Lleyton news and articles [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Lleyton news and articles

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KaseyL
07-23-2002, 12:46 PM
Haven't seen it posted yet... was in an Australian newspaper.
Trust Lleyton will turn out fine in a couple of days.

"Hewitt aced by mystery sickness
By ROBERT LUSETICH
July 22, 2002

LLEYTON HEWITT's preparations for his US Open title defence have been jolted by the re-emergence of a chronic illness that has forced his withdrawal from this week's Mercedes-Benz Cup in Los Angeles.

The world No.1 has not played a tournament since winning his first Wimbledon crown two weeks ago and, according to his agent Tom Ross, was unable to train last week while staying in Belgium with girlfriend Kim Clijsters.

He could not hold down food and has been prescribed an aggressive dose of antibiotics.

Ross said he hoped Hewitt, who has had health problems for two years, would resume training in "a matter of days".

Since 2000, Hewitt has suffered from a recurring mystery virus that affects his breathing and leaves his stomach extremely bloated.

An army of medical experts has been unable to properly diagnose the virus beyond identifying it as a form of viral gastroenteritis.

The 21-year-old contracted chicken pox at last year's Hopman Cup in Perth, forcing his withdrawal from the event. He clearly had not recovered at the Australian Open, where he appeared listless in losing in the first round to Spain's Alberto Martin.

After the chicken pox and with his immunity low, Hewitt was laid low for weeks by another virus that kept him from travelling with the Australian Davis Cup team to Argentina.

At his comeback tournament, in San Jose in late February, Hewitt said he was so ill he had not held a tennis racquet for five weeks.

"I was basically in a sick bed for a fair few weeks after the Australian Open," he said.

The US Open begins in five weeks.

The 21-year old South Australian also pulled out of a quarter-final match at the Ordina Open in the Netherlands - the week before Wimbledon - with the stomach virus.

However, he was seen practising at Wimbledon the day after pulling out, prompting his first round opponent at the All-England club, Jonas Bjorkman, to wonder whether Hewitt was really sick at all.

"I'm not sure if he has a stomach virus, maybe he just wanted a couple of days off," Bjorkman said. "I'm sure he will be sharp when we play."

But, during an interview with The Australian in San Jose at the Siebel Open, Hewitt said the illness had taken an enormous toll on him for two years.

"As strong as I've been over the past couple of years, to me, health-wise, I haven't been 100 per cent most of the time," he said.

"I've had to guts out a lot of matches. Even when I won (the Masters Cup) in Sydney, I didn't ever feel 100 per cent."

Hewitt said the illness depletes his energy.

"I've been to some homeopaths and they think I've got a virus in my trachea which has gone into my stomach," he said.

The onset of the symptoms leaves him "forgetting how to breathe normally" and with "a very bloated stomach".

During the weeks after the Australian Open, he lost a lot of weight.

Like his mate Pat Rafter, Hewitt has had an affinity for the US hardcourts.

After returning to competitive play in February, he rattled off 15 consecutive wins, including an epic win over Andre Agassi in the final at San Jose.

He then won the Indian Wells tournament and made it to the semi-finals in Miami.

This season, Hewitt has a 39-7 record and has won $US1.63 million ($2.9m), cementing his place as the world's best player.

The Australian"

Goonergal
07-23-2002, 02:00 PM
I worry a lot sometimes-I just can't understand how a guy as young and fit as LL gets ill so regulary :confused:

KaseyL
07-24-2002, 12:20 PM
Special message for the Lleykis :) :


In case you might doubt that Lleyton is with Kim at Stanford, I've found confirmation in a text from Reuters: he was seen watching Kim during her second round match against Tu yesterday.

The text of the article is on Clijsters City btw, and in the Classy Clijsters' Lounge.
Don't forget to check it out! (a bit of advertising won't hurt LOL) :)

KaseyL
07-24-2002, 02:34 PM
forgotten to post this one, :o

is a quote from an article by Matthew Cronin, tennisreportersnet, July 23...

Your thoughts please? :

"Kim Clijsters – who is in the worst slump of her young career – will take the court on Tuesday night against the scrappy Meilen Tu , while her boyfriend, the virus-ridden Lleyton Hewitt, will watch from the sidelines instead of being where he belongs – in L.A. playing the Mercedes-Benz Cup. "

pff :rolleyes:

Goonergal
07-24-2002, 03:15 PM
Originally posted by KaseyL
forgotten to post this one, :o

is a quote from an article by Matthew Cronin, tennisreportersnet, July 23...

Your thoughts please? :

"Kim Clijsters – who is in the worst slump of her young career – will take the court on Tuesday night against the scrappy Meilen Tu , while her boyfriend, the virus-ridden Lleyton Hewitt, will watch from the sidelines instead of being where he belongs – in L.A. playing the Mercedes-Benz Cup. "

pff :rolleyes:

My thoughts :fiery: :fiery: :fiery: :fiery:

KaseyL
07-24-2002, 10:34 PM
As of the moment that the news of Lleyton not playing LA came up, I had been wondering how long it would take before a journalist was going to comment on it ... :rolleyes:

Virgil
07-25-2002, 05:24 AM
I feel like I'm playing catch-up, what with the move from WTA to ATP World. By the way I'm digswing from WTA World. I'm just curious, does anyone else think that reporter's comment about the Mercedes Benz Cup was a sarcastic comment and somehow insinuates that Lleyton's not really sick? Seemed that way to me. Just wondering what you all think.

Goonergal
07-25-2002, 01:43 PM
Originally posted by Virgil
I feel like I'm playing catch-up, what with the move from WTA to ATP World. By the way I'm digswing from WTA World. I'm just curious, does anyone else think that reporter's comment about the Mercedes Benz Cup was a sarcastic comment and somehow insinuates that Lleyton's not really sick? Seemed that way to me. Just wondering what you all think.

:wavey:

Yeah I totally agree the comment was just a cheap dig at Lleyton, it makes you wonder y they dnt have anything else better to report on.:rolleyes:

Hania
07-26-2002, 11:24 AM
It's so pathetic imagine if he had played in L.A they'd all be putting him down and saying what bad form he's in so he can't win

Goonergal
07-27-2002, 09:36 AM
An extract I picked out from an Article I posted in the CCL

By the way, if Lleyton was sick enough to have to pull out of L.A. with a stomach virus, why was he sitting under an intense sun for more than an hour while Kim played? There were a few spots in shade.


:rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Goonergal
07-27-2002, 09:37 AM
Hewitt a marked man for US Open
| Sports Watch ... 26 July 2002 |

World No.1 Lleyton Hewitt is a marked man heading into next month's US Open.


Talk around the courts at the Mercedes-Benz Cup in Los Angeles centred on how to beat the 21-year-old South Australian at New York's Flushing Meadows.

One of Hewitt's great foes, Gustavo Kuerten, actually admitted he did not give himself much of a chance of toppling the in-form Hewitt at the US Open.

"I think Hewitt is the favourite," three-time French Open champion and former world number one, Kuerten, said.

Kuerten has been plagued by injuries this year and says he won't have the form to challenge Hewitt.

"I don't see myself with much of a chance to make the final," the 25-year-old Brazilian said.

One of America's hopes, Jan-Michael Gambill, named Hewitt the man to beat at the US Open.

"He's obviously the number one threat," Gambill said.

"Lleyton Hewitt is playing the best tennis in the world right now. He only lost two sets at Wimbledon and he probably shouldn't have lost those two sets."

Hewitt was the No.1 seed for this week's tournament in Los Angeles, which is a key warm-up event for the US Open, but he withdrew last week after picking up a stomach virus in Europe.

The Australian baseliner has dominated tennis this year, winning four tournaments including his first Wimbledon title. He also won the US Open last year, his first grand slam.

Hewitt is expected to return to the court next week for another US Open warm-up tournament in Toronto, Canada.

He'll go into the August 26 US Open a hot favourite to retain his title.

Kuerten said another former world No.1, Andre Agassi, had the best chance to knock off Hewitt at the US Open.

Gambill likes his own chances against Hewitt, despite losing to the Australian in all three of their meetings this year.

In their last match in Miami in March, Gambill claimed a set off Hewitt before losing 3-6 6-4 7-5.

"To beat Lleyton you have to get out there and really run him and not hit the ball to him," Gambill said.

"I think I've done it more than anyone else on the tour has.

"The key is to press him and that's what I've done well against him. But his fundamentals are better than anyone else."

Gambill, 25, reached the quarter-finals of the LA tournament with an easy 7-6 6-2 victory over Israel's Noam Okun.

Kuerten had a tougher match to reach the quarters, doing just enough to beat Britain's Martin Lee 7-5 7-6.

Brought to you by AAP.

KaseyL
07-29-2002, 10:52 PM
Here's an article coming from the South African press agency sapa yesterday:

Hewitt back on track

Toronto - Wimbledon champion Lleyton Hewitt faces Spaniard Felix Mantilla in a low-stress return to tennis as top seed starting on Monday at the $2.95 million Masters Series.

The Australian world number one, who has been fighting an infection since claiming his Wimbledon Championships title three weeks ago, has only been back in training for a few days.

Hewitt, with four titles this season and heading into the defence of the first Grand Slam of his career at next month's US Open, needs to kick-start his game on the hardcourts where he shines.

The 21-year-old pulled out of this week's Los Angeles event which begins the North American cement stand due to his fitness problem. But the fighting Aussie will surely have a renewed hunger for the game after his enforced health absence.

"I wasn't able to eat an awful lot. Fruit, sort of milk and water was basically my diet for a few days there," Hewitt said of the bug which seems to plague him regularly but which doctors cannot quite figure out.

"I couldn't have any sort of heavy foods and that was tough. But, now I'm back on track again. I feel like I'm fighting fit at the moment and hopefully I'm able to continue that through this whole American summer now."

END

Hope he doesn't get this problem again!

KaseyL
07-29-2002, 11:08 PM
And another article:

Source: Canadian Press, July 27, 2002

Canadian court hard for Hewitt to figure

World No.1 can't explain his lack of success at York facility

by Curt Rush

If Lleyton Hewitt, the fastest man in tennis, can run away with the U.S. Open and Wimbledon titles, why has he been so slow to take Canada? That question might haunt the world's No.1 player at the Tennis Masters Canada tournament in Toronto.

Qualifying play runs today and tomorrow. The main draw begins Monday at the National Tennis Centre at York University.

"It's hard to say" why he hasn't advanced past the second round the past two years in Canada, the Aussie said yesterday. It might be because it takes him longer to adjust to the hardcourts after coming off the grass at Wimbledon and maybe it has something to do with the fact that he hasn't peaked until the U.S. Open in late August.

Hewitt, the 2001 U.S. Open champion and 2002 Wimbledon title-holder, comes to Toronto on a 14-match winning streak and as the hottest act in pro tennis — a 5-foot-11 counter-puncher who still has no idea how he's able to track down the fastest serves and groundstrokes in the game.

"I've always been quick," the Aussie said from Stanford, Calif., in a conference call. "I haven't done a hell of a lot of work on it," although he admits to running the occasional wind sprint.

Hewitt, who brings a 39-7 won-lost record into Toronto, will face a strong field at York. "We've got 45 of the top 50 players in the world here," said Stacey Allaster, the tournament director.

"This is our strongest field ever."

Hewitt arrives with health concerns. The 21-year-old came down with a stomach virus after Wimbledon and had to skip the hardcourt tournament this week in Los Angeles. In fact, Hewitt hadn't even picked up a racquet until a few days ago and this will be his first hardcourt tournament of the summer.

After Wimbledon, he put his racquets away and "just wanted to put my feet up and sort of recognize the achievements that I've had." During that time, he also had what he describes as a "letdown feeling," which was later diagnosed as a stomach virus.

With Hewitt's success has come more pressure off the court. And that's something he's adjusting to. "That comes with the territory," he said, adding he wants as few distractions as possible because "I don't want to lose the reason why I became No.1. I don't want to lose sight of working hard, giving 100 per cent."

He calls himself a "driven person. I play with a lot of emotion. That's when I play my best tennis," he said.

Given his temperament and style, Hewitt is most often compared to the scrappy Jimmy Connors. But Hewitt finds he's more similar in style to the quiet, stoic Swede Mats Wilander.

"I play a similar game," Hewitt said. "You know, mainly from the back of the court, not the strongest guy, very quick, very consistent, good returns, good passing shots."

After Toronto, Hewitt will hit tournament stops in Cincinnati and Indianapolis. "It's going to be three extremely tough tournaments," he said.

KaseyL
07-29-2002, 11:11 PM
And a long last one:

Source: Canadian press, July 26, 2002

Hewitt looks to bounce back from viral infection and resume winning ways

NEIL DAVIDSON

TORONTO (CP) - Lleyton Hewitt hasn't had much success in Canada and he arrives at next week's Tennis Masters Series Canada tournament without having played since winning Wimbledon some three weeks ago.

In between, the 21-year-old Australian was laid low with a bout of viral gastroenteritis, a stomach bug that forced him to withdraw from the Mercedes-Benz Cup in Los Angeles. He only picked up a racket a few days ago. But Hewitt isn't concerned about any lack of focus at the $2.95-million US Canadian stop on the ATP Tour, played on a hard surface as opposed to Wimbledon's grass.

"I'm a very driven person. I'm very competitive and I don't enjoy losing," the world No. 1 said Friday in a conference call. "I'm going to go out there still and be as hungry as ever when I get out on the court."

Hewitt, a second-rounder loser the last two visits to Canada, carries a 14-match winning streak into Toronto. He is 39-7 this season with four titles, helping boost his career bankroll to $7.9 million U.S.

After defeating Argentina's David Nalbandian in straight sets to win Wimbledon, Hewitt said he felt off - "I thought it was just a bit of a letdown feeling."

He waited a week and then saw a doctor while in Belgium, the home to girlfriend Kim Clijsters. The doctor prescribed antibiotics and the lean 5-11 145-pounder, unable to handle most food, made do with fruit, milk and water while getting over the bug.

"I feel better now and hopefully, come Monday or Tuesday when I have to play, I'll be 100 per cent and be able to out everything on the line again."

Still Hewitt acknowledged that Grand Slams are now his No. 1 goal and that everything now is focused on peaking for the U.S. Open.

"When you win a Grand Slam (event), your priorities change," he explained. "You win a Slam, and you get to No. 1 and then the thing that drives you more and more is more Grand Slam. When I set my schedule at the start of the year I write in there with black pen the Davis Cup ties and the four Grand Slams and I work backwards from all the Slams to what the best preparation's going to be for me."

Hewitt attributed his modest showing in Canada the last two years - he was beaten Morocco's Hicham Arazi last year and France's Sebastien Grosjean in 2000 - to the fact he didn't peak each season until the U.S. Open, where he reached the semis in 2000 and won last year.

"It's taken me a little while to adjust from the grass to the hardcourt season," he acknowledged.

Hewitt found the surface in Montreal "lightning quick" last year, saying he preferred the feel of the Toronto courts.

"It should suit my game," he said.

Despite his youth, Hewitt seems comfortable with his perch atop the men's tennis mountain.
Does he think he is the No. 1 player in the world, he was asked?

"At the moment I'm 2,000 points ahead on the (ATP) Entry system and that's the rankings that I go by, on the full 52-year calendar," he said matter of factly. "It's hard to argue at the moment."

Hewitt, blessed with a fine return of serve and plenty of competitive juices, won his first ATP title at 16 in Adelaide.

"I've done everything a little quicker than I think a lot of people have expected," he added.

Goonergal
07-29-2002, 11:45 PM
July 26, 2002

ATP Media Teleconference

LLEYTON HEWITT

GREG SHARKO: Good afternoon to everyone and thank you for joining us for today's conference call with Lleyton Hewitt. Next week Lleyton returns to action in the Tennis Masters Toronto where he'll take his 14-match winning streak into the tournament. This will be Lleyton's first appearance since capturing his second Grand Slam title at Wimbledon on July 7th. Following Toronto, Lleyton will play the Western and Southern Financial Group Masters in Cincinnati, followed by the RCA Championships in Indianapolis. For the season, Lleyton Hewitt has a 39-7 match record with four titles, the Siebel Open in San Jose, Pacific Life Open in Indian Wells, Queen's Club in London and, of course, the Wimbledon championships, becoming the first Aussie to win there since Pat Cash in 1987. So thank you again for joining in on the call and at this time I will open it up for questions.

Q. I wondered if you could tell us how you're feeling since you withdrew from Los Angeles because of a viral problem. Can you tell us how you feel?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I feel a little bit better now. Yeah, I didn't pick up a racquet until a couple of days ago. You know, sort of got it pretty much straight after Wimbledon. Pretty much a letdown feeling. I probably waited a week or so to see a doctor, and then, you know, I'd been speaking to doctors back in Australia. Then when I was in Belgium, I went and saw the doctor and they prescribed some antibiotics for me that I had to take at the time. I couldn't do any exercise at all. So it was obviously disappointing. You know, I feel like I'm better now. I feel fresh at the moment. Hopefully come Monday or Tuesday when I have to play, I'll be a hundred percent and, you know, be able to put everything on the line again.

Q. Did you lose any weight? What kind of effect has it left you with?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I don't think so. You know, I wasn't able to eat an awful lot. Ate pretty much fruit, sort of milk and water was basically my diet for a few days there. I couldn't have any sort of heavy foods or anything, and that was tough. But, you know, now I'm sort of back on track again. You know, I feel like, you know, I'm fighting fit at the moment and hopefully I'm able to continue that, you know, through this whole American summer now.

Q. Do you feel having missed LA, that will put your training back? Obviously, you would have loved to play LA to get that match toughness on the hard courts again. What will it be like playing your first hard court tournament after Wimbledon?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it's always going to be tough. Last couple of years I don't think I've peaked really until the US Open. You know, the Canadian and Cincinnati and Indianapolis, I haven't played my best tennis I haven't felt the last couple of years, and it's taken me a little while to adjust from the grass to the hard court season. You know, come US Open the last couple years, I've peaked pretty much. I couldn't play much better, you know, making a semi and then going on and winning it last year. You know, sure, that was my plan, to play LA and get more matches. You know, I've got to reschedule now. Now I want to get as many matches as I can before the US Open. It's a good place to start. It's going to be still three extremely tough tournaments. I'll need to go out there and, you know, get all the matches and the match toughness before going into The Open again.

Q. Why has Canada not been a good place for you to put up some victories?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's hard to say. You know, I like playing there. But, you know, the court surface, I felt last year, was just lightning quick in Montreal, the court surface. It was hard coming off the grass and, you know, trying to get some rhythm back on hard court with the courts being so quick. I didn't find two years ago when I played in Toronto that being the case. You know, I'm looking forward to getting back there. You know, it should suit my game. It's really hard to say. You know, as I said before, it's taken me a little bit of time to, you know, get my footwork, get everything clicking again on the hard courts. You know, I've started in Toronto the last couple years, and maybe that's the reason why. You know, I can't do much about it this year. I was hoping to play LA and get some matches coming into two Masters Series events. Too late now. It's a minor setback. But I still feel like I'm fresh enough to do well.

Q. How long were you off the court with your virus? Was it the week after Wimbledon you stopped practicing pretty much?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I haven't practiced -- I didn't practice until about, you know, two days ago. Didn't pick up a racquet. What's that, two, two and a half weeks I guess after Wimbledon. Two and a half weeks, about that.

Q. A general question about men's tennis. I know Venus was quoted a few weeks ago saying she doesn't think it's very exciting. What do you think about it?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I think it's pretty good. Obviously, I'm sitting on the top of it at the moment. But there's a lot of young guys coming up. It's sort of that transition period, I guess, where, you know, people are going to have to start getting used to a lot of younger names that maybe people haven't heard of yet coming up and winning big tournaments. You know, it's not just this year that it's happened. You see Kuerten coming out and winning three French Opens the last three or four years, you've got Costa winning, that's a new name, on the clay you've got Ferrero pushing every time, Safin and myself winning Slams on hard courts and now myself on grass at Wimbledon, Roger Federer winning big tournaments on clay. There's a lot of young guys coming up. Roddick is another one, you know, an American. Sort of the ATP has been trying to get this whole next generation, changing the guard sort of thing going, I think at least a year and a half or so now. You know, it's slowly starting to happen. I think the public and the media have got to come to expect that. Obviously Sampras and Agassi, who you've seen so much at the top of the game for so many years now, you know, age is a factor. There's nothing much you can do about that. I still think they've got good matches left in them, no doubt about that, a lot of good tournaments left in them. But whether they're going to be around in five years' time, that's another question.

Q. Following up on that last question, the state of men's tennis, the parity, depth and balance, what do you think has gone into this? You're No. 1. Is it as hard to dominate now as ever? Anyone can kind of beat anyone?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, for sure. You know, you've got to be on your game. I think we all have seen that probably more so in the Australian Open earlier in the year and also, you know, at Wimbledon this year where anyone can beat anyone on any given day on any surface these days. You know, it's seven tough matches. You know, we don't get the 40-minute matches going through to the quarterfinal. It's as simple as that. Going into -- at the French Open, I was playing matches, you know, four hours long against qualifiers in the second and third round. You know, the type of depth that's in men's tennis at the moment. You know, that's why there's a lot of new names that I think the public, you know, haven't really seen a lot of coming out and, you know, making Round of 16s and quarterfinals in big tournaments these days.

Q. I think around the world after the last 12 months you've gotten a lot of respect for everything that you've done, appreciation, all that. How are things back home? I know the media in Australia are still somewhat slow to warm to you. You're always probably going to be compared to Patrick Rafter. How has the reception been back home lately?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, you know, I haven't been back since February basically, since the start of the year. So, you know, I'm not sure at the moment. But, you know, every time I go back home, it's an incredible reception. You know, the public is all over me back home. You know, it's a great feeling to have. Whenever I have to play a Davis Cup tie there or the whole Australian summer during January, it's an incredible feeling. It's my favorite time of the year, to go back and play in front of, you know, friends and family back there and get the reception that I've got, you know, every time I step on the tennis court. You know, even with some of the awards that I won, how well I did last year, you know, that means a lot, you know, to win a lot of people's choice awards and stuff like this. That really means a lot to me because that's coming, you know, not from any judges, you know, that's coming from the public. I think that means more than anything.

