Who had the biggest impact on the modern game ? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Who had the biggest impact on the modern game ?

TheMightyFed
09-22-2005, 08:38 AM
I see in the modern game some influences of certain players, that have changed the game, together with racquet technologies and surface changes.
Who do you think had the biggest impact today's game, not in terms of achievement, but of influence ?
For example, Borg had an influence I think on fitness level and topspin use.
Lendl bought the physical preparation and stamina to another level, plus he made fashinable the big baseline forehand to dictate the point.
Agassi had a great impact in taking the ball earlier than usual (a bit Connors earlier as well).
Becker brought the big serve and pert of the power tennis.
Your thoughts ?

ClaycourtaZzZz.
09-22-2005, 10:16 AM
:rolleyes:

tennisvideos
09-22-2005, 10:22 AM
I think Laver had an impact with topspin on those following him in the 70s. He was able to generate topspin off both the forehand and backhand.

I think Connors was the forerunner of the modern day powerbaseliner although his shots were relatively flat, and of course he had a huge impact with his double handed backhand (although there have been others in the past to use this shot, tennis didn't have as much exposure for it to take off with the masses).

TheMightyFed
09-22-2005, 10:23 AM
:rolleyes:
Thanks for your contribution to the debate :yeah:

TheMightyFed
09-22-2005, 11:07 AM
I think Laver had an impact with topspin on those following him in the 70s. He was able to generate topspin off both the forehand and backhand.

I think Connors was the forerunner of the modern day powerbaseliner although his shots were relatively flat, and of course he had a huge impact with his double handed backhand (although there have been others in the past to use this shot, tennis didn't have as much exposure for it to take off with the masses).
And he had maybe even more impact on women's game than female champs... strangely enough, Graff or Navratilova didn't have a huge impact on women's game if we consider the use of respectively S&V and sliced backhand today...

RonE
09-22-2005, 11:23 AM
I don't think any one particular player had a bigger impact than others on the game because different players had impact on different facets of the game as we know it today.

IMO the three players who could most be credited with the game as we see it today are:

1.) Ivan Lendl

2.) Boris Becker

3.) Andre Agassi

Let's begin with Lendl- he was the pioneer of work ethics and training- eat right, work out right. Before him there wasn't anyone who really abided by a controlled and calculated fitness regiment. He introduced it and now basically every player has to adhere to those fundamental procedures just to keep up physically. This in turn has contributed to the game being a lot more physical today than it ever was before.

We then have Becker- he was the first one to introduce the real power game. The mid 80's were also a time when new racquet technology was being introduced with the graphite replacing the wood and aluminium. Nothing like Becker had been seen in the game prior. His ferocious power off the serve and the ground really made an impact and so younger players started to beef up their strokes and hit with more pace.

Finally we have Andre Agassi- Agassi basically defied the accepted paradigm of ball striking by taking the return early standing inside the baseline and often times half volleying his groundstrokes with a lot of force. While very few players have his timing, there has been a noticeable trend in the last 10 years of new players adhering to that school of thought- take the ball early and stand inside the baseline.

So to conclude- Lendl, Becker and Agassi each influencing a certain characteristic and redifining it, together basically shaped the game as we see it today.

TheMightyFed
09-22-2005, 11:30 AM
I don't think any one particular player had a bigger impact than others on the game because different players had impact on different facets of the game as we know it today.

IMO the three players who could most be credited with the game as we see it today are:

1.) Ivan Lendl

2.) Boris Becker

3.) Andre Agassi

Let's begin with Lendl- he was the pioneer of work ethics and training- eat right, work out right. Before him there wasn't anyone who really abided by a controlled and calculated fitness regiment. He introduced it and now basically every player has to adhere to those fundamental procedures just to keep up physically. This in turn has contributed to the game being a lot more physical today than it ever was before.

We then have Becker- he was the first one to introduce the real power game. The mid 80's were also a time when new racquet technology was being introduced with the graphite replacing the wood and aluminium. Nothing like Becker had been seen in the game prior. His ferocious power off the serve and the ground really made an impact and so younger players started to beef up their strokes and hit with more pace.

Finally we have Andre Agassi- Agassi basically defied the accepted paradigm of ball striking by taking the return early standing inside the baseline and often times half volleying his groundstrokes with a lot of force. While very few players have his timing, there has been a noticeable trend in the last 10 years of new players adhering to that school of thought- take the ball early and stand inside the baseline.

