excellent. apart from the fact i heard he is not that tall but his very fast. how do you do you think i can beat that type of guy?

If he is not tall, throw some high moonballs that go over the shoulder, don't do it all the time.

Neely
10-10-2005, 06:11 PM
aces, smashes, attacking net... against very good solid players: playing "unforced error or winner"