Q. Now that you are No. 1, is there any more pressure or expectation that you are sort of the main ambassador for tennis in dealings with the public, media, things like that?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Oh, I don't know. I'm sure there's a lot more things that I have to do. That comes with the territory. There's not a lot you can do about it. You've got to, you know, deal with it as well as possible. But, you know, also I don't want to lose the reason why I, you know, got to No. 1. I've won two Slams already at the age of 21. That's because I go out there and I don't want to lose sight of working hard, giving a hundred percent, not only in all my matches but on the practice court, as well. That's one of the main reasons why I think I've been able to get here and have so many big wins at such a young age.

Q. You have the No. 1 ranking, you won two of the last four Slams. Do you think you're definitely the No. 1 player in the world right now? You talked about how wide open it is. Do you think you are No. 1?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I think at the moment, you know, I'm 2000 points ahead on the entry system. That's the rankings that I go by. At the moment, you know, it's hard to argue I think. I've come out, had an incredible run basically since the US Open last year, then came home, obviously got the chicken pox at the start of the year, which was tough, especially in the Australian Open, one of the tournaments I'd love to do well in. Then I came over and felt like, you know, I played some of my best tennis. You know, I won most of my matches here in San Jose, Indian Wells, Miami, first two tournaments making the semis. Clay court season I played pretty well, not bad. Then since then I've won 14 matches on grass. It's sort of hard to argue with my performance basically since the US Open last year.

Q. When you look at these tournaments like Toronto and Cincinnati, Indianapolis, are you more focused on results or are you trying to prepare for the US Open? What's your focus going into those?

LLEYTON HEWITT: There's no doubt that it's mainly the US Open. You know, when you win a Grand Slam, your priorities change. You know, you win a Slam and you get to No. 1, the thing that drives you more and more is more Grand Slams. So when I set my schedule at the start of the year, I write in there with black pen the Davis Cup ties and the four Grand Slams, and I work backwards from all the Slams to what the best preparation is going to be for me. You know, I go out there, though, every time I step on the court and give everything I've got. But at the end of the day, I'm not going to get discouraged by if I do have an early loss, you know, in one or a couple of these next tournaments, as long as I'm peaking in four weeks' time basically.

Q. You seem to be pretty pleased with how you're perceived, your accomplishments. I'm wondering if you feel that you've gained the notoriety you should have for winning Wimbledon and being No. 1, especially because tennis doesn't seem to be as big a sport as it was maybe 15 years ago?

LLEYTON HEWITT: You know, I don't know. I haven't even -- you know, everywhere I've gone, it's been fine. I really haven't, you know, looked at too many things around the world since Wimbledon. I sort of stuck to myself. I've enjoyed it with family and friends. You know, from what I've heard, I can't argue with the sort of support and the congratulations that I've got from around the world. You know, to me it's been great.

Q. Do you think tennis should do anything to become more popular or are there just so many sports going on at the same time now that everyone seeks its level and that's it? Can tennis become more popular than it is?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I'm sure it can. You know, I don't have reasons off the top of my head how they can really do it. You know, I'm sure you can get more and more popular, try and get more people to come to matches and make it more public friendly, I guess. But, you know, I think, you know, there's been a few changes over the last few years that have tried to help in that way. I think, you know, the more we try and get the names of the younger guys who are going to be, you know, holding the stature of tennis up, you know, the next five to 10 years, the more you can get those names out in the spotlight and out in the public, you know, names that you haven't heard of, Robredo, Federer, Ferrero, these kind of names out there, the better off I think the game is going to be.

Q. Have you reached No. 1 and won the Grand Slam events that you've won quicker than you expected? When you're 15, 16 years old, everyone has a dream, but sometimes that's just a dream.

LLEYTON HEWITT: No doubt. You know, when I was 15, I was still playing junior tournaments in Australia, satellites. If you told me that five, six years ago that I was going to be in this situation now, you know, No. 1 in the world, won two Grand Slams, US Open and Wimbledon, then going to try and finish the year No. 1 for two years in a row, I would have told you you're joking. I've come on I think a lot quicker than a lot of people probably expected. You know, a lot's got to do with the hard work and I think self-belief, as well. I've taken it a step at a time and I think I've done everything, even winning my first ATP title at Adelaide, I've done everything a little bit quicker than a lot of people have expected. So it's a little bit surprising to me. But also I don't get wrapped up in winning my first title at 16 and then sort of be done with it. I've always wanted to keep improving and try and take that next step and try and, you know, find bigger goals to go for.

Q. Was there one tournament or one match that you played that you realized you could accomplish this, not just hope you would accomplish this?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know if there's one match. Not till you're actually playing that one match for it, you know, the US Open final against Sampras last year, until you're actually in that position where you're one match away, a few sets away from winning a Grand Slam, I don't think deep down you can actually realize that, "I'm going to be a Grand Slam champion." Until I actually got that match against Rafter, I had to play in Sydney playing for the -- to finish No. 1 last year, I'd never even really thought about getting to No. 1. Even after I won the Grand Slam, I was happy with the Grand Slam, and I didn't even go around chasing points at the end of the year too much to try and finish the year No. 1. I just went out there in every match and, you know, gave a hundred percent. If it fell my way, it fell my way.

Q. You talked about how winning a Grand Slam changes your life. Has life changed for you after the Wimbledon win? Getting offers, people wanting more of you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: A little bit. I tried after Wimbledon just, you know, putting the racquets away, basically putting the phone away as well for a few weeks, chilling out with my friends and family basically, not doing a hell of a lot. You know, I just wanted to put my feet up and sort of recognize the achievements that I've had, not only over Wimbledon but also over the last, you know, year or so because I really had very little time to reflect on all those big matches that I played. Since then, I'm not sure. Obviously, you get a lot more demands to do interviews and media stuff, to be places. You know, that comes with winning another Grand Slam, winning such a big Grand Slam, as well. You know, in Australia, Wimbledon I think is perceived as the biggest one in the world.

Q. Is focus going to be a bit of a problem?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Oh, I don't think so. I'm a very driven person, I guess. I'm very competitive. I don't enjoy losing. So I'm going to go out there still and be as hungry as ever when I get out on the court. You know, I'm still going to take that same motivation into every match that I step on the court.

Q. Your win at Wimbledon proved that quickness still reigns despite the power in the game. Talk about your quickness and what do you do to work on it? Do you think this is a model for other people who don't have the big power? Can you rely on quickness?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, well, you know, I think for sure. Look at me and take me as a role model just as I've looked at Andre Agassi and Michael Chang over the years, as well. You know, it's great to sort of counter-punch those big servers now and then. There's obviously a lot more of the bigger guys, Safin, Philippoussis, Sampras guys around. I've took advantage from looking at a guy like Agassi do well, you know, 10 years ago at Wimbledon, winning from the back of the court there. I decided not to change my game. Really, I go out there and I play my game, I return extremely well on grass, it puts a lot of pressure on the other guy's serve. I've been able to work on my serve a little bit, get a few more cheaper points, it helps on grass. You know, working on my speed, I really haven't done a hell of a lot to work on it. I've always been pretty quick. I do some wind sprints, stuff in the gym now and then. But, you know, you don't get that much time off to try and do it consistently week-in and week-out.

Q. Last time I saw you you had the hat backwards as a superstition. You've taken it off. Can you tell me the reason why? Will we continue to see you have this at the tournaments?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Have to wait and see how hot it is. I might have to wear it forwards. I've never really been superstitious. I just preferred to wear it backwards at the time. I took it off, I was getting a bit sick of wearing a hat. I don't know even why I did it. I cut my hair a bit shorter as well, which helped. (LMAO! :P)

Q. It seems like everyone makes a comparison when they try to describe you and your game, groundstrokes like Borg, intensity of Connors, style of Chang. Do you hear a lot of that? Do you mind that? Do you have someone in particular you modeled your game after?

LLEYTON HEWITT: You know, I hear it, but it doesn't really worry me either way. You know, if I win as many Slams as Borg, I'll be extremely happy. You know, I never really modeled my game after everyone. I enjoyed Mats Wilander, though. I play a little bit similar game to Mats on the court. You know, mainly from the back of the court, not the strongest guy, very quick, very consistent, good returns, good passing shots. He's probably one player that I probably liked watching as much as anyone, I think.

Q. If you modeled your game after him, he was still more the calm and cool guy, you kind of thrive on your emotions. Is that the key difference to Wilander?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, well, I just -- I play with a lot of emotion. You know, that's when I play my best tennis. I get fired up when I feel like I have to get fired up, and after a big point. If you watched, even Tim Henman was getting pretty fired up at Wimbledon this year. I think a lot more people are getting fired up on the court these days.

GREG SHARKO: Thanks, everyone, for joining us. Lleyton, thank you for your time. Have a good trip over to Toronto. Good luck this summer.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Thanks, mate.

Goonergal
07-30-2002, 12:29 AM
07/28/02

Lleyton Hewitt Thrills Fans

They screamed. They cheered. Lleyton Hewitt, the world's No. 1 player, was greeted like a rock star at Lever 2000 Day when he appeared Sunday for a question and answer session at the 2002 Tennis Masters Canada.

The fiery Australian and Wimbledon champ spent 15-minutes on the Main Stage, signing autographs while he answered fans' questions.

Clearly, Hewitt is as articulate off court as he is magical on it. Here's what he said: Asked whether he ever considered changing careers, he answered: "No, things are going alright at the moment. It was my dream to get to No. 1 in the world at the age of 21. " What was his first reaction after winning Wimbledon? "It was relief it was over. Two weeks is a long time with seven best-of-five matches."

What is his favorite city or tennis stadium? "Adelaide, my hometown. I haven't been home since February and it's nice to be able to sleep in your own bed and put your feet up. As for the stadium. Wimbledon Centre Court is a nice play to play with great atmosphere and a lot of tradition."

On whether it's hard to keep his relationship going with women's tennis star Kim Clijsters because they both travel so much, he responded: "Yeah, it's tough. But we try to play as many tournaments as we can together. And then we have weeks off. In one way it's easy because we both know the pressure of being in the top five in the world at such a young age."

How does he feel about so much travel? "You get sick of it," he said. "But getting better at tennis is one of the things that drives you on." Finally he was asked, what style of player does he like to play. "It doesn't matter really. I like to play guys with a big serve who attack me and those who stand back and rally. I find it easy to adjust to all surfaces."

Goonergal
07-30-2002, 10:49 AM
Shock first round exit for Hewitt in Toronto
By Steve Keating

TORONTO (Reuters) - World number one Lleyton Hewitt has crashed out 2-6 6-4 6-3 to 55th-ranked Felix Mantilla of Spain in the opening round of the $2.95 million Canada Tennis Masters.

The 21-year-old Australian, who has spent the last three weeks basking in the glow of his Wimbledon triumph, could not shake off the rust as he began the hardcourt season and the build-up to his U.S. Open title defence with a stunning defeat.

"It's tough to come out and play your first match on hardcourt after three weeks off," said Hewitt.

"I wasn't expecting heaps coming in here but I would have liked to get a few more matches in and get a little more match tough for the American hardcourt season. But he played extremely well, a lot better than I expected."

The top seed broke Mantilla's serve to go 2-1 up and again to lead 5-2 before serving out the opening set. But Mantilla hit back to take a 5-4 lead in the second before heavy rain forced a two-hour delay.

When the players returned to the floodlit court Mantilla, who has advanced beyond the second round just once in his last 16 tournaments, claimed the decisive break to level the match at one set apiece.

In the third set, Hewitt held serve only once as Mantilla registered his second career win over a world number one.

Goonergal
07-31-2002, 02:12 PM
LLEYTON HEWITT

PRESS CONFERENCE/CONFERENCE DE PRESSE

MATCH:

SCORE/RESULTAT:

MONDAY, JULY 29, 2002/LUNDI 29 JUILLET 2002

AN INTERVIEW WITH:

LLEYTON HEWITT

TOUR OFFICIAL: All right. Questions.

REPORTER: Lleyton, how much was him and how much was you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: He played extremely well. He played a little better than I thought he would play especially on High Court. His first week on hard court as well. It was very humid conditions out there tonight as well which obviously I think helped him the heavier it was. You know I came into net -- I actually felt like I hit the ball cleanly out there and I came into net, you know, a lot more times than I probably normally would on a High Court as well and I actually felt like I volleyed pretty well out there and, yeah, he just -- he stood back. The balls are heavy. Yeah the ... (Inaudible) ... Of balls we used and the conditions were very -- there was a lot of moisture in the air which didn't quite suit, you know, me matching up against him.

REPORTER: The fitness factor -- anything from last week or previously still with you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It would have been nice to have another day like I requested but I can't do much about it now. You know it was -- it was always going to be tough to come out and the first match on High Court after, you know, three weeks off and only picking up the racket a couple of days ago and, you know, I really didn't expect a hole heap coming in here but, you know, obviously I would have liked to have played a few more matches and got a bit more match tough going into the whole American summer but, you know, at the end of the day the U.S. Open is a big one for me and, you know, as long as I'm -- I have hit my strokes by then then I'll be happy.

REPORTER: Lleyton, what were you told when you asked for not to play on the first day? Did they tell you right away that you had to play on Day One?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No. I found out at 7:o0 o'clock on the golf course last night --

REPORTER: Really?

LLEYTON HEWITT: -- when I rang up to find out if my practice partner was playing or not. I was pretty happy with that.

REPORTER: Lleyton, what about the rain delay? How did that affect the momentum? I mean that's a -- that seemed to change everything.

LLEYTON HEWITT: In some ways it did. In some ways it -- probably the bigger thing for me was 6 -2, 4 -3 break. You know I sort of weathered the storm. He'd come out and play great tennis at the start of the second set and I was able to sort of put that behind me and I worked my way back in the match. I grinded it out and I got to 4-3 up a break. And I don't know if you remember but, you know, the first point I hit a good first serve. I came in on a backhand. He sort of hit a half flick, you know, looking the other way sort of pass me and, you know, that was a huge turning point I think because I double-faulted the next point and that gave him the momentum from then and even though it was 5-4, you know, when we went into the rain delay, it sort of had turned a little bit the momentum. He was sort of, you know, hanging his head at 4-3 set in a breakdown and he was able to -- you know, he'd come back and to his credit he kept fighting it out and he played the better tennis.

REPORTER: What was the mental thing between being on Centre Court at Wimbledon and here in Canada? How do you try to come back after such a big high?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's obviously a lot different but, you know, there is no doubt that me in particular get up for bigger matches and it is easier to get up for bigger matches, especially coming out after the rain delay, and the crowd is half full out there and trying to play. It's harder but that's when you have got to be still be able to win on this set of court or Wimbledon. Yeah, the court is still the same.

REPORTER: Lleyton, did he surprise you at all at how well he played tonight? He said tonight that he was even shocked about the level that he played at this evening because it seemed that you would give him a great rally. He would somehow find a way of returning what you gave him.

LLEYTON HEWITT: He played it extremely well as I said before but the conditions really helped him I think. He stood firmly (Ph) behind the baseline and he ran down everything. I actually felt like I hit the ball pretty clean from the back of the court. The court was -- you know maybe if we were playing in Montreal where there is lightning quick courts like last year then I might have had a bit better chance.

REPORTER: How does this affect your overall preparation for the American summer? What are you -- what are you going to change or what can you -- you know what would be the logistics sort of be doing?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not a lot. I have done pretty shitty(LMAO :p) in Canada every year and then I've gone on and made the semis in the U.S., you know, and won it. I actually felt like I saw the ball well out there. I was hitting it clean enough and, you know, I didn't win the big points. I had a lot of breakpoints. Even in that last game I had chances to break back and, you know, serve to stay in the match again and I wasn't able to do it and you come to, you know, U.S. Open time and, you know, I have got to be able to play the big points better because you get in those tough five set matches and there are only one or two points here or there and yet you can go from -- you know take an example the Roddick match last year there was probably only two or three points in it and I was able to get over that hurdle and then I went on to win it so, you know, I think taking your chances in the big matches is going to be the biggest difference hopefully.

REPORTER: Your mystery fitness problems that comes and goes, does that detract in any way from your preparation, or mentally, or anything like that but obviously it would be good to get it behind you but do you live with it?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, I can't do much about it. I am trying as hard as I can and I have been able to block it out pretty well in the big tournaments. I think I have been pretty mentally tough in the big time and have been able to deal with it and it hasn't affected me especially in the U.S. Open last year and Wimbledon this year so I can't see why it would be any different in three or four weeks time in New York.

REPORTER: One last question. At the Cincinnati and Indianapolis, what would be your goals or what would be your realistic preparation for -- what you obviously want to do is get back to the Open in great shape.

LLEYTON HEWITT: I just want to be hitting the ball well I think by the end of those two tournaments. I'm not going to -- I would love to win them -- win the tournaments and have that confidence of match hard, you know, match toughness under your belt going in and the confidence of sort of being in a winning feeling as well but, you know, I think if I gradually just improve day-by-day for the next week or so, then I'll give myself a good chance of doing well in Cincinatti and Indianapolis. Hopefully I'll get a few more matches under my belt than I did here then.

TOUR OFFICIAL: Any other questions?

Okay. Thanks.

Goonergal
08-02-2002, 12:07 PM
Hewitt in, Scud maybe for Davis Cup tie
Thursday, 1 August, 2002 - Tennis Australia

ADELAIDE, Aug 1 AAP - Lleyton Hewitt is a confirmed starter for next month's Davis Cup clash with India, but Mark Philippoussis is yet to declare his availability for the relegation play-off.

Cup team captain John Fitzgerald said world No.1 Hewitt was thrilled at the opportunity to play the September 20-22 tie in his hometown of Adelaide, on the Memorial Drive centre court he regards as his own. "He wants to come home," Fitzgerald told reporters at Memorial Drive today.

"He feels that this court at Memorial Drive is almost like playing in his backyard, he hasn't lost a lot of matches on this court over the years. It was the site where he won his first ATP tour event when he was 16, he beat (Andre) Agassi that week, he loves this court.

"He's keen to come here and he is going to play unless there's something catastrophic that happens between now and the end of the US Open."

KaseyL
08-07-2002, 08:01 PM
Re Lleyton's fine at Cincinnati:

Here's an article in Australian newspaper The Daily Telegraph about the issue:

Dummy spit may cost Lleyton $370,000
By PAUL MALONE, 08aug02
AN angry Lleyton Hewitt threatened to default a match in the rich Tennis Masters Series yesterday when his running battle with the media culminated in a fine which could reach $370,000.

Tennis' ultimate competitor considered boycotting his first round match in Cincinnati because of a fine which will be a minimum of $37,764 or half of his prizemoney, whichever is greater.
Hewitt could recieve as much as $740,180 if he wins the tournament.

Facing a possible $370,000 fine ... Australia's world No 1 tennis player Lleyton Hewitt during his 6-0 6-0 drubbing of US qualifier Robbie Ginepri in the Tennis Masters Series in Cincinnati.
ATP Tour spokesman JJ Carter said Hewitt had been told before the match he would be fined for not fulfilling a compulsory pre-tournament interview for the US tournament's host broadcast network ESPN.

Tour sources said the Wimbledon champion had first been requested to give the network an interview as far back as last Wednesday and had been asked again on Sunday and Monday before his first round match early yesterday (Sydney time).

Under the ATP Tour's "Stars" program to promote the sport and make players better known, every player at every tournament can be asked to provide a maximum of two hours per tournament for sponsor commitments, junior clinics or interviews on top of mandatory post-match conferences.
It is compulsory for players to be available as a condition of playing in a tournament.

A default from his first round match would have brought Hewitt a second fine for a late withdrawal from the tournament and he reconsidered.

Hewitt said he had offered to do the interview five minutes before beginning a 6-0 6-0 demolition of American qualifier Robby Ginepri but was told the timing would not suit the network.

"In the end, I wasn't going to walk on the court. " said Hewitt, who took his sense of injustice out on Ginepri in a match lasting 41 minutes. If I am going to be fined for going out, what is the point of me going out to play? I have never, ever done an interview before I play a match.
"My head was actually spinning before I went out and I'm surprised I didn't do what (Ginepri) did and miss every ball.
"They first asked me in the days leading up (to the tournament) and I said: 'No, I'm not doing it. I've done all my other stuff before and I've got all these other requests that I'm doing'. Then they throw another one at me and tried to make out that I've got to do this, otherwise I'm going to get fined."

Hewitt said he did not want to be like other players who do "not give 100 per cent" on court.

If Hewitt takes out the Cincinnati final on Monday morning (AEST), his winner's cheque would be $740,180 and his fine would be $370,090. The fine, which has drawn instant criticism from tennis observers for its size, can be appealed by Hewitt to an ATP board of chairmen.

Carter said the board could decide whether or not to reduce the fine. A $370,090 penalty would be 65 times what Russian Marat Safin was fined for not trying in a 2000 Australian Open defeat and 196 times the penalty imposed on Czech firebrand Michal Tabara for spitting at opponent Justin Gimelstob at the 2001 US Open.

It would also be 196 times the amount Hewitt was fined for "abuse" in the French Open when he called a linesman a "spastic".
Hewitt's fine yesterday is part of what has been interpreted as a crackdown on the top male players in their obligations to the sport and the fans. Andre Agassi was fined $148,837 for being a late withdrawal from Tennis Masters Canada tournament last week.

Hewitt said he could understand why the organisers of the Women's Tennis Association Tour were thought by some people to be "going stronger than the ATP at the moment. And I can't blame them."