So to conclude- Lendl, Becker and Agassi each influencing a certain characteristic and redifining it, together basically shaped the game as we see it today.
Agree... Becker and Agassi and impact is even more impressive as they were 17 and 18 when it happened...

MisterQ
09-22-2005, 01:11 PM
I don't think any one particular player had a bigger impact than others on the game because different players had impact on different facets of the game as we know it today.

IMO the three players who could most be credited with the game as we see it today are:

1.) Ivan Lendl

2.) Boris Becker

3.) Andre Agassi

Let's begin with Lendl- he was the pioneer of work ethics and training- eat right, work out right. Before him there wasn't anyone who really abided by a controlled and calculated fitness regiment. He introduced it and now basically every player has to adhere to those fundamental procedures just to keep up physically. This in turn has contributed to the game being a lot more physical today than it ever was before.

We then have Becker- he was the first one to introduce the real power game. The mid 80's were also a time when new racquet technology was being introduced with the graphite replacing the wood and aluminium. Nothing like Becker had been seen in the game prior. His ferocious power off the serve and the ground really made an impact and so younger players started to beef up their strokes and hit with more pace.

Finally we have Andre Agassi- Agassi basically defied the accepted paradigm of ball striking by taking the return early standing inside the baseline and often times half volleying his groundstrokes with a lot of force. While very few players have his timing, there has been a noticeable trend in the last 10 years of new players adhering to that school of thought- take the ball early and stand inside the baseline.

So to conclude- Lendl, Becker and Agassi each influencing a certain characteristic and redifining it, together basically shaped the game as we see it today.

Great post :worship: I agree with those three names.

joycomesmorning
09-22-2005, 01:16 PM
We may include the name Mike Agassi, Andre's Dad...many tennis authors salute his genius in how he taught the game.

jcm

adee-gee
09-22-2005, 01:19 PM
Agassi by a country mile in terms of how much he changed the game of tennis, and how much impact he had on the next generation.

Scotso
09-22-2005, 03:01 PM
Lendl made the game what it is today.

R.Federer
09-22-2005, 03:28 PM
Lendl - definitely the pioneer in the physical conditioning, forces everyone else to rise their physical condition

TheMightyFed
09-22-2005, 03:44 PM
Lendl - definitely the pioneer in the physical conditioning, forces everyone else to rise their physical condition
Yes Lendl was decisive, and I find that Fed has something of Lendl in his approach besides the all-round talent Lendl didn't have...

NYCtennisfan
09-22-2005, 05:40 PM
Originally Posted by RonE
I don't think any one particular player had a bigger impact than others on the game because different players had impact on different facets of the game as we know it today.

IMO the three players who could most be credited with the game as we see it today are:

1.) Ivan Lendl

2.) Boris Becker

3.) Andre Agassi

Let's begin with Lendl- he was the pioneer of work ethics and training- eat right, work out right. Before him there wasn't anyone who really abided by a controlled and calculated fitness regiment. He introduced it and now basically every player has to adhere to those fundamental procedures just to keep up physically. This in turn has contributed to the game being a lot more physical today than it ever was before.

We then have Becker- he was the first one to introduce the real power game. The mid 80's were also a time when new racquet technology was being introduced with the graphite replacing the wood and aluminium. Nothing like Becker had been seen in the game prior. His ferocious power off the serve and the ground really made an impact and so younger players started to beef up their strokes and hit with more pace.

Finally we have Andre Agassi- Agassi basically defied the accepted paradigm of ball striking by taking the return early standing inside the baseline and often times half volleying his groundstrokes with a lot of force. While very few players have his timing, there has been a noticeable trend in the last 10 years of new players adhering to that school of thought- take the ball early and stand inside the baseline.

So to conclude- Lendl, Becker and Agassi each influencing a certain characteristic and redifining it, together basically shaped the game as we see it today.

Completely agree.

alfonsojose
09-22-2005, 06:14 PM
I don't think any one particular player had a bigger impact than others on the game because different players had impact on different facets of the game as we know it today.

IMO the three players who could most be credited with the game as we see it today are:

1.) Ivan Lendl

2.) Boris Becker

3.) Andre Agassi

Let's begin with Lendl- he was the pioneer of work ethics and training- eat right, work out right. Before him there wasn't anyone who really abided by a controlled and calculated fitness regiment. He introduced it and now basically every player has to adhere to those fundamental procedures just to keep up physically. This in turn has contributed to the game being a lot more physical today than it ever was before.