The dispute with his own tour will consolidate Hewitt's reputation internationally as a prickly personality, despite his welcome and improved on-court behaviour over the past 12 months.
The crackdown on Hewitt and Agassi shows the ATP particularly wants to build the international profile of its nine-event Tennis Masters Series, of which Cincinnati is part.

Agassi, 32, said on Monday he was no longer able to play four weeks of tournaments in a row anymore, hence his withdrawal from the Toronto event last week a day after winning in California. "I don't think it's a great rule by any means," he said.
Tour insiders cannot remember a fine as high as the maximum fine Hewitt faces.

WHY MAKE HEWITT A SCAPEGOAT COMMENT

by PAUL MALONE

FOUR weeks ago, Lleyton Hewitt set out his terms for what sort of world No. 1 he wanted to be. Yesterday, the ATP Tour fined him for it.
"I've got to think about what it took to get me to No. 1 in the world. And I'm not going to go trying to change everything just because I'm No. 1," Hewitt said in a Wimbledon victory press conference.

In Hewitt's mind, this week, of all weeks, would have been when he needed to concentrate on his tennis.
He was coming off a stomach virus which forced his withdrawal from one tournament and left him so short of match practice in the next that he lost his first match.

It's Hewitt's single-minded determination that made yesterday's collision with the ATP inevitable. The fine, of up to 50 per cent of Hewitt's Cincinnati prizemoney, is excessive and must be reduced on appeal.

Czech Michal Tabara was fined 10 per cent of his prizemoney, or $1888, by Grand Slam officials for spitting at an opponent at the US Open last year.

If the ATP Tour is trying to engender a greater responsibility among top players, it is fighting the right war, even if it seems to have turned its heaviest artillery on the wrong man.

It's the inconsistency in fines in a sport which has made abuse of officials an artform. It's a bad state of affairs for the ATP Tour to be at loggerheads with a player who is looking like a dominant No 1 and it is in the interests of both the tour and Hewitt to find common ground on the question of what media access he should permit in future.

TENNIS FINES – HOW THEY HAVE RANGED

August 2002: Lleyton Hewitt fined between $37,764 and $370,090 for not doing an interview
July 2002: Andre Agassi fined $148,837 for withdrawing from 2002 Tennis Masters Canada without an injury
January 2000: Marat Safin fined $5665 for not trying in 2000 Australian Open defeat
September 2001: Michal Tabara fined $1888 for spitting at opponent at 2001 US Open
May 2001: Hewitt fined $1888 for abusing an on-court official during 2001 French Open
*All sums of money expressed in Australian dollars

budgirlbz
08-08-2002, 04:33 AM
Can someone post that interview with Lleyton talking about Kim!!!

Thanks.

Goonergal
08-08-2002, 10:09 AM
Hahaha LL Interview with Drysdale and Pat Mac :rolleyes: They better give him some credit!

Drysdale: Lleyton, let’s talk about the edge, the little edge there is between you and the ATP Tour. Yesterday, you had some harsh words with them regarding the Stars program and lack of sometimes interest in doing interviews when the Tour wants you to. Do you want to address that?

Lleyton: Oh, it’s something that, you know, annoys me when I’ve got so many things on my plate. You know, I’ve already done four things this week. Um, you know, I’ve done LA Times interviews, I’ve already done all these things, and for me, my managers had already spoken to the producers of ESPN, and they were happy for me just to talk after my match on the court like I am today. Then I find out two hours before the match yesterday that I was gonna get fined if I didn’t do an interview BEFORE the match; doesn’t matter if I spoke to you guys afterwards or not. So with an hour to go, I let the ATP know, all right, you set ‘em up outside the locker room, I’ll come and talk for five or ten minutes, and I’m fine whenever. So I was sitting in the locker room, waiting with my coach there, it got to five-to-one at the time, they come to me and say no, it’s too late then. Obviously that was a little bit disappointing for me. There’s not much I can do about it. I was in a situation where I was just about going to pull out yesterday. I was that disappointed in what had happened, and the outcome of everything that was going on, and no one could make a decision one way or another. To my credit, I came out here and I played well, and I’m through to the—what, the round of 16 now?—and um, obviously I want to try and help out these big tournaments as much as possible.

Drysdale: Played well, you haven’t lost a game yet in the tournament.

Lleyton: Yeah, thanks. (smiles)

Drysdale: Lleyton, it’s really important for us, and for tennis’ image, and for you as the number one player in the world, and obviously as that you’re sort of the spokesman for it. We really love talking to you when it’s all over, the fans want to hear from you, so we hope that we will be talking to you a lot throughout the rest of this hard court season.

Lleyton: Well, I hope I keep winning to be able to talk to you. (smiles)

Drysdale: Good man. Well done.

McEnroe: Well done, Lleyton, thanks.

Goonergal
08-08-2002, 10:17 AM
Anne-:bounce:

2002 WESTERN & SOUTHERN FINANCIAL GROUP MASTERS
CINCINNATI, OHIO

August 6, 2002

HEWITT/Ginepri
6-0, 6-0

An Interview With:

LLEYTON HEWITT

THE MODERATOR: Questions.

Q. Talk a bit about the match, it went by so quickly.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, well, he didn't play great obviously. He struggled a lot, but I just kept balls in play, what can I say. I practiced with him before and he hit the ball well. Then today just went out on the court, he looked very nervous right from the start. Apart from a few big serves here and there he really -- he struggled. I didn't have to do a lot, and was a bit surprised that I was able to keep any balls in considering all the crap that was going on before the match with the ATP trying to make me do another interview before I went out. Gonna fine me if I didn't do it. My head was actually spinning before I went out. I am surprised that I didn't do what he did and missed every ball out there.

Q. What were you asked to do?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Done all my commitments for the week. I'd never agreed to do another interview and then before the match, two hours before the match, I got told that I got to do an interview when I came in from practice. I said, that's ridiculous, before I play a match, I have never ever, ever done an interview the day before I play a match. So this crap is going on and in the end I wasn't going to walk out on the court, simple as that. They were going to fine me if I didn't walk out on the court. So ten minutes -- about an hour before I said, yeah, I will agree to do it. I said I will do five minutes before I go out. Nothing got solved. Then I am sitting in the locker room, my head is spinning, I didn't know what was going on; whether I was actually going to go out and play or not. It is a tough situation to be in, but when you got guys who can't make decisions within the ATP setup, it makes it pretty tough on everyone, I think, and I can really understand why the WTA, I think a lot of people see is going stronger than the ATP at the moment. I can't blame them.

Q. What did they actually want you to do, TV or radio?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I have done TV interviews during -- leading up to the tournament as it is anyway. I have done -- I got planned things to do as the week progresses that I have agreed to do. This pops up, I have never ever agreed to do this. It pops up and then they try to fine me before I have to play. At the end of the day ---

Q. When were you actually supposed to do the interview, before you went on the court?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I think they wanted in days leading up and I said, no, I am not doing it, I have done all my other stuff beforehand; I have got other stuff going on -- ongoing through the week and that's where the problem kicked up. I have got other interviews for US Open previews obviously as defending champion, and I have got all these other requests that I am doing. Then they throw another one at me and try to make out that I have got to do this otherwise I am going to get fined. That's when all hell broke loose then because if I am going to get fined for going out, what is the point of me going out and playing. I really don't understand that. It's tough for me to go out there and try and concentrate 100% on your game when you got 15,000 things going through your mind.

Q. How was it resolved?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's not revolved.

Q. Did you do the interview?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I haven't done anything. I have still got other stuff that's got to be done, obviously with trying to talk to the head of the ATP. No one can make decisions - obviously by their decisions last year with ISL, for any decisions like that, then I think everyone is in a lot of trouble.

Q. How close were you not to playing today?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I wasn't going to walk on the court. I don't see any point in me walking on the court not giving 100% when I step on the court. We have seen guys in the past. I know everyone in this room has seen -- I am not going to mention names -- but there's so many guys who just show up and play for the money and then walk off. It doesn't matter. I wear my heart on my sleeve every time I step on the tennis court. If that's going to be ab issue when I go out there and play then I don't see a point in me going out there if my heart is not in it and I am competing for the right reasons.

Q. You mentioned something about obviously the women's Tour having a lot of exposure now and everything. Do you sense an urgency within yourself about where the men's game is or do you think it's just kind of everybody taking it to so seriously?

LLEYTON HEWITT: As in what?

Q. In terms of like in relation to the women's game, do you think the men's game is behind?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It didn't help with the whole ISL deal last year. That definitely hurt the men's game. It is a tough situation as it is anyway because we are in a transition kind of period with the whole young guys coming up and obviously Sampras, Agassi are so well known around the world, Rafter, everyone knows these guys, it's tough. Federer who lost yesterday, Kafelnikov, a whole list of big names that lost yesterday. It's tough for the tournament. Canas is a great player, but he came out and won a Masters series events last week, and that makes it tough I think for the Tour as it is. When you make decisions like that on top of it, then it's going to make it even tougher.

Q. Do you have any sympathy for the fact the Tour is trying desperately to get the Tour sold out there and pushing the sport and needs somebody like yourself as the No. 1 to help do it?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I can understand, you know, but that's even more reason not to push me before I go out and play. That's the way I see it. Sure, I can help, I think everyone can help, but the position I am in, then sure I can help it even more. I think is -- myself, Safin, Ferrero, these young guys coming up, Roddick, guys who are already half out there who can try and make the game bigger and better, sure, I have done so many things already leading into the US Open, coming into the US Open, after winning Wimbledon, at the end of the day when I can (inaudible) when it happens an hour, an hour and a half before you have got to play first round Masters Series event, you sort of wonder who is making the right decisions here; where is it all going.

Q. Do you wonder how players like in the NBA and baseball they talk before games, whether it is the 7th game of the NBA Finals; whether it's the biggest game in the World Series, other athletes in other sports do talk before the game, do you wonder how they do it?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, it's something if I was, I think, if you are growing up doing it, then you'd have a lot better understanding of it. I think -- what am I 21, I have never done it so far, this is my fifth year on Tour, and I have never done it. I know Pat Rafter has never done it in his whole career. It's different sports. If you had it and one day they decided that every time before every match you are going to do this, then I don't see a problem with it. The things is, you know, one time before your match when I am preparing to play, I am warmed up already, you know, I am in the locker room, I don't leave the locker room for that hour, and then comes at 50 minutes before I said, all right, I will do this interview, because I want to just -- that's how badly I wanted to get out there and play, not worry about getting fined, whether I was going to walk on the court, what my attitude was like, I wanted to get it all out of the way. I gave them 50 minutes to an hour, bring the camera crew, I said, bring the crew in the corner of the locker room, I will do the interview; then I will worry about my match. I am sitting there 'til five minutes to one, not knowing if -- what is going to happen. I ended up sending Jason, they said, no, we have don't have enough time. That's the thing that I think hurts in the end because are they looking after the players'best interest.

Q. Who asked you to do the interview?

LLEYTON HEWITT: A few guys in the ATP. But we have been having talks with the CEO, the last ongoing weeks let alone the last 24, 48 hours about the whole thing. He hasn't seemed to have enough guts to put himself on the line and make the big calls.

Q. Do you think it hurts -- I mean, not just yourself but a lot of agents control a lot of what the players do with media requests, things like that. Would you feel better if one universal authority said, here's your interview list for the week, this is what you need to do instead of an agent telling you one thing; ATP needing something else, then maybe individual media come up to you on your own?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, in some ways, but the other, you know, there's so many things that the player, I don't think, needs to deal with as well. There's requests after obviously you win a tournament, let alone you win Wimbledon or US Open, the requests are that long, that to try and for a player, I think, to say that you have got to do all these, I think that's ridiculous. That's too tough. I think the agents are there to try and pick out what is in the player's best interest obviously. I think it happens in all sports, I am getting -- I can't -- I know football back home, stuff like that, that happens. I can't speak for American sport, but in tennis it's always sort of been the way. That's the only way I have sort have known growing up, so I try and deal with that as much as possible. I try and give myself or give everybody as much notice as possible as well about doing the things because that way it makes it easier on everybody.

Q. Does it take a price to pay to be No. 1, though, to have those kind of requests around you --

LLEYTON HEWITT: There's definitely more things you have got to do. But I am willing to do that. That's part of being No. 1 in the world; that's part of being a professional athlete. I am still learning. I have got no problem with that. But there's things you have got to do and you have got to put yourself out there be in the spotlight. I have got no problem with that. But then again, I want to sort of have a schedule and sort of know what I have got to do ahead of time as well. I don't want anything sort of affecting the way that I play. At the end of the day, I have got to No. 1 because I train hard, I work extremely hard, and I don't want to get to No. 1 and then do all the media and everything can sort of get - not psyched out - but worrying about doing the media and whatever, rather than what you did to get to No. 1; how hard you had to work to get there.

Q. Do you ever enjoy doing interviews or are they always like a task?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I enjoy doing them. Everyone keeps saying about Australia media, but there's Australia media that I talk to all the time. But it's not always on an interview basis, it is on a friendship basis talking about the footie back home stuff like that. There's only been a few people in Australia who have sort of got on the wrong side with, I think both them against me and me against them. Apart from that, the Australian media has been fine, every time I go home I speak to, you know, all the networks when I arrive home, I have been speaking to reporters who -- Australians who work in London and also in Australia over the last few weeks as well. I think -- I enjoy it some interviews. Obviously if it always adds up, it becomes a bit of a chore. I did an interview a couple of weeks ago with the L.A. times and it was fun. I really enjoyed it. They are the kind of interviews I think that are better when -- I thought it was a 15 minute interview, we ended up talking for over an hour because just kept rolling, and I got no problem with that.

Q. Is your understanding that you are getting fined or you don't know?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I have good no idea, mate. I don't know what is going on. I am trying to play tennis.

Q. Ask you about New York since you refused to be interviews by the NEW YORK TIMES can I ask you about New York then. Was that moment last year when you won a blur or was it something that you really remembered in detail when you won last year?

LLEYTON HEWITT: US Open?

Q. Yes.

LLEYTON HEWITT: I pretty much remember most of it, I think. Obviously I think as soon as you win you are sort of in awe of the whole situation. Winning the US Open, winning your first Grand Slam, I think more importantly, everything sort of hits you at once, I guess. I hadn't been in that much of a spotlight before even 16 year old winning a tournament always sort of did everything before everyone sort of thought you would, but when you win a Grand Slam and it's sort of your dream come true then I think it hits you a little bit quicker.

Q. Did your life change at that instant do you think?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It changed a little bit, as you know you probably people are coming at you more, as a Grand Slam Champion as I am sure Costa and Johansson and these guys are starting to experience. After you win a Slam people obviously have a lot more respect for you as a tennis player but also they want to get a win over a guy who has just won a Slam as well. Everything sort of changed. For some reason I felt like I handled it really well. I felt like it was, you know, I always dreamt of winning a Grand Slam, always believed that I was able to, and when the time came, I still believed there was more to go on with and I think I showed that by going out at the Masters Cup and trying to win that as well.

Q. When you go back to New York this year somebody will think you of you as like the champion and that wonderful moment you had with Pete; some people will remember the James Blake incident. How do you think you will be received when you go back to New York this time?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I hope well. I was able to forget about it during the tournament and go on with it. Everything has been fine pretty much since then. You know, I actually felt like the crowd was -- from that moment on I felt like the crowd was pretty good. Obviously against Roddick in the quarters and Pete in the final, the crowd was going to be going for them. If it comes to Australia, then the crowd goes for me. It's not much you can do about that. But when I played Kafelnikov in the semis, I felt like the crowd was great when you got two guys from different countries playing, I think they wanted to see a young guy have an opportunity at winning his first Grand Slam.

Q. Do you have any regrets about the Blake episode, even if it's just, you know, I wish that the whatever-perception, the misunderstanding had never occurred, something to that effect?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I think you always, you know, when people, you know, sort of perceiving it in the wrong way, I think it always hurts a little bit. You are disappointed in some way or you'd love it not to happen. But it happened, and people saw it their way and everyone's got their opinion. I can't change that. I go out there and thank God I was able to be very mentally tough and block everything out and I knew I was playing good tennis and sort of move on from there, and get the job done.

Q. It will be a different experience for you first time you will be defending a Grand Slam title. How do you think you will approach that?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Really don't know. I am going in with the same preparation as last year obviously playing the same tournaments now, taking a week off before the Open and I feel like before the US Open I think for me it's important to take a week off, and it's going to be really nice. I spoke to Pat a few times after he won the US Open, he said, just to go back there at a place that meant so much to you and, you know, won so many big matches and changed your life, you know, he nearly bowed out in the first round to Arazi the first year, but he was able to go on and win back-to-back and hopefully I can go in there and I am sure the first few rounds are maybe going to be the toughest.

Q. The match today, being that it was pretty easy and you have had -- you were sick, then last week didn't go so well. Does it make it a little hard for you to gauge where your game is at?

LLEYTON HEWITT: A little bit. But I am playing doubles this week, which is great. I had a win yesterday somehow, didn't play great but we got through. I think it's good for me now to get some -- try and get as many matches as possible. Sure, I'd love to win here in Cincinnati going to do everything in my power to win here and both in Indy next week. If I don't I still want to be gradually improving, improving for the big one at the US Open.

Q. Given the schedule, have you hit the right mix the last year maybe even sort of -- you talked about overscheduling yourself and not taxing yourself too much before a Slam, have you found the right mix?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, sort of, I think. I think for the US Open definitely. As long as -- I feel like I'd like to play a fair few matches before going into it. But then also the week off, I think is extremely important. Hard court in this -- if the heat is like it has been the last few days here it's going to take the toll. I don't think going out there and playing the week before is the best thing with my game. Australian Open, I really don't know what is best for me just yet. Obviously the chicken pox and everything sort of up in the air earlier this year, and for the French, Wimbledon, Wimbledon I pulled out of the tournament beforehand. But I had a lot of matches under my belt which I think helped. Because I think on grass, particularly you have to do well and get a feeling for the grass court because the grass court season is that short.

Q. From all appearances, at least from what Kim has said, you are good to her and you certainly have shown a different side in that you have somebody like that in your life. Is that a side that we just don't get to see too much of because you are all about the intensity on the court and maybe there is this flip-side of the personality that we don't get a chance to view too much?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I think I am the first to admit I am very competitive. As soon as I step on the court I am intensity, I want to win. Like most of the players out here, I give 100% every time I step on the tennis court. I think a lot of people perceive that but then they will think that I don't know -- he's probably nasty off the court whatever, I am actually pretty shy. When I went to school back in Adelaide I was shy. I didn't argue with anyone, I had a lot of friends there. But it's sort of the same on the Tour. In the locker room I sort of keep to myself. I do my own thing. I have got a lot of friends at home that I keep in contact with. Obviously with Kim, that all helps as well. But she understands the pressures that I am going through and I understand what she's going through. So that side of it, I think is all sort of a bonus for both of us.

Q. As a shy guy growing up did you have the courage to ask a girl out?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Actually didn't have that many girlfriends. When Kim and I started it was -- I don't know, actually, it was a little bit of both. But I didn't have a lot of guts when it comes to that.

Q. Did you just kind of chat her up a little bit or just ask her out?

LLEYTON HEWITT: We were -- when was it -- 2000 Australian Open and I'd just won Adelaide and Sydney that year, and I arrived late and I was chatting with one of my mates who I played juniors with, Nathan, he was playing doubles at the Australian Open. He knew Kim through juniors. I was sitting together, I just sat down and that is how we got introduced. She asked me if I wanted to play mixed doubles. I think she knew we could get a wildcard. I couldn't because I committed to my sister about three months before that. That's how it started.

Q. She literally asked you out?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, she asked me to go on the tennis court. I don't know if it was because of my looks or anything to do with that.

fcap
08-08-2002, 11:43 AM
OMG!! My new favourite lleyton interview!! He talked abbot kim!! I'd iek to conrgatulate Marly for helping lleyton and out and sucedding!!:p:p

budgirlbz
08-08-2002, 01:09 PM
Hi Cilla!

Aawww....I always melt when I read this...I hope we hear him talk about Kim and their relationship more often...

Were they ever interviewed together? Like on t.v.?

Goonergal
08-08-2002, 02:25 PM
I don't think so, well not that I know of. I think that would really only happen if they both won the same GS Tournie *cough* The USO 2002 ;) Plus Kim could never drag Lleyton to go on some cheesy Chatshow :o :p

budgirlbz
08-08-2002, 05:37 PM
absolutely right, i don't think that lleyton will go for it and talk about their relationship!!!

it's good too see them keeping it for themselves, makes us melt more when we hear them talk about each other once in awhile...


awwwwwwwwwwww...........

budgirlbz
08-09-2002, 04:12 AM
interview...found this..

excerpt from TV interview Aug 7

Drysdale: Lleyton, let’s talk about the edge, the little edge there is between you and the ATP Tour. Yesterday, you had some harsh words with them regarding the Stars program and lack of sometimes interest in doing interviews when the Tour wants you to. Do you want to address that?

Lleyton: Oh, it’s something that, you know, annoys me when I’ve got so many things on my plate. You know, I’ve already done four things this week. Um, you know, I’ve done LA Times interviews, I’ve already done all these things, and for me, my managers had already spoken to the producers of ESPN, and they were happy for me just to talk after my match on the court like I am today. Then I find out two hours before the match yesterday that I was gonna get fined if I didn’t do an interview BEFORE the match; doesn’t matter if I spoke to you guys afterwards or not. So with an hour to go, I let the ATP know, all right, you set ‘em up outside the locker room, I’ll come and talk for five or ten minutes, and I’m fine whenever. So I was sitting in the locker room, waiting with my coach there, it got to five-to-one at the time, they come to me and say no, it’s too late then. Obviously that was a little bit disappointing for me. There’s not much I can do about it. I was in a situation where I was just about going to pull out yesterday. I was that disappointed in what had happened, and the outcome of everything that was going on, and no one could make a decision one way or another. To my credit, I came out here and I played well, and I’m through to the—what, the round of 16 now?—and um, obviously I want to try and help out these big tournaments as much as possible.

Drysdale: Played well, you haven’t lost a game yet in the tournament.

Lleyton: Yeah, thanks. (smiles)

Drysdale: Lleyton, it’s really important for us, and for tennis’ image, and for you as the number one player in the world, and obviously as that you’re sort of the spokesman for it. We really love talking to you when it’s all over, the fans want to hear from you, so we hope that we will be talking to you a lot throughout the rest of this hard court season.

Lleyton: Well, I hope I keep winning to be able to talk to you. (smiles)

Drysdale: Good man. Well done.

McEnroe: Well done, Lleyton, thanks.

KaseyL
08-09-2002, 01:25 PM
Article in the Daily Telegraph, August 9:

Consensus says Lleyton in the wrong

By PAUL MALONE and JOHN THIRSK
09aug02

LLEYTON Hewitt's Davis Cup teammate Wayne Arthurs has pleaded with the Wimbledon champion to change his frosty attitude to the media for his own good.

Hewitt's appeal against a fine of up to $370,000 is headed to an ATP Tour committee which could include American Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe, one of the television commentators he snubbed for a pre-arranged interview in Cincinnati on Tuesday to incur the fine.

Hewitt claims he never agreed to the interview, had already completed his press commitments for the week and will appeal.

After Arthurs landed one of the best wins of his career, a 4-6 6-3 7-6 (7-4) verdict over fading great Pete Sampras to join Hewitt in the third round of the Tennis Masters Series, he said it was regrettable Hewitt has had problems in dealing with the media.

"He might have to look at that side of things a little harder than he has in the past," Arthurs said. "My opinion of Lleyton is he's actually a nice guy. He has to do something about it, (but) I don't know what it is."

Even Channel 9's John Newcombe, who brought Hewitt into the Davis Cup fold six years ago, was rejected at Wimbledon. Newcombe approached Hewitt after a practice session before the tournament but was told: "I'm not giving any interviews."

Newcombe said yesterday he did not want to enter into the controversy but Davis Cup coach Wally Masur, who also works as a commentator for Fox Sports, backed Hewitt and didn't even bother asking Hewitt for a pre-tournament interview at Wimbledon.

"I knew what the answer would be," Masur said. "My opinion is that a pre-tournament interview is bad timing.

"Look at Wimbledon, the biggest event in the world, Lleyton was happy to do up to six post-match interviews.

"Can you imagine how someone like Mike Tyson, Michael Jordan or David Beckham would react if the media asked them for an interview an hour before they went into action."

An ATP spokesperson confirmed yesterday that Hewitt was given several opportunties to do an interview with ESPN.

"We would never ask any player to do an interview 25 minutes before their match," the spokesperson said.

"This was not a time we nominated.

"The ESPN commentators Cliff Drysdale and Patrick McEnroe were in the booth waiting to call the match and it was impossible for them to come down at that time.

"The players know the rules that a fine is the consequences and Lleyton had plenty of time to fulfil his responsibility."

Australian Open CEO Paul McNamee said there was no agreement with tournament host broadcaster Channel 7 for pre-match interviews.

"However, we do endeavour to get a quick grab from the players who are involved in prime TV matches at night," he said.

But John Alexander, a former Davis Cup player and now Channel 7 commentator agrees with Arthurs that the world No. 1 has a responsibility towards the media.

"Lleyton is the person most people want to talk to and as the No. 1 he has an obligation greater than anyone else," he said. "If the prerequisite of the tournament was for Lleyton to do a an interview before his opening match, then he is really in breach of contract.

"I can see ESPN's point of view because he is playing an American event and is the defending US Open champion starting in New York in two weeks.

"Top athletes should work with the media because they will kill any sport if they don't."

Hewitt confirmed he would appeal against the fine of 50 per cent of his tournament prizemoney, which would be $740,180 if he wins the final.

"I plan to win it (the appeal)," Hewitt said after winning 5-0 (retired) over injured Italian Davide Sanguinetti.

His manager Tom Ross met ATP chief executive Mark Miles, who was hoping Hewitt would spend the same amount of time promoting the sport as past No. 1s.

Hewitt criticised the ATP over his fine and said he could not blame people who thought organisers of the women's tour were "going stronger than the ATP".

ATP Tour vice-president Brad Drewett said criticism of the size of the fine did not take into account that the players voted for the 50 per cent figure when the Stars program was introduced four years ago.

An ATP spokesperson said top 10 players were usually fined $37,764 when found to have breached the rules of the Stars program, which requires players to find time for a maximum of two hours promotional work per tournament.

END

Your opinions?

Goonergal
08-09-2002, 02:03 PM
Hewitt solves chickenpox mystery

http://eur.news1.yimg.com/eur.yimg.com/xp/reuters_ids/20020808/i/1365324655.jpg

CINCINNATI, Ohio (Reuters) - Lleyton Hewitt believes a visit to his old school was responsible for the bout of chickenpox which ruined his chances at this year's Australian Open.


"After the Masters Cup and the Davis Cup final (in December) I went to my primary school to speak to the kids in front of everyone," the Australian said on Thursday.


"On the way out the principal wanted everyone to shake my hand and give me a high five as I walked out."


The world number one became ill 10 days before the Australian Open in January this year and was beaten in the first round by Alberto Martin while still suffering from the symptoms.


Afterwards he missed six weeks from the tennis circuit while he recovered.


"I actually didn't even think about it until one of the mothers came up to me a few weeks later," Hewitt said.


"She said 'I guess that's probably where you got the chicken pox from.' I don't know which kid gave it to me though."


Suffering from the illness doesn't seem to have done the 21-year-old any harm though.


Since his recovery he has won four titles, including his second grand slam at Wimbledon four weeks ago.

KaseyL
08-09-2002, 02:32 PM
Thanks for this article!

So that's where he catched the virus.

I hope his docs have taken precautions since, as he never had any child's desease. Getting these as an adult is not always harmless at all, even sometimes very dangerous.

KaseyL
08-17-2002, 08:44 PM
Lleyton is very outspoken in this article!

Lleyton to sacrifice No 1

By LEO SCHLINK in London
18aug02
AUSTRALIA's world No 1 Lleyton Hewitt says the professional tennis circuit is a badly-run "circus" and he'd rather stay at home and watch the Adelaide Crows.

On the eve off the US Open the defending champion has blasted the ATP, saying: "You have to ask why men's tennis is struggling and you have to start by looking at the top.

"I'll change my schedule next year if the ATP keep up with this garbage.

"Next year I couldn't give two hoots about No 1. There are times when you feel like (walking away) and pulling on the boots and playing footy.

"It's a great sport – if the ATP would just get out of the way."

In an amazing revelation from a man who rarely opens up to the media, Hewitt said:

He is considering legal action against the ATP after being fined almost $200,000 for not doing a television interview before his first-round match at last week's Cincinnati Tennis Masters.

He regards the tour as "a circus" and is dismayed at the direction professional tennis is heading under the ATP banner.

Players are being burnt out prematurely by being forced to protect their world rankings with ridiculous scheduling.

He will only play lead-up tournaments to the grand slam and Davis Cup events next year. He is relieved the ITF runs the grand slams, not the ATP.

And he sometimes feels like he could walk away from tennis, instead "pulling on the boots and playing football".

Hewitt, 21, has outlined plans to retain his world No 1 ranking this year before reassessing his commitment to the sport because of "harassment from officials".

"When things happen like in Cincinnati, when you think about the way everything has been run, it's just not much fun."

Hewitt has fired a volley at the ATP, insisting it has double-faulted on a range of key issues.

"You look at what the ATP's done. They went ahead with the whole ISL deal, which collapsed after they were warned the numbers didn't add up," he said. "The bonus pool is lost, the whole player retirement fund has been put on hold and the prizemoney is still coming down.

"The whole thing is disappointing. It's lucky the ITF (International Tennis Federation) runs the grand slams, not the ATP."

Hewitt said he would sacrifice the No 1 ranking to play fewer tournaments, most of which would be used to peak for the grand slam events – the Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon and US Open – and Davis Cup.

"Wimbledon has set me up really well for this year and, after getting No 1 last year, you get hungrier and you want it again," he said.

"But next year I'm going to try to peak for the majors, not go around to chase so many smaller tournaments and put up with some of the ATP requirements.

"I get less pleasure out of winning the tournaments on tour than I used to because of the way they (the ATP staff) carry on. I'd rather be back home in Adelaide watching the Crows play.

"You look at a guy like Pat's (Rafter) schedule, where he plays 12-13 tournaments instead of 17-18. I'd be happy doing that. It's better for my health and it's better for my tennis."

In his first few years on tour, Hewitt routinely took off much of February, April and July, turning his back on appearance and bonus pool money.

In the process, he has won 16 tournaments, including two grand slams, and reached No 1 faster than any man in history.

Hewitt said players had suffered under the bonus pool arrangement, which involves them being guaranteed incentives based on the previous year's results – as long as they played a specified number of tournaments in the current season.

"You look at a guy like Marat Safin, who played with an injured back just so he could fulfil his ATP commitment," he said.

"It's not good for his health, it's not good for the game of tennis and they (ATP) are wanting guys to go out there and play."

An ATP spokesperson last night refused to comment on Hewitt's remarks.

END

Your comments?

kevijntje
08-17-2002, 09:23 PM
wow it looks like Lleyton is really mad , he has some point though good points though

ikke
08-17-2002, 09:27 PM
Thanks!!
Yeah he must be mad, but imo he is right!! I like his attitude!
I wonder how many tournaments kim will play next year iff lleyton will only play 12

KaseyL
08-17-2002, 09:30 PM
Yep, it looks like the ATP made him very angry.

I think he makes a good point too re the ATP organisation, esp. the number of tournaments.

KaseyL
08-18-2002, 02:55 PM
Another article re Lleyton:

US ambush awaits Hewitt, says Newk

Paul Malone, tennis
17aug02

LLEYTON Hewitt has been warned by his former Davis Cup captain John Newcombe that he is walking into a media ambush in New York next week.

Newcombe yesterday urged Hewitt to "keep his head down" when he returned as defending US Open champion to the city where he was accused of making racist comments in a match.

In its coverage of Hewitt's Wimbledon final win five weeks ago, the New York Daily News said he was a "worry . . . as the standard bearer for the sport, as a human being".

The Australian's preparation for the US Open, which starts on Monday week, will now consist of practice after he was a third-round casualty in the Indianapolis tournament yesterday, losing 7-6 (7-3), 6-4 to Britain's Greg Rusedski.

Hewitt, who also is mistrustful of most Australian media representatives, will appeal against a fine of $192,000 by the ATP Tour last week for not doing a pre-arranged television interview.

"You can't beat the media, so you gradually have to learn not to take everything to heart," said Newcombe, who will add his support to Hewitt at Flushing Meadow, where he will head up Channel 9's telecast commentary team.

"It's not a healthy situation for Lleyton that he has a number of American media people who feel quite antagonistic towards him.

"He seems to produce some of his best tennis in the face of adversity, but eventually it's going to wear at your soul. It's much easier if you do it the other way.

"If you are (ranked) No. 10 and they are against you, so what – they're not going to write much because you're not that big news. The king is news.

"I would hope Lleyton keeps a very low profile and just plays tennis. There are a number of them around to get him."

Last September, the New York Post newspaper accused Hewitt of making racist comments when he called for linesman Marion Johnson to be replaced during a first-week match against American James Blake.

Hewitt denied allegations his comments – that the umpire "tell me what the similarity is" – were a reference to the shared African-American heritage of both Blake and Johnson. The New York Daily News said it was impossible to forget that Hewitt had not apologised to the New York public, although conceding he "has (since) shown considerably more temperance".

Newcombe said: "He started playing better right after that match (against Blake) and he did keep his head down."

Hewitt's hefty fine came after several months in which there had been some unrest among international media over the amount of time the world No. 1 was willing to set aside for interviews.

On court, the wear-and-tear injuries which often plague the US hardcourt season have hit hard and cloud title considerations.

Hewitt has needed treatment for a back injury at times during the North American leg of the tour and shoulder injuries have clouded the participation of out-of-form Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson and world No. 5 Tim Henman, who defaulted his third-round match in Indianapolis.

"There are areas of my game I feel I can just touch up on and sharpen. But I don't feel too bad going into the Open," Hewitt said.

END

I agree with Newcombe that you can't beat the media, however I don't agree that Lleyton should keep a low profile. Anything he would do, might be explained differently anyway, he'll get critics anyhow.

Imo he better should be himself, if he wants to keep a low profile, fine, although a missed opportunity for his own PR, and if he wants to share his opinion re the ATP, let him. He is one of the few who can afford themselves to stand up and speak out their mind.

KaseyL
08-19-2002, 12:00 PM
FYI- all Lleykis that is:

There is a new interview with Carl Maes in Belgian press.
In this interview Carl Maes talks about his years with Kim, including the working relationship with her dad, shares some interesting views re her future and his new role in the tennis world.
I’ll finish a translation in full ASAP, meanwhile you’ll find the highlights in the CCLounge.
One of his quotes:
“The combination Lleyton-Kim will become very important now.”

Goonergal
08-19-2002, 01:05 PM
Hewitt 'could quit tennis'

http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38205000/jpg/_38205135_hewitt300.jpg
Hewitt has been heavily critical of the ATP

Lleyton Hewitt could follow the legendary Bjorn Borg in walking away from the game early, according to Australian Open chief executive Paul McNamee.
McNamee spoke out after the world number one was left fuming at a $103,000 fine handed out to him at the Cincinnati Masters earlier this month.

Hewitt called the ATP a badly-run "circus" and threatened to skip many of their tournaments from next year.

Former Wimbledon doubles champion McNamee said the ATP should learn from the loss of Borg, who walked away from the game when just 27 years old.

"Let's look at history here and sort out the problems in the sport which Lleyton has taken the lid off," McNamee told the Australian Associated Press (AAP).

"They have been there for a while and nobody has been prepared to talk about them. Go back 20 years...we lost a number one (Bjorn Borg)."

Borg retired in 1982 after a dispute over his plans for a four-month break from tennis.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38205000/jpg/_38205133_borg150.jpg
Borg walked away at the age of 27


"He wasn't allowed direct entry into tournaments as the number one in the world," McNamee said.

"And he had to play qualifying at Las Vegas and Monte Carlo which he had won.

"Because Grand Slams were independent he got a wildcard into the French Open, which he won, and he lost in the final of Wimbledon and the US Open. And then he quit.

"That is what happened. So we should take this pretty seriously."

Hewitt was fined after refusing to conduct an interview with host broadcasters ESPN before his first-round match in Cincinnati.

He told Sydney's Sunday Telegraph: "I'll change my schedule next year if the ATP keep up with this garbage.

"Next year I couldn't give two hoots about the number one ranking."

Tennis Australia (TA) president Geoff Pollard has written to the ATP to raise his concern about the level of the fine, AAP reported.

fcap
08-19-2002, 01:08 PM
ERRR lleyt wont quit!!! If he dose he'll play AFL and dats ok!! :p:p

Jackie
08-19-2002, 01:36 PM
At least if he's playing for the Crows, his matches will make it to TV here

KaseyL
08-19-2002, 02:36 PM
Thanks for the article, Cilla!

A similar article in this regard, from Reuters:

McNamee fears rebellion from world number one Hewitt

MELBOURNE (Reuters) - The ATP should take seriously a threat by Australia's Lleyton Hewitt to walk away from his number one ranking, Australian Open chief executive Paul McNamee warned.

Hewitt last week called the governing body of men's tennis a badly-run "circus" after he had been fined half his $206,000 runners-up prize money in Cincinnati for refusing to conduct an interview with host broadcasters ESPN before his first round match earlier this month.

The fine prompted Hewitt to say he could in future ignore ATP rules governing how many tournaments a player is obliged to compete in and that he would play where, and when, he wanted, regardless of what that would mean to his ranking.

"There are times when you feel like (walking away)...it is a great sport if the ATP would just get out of the way," the 21-year-old said.

McNamee, a former Wimbledon doubles champion, urged the ATP to consider Hewitt's comments carefully.

"Let's look at history here and sort out the problems in the sport which Lleyton has taken the lid off," McNamee told Australian Associated Press (AAP).

"They (the problems) have been there for a while and nobody has been prepared to talk about them. Go back 20 years... we lost a number one (Bjorn Borg)," he added.

TWO HOOTS

McNamee said Borg was lost to the game in 1982 aged just 27 after a dispute over the Swede's plans for a four-month break from the sport.

"He wasn't allowed direct entry into tournaments as the number one in the world," McNamee said.

"And he had to play qualifying at Las Vegas and Monte Carlo which he had won.

"Because grand slams were independent he got a wildcard into the French Open, which he won, and he lost in the final of Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. And then he quit.

"That is what happened. So we should take this pretty seriously."

Hewitt told Sydney's Sunday Telegraph newspaper last week that he was sick and tired of the governing body of men's tennis.

"I'll change my schedule next year if the ATP keep up with this garbage," the newspaper quoted Hewitt as saying.

"Next year I couldn't give two hoots about the No.1 ranking."

Tennis Australia (TA) president Geoff Pollard has written to the ATP to raise his concern about the level of the fine, AAP reported.

END

The same article is on Eurosport btw.

lurker
08-19-2002, 03:01 PM
So many guys will thank Lleyton in the future if he makes good on his threat, or if the ATP backs down now before calling him on it. I'm really glad Lleyton is around to stick out his neck on this issue...everyone else is too afraid to, and Lleyton has so much self-confidence and so much going for him in life that this isn't really a sacrifice.

Whatever they say about the media in New York, there are plenty of tennis fans out there who love Lleyton. I will miss his participation in the ATP event that plays near my home...I know it will not be on his list of preparation tournaments. I can see that tournament, which relies on his star presence and that of Agassi, will die out when these two fail to show up next year. No one else inside the top ten this year showed up either.

shakya
08-19-2002, 04:22 PM
whoeeeeeeeeeeehoooooooooooooooooeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeee


goooooo lleyton !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
man hes doing good hehe

fuck the atp

C'mon_Lley
08-20-2002, 04:40 AM
RCA Championships notebook
August 18, 2002

www.indystar.com



Wishes come true

For attendance and TV purposes, tournament director Rob MacGill no doubt wishes top seed Lleyton Hewitt had made today's final.

Hewitt lost in the third round to Greg Rusedski, but Hewitt made some other wishes come true earlier in the week.

In conjunction with the RCA Championships and the Make-A-Wish Foundation, teen-agers Evan West and Katie Collier got to meet Hewitt.

West, a Center Grove High School senior, is in remission from central nervous system lymphoma. Collier, a New Palestine sophomore, suffers from Hodgkin's disease. She completed chemotherapy and radiation earlier this summer and is awaiting a report from her most recent tests.

The top-ranked Hewitt, a 21-year-old Australian, met with Collier and West for about a half-hour on Tuesday. He asked about their interests and their tennis games and answered questions.

West plays tennis for Center Grove. Collier hopes to play this spring but missed last season because of her illness.

"It was so awesome," Collier said. "He talked directly to us. He wasn't looking around or in a big hurry. It was like he wasn't even a superstar. He was a normal person."

West agreed with that assessment.

"He was very down-to-earth," West said. "It was a great experience. I was happy he was so willing to do it."

West and Collier had no idea when they were invited to the tournament that they would get to meet Hewitt.

"They told us we probably would get to meet one of the players, but we didn't know who it was," said Jeff West, Evan's father. "It couldn't have been better."

Afterward, Hewitt posed for pictures with the teen-agers and their families and signed autographs.


Kudos to Lley for doing this!!! :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

KaseyL
08-20-2002, 10:32 PM
Thanks! Good of him to spend some time for this!

Goonergal
08-21-2002, 03:35 PM
Serena and Hewitt given top seed spots for U.S. Open
http://eur.news1.yimg.com/eur.yimg.com/xp/reuters_ids/20020821/i/2866553837.jpg

NEW YORK (Reuters) - World number one's Serena Williams and Lleyton Hewitt were awarded the top seeds on Tuesday in the women's and men's draws for next week's U.S. Open.


The year's final grand slam event begins on Monday and runs until September 8.


Williams is the reigning French Open and Wimbledon champion and is attempting to become the first woman to capture three grand slam titles in the same year since Martina Hingis did so in 1997.


The 20-year-old American, who captured her first Grand Slam title here in 1999, halted Hingis' streak of five consecutive U.S. Opens at which she was the top seed.


Switzerland's Hingis is seeded ninth this year.


Hewitt will try to become the first man since his Australian compatriot Patrick Rafter in 1997 and 1998 to defend his U.S. Open crown.


The world number one captured his second career grand slam title in July at Wimbledon.


In the women's draw, two-time defending champion Venus Williams -- Serena's sister -- received the number two seed and is followed by fellow Americans Jennifer Capriati and Lindsay Davenport.


This marks the first time since 1983 that Americans occupy the top four women's seeds.


Yugoslavia's Jelena Dokic is seeded fifth, followed by American Monica Seles and Belgians Kim Clijsters and Justine Henin.


Amelie Mauresmo of France rounds out the top 10.


On the men's side, 2000 champion Marat Safin of Russia is the second seed.


Next is Germany's Tommy Haas, Russia's Yevgeny Kafelnikov and Britain's Tim Henman.


Andre Agassi, a two-time U.S. Open champion, is the sixth seed and Spaniards Juan Carlos Ferrero, Albert Costa and Carlos Moya occupy the next three spots.


Sebastien Grosjean of France rounds out the top 10 on the men's side.