We then have Becker- he was the first one to introduce the real power game. The mid 80's were also a time when new racquet technology was being introduced with the graphite replacing the wood and aluminium. Nothing like Becker had been seen in the game prior. His ferocious power off the serve and the ground really made an impact and so younger players started to beef up their strokes and hit with more pace.

Finally we have Andre Agassi- Agassi basically defied the accepted paradigm of ball striking by taking the return early standing inside the baseline and often times half volleying his groundstrokes with a lot of force. While very few players have his timing, there has been a noticeable trend in the last 10 years of new players adhering to that school of thought- take the ball early and stand inside the baseline.

So to conclude- Lendl, Becker and Agassi each influencing a certain characteristic and redifining it, together basically shaped the game as we see it today.
:bowdown:

Fedex
09-23-2005, 12:09 AM
Lendl.

Sjengster
09-23-2005, 12:41 AM
I actually tried to get a discussion like this going when I posted my "Borg on tennis myths" article, but hey-ho. I'll bump it up again...

Flibbertigibbet
09-23-2005, 05:13 AM
I don't think any one particular player had a bigger impact than others on the game because different players had impact on different facets of the game as we know it today.

IMO the three players who could most be credited with the game as we see it today are:

1.) Ivan Lendl

2.) Boris Becker

3.) Andre Agassi

Let's begin with Lendl- he was the pioneer of work ethics and training- eat right, work out right. Before him there wasn't anyone who really abided by a controlled and calculated fitness regiment. He introduced it and now basically every player has to adhere to those fundamental procedures just to keep up physically. This in turn has contributed to the game being a lot more physical today than it ever was before.

We then have Becker- he was the first one to introduce the real power game. The mid 80's were also a time when new racquet technology was being introduced with the graphite replacing the wood and aluminium. Nothing like Becker had been seen in the game prior. His ferocious power off the serve and the ground really made an impact and so younger players started to beef up their strokes and hit with more pace.

Finally we have Andre Agassi- Agassi basically defied the accepted paradigm of ball striking by taking the return early standing inside the baseline and often times half volleying his groundstrokes with a lot of force. While very few players have his timing, there has been a noticeable trend in the last 10 years of new players adhering to that school of thought- take the ball early and stand inside the baseline.

So to conclude- Lendl, Becker and Agassi each influencing a certain characteristic and redifining it, together basically shaped the game as we see it today.

Nice post. :bigclap: I suppose some might suggest Borg as well on that list - and possibly Connors and/or Laver might be in the top 5/6ish area.

oz_boz
09-23-2005, 02:55 PM
I'd say Lendl regarding the technical and physical parts, and McEnroe behaviour-wise.

kabuki
09-23-2005, 08:24 PM
Lendl and Agassi for the aforementioned reasons. In addition, Andre is the one who I associate with the use of swing volleys, which are commonplace nowadays.

joycomesmorning
09-23-2005, 11:30 PM
Lendl and Agassi for the aforementioned reasons. In addition, Andre is the one who I associate with the use of swing volleys, which are commonplace nowadays.
I don't know if any of you caught it today during the USA DC match with Belgium, but commentators Drysdale and Gilbert were talking about the swing volley from the baseline.

Gilbert commented that swing volley from the baseline was best performed by Federer and Agassi.

Drysdale commened that that shot did not exist in his day...and that the FIRST time he was even aware of that shot was from Agassi.

Gilbert said he knew who invented the shot...According to Gilbert, the shot was "invented" by Mike Agassi when he took a very young Andre onto racquetball courts as part of his training when he was a little kid...

Interesting.

jcm

pinky
09-24-2005, 12:30 AM
Agassi brought two other thing to modern tennis:

1) Hitting the ball not only early, but very hard as well! I remember when he was just the "new sensation", everyone was so amazed at how hard he was hitting every balls. At one of his first Roland Garros, he even broke a net, hitting a big forehand into it. The incident also added to the myth at this time :)
Of course, these days, lots of players hit the ball as hard or even harder as he did back then...

2) He was also one of the first to bring some "trendy" (jean shorts, long flashy underwear, long hairs etc... can say awful ;) ) look for a tennis player. Basically everyone was wearing the usual tennis shirt and short before that.
These days... well, there is not much left of it, and that's a good thing i guess ;)
Well, seems like Nadal traying something with his long pants and stretchy no sleeves shirts :)