Goonergal
08-21-2002, 05:03 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/us_open/2193119.stm

Hewitt leaves rivals standing http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38206000/gif/_38206908_hewitt_supuf.gif

http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38196000/jpg/_38196263_hewitt300.jpg
Hewitt's never-say-die attitude sets him apart

Before winning the 2001 US Open, Lleyton Hewitt was accused in some quarters of not being quite good enough to win the major titles.
It is certainly not an accusation that could be levelled at him now, with the 21-year-old following up his maiden Grand Slam with wins in the prestigious Tennis Masters Cup and at Wimbledon.

In truth, the current world number one has one of the most potent weapons in the men's game.

"There's always a chance you're going to lose, but it never enters my mind when I'm out there playing"

-Lleyton Hewitt


While his fellow young contenders have failed to marry talent with consistency, Hewitt has shown a loathing of defeat which has drawn comparisons with Jimmy Connors.

Even when playing below his best, Hewitt has an ability to harry, fight and retrieve which outshines every other player on the tour.

It is a quality the player himself cites as his greatest.

"A lot of guys would probably opt for the easier option rather than hang out there and keep fighting," he said recently.

"There's always a chance that you're going to lose, but it never enters my mind when I'm out there playing."

When Andre Agassi first took on Hewitt, then aged 16, he lost in straight sets, saying later: "I didn't give him enough respect - I think I was convinced he would go away."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38196000/jpg/_38196273_hewitt150.jpg
Hewitt destroyed Sampras to win the 2001 US Open


That forlorn hope has accounted for many more after Agassi but if the combative attitude serves him well on the court, it has not won him favour off it.

Controversy has followed Hewitt throughout his career, not least at last year's Open when he was accused of making racist remarks during a second-round match against James Blake.

But if anything, the fiery Australian thrives on, and perhaps needs, the 'me-against-them' scenario.

No surprise, then, that his hero is the fictional boxer Rocky Balboa, the ultimate underdog.

At the Cincinnati Masters, he became embroiled in an argument with the ATP for his refusal to carry out a five-minute interview with a television broadcaster, and threatened not to play his first-round match.

He made it to the court, though, and thrashed the unfortunate Robby Ginepri 6-0 6-0 before launching into a bitter tirade about what he perceived as unfair treatment.

His testy relations with the media have not helped his popularity in his home country, where comparisons with Patrick Rafter had already shown him in an unfavourable light.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38196000/jpg/_38196340_hewittl150.jpg
Hewitt uses lines from 'Rocky' films as inspiration


But there is nothing that Australia likes more than a winner.

And Hewitt's current status as the world's best player, along with his devotion to the Davis Cup, cause has gone some way to improving his image.

Not that any of that will bother the player, who craves winning as much as he repels the attention that goes with it.

He refuses to allow external influences to upset his much-vaunted focus, another intimidating part of his increasing armoury.

Add to that a serve which has developed in pace and variety even since last year's US Open win, and it is difficult to argue against another Hewitt victory.

Like Connors before him, Hewitt shows no sign of maturing and softening his attitude towards those who dare to criticise.

But to do so would blunt the very weapon which has him peering down at his rivals from a very lofty height.

Goonergal
08-21-2002, 07:37 PM
Hewitt and Safin handed brutal Open draws


NEW YORK (Reuters) - Top seed and defending champion Lleyton Hewitt was handed a tough draw at next week's U.S. Open on Wednesday where he could meet red-hot Briton Greg Rusedski in the second round.


The Australian faces France's Nicolas Coutelot to open his defence but will then come up against former runner-up Rusedski if the unseeded Briton beats a qualifier.


The British number two will take heart from his superb form last week that helped him beat Hewitt on the way to winning the RCA Championships in Indianapolis.


Second seed and 2000 champion Marat Safin also faces a tough time.


The Russian meets German Nicolas Kiefer in his opener and could then play former world number one Gustavo Kuerten in round two.


Four-time champion Pete Sampras meets Spaniard Albert Portas while Andre Agassi, seeded sixth, plays fellow American Robby Ginepri.


In the women's draw, top seed Serena Williams faces wildcard Corina Moriariu who has just returned to the circuit after having treatment for leukaemia.


Defending champion Venus Williams - seeded second - faces a qualifier, while ninth seed Martina Hingis, on the comeback trail after injury, meets American Marissa Irvin.


Hingis is in the same quarter of the draw as Venus and Monica Seles.

Goonergal
08-22-2002, 12:15 PM
Hewitt offers hope for the shorter starter


NEW YORK (Reuters) - Lleyton Hewitt and his brand of baseline combat is changing the face of modern tennis, according to U.S. Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe.


Almost single-handedly the young Australian, who next week defends his U.S. Open title, has blunted the power of the big servers and is giving hope to all youngsters who want to pick up the game.


"What happened to all the 6 ft 3 ins (1.905 m) guys with big serves who dominated tennis?" McEnroe, whose elder brother John won seven grand slam titles by serve-volleying.


"I still get this comment from people all the time, how come men's tennis is so boring, it's all about serving. I am like, have you looked __ do you understand who is in the top 10.


"It's like absurd. That there's this sort of this idea out there that it is a server's game. It's completely the opposite."


Former women's world number one Billie Jean King, now America's Fed Cup captain, said Hewitt was doing wonders for the sport.


"How can you not love Hewitt? He's incredible for all of us ones that aren't 6 ft 2 ins ... he's giving everybody hope again to play this sport.


"This guy loves it so much he just loves every ball, he's just like give me the ball," she said after Wednesday's draw for next week's U.S. Open.


"God, I love him. How can you not love this guy?"

Billie Jean!! :eek: :D

ikke
08-22-2002, 12:22 PM
Thanks Cilla for the articals!!
lol at billie Jean, kim it is time to get jealous

KaseyL
08-22-2002, 12:26 PM
Thanks for all the articles! :kiss:

LOL @ Julie; seems Lleyton has quite an admirer in the form of BJ King! :hearts:

Angele
08-22-2002, 12:31 PM
LMAO at BJ King :D

KaseyL
08-22-2002, 07:33 PM
Coach Bollettieri Sizes Up U.S. Open

The Associated Press, Thu 22 Aug 2002

NEW YORK (AP) — Andre Agassi was his greatest student and Anna Kournikova his biggest disappointment.

Serena Williams worked on her timing under his tutelage the past week while rehabbing her sore left knee. Pete Sampras used to practice on his courts and got a long, stern letter from him recently on what it will take to win a Grand Slam title again.

The world's most famous tennis coach, 71-year-old Nick Bollettieri has befriended and, at times, feuded with many of the biggest names in the game. He's discovered and developed some and occasionally put them up in his house. He's seen them leave his academy in a huff and return with remorse. He's broken off with more than a few stars and made up with most, egos clashing and reconciling.

He runs his tennis academy in Florida like a boot camp for jocks, working 10 hours a day and overseeing a battery of coaches who drill and drive kids to their limit. He's a motivator and teacher, producing champions year after year.

Admire him or not, Bollettieri knows tennis and what it takes to win. With the U.S. Open starting Monday, no one is better at sizing up the field than this peripatetic man with the dark, leathery tan and wraparound shades.

As usual, he has multiple rooting interests on both sides of the main draw and the juniors.

There are Serena and Venus Williams, who have often come to his academy with their father to practice, and No. 11 Daniela Hantuchova of Slovakia, who was with Bollettieri for three years until last year. He has a sentimental favorite in former protege Monica Seles, and a junior hopeful in Maria Sharapova, a 15-year-old Russian.

In the men's draw, Bollettieri has long worked with Tommy Haas of Germany, seeded No. 3, and he has a potential star in Wimbledon juniors champ Todd Reid of Australia. And though it's been nine years since he worked with Agassi, who came to the academy at 14, Bollettieri retains a warm affection for him and a respect for the man he's become.

Bollettieri has something to say about everyone and everything in the game. Herewith are his thoughts on the state of some of the top players:

—Defending champion and No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt: ``Every stallion's got to be rested. The last couple of weeks he's had to be massaged on the court. If you have to bet, you bet on Hewitt. He's the best in the world today, but he's been working his butt off.''

—Andre Agassi: ``If Andre plays Hewitt (they could meet in the semifinals), Hewitt comes out ahead. Andre's stronger, Hewitt's faster. Andre creates shots, Hewitt puts those shots away. Andre moves the ball around better than Hewitt, Hewitt hits more outright winners. In the serve category, Hewitt is ahead. Everything stacks up for Hewitt, and the telling toll is that Andre is 11 years older. But the New York crowd likes Andre. That could make a big difference.''

—Pete Sampras: ``I told Pete that he should go back to being an aggressive player. Come in, baby, come in. Don't worry about your tongue wagging. Let your shoulders droop and play your game, which is coming forward. The biggest differences in Pete Sampras today are that he's a split second slower and he's making a lot of mistakes off the running forehand. He's got to pick up his confidence, let the other players know he's still king. Right now, he's playing scared.''

—Serena and Venus Williams: ``To beat both of them and not have one in the final is difficult to believe. Serena's left knee is not up to par, but she'll be ready. They're both way above everybody else right now.''

—Jennifer Capriati: ``She's struggling a bit and I don't think she can win the U.S. Open. I think her serve will break down.''

—Martina Hingis: ``For her to win it, she would have to attack about 50 percent more and play very close to the baseline. I don't think Venus and Serena will ever allow her to be No. 1 or 2 again.''

—Monica Seles: ``I'd love to see her do it, but it would be difficult for her to get through two weeks of pounding and go all the way.''

—Daniela Hantuchova: ``Watch out for her. She's not too far off of winning a big one. She moves beautifully.''

—Anna Kournikova: ``Her mom had too much to do with her career and never let a coach really develop the game that Anna should have gone to. Her strokes are too long and too flat from the baseline and she never developed the serve. Did her modeling get in the way? I don't think so. The problems with her techniques started a long time ago. She came to me at 9 1/2 and she was here about five or six years. We put a lot of effort into her. It disappoints me tremendously because I think Anna Kournikova is a tremendous girl.''

END of article

He's right imo re Lleyton, although I don't see any advantage for Agassi having the home crowd behind him...

Pfff he even doesn't mention Kim...

KaseyL
08-22-2002, 08:50 PM
Here's some interesting news:

RUSEDSKI DRAW COULD CHANGE
By Andy Schooler

Greg Rusedski's position in the US Open draw could change following Thomas Johansson's withdrawal.

The British number two had been drawn in the same section as defending champion Lleyton Hewitt with a second-round meeting likely.

But 12th seed Johansson has withdrawn due to a shoulder injury and that means the draw could now be rearranged with Rusedski a possible mover.

Johansson pulling out means a 33rd seed will be created and with Rusedski ranked 33 in the world, that is likely to be him.

The 33rd seed could then take Johansson's place in the draw.

The Swede had been due to face Fernando Vicente in his opening match.

If Rusedski does move to Johansson's position, he could not meet Hewitt until the quarter-finals.

END

I so hope this would be the case!

KaseyL
08-22-2002, 10:12 PM
Wertheim's US Open predictions re Lleyton:

1. Lleyton Hewitt: Ordinarily, one would think his bush-league feud with the ATP would detract from his focus, but this is a player who uses discord as fuel. Even so, he has a brutal draw that likely has him facing James Blake in Round 3, Richard Krajicek in Round 4 and Andre Agassi in the semis.

PREDICTIONS

Semifinals: Hewitt vs. Agassi; Haas vs. Fernando Gonzalez
Final: Hewitt vs. Haas
Champion: Haas

Goonergal
08-22-2002, 11:20 PM
I think he's forgetting about Tommy's Shoulder :o Oh I hope greg takes Thomas' place :bounce:

C'mon_Lley
08-22-2002, 11:26 PM
Originally posted by Lleyton's_Chick

"How can you not love Hewitt? He's incredible for all of us ones that aren't 6 ft 2 ins ... he's giving everybody hope again to play this sport.


"This guy loves it so much he just loves every ball, he's just like give me the ball," she said after Wednesday's draw for next week's U.S. Open.


"God, I love him. How can you not love this guy?"

Billie Jean!! :eek: :D


LMAO BJK!!! :eek: :eek: :D

C'mon_Lley
08-22-2002, 11:32 PM
I hope Greg moves. ;)

I don't think Tommy will win. He's not quite there yet. But hey, anything can happen! :)

C'mon_Lley
08-23-2002, 01:49 AM
August 21, 2002

Aussie Rules

By Curry Kirkpatrick

ESPN The Magazine


The new face of men's tennis was going to be Russian, a huge grinning wolfhound swatting the game into untold nether reaches of muscle and power. Or Spanish. Or Argentine. Or Brazilian, its happy-go-lucky personality sauntering to a samba backbeat. Or maybe -- post-Sampras, post-Agassi -- the new face of men's tennis was going to be another American, a tall, strong hero from the heartland who would not only Save the Men's Game but might even stand a chance of whipping those You-Know-Who sisters after they got bored pounding the poor women and took on the other half of humanity. But because of strain or pressure or hormonal disorder or the stock market, all those new faces seem to have faded into the rearview mirror on tennis' road to perdition. Instead, rising from the ashes of a sport that has longed for the days of Borg and Connors and even the best-selling author, TV commentator and America's Psycho Guest McEnroe, comes a kind of conglomeration of all of them.


There's no love lost between Hewitt and well, everyone.
His name is Lleyton Hewitt. A former surf baby from Australia, he's a straggly-haired, cap-backward, boulder-on-his-shoulder malcontent who has won both the U.S. Open and Wimbledon without most people outside tennis knowing much about him. Or caring. And that's just the way he wants it.

"I choose what's right for me," Hewitt said at Wimbledon after he'd almost lost to Dutchman Sjeng Schalken, then pulverized poor homebody Tim Henman and finally eliminated everybody else, ending with Argentine David Nalbandian, for the championship. "I'm not going to go out and do every interview. That's not right for my tennis, not in my best interest. Off the court I'm shy, more private than a lot of people."

Well and good. Given their druthers, wouldn't most of our sporting legends (save Charles Barkley and Tatum's ex-hubby) rather just hit their home runs, swish their baskets, score their TDs and spend their millions while skipping all those media and commercial and fan obligations? Sure they would, and Hewitt -- bless his enormous, fighting heart that seems four sizes bigger than his bony, 5-foot-11 (sure!), 150-pound (when soaked!) body -- does something about it. Namely, nothing.

Perceptive, even pleasant in the mass interviews required of him at the Grand Slams, Hewitt has almost surreptitiously (but absolutely) dominated his sport over the past year while denying face time to, among others, the trio of Australian beat writers whose job it is to report on him daily, a couple of Australian TV channels and, remarkably, The Times of London -- the latter slap setting off a somewhat hilarious huffy fit, to wit:

Hewitt's agent, Tom Ross: "You've dug yourself a very large hole with Lleyton."

The Times' Neil Harman: "If he doesn't want to speak to the most important newspaper in the world, you can both f-- off."

Pretty much the same treatment has been afforded The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Sports Illustrated and -- speaking of the most important publication in the world -- this magazine. Okay, we're the media. But ESPN? Before the Tennis Masters Series in Cincinnati, which the network televised? Now that's getting downright ornery.

It's all happened so quickly: taking over the game with the panache of Borg, the heart of Connors and the 'tude of Mac ... changing coaches in midstream ... romancing the universally popular Belgian Top-10er, Kim Clijsters ... endearing himself to all the classic Aussie gentlemen stars of the past even while wallowing in politically incorrect, even racist, controversies in the present.

A couple of years ago, Hewitt was thought to be too short and scrawny, too lacking in the solid weapons needed to survive among the game's Big Bashers. He was even nixed as a mixed doubles partner by none other than Anna Kournikova for being "not accomplished enough." Last year he was just another one of those "New Balls Please" poster boys for an ATP Tour praying for somebody to replace the two-headed Sampragassian cash cow. One of his few press defenders, Richard Evans of The Sunday Times in London, described him as "a grunting, fist-pumping young pup with an attitude ... [who] thought winning necessitated behaving like a starving rottweiler."

Last September, when Hewitt shocked Sampras in straight sets to win the Open, the prevailing notion was that the old champion was running on empty after grueling battles against Agassi and defending titleholder Marat Safin. Even after he became, at 20, the youngest No.1 in ATP history by beating mentor-idol-countryman Pat Rafter at the Tennis Masters Cup in Sydney last November, it seemed obvious Hewitt was simply the beneficiary of everybody else reaching senility, suffering injury or not caring. After all, here was this skinny, blond, ever-yapping ("Come on!") kid who called himself Rock after the Rocky movies, who stayed on the baseline and hardly ever volleyed and who, in his first Slam after gaining the top rank, lost in the first round of the Australian Open to Alberto Martin of Spain because of ... chicken pox!! This guy couldn't be the best player on the planet, could he?

Well, yeah. And by a lot.

After all, Hewitt first drilled Agassi way back when he was a 16-year-old high school junior, stunningly winning his hometown Adelaide tournament. (He never went back to class.) He first thrashed Sampras two years ago when he won the Wimbledon warmup event at Queen's for the first of his three-peat titles there. "This guy is the future of tennis," Sampras said then, obviously unaware of how soon that future would arrive.

Even though he didn't grow up on grass -- unlike the other legends of Oz, Laver and Emerson and Newcombe -- Hewitt now seems more at home on it than on any other surface. "Several months ago, I just had a warm feeling about Wimbledon, coming back to it," Hewitt said in London. "I knew the victories at Queen's, even my prior losses on the Centre Court at Wimbledon, would help me this time."

In his first Centre Court visit, in 1999, when Hewitt was beaten by Boris Becker, the typically emotional roustabout was uncharacteristically in awe of the setting and in restraint of himself. "It was the 'class factor,'" he said then. "I've always tried to get in my opponent's face. Bring the aggression and passion from football to my game. But at Wimbledon, the Centre Court doesn't let you be you. It was like a church, a morgue. The place is intimidating. But then so was Boris."

Hewitt, who was a promising Aussie Rules footballer, still worships his hometown Adelaide Crows. "Competitiveness, fire, never giving up has always been in my blood. Aussie Rules is a pretty punchy sport, and I learned to survive. I'm one of the most mentally tough guys around. Other people hate to play me because they know I'm never-say-die."

Wimbledon 1999 was probably the last time a player or court intimidated Hewitt. With drive, talent and focus, as well as an uncanny ability to learn from experience, the South Australian has rarely seemed out of his element since swaddling clothes.

Whomp Todd Martin in his Davis Cup debut at Boston in 1999? Hey, he'd been an "orange boy" (fetching fruit for the mates) on the Aussie Davis Cup team when his hero, Rafter, was pulling off his own Cup heroics. Blitz Henman on the Englishman's own turf? Hey, Hewitt went all the way to Brazil in April 2001 and pounded Guga Kuerten in a Davis Cup match at Florianapolis. Embarrass the all-time majors record-holder, Sampras, in Hewitt's first Grand Slam final, the 2001 U.S. Open? Hey, he'd scared the bejesus out of the Pistol a year earlier in the Open semis, forcing two tiebreakers.

Facing down Wimbledon's veteran baiters from the fourth estate was a piece of cake for a guy who, in the past, has squirreled out of controversies at the French, where he once called an umpire "a spastic," and at Flushing Meadow, where he had to apologize to James Blake. "Are you more likely to be beaten up in the locker room than anyone else?" somebody asked Hewitt during the recent All England Club fortnight. "Doesn't really worry me," said Mr. Aussie Wonderful. "Bit of a silly question, isn't it?"

Hewitt's been taking vicious hits since 1999, when a newspaper columnist called him a "national disgrace." (Angered that an Adelaide crowd cheered against him because he had questioned a line call when he was up 5-0 on some pitiful wild card, Hewitt had uttered the immortal: "It's weird, but it's the stupidity of the Australian public.") Two years ago, an Australian magazine labeled him the country's "least admired sportsperson."

Before his recent press boycott, Hewitt told The Magazine: "I've grown up in tennis. This is what I've dreamed of doing forever. The role models may seem strange, but I always enjoyed watching the Swedes play -- Mats Wilander, Stefan Edberg. I remember Connors' comeback in the 1991 Open, when he was so old, watching early in the morning from Australia. I could relate to that. And McEnroe? He took on the crowd, yelled at officials, bitched at everybody. That was his way, and I'm probably a lot like that. I've learned not to be inhibited."

The fist-pumping, chest-pounding and screaming at spectators, officials and players have kept Hewitt in hot water for much of his brief career. In his French Open debut in 1999, he called Argentine Martin Rodriguez an "ass--." Before a Davis Cup match the same year, when Yevgeny Kafelnikov vowed to teach Hewitt a lesson, the teenager kept screaming at the Russian, "I'm not going down!" Then, after winning easily, he held up some cash to mock paying for the "lesson" and said he'd enjoyed "sticking it to somebody who mouths off."

Even the low-key Alex Corretja of Spain calls Hewitt "an unfriendly guy who thinks he's a know-it-all when he's on court." Says Agassi's former coach, Brad Gilbert: "I'd be amazed if somebody doesn't whack him in the locker room."

But it's becoming increasingly difficult to whack Hewitt elsewhere, primarily because of his solidity off the ground and a deadly return game built on the fastest feet in the business. "I used to think Borg was the quickest guy I'd ever seen in tennis," says McEnroe. "Now I'm not so sure."

There were 33 players in the Wimbledon field with faster serves than Hewitt's best (124 mph). But opponents won only 35 percent of their second-serve points against his defense. Last year Hewitt led the tour in points won against second serve with an astounding 55 percent. Over all his matches in the past two years, Hewitt's 35 percent winning return games has also led the circuit. "His hand-eye coordination is just amazing," says left-handed Aussie rocket launcher Wayne Arthurs. "Put him on any surface -- grass, hardcourt, clay, cow paddock, I don't care -- he'll still hit the ball in the middle."

Henman, ever the thoughtful analyst and arguably the preeminent volleyer in the game, describes how it felt to play one of his best matches at Wimbledon, yet be smashed like an overripe strawberry, 7-5, 6-1, 7-5, by the relentless Hewitt: "I tried different tactics, different variations. But his legs are a massive asset. Unless you ace him, serving and volleying is probably a negative because you're playing into his biggest strength. You almost want to border on being negative in the rallies. You want to wait for a short one and then you don't really want to hit an approach shot because if you give him a chance to hit a pass, he'll hit it. You've just got to stay at the baseline and give him no pace. You either hit a winner or make a mistake. Approaching, winning points from the net, that doesn't work against him."

Consider the impression Hewitt made on the retired master, Becker: "What amazes me is the level of professionalism at only 21. He knows when to slow a match down, when to get excited and what levels of excitement bring out the best in him. Much of what I did was instinctive. But this guy has to spend a lot more time thinking on the court. In his attitude -- a street fighter without a timid bone in his body -- he's Connors. But the way he moves, the way he paces the points, he's Borg. He's the classic counterpuncher who also can win free points from his serve. In my mind he can do what Borg did and win Wimbledon five times. He can win five U.S. Opens, too. The guy is a lethal customer." Scion to a rich athletic heritage, Hewitt credits his competitive zeal to a gene pool stirred by his father, Glynn, a former football player with Richmond in the old Victorian League (now the Australian Football League), and his mother, Cherilyn, a phys ed instructor and netball player. (Netball is a combination of basketball and team handball that's hugely popular in Australia.)

"He's almost shy at home, but the court has always brought out the extrovert in him," says Glynn. "As Lleyton went through the club ranks and various divisions, he'd always have to play older men. If he'd get dodgy line calls, thought he was hooked, it wouldn't matter how old the other guy was, he'd let him know it. He's never taken a backward step on a tennis court."

John Newcombe, who's grown to admire Hewitt since bringing him onto the Davis Cup team as one of those orange boys, says he's the man to bring tennis out of its doldrums: "We once worried that his fire in the belly would turn into negativity. But he's beyond that bad stuff, and he's learning more every day. To suggest he's Connors or McEnroe is wrong. Those people were bullies on court. Lleyton's not. He's a lovely young bloke."

A bloke who may be on the verge of dominating the block on all surfaces. Hewitt's lack of a putaway killer shot has hindered progress on the slow, heavy dirt, where he's still learning to power through the ball in the manner of Kuerten, Corretja and Juan Carlos Ferrero of Spain. But as he defends his title at the Open, he'll undoubtedly rely on the good memories from last year's event, as well as his victory over the star field at Indian Wells, Calif., in March, when he defeated former No.1 Carlos Moya, Thomas Enquist, Sampras and Henman (losing but nine total games in the latter two matches).

"Reaching No.1, winning Wimbledon, knowing your name will go up on the boards with all the greats, it's what every Australian kid who picks up a racket dreams of," says Hewitt. "For me to be there at the age of 21 is incredible."

Not to mention that the next time he asks Anna K to play doubles, she just might take his call.


This article appears in the September 2 issue of ESPN The Magazine.

KaseyL
08-23-2002, 10:51 AM
Thanks for the articles!

Here's a new one:

Host of big names eye New York silverware

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The men's tennis circus decamps at Flushing Meadows for the final grand slam of the year next week, and a host of big names will slug it out for the most open major in years.

Defending champion Lleyton Hewitt heads the field but with eight different winners in the last nine grand slam events, there is no clear favourite in New York.

Hewitt's form since winning Wimbledon last month has been patchy with a first round defeat in Toronto, a finals appearance in Cincinnati and a third round loss in Indianapolis.

The Australian is eager to open his defence, however.

"I think it's obviously going to be a bit of a buzz for me, going back to a place that has changed my life in a lot of ways," he said. "I really look forward to getting back there. The U.S. Open holds a very special place for me, being the first place I really performed well in a grand slam."

The player who ousted Hewitt from Indianapolis and went on to win the title, Greg Rusedski, certainly will not be underestimating the dynamic baseliner.

"I think it's so hard to do what he's accomplished," said the Briton, a U.S. Open runner-up in 1997.

"He's the youngest player to be number one, he's won two major championships already, he's got a game where he has to work from the first ball to the last. He beats you with one extra step and one extra shot.

NAGGING INJURY

"It's his consistency week in and week out that sets him apart, and his competitiveness.

"He is the favourite to repeat in New York along with Andre Agassi, but it's another story having to come and defend a slam, to win it back-to-back.

"Right now you'd have to say it's Hewitt, Agassi, Carlos Moya depending on how quick the courts are at the U.S. Open.

"There are very few serve and volley players who are doing well. Maybe I can be one of the dark horses."

Moya beat Hewitt in the final of Cincinnati earlier this month and, having put a nagging back injury behind him, is intent on making up for lost time.

"I'm healthy...I'm fit...I know when this happens I can be a dangerous player," he said when asked of his chances in New York.

"But I don't know if it is good to set a goal. Because what I learned this year is that you just have to enjoy on court and when you have the bad moments, you have to think that the good ones are going to come soon.

"I'll just do my best and I'll fight and give 100 percent."

Another player eyeing the silverware is Britain's Tim Henman, still seeking a grand slam breakthrough.

Seeded fifth this year, he said: "I've got to believe in my game and go out there and see what happens.

"Certainly this year, with the way I've played, it's my best chance. But it's no good talking about it now. I've got to get out there and do it on the court."

Pete Sampras's preparation for the Open, a title he has won four times and where he has been runner-up for the last two years, has hardly been encouraging, but he still believes he has what it takes to add to his record 13 grand slam titles.

"You have to remember who I am and where I'm playing next week," he said.

"The U.S. Open is where you shine, and that is where I hope to shine.

"My goal is to win another major and, hopefully, destiny will be on my side."

KaseyL
08-23-2002, 11:13 AM
And another article:

Revised draw offers Hewitt some relief

from AAP, August 23, 2002

The withdrawal of two injured seeds has handed Lleyton Hewitt some welcome relief ahead of his US Open defence starting in New York next week.

Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson (shoulder), the 12th seed and 15th-seeded Argentinian Guillermo Canas (wrist) have both pulled out on the tournament's eve, forcing officials to release a revised draw for the year's final grand slam.

And it would have left Hewitt breathing a huge sigh of relief.

The world No.1 was scheduled to meet Greg Rusedski in the second round - in his first event since the British dangerman dumped the Australian out of the last week's Indianapolis Open in straight sets.

Instead, Rusedski has been promoted to 33rd seed and moved to the bottom half of the draw.

Hewitt will now face a lucky loser qualifier if, as expected, he negotiates world No.103 Nicolas Coutelot in the first round.

Rusedski, though, might not be as pleased with his amended schedule.

While the big-serving Brit - runner-up to Patrick Rafter at Flushing Meadows in 1997 - won't have to battle Hewitt unless they both reach the final, Rusedski will still have his work cut out progressing through the tournament.

The Indianapolis Open champion has been shifted to a tough quarter featuring third seed Tommy Haas, fifth-seeded compatriot Tim Henman, fellow seeds Alex Corretja, Andy Roddick and four-times champion Pete Sampras, the runner-up the last two years.

Rusedski is on track to meet Sampras in the third round, Haas in the last 16 and Henman in the quarter-finals.

Hewitt is still drawn to meet talented black American James Blake in the third round in what would be a potentially explosive sequel to their heated second-round encounter at Flushing Meadows last year.

Hewitt won in five sets en route to claiming his maiden grand slam title, but also found himself caught up in a messy race row after making controversial remarks to a black linesman during that match.

Blake, the 25th seed, is among the form players on tour, having broken through for his first tournament success last week on hardcourt in Washington.

The highest remaining seed in Hewitt's quarter is 14th seed Jiri Novak, but Spanish nemesis Carlos Moya, the ninth seed, or sixth seed Andre Agassi await in the semi-finals.

KaseyL
08-23-2002, 12:17 PM
And here's another interesting article from the BBC:

Hewitt leaves rivals standing

Hewitt's never-say-die attitude sets him apart

by Caroline Cheese
BBC Sport Online, August 23, 2002

Before winning the 2001 US Open, Lleyton Hewitt was accused in some quarters of not being quite good enough to win the major titles.

It is certainly not an accusation that could be levelled at him now, after the 21-year-old followed up his maiden Grand Slam with wins in the prestigious Tennis Masters Cup and at Wimbledon.

In truth, the world number one has one of the most potent weapons in the men's game.

"There's always a chance you're going to lose, but it never enters my mind when I'm out there playing" says Lleyton Hewitt.

While his fellow young contenders have failed to marry talent with consistency, Hewitt has shown a loathing of defeat which has drawn comparisons with Jimmy Connors.

Even when playing below his best, Hewitt has an ability to harry, fight and retrieve which outshines every other player on the tour.

It is a quality the player himself cites as his greatest.

"A lot of guys would probably opt for the easier option rather than hang out there and keep fighting," he said recently. There's always a chance that you're going to lose, but it never enters my mind when I'm out there playing."

When Andre Agassi first took on Hewitt, then aged 16, he lost in straight sets, saying later: "I didn't give him enough respect - I think I was convinced he would go away."

That forlorn hope has accounted for many more after Agassi but if the combative attitude serves him well on the court, it has not won him favour off it.

Controversy has followed Hewitt throughout his career, not least at last year's Open when he was accused of making racist remarks during a second-round match against James Blake.

But if anything, the fiery Australian thrives on, and perhaps needs, the 'me-against-them' scenario.

No surprise, then, that his hero is the fictional boxer Rocky Balboa, the ultimate underdog.

At the Cincinnati Masters, he became embroiled in an argument with the ATP for his refusal to carry out a five-minute interview with a television broadcaster, and threatened not to play his first-round match.

He made it to the court, though, and thrashed the unfortunate Robby Ginepri 6-0 6-0 before launching into a bitter tirade about what he perceived as unfair treatment.

His testy relations with the media have not helped his popularity in his home country, where comparisons with Patrick Rafter had already shown him in an unfavourable light.

But there is nothing that Australia likes more than a winner.

And Hewitt's current status as the world's best player, along with his devotion to the Davis Cup, cause has gone some way to improving his image.

Not that any of that will bother the player, who craves winning as much as he repels the attention that goes with it.

He refuses to allow external influences to upset his much-vaunted focus, another intimidating part of his increasing armoury.

Add to that a serve which has developed in pace and variety even since last year's US Open win, and it is difficult to argue against another Hewitt victory.

Like Connors before him, Hewitt shows no sign of maturing and softening his attitude towards those who dare to criticise.

But to do so would blunt the very weapon which has him peering down at his rivals from a very lofty height.

KaseyL
08-23-2002, 12:55 PM
forgotten to post this:

In the weekly power rankings of CBS Sportsline, Lleyton is at number 10. :rolleyes:

Their top 3 is Rusedski, Blake and Srichaphan.

Here's what they say:

(SportsLine.com's Power Rankings feature 10 players based on the past weeks' performances. It is not an official ranking based on points but takes into account the strength of schedule and the quality of play of each player during that period.
SportLine.com's Power Rankings will focus on the hard court tournaments before the U.S. Open.)

10 Lleyton Hewitt (coming from # 2 last week)
Hewitt has been overwhelmed by Rusedski's serve. He remains a comfortable leader of the ATP Champions Race, but hasn't won since Wimbledon.

Goonergal
08-23-2002, 04:41 PM
Host of big names eye New York silverware

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The men's tennis circus decamps at Flushing Meadows for the final grand slam of the year next week, and a host of big names will slug it out for the most open major in years.


Defending champion Lleyton Hewitt heads the field but with eight different winners in the last nine grand slam events, there is no clear favourite in New York.


Hewitt's form since winning Wimbledon last month has been patchy with a first round defeat in Toronto, a finals appearance in Cincinnati and a third round loss in Indianapolis.


The Australian is eager to open his defence, however.


"I think it's obviously going to be a bit of a buzz for me, going back to a place that has changed my life in a lot of ways," he said. "I really look forward to getting back there.


"The U.S. Open holds a very special place for me, being the first place I really performed well in a grand slam."


The player who ousted Hewitt from Indianapolis and went on to win the title, Greg Rusedski, certainly will not be underestimating the dynamic baseliner.


"I think it's so hard to do what he's accomplished," said the Briton, a U.S. Open runner-up in 1997.


"He's the youngest player to be number one, he's won two major championships already, he's got a game where he has to work from the first ball to the last. He beats you with one extra step and one extra shot.


NAGGING INJURY


"It's his consistency week in and week out that sets him apart, and his competitiveness.


"He is the favourite to repeat in New York along with Andre Agassi, but it's another story having to come and defend a slam, to win it back-to-back.


"Right now you'd have to say it's Hewitt, Agassi, Carlos Moya depending on how quick the courts are at the U.S. Open.


"There are very few serve and volley players who are doing well. Maybe I can be one of the dark horses."


Moya beat Hewitt in the final of Cincinnati earlier this month and, having put a nagging back injury behind him, is intent on making up for lost time.


"I'm healthy...I'm fit...I know when this happens I can be a dangerous player," he said when asked of his chances in New York.


"But I don't know if it is good to set a goal. Because what I learned this year is that you just have to enjoy on court and when you have the bad moments, you have to think that the good ones are going to come soon.


"I'll just do my best and I'll fight and give 100 percent."


Another player eyeing the silverware is Britain's Tim Henman, still seeking a grand slam breakthrough.


Seeded fifth this year, he said: "I've got to believe in my game and go out there and see what happens.


"Certainly this year, with the way I've played, it's my best chance. But it's no good talking about it now. I've got to get out there and do it on the court."

ROTFLMAO!:rolleyes: :rolleyes:


Pete Sampras's preparation for the Open, a title he has won four times and where he has been runner-up for the last two years, has hardly been encouraging, but he still believes he has what it takes to add to his record 13 grand slam titles.


"You have to remember who I am and where I'm playing next week," he said.


"The U.S. Open is where you shine, and that is where I hope to shine.


"My goal is to win another major and, hopefully, destiny will be on my side."

LMAO! :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

budgirlbz
08-23-2002, 06:40 PM
HI. I found this one on ESPN.COM for the 9/02 issue...I think...

August 21, 2002
Aussie Rules
By Curry Kirkpatrick
ESPN The Magazine


The new face of men's tennis was going to be Russian, a huge grinning wolfhound swatting the game into untold nether reaches of muscle and power. Or Spanish. Or Argentine. Or Brazilian, its happy-go-lucky personality sauntering to a samba backbeat. Or maybe -- post-Sampras, post-Agassi -- the new face of men's tennis was going to be another American, a tall, strong hero from the heartland who would not only Save the Men's Game but might even stand a chance of whipping those You-Know-Who sisters after they got bored pounding the poor women and took on the other half of humanity. But because of strain or pressure or hormonal disorder or the stock market, all those new faces seem to have faded into the rearview mirror on tennis' road to perdition. Instead, rising from the ashes of a sport that has longed for the days of Borg and Connors and even the best-selling author, TV commentator and America's Psycho Guest McEnroe, comes a kind of conglomeration of all of them.


There's no love lost between Hewitt and well, everyone.
His name is Lleyton Hewitt. A former surf baby from Australia, he's a straggly-haired, cap-backward, boulder-on-his-shoulder malcontent who has won both the U.S. Open and Wimbledon without most people outside tennis knowing much about him. Or caring. And that's just the way he wants it.

"I choose what's right for me," Hewitt said at Wimbledon after he'd almost lost to Dutchman Sjeng Schalken, then pulverized poor homebody Tim Henman and finally eliminated everybody else, ending with Argentine David Nalbandian, for the championship. "I'm not going to go out and do every interview. That's not right for my tennis, not in my best interest. Off the court I'm shy, more private than a lot of people."

Well and good. Given their druthers, wouldn't most of our sporting legends (save Charles Barkley and Tatum's ex-hubby) rather just hit their home runs, swish their baskets, score their TDs and spend their millions while skipping all those media and commercial and fan obligations? Sure they would, and Hewitt -- bless his enormous, fighting heart that seems four sizes bigger than his bony, 5-foot-11 (sure!), 150-pound (when soaked!) body -- does something about it. Namely, nothing.

Perceptive, even pleasant in the mass interviews required of him at the Grand Slams, Hewitt has almost surreptitiously (but absolutely) dominated his sport over the past year while denying face time to, among others, the trio of Australian beat writers whose job it is to report on him daily, a couple of Australian TV channels and, remarkably, The Times of London -- the latter slap setting off a somewhat hilarious huffy fit, to wit:

Hewitt's agent, Tom Ross: "You've dug yourself a very large hole with Lleyton."

The Times' Neil Harman: "If he doesn't want to speak to the most important newspaper in the world, you can both f-- off."

Pretty much the same treatment has been afforded The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Sports Illustrated and -- speaking of the most important publication in the world -- this magazine. Okay, we're the media. But ESPN? Before the Tennis Masters Series in Cincinnati, which the network televised? Now that's getting downright ornery.

It's all happened so quickly: taking over the game with the panache of Borg, the heart of Connors and the 'tude of Mac ... changing coaches in midstream ... romancing the universally popular Belgian Top-10er, Kim Clijsters ... endearing himself to all the classic Aussie gentlemen stars of the past even while wallowing in politically incorrect, even racist, controversies in the present.

A couple of years ago, Hewitt was thought to be too short and scrawny, too lacking in the solid weapons needed to survive among the game's Big Bashers. He was even nixed as a mixed doubles partner by none other than Anna Kournikova for being "not accomplished enough." Last year he was just another one of those "New Balls Please" poster boys for an ATP Tour praying for somebody to replace the two-headed Sampragassian cash cow. One of his few press defenders, Richard Evans of The Sunday Times in London, described him as "a grunting, fist-pumping young pup with an attitude ... [who] thought winning necessitated behaving like a starving rottweiler."

Last September, when Hewitt shocked Sampras in straight sets to win the Open, the prevailing notion was that the old champion was running on empty after grueling battles against Agassi and defending titleholder Marat Safin. Even after he became, at 20, the youngest No.1 in ATP history by beating mentor-idol-countryman Pat Rafter at the Tennis Masters Cup in Sydney last November, it seemed obvious Hewitt was simply the beneficiary of everybody else reaching senility, suffering injury or not caring. After all, here was this skinny, blond, ever-yapping ("Come on!") kid who called himself Rock after the Rocky movies, who stayed on the baseline and hardly ever volleyed and who, in his first Slam after gaining the top rank, lost in the first round of the Australian Open to Alberto Martin of Spain because of ... chicken pox!! This guy couldn't be the best player on the planet, could he?

Well, yeah. And by a lot.

After all, Hewitt first drilled Agassi way back when he was a 16-year-old high school junior, stunningly winning his hometown Adelaide tournament. (He never went back to class.) He first thrashed Sampras two years ago when he won the Wimbledon warmup event at Queen's for the first of his three-peat titles there. "This guy is the future of tennis," Sampras said then, obviously unaware of how soon that future would arrive.

Even though he didn't grow up on grass -- unlike the other legends of Oz, Laver and Emerson and Newcombe -- Hewitt now seems more at home on it than on any other surface. "Several months ago, I just had a warm feeling about Wimbledon, coming back to it," Hewitt said in London. "I knew the victories at Queen's, even my prior losses on the Centre Court at Wimbledon, would help me this time."

In his first Centre Court visit, in 1999, when Hewitt was beaten by Boris Becker, the typically emotional roustabout was uncharacteristically in awe of the setting and in restraint of himself. "It was the 'class factor,'" he said then. "I've always tried to get in my opponent's face. Bring the aggression and passion from football to my game. But at Wimbledon, the Centre Court doesn't let you be you. It was like a church, a morgue. The place is intimidating. But then so was Boris."

Hewitt, who was a promising Aussie Rules footballer, still worships his hometown Adelaide Crows. "Competitiveness, fire, never giving up has always been in my blood. Aussie Rules is a pretty punchy sport, and I learned to survive. I'm one of the most mentally tough guys around. Other people hate to play me because they know I'm never-say-die."

Wimbledon 1999 was probably the last time a player or court intimidated Hewitt. With drive, talent and focus, as well as an uncanny ability to learn from experience, the South Australian has rarely seemed out of his element since swaddling clothes.

Whomp Todd Martin in his Davis Cup debut at Boston in 1999? Hey, he'd been an "orange boy" (fetching fruit for the mates) on the Aussie Davis Cup team when his hero, Rafter, was pulling off his own Cup heroics. Blitz Henman on the Englishman's own turf? Hey, Hewitt went all the way to Brazil in April 2001 and pounded Guga Kuerten in a Davis Cup match at Florianapolis. Embarrass the all-time majors record-holder, Sampras, in Hewitt's first Grand Slam final, the 2001 U.S. Open? Hey, he'd scared the bejesus out of the Pistol a year earlier in the Open semis, forcing two tiebreakers.

Facing down Wimbledon's veteran baiters from the fourth estate was a piece of cake for a guy who, in the past, has squirreled out of controversies at the French, where he once called an umpire "a spastic," and at Flushing Meadow, where he had to apologize to James Blake. "Are you more likely to be beaten up in the locker room than anyone else?" somebody asked Hewitt during the recent All England Club fortnight. "Doesn't really worry me," said Mr. Aussie Wonderful. "Bit of a silly question, isn't it?"

Hewitt's been taking vicious hits since 1999, when a newspaper columnist called him a "national disgrace." (Angered that an Adelaide crowd cheered against him because he had questioned a line call when he was up 5-0 on some pitiful wild card, Hewitt had uttered the immortal: "It's weird, but it's the stupidity of the Australian public.") Two years ago, an Australian magazine labeled him the country's "least admired sportsperson."

Before his recent press boycott, Hewitt told The Magazine: "I've grown up in tennis. This is what I've dreamed of doing forever. The role models may seem strange, but I always enjoyed watching the Swedes play -- Mats Wilander, Stefan Edberg. I remember Connors' comeback in the 1991 Open, when he was so old, watching early in the morning from Australia. I could relate to that. And McEnroe? He took on the crowd, yelled at officials, bitched at everybody. That was his way, and I'm probably a lot like that. I've learned not to be inhibited."

The fist-pumping, chest-pounding and screaming at spectators, officials and players have kept Hewitt in hot water for much of his brief career. In his French Open debut in 1999, he called Argentine Martin Rodriguez an "ass--." Before a Davis Cup match the same year, when Yevgeny Kafelnikov vowed to teach Hewitt a lesson, the teenager kept screaming at the Russian, "I'm not going down!" Then, after winning easily, he held up some cash to mock paying for the "lesson" and said he'd enjoyed "sticking it to somebody who mouths off."

Even the low-key Alex Corretja of Spain calls Hewitt "an unfriendly guy who thinks he's a know-it-all when he's on court." Says Agassi's former coach, Brad Gilbert: "I'd be amazed if somebody doesn't whack him in the locker room."

But it's becoming increasingly difficult to whack Hewitt elsewhere, primarily because of his solidity off the ground and a deadly return game built on the fastest feet in the business. "I used to think Borg was the quickest guy I'd ever seen in tennis," says McEnroe. "Now I'm not so sure."

There were 33 players in the Wimbledon field with faster serves than Hewitt's best (124 mph). But opponents won only 35 percent of their second-serve points against his defense. Last year Hewitt led the tour in points won against second serve with an astounding 55 percent. Over all his matches in the past two years, Hewitt's 35 percent winning return games has also led the circuit. "His hand-eye coordination is just amazing," says left-handed Aussie rocket launcher Wayne Arthurs. "Put him on any surface -- grass, hardcourt, clay, cow paddock, I don't care -- he'll still hit the ball in the middle."

Henman, ever the thoughtful analyst and arguably the preeminent volleyer in the game, describes how it felt to play one of his best matches at Wimbledon, yet be smashed like an overripe strawberry, 7-5, 6-1, 7-5, by the relentless Hewitt: "I tried different tactics, different variations. But his legs are a massive asset. Unless you ace him, serving and volleying is probably a negative because you're playing into his biggest strength. You almost want to border on being negative in the rallies. You want to wait for a short one and then you don't really want to hit an approach shot because if you give him a chance to hit a pass, he'll hit it. You've just got to stay at the baseline and give him no pace. You either hit a winner or make a mistake. Approaching, winning points from the net, that doesn't work against him."

Consider the impression Hewitt made on the retired master, Becker: "What amazes me is the level of professionalism at only 21. He knows when to slow a match down, when to get excited and what levels of excitement bring out the best in him. Much of what I did was instinctive. But this guy has to spend a lot more time thinking on the court. In his attitude -- a street fighter without a timid bone in his body -- he's Connors. But the way he moves, the way he paces the points, he's Borg. He's the classic counterpuncher who also can win free points from his serve. In my mind he can do what Borg did and win Wimbledon five times. He can win five U.S. Opens, too. The guy is a lethal customer." Scion to a rich athletic heritage, Hewitt credits his competitive zeal to a gene pool stirred by his father, Glynn, a former football player with Richmond in the old Victorian League (now the Australian Football League), and his mother, Cherilyn, a phys ed instructor and netball player. (Netball is a combination of basketball and team handball that's hugely popular in Australia.)

"He's almost shy at home, but the court has always brought out the extrovert in him," says Glynn. "As Lleyton went through the club ranks and various divisions, he'd always have to play older men. If he'd get dodgy line calls, thought he was hooked, it wouldn't matter how old the other guy was, he'd let him know it. He's never taken a backward step on a tennis court."

John Newcombe, who's grown to admire Hewitt since bringing him onto the Davis Cup team as one of those orange boys, says he's the man to bring tennis out of its doldrums: "We once worried that his fire in the belly would turn into negativity. But he's beyond that bad stuff, and he's learning more every day. To suggest he's Connors or McEnroe is wrong. Those people were bullies on court. Lleyton's not. He's a lovely young bloke."

A bloke who may be on the verge of dominating the block on all surfaces. Hewitt's lack of a putaway killer shot has hindered progress on the slow, heavy dirt, where he's still learning to power through the ball in the manner of Kuerten, Corretja and Juan Carlos Ferrero of Spain. But as he defends his title at the Open, he'll undoubtedly rely on the good memories from last year's event, as well as his victory over the star field at Indian Wells, Calif., in March, when he defeated former No.1 Carlos Moya, Thomas Enquist, Sampras and Henman (losing but nine total games in the latter two matches).

"Reaching No.1, winning Wimbledon, knowing your name will go up on the boards with all the greats, it's what every Australian kid who picks up a racket dreams of," says Hewitt. "For me to be there at the age of 21 is incredible."

Not to mention that the next time he asks Anna K to play doubles, she just might take his call.

KaseyL
08-23-2002, 07:46 PM
It's raining articles LOL

Here's one about what Johnny Mac has to say about Lleyton:

Mac's backing Hewitt repeat

By PAUL MALONE, 24aug02

JOHN McEnroe has backed Lleyton Hewitt to defend his US Open crown but urged him to take a dominant hand in the promotion of men's tennis.

McEnroe, a four-time king of Flushing Meadows, said he could not understand growing American media sentiment that Hewitt would prove a caretaker No. 1.

Hewitt yesterday received the welcome news he had been spared a probable US Open second-round shootout with Greg Rusedski in a men's draw reshuffle ordered due to the withdrawals of injured seeds Thomas Johansson (12) and Guillermo Canas (15).

Australia's world No.1 will now play either a qualifier or a lucky loser in the second round if he negotiates the first step of his New York title defence against France's Nicolas Coutelot, ranked No.103.

McEnroe said Hewitt and men's tennis could both do with a rivalry and named two young Americans in the top 25, Andy Roddick and James Blake, as those who needed to take their games to Hewitt's level.

"He's a one-in-a-million type of guy that has the fire in the belly like a (Jimmy) Connors," McEnroe said yesterday.

"I don't agree with it (talk of him being a short-term No.1) at all.

"He's figured out a way to win and if someone like Roddick or Blake can create a rivalry it would be something the men's game badly needs."

McEnroe said Pete Sampras, seeded 17th, was low on confidence and compatriot Andre Agassi, the sixth seed, was also not a bankable prospect after failing to make the semi-final of the two grand slam events he has contested this year.

"Lleyton is the favourite, but hasn't played that well since Wimbledon," he said.

"Blake is faster and has a better forehand than I thought.

"If he plays Hewitt (in the third round) it would be interesting to see what happens after last year (the match in which Hewitt was accused of making racist comments when calling for a linesman to be replaced)."

Both the ATP and the Hewitt camp are refusing to say when Hewitt's appeal will be held against a $192,000 fine for not giving a pre-arranged television interview.

Hewitt has threatened legal action against the ATP over the fine.

"He's still growing up,' McEnroe said. "He has his parents with him almost all the time and he has a tennis player (Kim Clijsters) as a girlfriend and as far as being sheltered to play his best tennis, it's succeeding incredibly well.

'But as far as taking a leadership role is concerned, hopefully it will come.

"He's only 21, but a lot was expected of the Williams sisters and hopefully Lleyton will realise it's a chance for him to talk about the future of the game.

"It's important to do that when you're the No. 1 player in the world."

KaseyL
08-23-2002, 09:53 PM
And yet another one, from Pat Cash:

CASH: HARD TO SEE PAST HEWITT

By Pat Cash

Sporting Life, August 23, 2002

It's hard to look past Lleyton Hewitt at the US Open.
Lleyton's proved that he's clearly the world's number one player and the player to beat.
His Wimbledon victory was very easy. He did it in style and the hardcourt has always been his favourite surface. He struggles a little bit in the very fast conditions against the big servers which we saw last week against Greg Rusedski who knocked him off. At the end of the day, over five sets, it's going to be a different story. Hewitt's very, very tough to beat and I have him as the favourite.

Hewitt could play Andre Agassi in the quarter-finals.
That should be a great match, but Agassi is starting to show he's just gone over the hill. We've been wondering if that was the case for a year and didn't know for sure. But it's obvious now that he has gone over the hill. If he plays Hewitt, that's always an if of course, I think Hewitt would be too good over five sets - he'd just be too strong.

Similar things can be said of Pete Sampras. Unfortunately even though Sampras did do extremely well at the US Open last year, it's basically the end for him. I can't see him getting through too many rounds or too many tough matches. It's been a fantastic career, but I wouldn't be surprised to see Sampras go out early and announce his retirement. He's certainly getting very close to it.
If he's still willing to put the effort in he can still do well. But I can see him certainly taking short cuts - not willing to put the effort in that he used to, which was a phenomenal effort. I can't really blame him, but I'm also not expecting Pete to do that well.

On the other side of the draw, Tommy Haas is a young German player who's been improving year in, year out.
His ranking has been going up, his game's getting very solid but most importantly he's getting mentally tough. He's always been mentally fragile in the past and didn't used to be able to hang in there and play tough matches. Now he's willing to go that extra mile and play the extra shot to win the point and his ranking has shown that. He hasn't knocked off the top guys consistently yet, but he's one of the guys that you think 'maybe it's his breakthrough tournament'. I wouldn't be surprised to see him get through Sampras and go on to the semi-final.

Andy Roddick is a player who was expected to do very well this year but he hasn't performed at all.
Last year at the US Open if he'd sneaked through the match against Hewitt in the quarter-finals - which had a very dubious line call towards the end which would have given him an opportunity to win the match - I reckon he could have won the tournament. He becomes a better player playing in his home country and in New York the whole atmosphere is electric.
I think he will do well again this year and I'd certainly put him as one of my dark horses. He's a semi-finalist, finalist or even a potential winner this year. These are outside bets, but he's got a lot to warrant making that decision.

Marat Safin is a strange one. He's one of, if not the most talented player there.
He's a better all-round player than a guy like Roger Federer. He's got more power and more shots than a guy like Haas, and more power and more shots than a guy like Hewitt. But he only puts it together every once in a while. And unfortunately you never know when it's going to be. He does take a few short cuts as well in training which catch him out at the end of the day.
He did reach the final of the Australian Open on a similar surface, but just ran out of gas altogether. But if everything goes right for him - he plays at night and has a few easy matches - he could drop into the form that saw him win the US Open in the year 2000.

Carlos Moya was a surprise winner in the Masters Series recently.
Moya is a pedigree player. He can do really well on the hardcourts. He's been in the final of the Australian Open before, but he's had quite a few injuries over the last year or so. Even though he's really a claycourter, I think he's got more penetration on a hardcourt. He's a dark horse for sure.

I don't know how David Nalbandian will come through after Wimbledon and Xavier Malisse, who made the semi-finals there, is a guy with potential and he's one of my favourite dark horses.

But overall I can't see past Hewitt.

He's tough, he's determined and is still young - not burnt out. Obviously he's had a very, very big year but I just can't go past him as a winner.

As for another finalist, well I'd like to say Roddick but I'm not too sure.

(Pat Cash was talking to Andy Schooler).

Goonergal
08-24-2002, 12:57 AM
Mac's backing Hewitt repeat
By PAUL MALONE
24aug02

http://heraldsun.news.com.au/common/imagedata/0,1658,205327,00.jpg

JOHN McEnroe has backed Lleyton Hewitt to defend his US Open crown but urged him to take a dominant hand in the promotion of men's tennis.

McEnroe, a four-time king of Flushing Meadows, said he could not understand growing American media sentiment that Hewitt would prove a caretaker No. 1.
Hewitt yesterday received the welcome news he had been spared a probable US Open second-round shootout with Greg Rusedski in a men's draw reshuffle ordered due to the withdrawals of injured seeds Thomas Johansson (12) and Guillermo Canas (15).

Australia's world No.1 will now play either a qualifier or a lucky loser in the second round if he negotiates the first step of his New York title defence against France's Nicolas Coutelot, ranked No.103.

McEnroe said Hewitt and men's tennis could both do with a rivalry and named two young Americans in the top 25, Andy Roddick and James Blake, as those who needed to take their games to Hewitt's level.

"He's a one-in-a-million type of guy that has the fire in the belly like a (Jimmy) Connors," McEnroe said yesterday.

"I don't agree with it (talk of him being a short-term No.1) at all.

"He's figured out a way to win and if someone like Roddick or Blake can create a rivalry it would be something the men's game badly needs."

McEnroe said Pete Sampras, seeded 17th, was low on confidence and compatriot Andre Agassi, the sixth seed, was also not a bankable prospect after failing to make the semi-final of the two grand slam events he has contested this year.

"Lleyton is the favourite, but hasn't played that well since Wimbledon," he said.

"Blake is faster and has a better forehand than I thought.

"If he plays Hewitt (in the third round) it would be interesting to see what happens after last year (the match in which Hewitt was accused of making racist comments when calling for a linesman to be replaced)."

Both the ATP and the Hewitt camp are refusing to say when Hewitt's appeal will be held against a $192,000 fine for not giving a pre-arranged television interview.

Hewitt has threatened legal action against the ATP over the fine.

"He's still growing up,' McEnroe said. "He has his parents with him almost all the time and he has a tennis player (Kim Clijsters) as a girlfriend and as far as being sheltered to play his best tennis, it's succeeding incredibly well.

'But as far as taking a leadership role is concerned, hopefully it will come.

"He's only 21, but a lot was expected of the Williams sisters and hopefully Lleyton will realise it's a chance for him to talk about the future of the game.

"It's important to do that when you're the No. 1 player in the world."

The decision of Johansson (shoulder) and Canas (stress fracture of right wrist) to pull out of the Open meant Rusedski, the highest ranked unseeded player at No. 33, and Finn Jarkko Nieminen were moved from their previous places to seeded positions.

Rusedski, the winner in Indianapolis last week when he claimed Hewitt's scalp in a third-round upset, is now seeded in Canas's spot and could meet Sampras in the third round.

Peridotpixie
08-24-2002, 02:52 AM
Uh...when did lleyton ask Anna to play doubles?

duck
08-24-2002, 02:34 PM
U.S. OPEN
Other Side Is Mr. Hide
The Hewitt you don't see is shy 21-year-old who is miles from Connors-type character who prowls the court as if it's his war zone

By LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER


PALO ALTO -- "Come o-n-n-n!" he squeals, sounding like a wounded wombat, pumping his fists and cursing at the imaginary adversaries he has invented on his way to the top of his sport. And his sport just sits there, wondering what to make of this impudent kid in the backward baseball cap who has turned men's tennis on its head.

"Come o-n-n-n!" Lleyton Hewitt shouts, and the rest of tennis does a double take, giving serious thought to a question that has yet to be sufficiently answered: If Hewitt's doing the leading, are we really sure we want to go with him?

There are champions of the moment--Marat Safin, Thomas Johansson, Albert Costa--instant lottery winners who take their prizes, do their news conferences and fade quickly into the background. Staying power is a rarity. Men's Grand Slam champions of late seem to come equipped with ticking clocks.

Hewitt has changed this time-share arrangement at the top, apparently having settled in for the long haul. Top-seeded this year, he won the U.S. Open last year, becoming the youngest No. 1 in ATP history at 20, then added a Grand Slam bookend with his Wimbledon title in July at 21.

He wins and he snarls. He loses, less frequently, but the snarl remains. Consistency is both Hewitt's strength and his weakness. His world is a simple one, divided neatly into casts of supporters and enemies. Chair umpires, linespeople, reporters, opponents, tour officials, who you are doesn't matter--if you're not with him, the way Hewitt looks at it, you are most assuredly against him.

"I'm competitive. I'm the first to admit that," he says. "That's me. It doesn't matter if I'm swimming against [Olympic champion] Ian Thorpe, I'll try and win. I know I can't, but I'll try and do my best.

"That's probably one reason why I've probably been able to do as well as I have, because I go out on the court and try and give everything I've got every time."

That much the rest of tennis learned long ago. But what else do we know about Hewitt, the economy-sized firebrand from Adelaide, Australia, with the formidable groundstrokes and the attitude to match?

Rather than providing clues, Hewitt's triumph at Wimbledon only heightened the mystery. Australian writers, deprived of easy access during the tournament, were holding secret meetings with his family to help improve the situation. Reporters from other countries joined the pursuit. One was spirited into the house of Hewitt's entourage at Wimbledon to speak with his parents, Glynn and Cherilyn, in the basement, but was asked to stay in hiding because Lleyton had unexpectedly arrived with his girlfriend, tennis pro Kim Clijsters.

The Wimbledon title--taken with the loss of only two sets in seven matches--accelerated the unveiling of Hewitt. Then, after he'd pulled out of an event in Los Angeles because he was sick, his people were willing to make him available at the Stanford women's tournament where Clijsters was playing.

There the Hewitt we've come to see on the court was missing.

Where was the tennis brat columnist John Feinstein had recently compared to Barry Bonds, calling them champions who were "absolute chumps as human beings?"

Where was that rumored chip the size of New Zealand on his shoulder?

The heir apparent to John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors and early Andre Agassi was polite, reflective and even modest about his abilities.

This had an almost "Wizard of Oz" feel. On a bench near the practice courts at Stanford, Hewitt--the screaming, polarizing No. 1 who'd once called an umpire "a spastic" and had slid into a racially tinged controversy while playing African American James Blake at the 2001 U.S. Open--seemed more like a shy, skinny kid looking for the area's best skateboarding park.

"I think you learn from your mistakes now and then," Hewitt said. "Then again, sometimes people try to find the negative thing out of anything to write about. That's the disappointing thing."

So little was known about Hewitt, and outside of a couple of acquaintances in the media in Australia, he had little reservoir of goodwill when various controversies hit in the last year or so, including the break in December with respected coach Darren Cahill. He has been revealed in fits and starts, meaning that his story remains hard to tell.

"I'm probably more shy off the court than people probably think," he said. "I'm not the biggest fan of going there and standing up and telling stories about myself."

To that end, he has spoken a couple of times to the most outgoing and affable of previous Australian champions, John Newcombe, who was also Hewitt's first Davis Cup captain.

"Talking about yourself, I find that a little bit tough," Hewitt said. "I spoke to Newk a couple of times about it because he talks so well. He has so many stories to tell over the last 50 years he's played this game. He said when I'm his age, I'll have stories to tell as well. It's tough for a 21-year-old to go out there and stand up in front of a lot of people. That comes with experience."

The dual Hewitts are not a new development. His agent, Tom Ross, learned this from Hewitt's mother when he was recruiting the youngster.

"She would often say there's two Lleytons," Ross said. "There was the Lleyton on court, who is this fiery personality and an incredible competitor.

"Off court, you wouldn't recognize him. He's this shy little kid who sits in the back of the class."

One consistent thread was his passion for winning--at everything.

Hewitt says he got his body type and endurance from his mother, who was a netball player, and his quickness from his father, a former Australian rules football player. Competitiveness came from both sides.

Oftentimes, junior players go through periods of petulance--tanking a match or throwing a set or simply retiring. Hewitt looked stumped when asked if that ever happened in his childhood.

"I always gave 100%. I can't remember once, I honestly can't," he said.

This, combined with his counterpunching abilities, makes him a fitting successor to Connors, who, like Hewitt, won his first Wimbledon at 21.

Beyond that, he shares Connors' fighting spirit on the court and the ability to raise his level in hostile circumstances.

"He's pretty strong-headed," said Patrick McEnroe, ESPN commentator and U.S. Davis Cup captain. "That's why he's No. 1 in the world. He's always reminded me of Connors. When he first came on the tour, the way he played, a me-against-the-world type of mentality.

"Which, quite honestly, isn't the worst thing to have for a tennis player. He thrives on that. Jimmy was like that in a lot of respects, 'I'm going to screw everybody, and show everybody.' In tennis, you can get away with that."

Said Hewitt: "There's a few times when people tried to hop on the train, and try bagging you. It doesn't worry me. It doesn't affect my tennis. I don't think people really realized that until probably the U.S Open last year.

"It's happened so many times in Davis Cup. I was getting bagged before I played in Spain. I went out there and beat [Albert] Costa in five sets in Barcelona. The crowd doesn't worry me when I go out there. I'm able, for some reason, to block it out and play my best tennis."

The similarities to Connors don't end there. When Connors won at Wimbledon in 1974, he was dating Chris Evert. Their engagement was viewed by many as the class rebel hooking up with the leader of the pep squad. Hewitt has been seeing Clijsters since he met her at the Australian Open in 2000, attending as many of her matches as possible. Clijsters is well liked by media and her peers on the tour.

"Watching Kim affects me," Hewitt said. "I want her to win every time she steps on the court. It's tough. When you're out there, you don't feel those same sorts of pressures. You're sitting off the court and you're thinking, 'Get a first serve in here,' and then they miss it. I couldn't do it week in and week out."

Like Hewitt, Connors had his media problems and conflicts with tour officials in his day, even filing a $40-million antitrust lawsuit against the ATP officials and others, charging a conspiracy to monopolize pro tennis.

Hewitt's difficulties with the ATP aren't quite of that nature, but even on the eve of his U.S. Open title defense he was prepared to spar with that organization. He was fined $105,650 by the ATP for refusing to conduct an interview with ESPN this month before his first-round match at Cincinnati.

There is an appeal pending, but Hewitt hired counsel in Indianapolis this week, Barnes & Thornburg, to handle the matter should legal action be required. His camp felt an arrangement with the parties had been reached before the matter exploded at the tournament.

"Based upon Lleyton's experience with the tour to date, it's not hard to understand he felt the need to engage a litigator," Ross said. "There was some extremely bad judgment used by certain tour staff--and Lleyton paid the price."

One of the members of the appeals panel used to be Patrick McEnroe. He has stepped down from the position, citing his Davis Cup position as well as his broadcast responsibilities. McEnroe speaks highly of Hewitt as a performer and personality, but says that being No. 1 carries extra responsibilities.

"The tour has got to have some power here," he said. "The Lleyton Hewitts of the world have a lot more being asked of them. You need to do more when you're at the top of the sport."

For Hewitt, the good still outweighed the bad a few weeks ago at Stanford. This was before the ATP feud, long before he'd told an Australian newspaper that the men's tour was a badly run "circus."

On this day, there was still a Wimbledon afterglow and the thrill of holding the No. 1 ranking, talking about his favorite band, Midnight Oil, and getting to play on Tiger Woods' collegiate golf course.

So, what would the top tennis player want to ask the top golfer?

"The way that he handles himself every tournament he goes into, everyone expects him to shoot 65 every day," Hewitt said. "That's an extraordinary thing. The way he's been able to block everything out and concentrate on going out there and doing what he does best. If there is a secret for him doing that, I'd like to know it, to try and keep my ranking and majors going as long as I could."

*

(BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX)

*--* Quick Study Lleyton Hewitt at a glance: Country: Australia Age: 21 Recent U.S. Opens: 2001-won, 2000-semis, 1999-3rd, 1998-DNP Notable: At 5 feet 11, 150 pounds, he doesn't overpower many players but chases down just about everything an opponent hits. ... Few players return serve better. ... At 20, finished 2001 as youngest year-end men's No. 1 2002 REVIEW Singles record 45-10 Singles titles 4 Doubles record 4-6 Doubles titles 0 Prize money $1,863,989 CAREER Singles record 240-77 Singles titles 16 Double titles 2 Prize money $8,107,404 Times Wire Services

*--*

Goonergal
08-24-2002, 03:16 PM
Thanx 4 the article Duck! :)

Hewitt eager for New York return


NEW YORK (Reuters) - Twelve months ago Lleyton Hewitt was jostling for position among a new generation of players, with a bright future ahead of him but still to prove himself on the big stage.


When the Australian steps into New York's Flushing Meadows arena next week he will be defending a grand slam title for the first time and is, most certainly, the man to beat in men's tennis.


In a whirlwind 12 months the explosive baseliner has won the 2001 U.S. Open and this year's Wimbledon, finished the year ranked world number one and contended with a bout of chicken pox.


Now he cannot wait to get back to an arena he loves.


"The U.S. Open holds a very special place for me, being the first place I really performed well in a grand slam," he says, looking forward to the fourth and final slam of the season.


"I made my first semi in a slam there, won the doubles there and my first grand slam singles title so I hold that place pretty dear."


Defending a grand slam brings with it different pressures, but Hewitt shrugs them off with typical confidence.


"It's my first time. I'm not going to go in there with anything different to last year.


"I'm still going in there with the same attitude that I've got to beat seven guys to hold up the trophy again.


"I think it's obviously going to be a bit of a buzz for me, going back to a place that has changed my life in a lot of ways.


"I really look forward to getting back there."


New York is a different place since Hewitt's last visit after the September 11 attacks, and the 21-year-old knows a different atmosphere will prevail at the raucous major.


"I think it's going to be a different feeling on and off the court," he said.


"It's a weird feeling, I guess. I was probably very fortunate not to be in New York at the time. I could very easily have been stuck there.


"It's going to be a different feeling for the fact that one day I was driving around in a limousine with a trophy in my hand and having a lot of photos taken around Manhattan, and 24 hours later the whole world had changed.


"I think it's going to be different, not just for myself."

Angele
08-24-2002, 04:40 PM
Is that a new quote about Kim in the second to last article? The one about watching her play? I don't think i'd ever heard that before!

KaseyL
08-24-2002, 10:29 PM
I think I've read that at the time of San Jose this year...

KaseyL
08-24-2002, 10:37 PM
Article from Sydney Morning Herald, August 24, 2002:

Like we know him, he's not really friendly towards Lleyton, to put it politely, however there are a few cynical quotes in this article worth reading.

Some truths for Hewitt and other tennis asylum inmates to ponder

By Richard Hinds

Everyone seems to agree Lleyton Hewitt "owes something to the sport". Perhaps it is time tennis officials started to make it clear exactly what that is.

As Hewitt readies to defend his United States Open crown, the vague notions about player responsibility - and the sometimes equivocal rules and regulations governing them - led him to play victim in his dispute with the ATP.

Since the letter of the law was invoked in Cincinnati and Hewitt fined a seemingly disproportionate $200,000 (the size of fine reflected Hewitt's performance in the tournament, not necessarily the offence) for his failure to do a pre-match interview with a cable television network, he has blamed everyone except himself.

Hewitt has blown smoke about how certain tour officials are out to get him, whined he has been vilified by the press and even tried to put a gun to the tour's head by threatening to play fewer events.

This is not quite the dire threat some would have you believe. Given his commercial appeal has been limited by his on-court antics and off-court hibernation, Hewitt is clutching a starter's pistol - not a bazooka.

However, he does have one genuine cause for complaint. Hewitt and the other inmates in the tennis asylum constantly hear that old line: "You owe something to the sport." What their parents, coaches, agents, the press and tennis officials fail to tell them is just what that is

So, for starters ...

~ You owe it to the sport to talk to the media. And not just at the mandatory press conferences or when you are pushing a new sponsor because, like it or not, the media is the window through which your fans see you.

Yes, sometimes you'll get misquoted or misrepresented - but probably no more often than you misrepresent your own motives or intentions by telling half-truths or outright lies in press conferences.

Yes, those reporters can be odious, prying creatures and God knows who dresses them. But offer them a strong mint if they come within five metres, open up a little and it may not be the most unpleasant 30 minutes of your life.

~ You owe it to the sport to be a role model. It's a daggy term but it doesn't necessarily mean you have to escort little old ladies across busy roads or put on concerts for orphans. Not unless you're a saint or Pat Rafter or both.

What it does mean is you have to be five times more responsible than your old high school mates because simple indiscretions can have outsize consequences. For you, questioning a linesman's parenthood or blowing .06 after getting pulled over in your new Porsche are hanging offences.

Yes, it is unfair. As unfair as the winner of a tennis tournament pocketing $600,000 and the nurse in a cancer ward taking home $25,000 a year after tax.

~ You owe it to the sport to lose even better than you win. And we're not talking about the way Tim Henman loses Wimbledon. We mean showing that at your moment of greatest disappointment your are, publicly at least, at your best.
It matters because sport is supposed to breed people who would rather play their best game and lose rather than play their worst game and win. We all know it isn't true, but you can at least get back to the privacy of the dressing-room before breaking five racquets over your knee.

~ You owe it to the sport to turn up. It says something about tennis that the ATP had to introduce big fines and ranking-point penalties to ensure players would appear for some masters series events. Still, some would rather cite a bogus injury than go to Hamburg or Montreal to collect a guaranteed $10,000 first-round loser's cheque.

OK, golf is a lot less strenuous than tennis. But you might still heed the words of Peter Lonard, who will play the US and European tours this year then come home for at least three local events: "I don't think it's going to hurt that much, playing golf. That's what we do, isn't it?"

~ You owe it to the sport to shut up. The media will give you the opportunity to pass judgement on anything from Elle Macpherson's pregnancy to the Bolivian tax system. That doesn't mean you have to, though.
Yevgeny Kafelnikov's carping about underpaid tennis players' ingrained prejudices held against the sport and, therefore, hurt his fellow players. So tell them that you think Elle should have stopped at one bambino if you have to - but think about it first.

~ You owe it to the sport to chase down every ball. On this score at least, you have a great role model. Goes by the name of Lleyton.

duck
08-25-2002, 12:30 PM
From news.com.au




Hewitt hints at schedule cuts
By Maria Hawthorne
August 25, 2002

TENNIS fans should prepare to see less of Lleyton Hewitt next year, the world No.1 hinted again on the eve of his US Open title defence.



Wimbledon champion Hewitt, a hot favourite to win back-to-back grand slam titles, is still incensed at the prospect of a massive fine from the ATP Tour following a disagreement over a television interview at the Cincinnati Masters a fortnight ago.

The 21-year-old is considering slashing his ATP Tour tournament schedule to concentrate even more on the four grand slams and Davis Cup, which are organised by the International Tennis Federation.

It would probably mean sacrificing his No.1 ranking and risking potential sponsorship deals.

But Hewitt, who has won more than $US6.5 million ($A12 million) in prizemoney on top of a reported $A30 million in product endorsements, said he wanted to concentrate on the grand slams and the Davis Cup, which he helped to win for Australia in 1999.

"I love the grand slams," Hewitt said.

"Two slams, No.1 and Davis Cup - it doesn't get much better than that. Wimbledon meant an awful lot. An Australian hadn't won there for 15 years.

"Going into majors now is the priority and that's going to be the priority for the rest of my career.

"This is what I'm playing tennis for at the moment ... (and) it's lucky that the majors are still run by the ITF."

Hewitt's lawyers are considering legal action if the ATP Tour follows through with a potential $A193,065 fine - a record for any Australian athlete - for failing to do a television interview before his first-round match at Cincinnati.

He spoke out for the first time a week ago, describing the tour as a badly run "circus" and saying: "I'll change my schedule next year if the ATP keep up with this garbage. Next year I couldn't give two hoots about No.1."

Hewitt said he would temporarily put thoughts of the fine to one side as he prepared his bid to emulate his good mate Pat Rafter by winning consecutive US Open titles.

"I couldn't give two hoots about it at the moment," Hewitt said.

"I'm coming into a grand slam and that's pretty much where my focus is."

Hewitt spent the Saturday afternoon before his opening round match against unseeded Frenchman Nicolas Coutelot hitting balls around with 20 disabled athletes from the Special Olympics.

He appeared to genuinely enjoy the experience of playing against partially-sighted, mentally impaired and/or deaf athletes from New Jersey and New York, at one point smacking his racquet into the ground when his service return went into the net, and later tumbling over trying to win a point.

"It's pretty stressful when you're out there practising, so for me to come out and see these guys enjoying themselves so much, you really half-forget that you're out here preparing for such a big tournament in the next couple of days," Hewitt said.

"I came out here, I've enjoyed myself and I just relaxed."

Hewitt is one of three Australian men in the main draw, with Mark Philippoussis playing 24th seed Sjeng Schalken and big-serving lefthander Wayne Arthurs playing seventh seed Juan Carlos Ferrero.

Australian Davis Cup coach Wally Masur said Philippoussis has been showing great promise in recent tournaments.

"He's been playing a fair bit so his knee's in good shape and that's obviously the main thing," Masur said.

"Mark is a quality player. If his legs are right, five sets will suit him. You can go walkabout in a tour event and you lose a set and suddenly you're in a dogfight in the third.

"In a five set match, there's a few more ebbs and flows and the best player tends to win. He certainly can do well here."

AAP

Goonergal
08-25-2002, 01:29 PM
Cash predicts second U.S. Open win for Hewitt

MELBOURNE (Reuters) - Former Wimbledon champion Pat Cash is confident Australia's Lleyton Hewitt will successfully defend his U.S. Open title at the tournament starting in New York this week.


"Unless he gets tired out mentally, I'd feel very confident in him getting his second U.S. Open in a row," Cash said in an interview aired on Australian television.


Australia's Cash, the 1987 Wimbledon champion, said world number one Hewitt, 21, would be able to set aside his clash with the sport's governing body ATP.


Hewitt was fined half his $206,000 runners-up prize money in Cincinnati earlier this month for refusing to conduct an interview with host broadcasters ESPN before his first round match.


Hewitt was quoted in Australian newspapers as saying he has threatened to ignore ATP rules in future governing how many tournament a player is obliged to compete in.


He added that he would play where and when he wanted, and called men's tennis a badly-run "circus".


The world number one collected his second grand slam title with victory over Argentine David Nalbandian in the Wimbledon final in July.


"He's able to absorb that (ATP fine) and just move on," Cash said.


"He's just so tough to beat over five sets. The class isn't really there in the (U.S. Open) tournament.


"(Andre) Agassi and (Pete) Sampras have definitely gone over the hill.


"They are still certainly capable of playing great tennis, but to win another grand slam, I'm just not too sure."

Goonergal
08-25-2002, 01:32 PM
McEnroe questions Hewitt future

John McEnroe has revealed that he does not think world number one Lleyton Hewitt is big enough to dominate the game.
McEnroe told the Sunday Telegraph newspaper that it would be a "tall order for him physically" to have a long reign at the top.

But despite his reservations the seven-time former Grand Slam champion admits he considers Hewitt the clear favourite for the US Open.

And McEnroe goes on to compare Hewitt to the young Pete Sampras.


McEnroe respects Hewitt's fighting qualities


"As the reigning US Open and Wimbledon champion Lleyton Hewitt is definitely the man to beat," said McEnroe.

"But, as for dominating the game in the same way that Sampras and Agassi did in the 90s, it is going to be a tall order for him physically.

"There is no question he is the fastest player around and a great competitor, probably the greatest since Jimmy Connors, which is quite a compliment.

"But his sheer size will make it difficult for him to lord it.

"What you can say is he is as good as Sampras was at the same age."

Hewitt could have met Britain's Greg Rusedski in the second round at Flushing Meadows but Rusedski's promotion in the draw means that will now not happen.

Goonergal
08-25-2002, 08:55 PM
Hewitt leaves brash demeanor on the court

Copyright © 2002 AP MegaSports

NEW YORK (AP) - Lleyton Hewitt's fighting spirit has helped him become a Grand Slam champion and the world's top-ranked player. It also gets him into trouble.

He's been fined for yelling at linesmen, lost a point for throwing a ball near an official and was criticized for what was perceived as a racially influenced outburst during a match in last year's U.S. Open.

Away from the court, though, Hewitt can be affable and even shy, seeming very little like the brash player who wears a backward baseball cap and peppers his matches with shouts of "Come on!"

He's the defending champion and seeded first at the U.S. Open, which starts Monday. Neither Hewitt nor Venus Williams, who is trying to become the first woman to win three straight U.S. Opens since Chris Evert took four in a row from 1975-78, plays on the opening day.

Top matches Monday include Williams' younger sister, top-ranked Serena, against Corina Morariu, who'll be playing her first Grand Slam match since returning to the tour after fighting leukemia for more than a year.

Serena is aiming for her third consecutive major title, after beating Venus in the finals of the French Open and Wimbledon.
Others playing Monday include two-time Open champion Andre Agassi, fourth-seeded Lindsay Davenport and French Open winner Albert Costa.

Hewitt can't wait to get on court. His first-round match is against 103rd-ranked Frenchman Nicolas Coutelot.

"I love competition and I love getting out there, working hard," Hewitt said. "To come out and compete in the toughest environments, especially the U.S. Open, it's sort of what I put my mind to."

Listed generously at 5-foot-11 and 150 pounds, Hewitt is the perfect antidote to the popular notion that the modern tennis player has to be as oversized as today's rackets and can succeed only with a power game.

Hewitt wears down opponents by chasing down everything that comes across the net. He just never stops. It's superb defensive tennis, highlighted by a fantastic return and complemented by an improving serve. Last month that package made him the first baseliner to win Wimbledon since Agassi in 1992.

"I love the Grand Slams, and you don't need much motivation to get up for them," Hewitt said. "That's what I'm playing tennis for at the moment."

His smooth game comes with a snarl, however. It's as though he steps on court with a mental enemies' list containing many more names than just that of his opponent. Fans, linesmen and the media all are fair game.

Hewitt was docked $1,000 for calling a chair umpire at the 2001 French Open a "spastic." He upset fans in his hometown of Adelaide, Australia, by calling them "stupid" for rooting for his underdog opponent during a 2000 match.

Most recently, the ATP Tour fined Hewitt half his winnings at a Tennis Masters Series event in Cincinnati - more than $100,000 - for not doing an interview with ESPN, which was broadcasting the tournament. He's appealing the penalty.

In typical fashion, Hewitt went out in his next match and beat his opponent 6-0, 6-0.

"It helps him that his natural competitiveness comes out on court," said Hewitt's coach, former tour player Jason Stoltenberg. "He's actually eased up a little bit compared to when he was younger."

During a second-round victory over James Blake in the 2001 U.S. Open, Hewitt demanded that linesman Marion Johnson be removed after calling two foot faults. Blake and Johnson are black.

"Look at him, mate," Hewitt said to the chair umpire, referring to Johnson. "Look at him and tell me what the similarity is." Hewitt said his use of the word "similarity" referred to both faults being called by Johnson.

Hewitt and Blake could meet in the third round this year.

Winning the U.S. Open title helped Hewitt, then 20, finish 2001 as the youngest year-end No. 1. A 45-10 match record and four tournament titles this year kept him there, putting at least a temporary stop to the merry-go-round nature of men's tennis.
Eight Grand Slam titles had been won by eight men until Hewitt added Wimbledon to his U.S. Open breakthrough.

"If you can do it once at a Grand Slam, you can do it again," said Agassi, who is seeded sixth. "He's shown the mindset to give what it takes to be at the top."

A kinder, gentler Hewitt was on display during a clinic Saturday with local Special Olympics athletes. For an hour, in the rain, the 21-year-old Australian played points, offered tips, exchanged high-fives and drew smiles.

He even persuaded one boy to turn his cap backward.

Nothing brash about that.

:angel:

KaseyL
08-25-2002, 10:09 PM
Thanks for the articles!

Angele
08-25-2002, 11:47 PM
Tennis Champion Lleyton Hewitt Picks a 'Career Doubles Partner'
Sunday August 25, 12:04 am ET

FLUSHING, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aug. 24, 2002--Defending U.S. Open Champion Lleyton Hewitt today announced his commitment to join Special Olympics in its campaign to double the number of Special Olympics athletes worldwide. A million athletes strong, Special Olympics looks to grow the movement by another million athletes with mental retardation by the year 2005. Hewitt will support this by spreading the message of athlete and coach recruitment for the worldwide Special Olympics movement throughout his international tennis travels.

"Lleyton will be instrumental in helping Special Olympics reach the next generation of Special Olympics athletes," said Tim Shriver, President and CEO of Special Olympics. "As one of sport's brightest young global stars, his commitment to Special Olympics is a tribute to our athletes and a clarion call to the world's youth that Special Olympics athletes deserve admiration and respect. Lleyton's personal dedication will help bring the joy of sport and achievement to a million more Special Olympics athletes worldwide."

Hewitt launched the partnership today at the U.S. Open with a tennis clinic for Special Olympics athletes as part of the Arthur Ashe Kids' Day. Special Olympics athletes from New York and New Jersey received tennis tips from the No. 1-ranked Hewitt. Next, he will most likely hit the athlete-recruitment trail with a stop in China in November to help launch the country's tennis program. A trip home to Australia will follow where Hewitt plans to incorporate a Special Olympics' component into his International Tennis Camp.

"I've been fortunate to have earned the title of champion in tennis, but Special Olympics athletes earn that title every day of their lives," said Hewitt. "Their courage and success over daily challenges is the true definition of 'champion.'"

Hewitt was first introduced to Special Olympics in 1998 by his former coach Peter Smith. Smith would host tennis clinics in Adelaide at which Hewitt would speak and play with the Special Olympics athletes. In 1999, Hewitt was featured in a South Australian-based advertising campaign with SPARC (Sport Art & Recreation Council Disability Foundation) to raise funds for Australian athletes with physical disabilities. Hewitt's interest in supporting sport opportunities for all people globally has helped mold his decision to join Special Olympics' campaign for growth.

Special Olympics

Special Olympics is an international year-round program of sports training and competition for children and youth with mental retardation. More than 1 million athletes in more than 150 countries train and compete in 26 Olympic-type summer and winter sports. Founded in 1968 by Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Special Olympics provides people with mental retardation continuing opportunities to develop fitness, demonstrate courage, and experience joy as they participate in the sharing of gifts and friendship with other athletes, their families and the community. There is no cost to participate in Special Olympics.

Visit Special Olympics online at http://www.specialolympics.org.

KaseyL
08-26-2002, 11:42 AM
Great article, Angele! Thanks!

KaseyL
08-26-2002, 11:47 AM
Article from The Courier Mail, August 26, 2002:

Hewitt feeling the heat

Paul Malone in New York

LLEYTON Hewitt is fighting a battle on five fronts in a US Open title defence which is stretching the resources of the defiant world tennis No. 1 to the limits.

It will take a lot for the tough Wimbledon champion to block out the distractions stalking his campaign – his unease over reliving his September 11 experiences, a chest cold, his dispute with the governing body of men's tennis, uneasy dealings with the New York fans and the challenge from as many as seven opponents.

But it is hard to find anyone at Flushing Meadows foolhardy enough to say Hewitt will not walk with the greats at the end of the US Open, starting tomorrow morning (Australian time), by defending his title.

Hewitt is attempting to become the seventh man since the open era started in 1969 to defend the US title and join John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors, Ivan Lendl, Stefan Edberg, Pete Sampras and Pat Rafter.

Of even greater historic significance would be a Wimbledon-US Open double, a feat managed by Rod Laver, Connors, McEnroe, Boris Becker and Sampras, and now possibly by a 21-year-old who admits he has no firm ambition now he has won Wimbledon.

"I won two Slams and a No. 1 (ranking) and the Davis Cup, so it doesn't get much better," said Hewitt in the countdown to his first-round match against France's Nicolas Coutelot.

"It's a huge burden to have off your back to win your first Slam and if you win more, you have more off your back.
"The majors are the priority for the rest of my career now and you don't need any motivation to win them. But there are a lot of stresses you have to try to block out."

Hewitt candidly spoke about how he was a passenger on the last Australia-bound flight to leave New York before the two teams of terrorist hijackers attacked the World Trade Centre.
"It's tough to come back here. But I think sport and the US Open is a good way for people to get over September 11 in any way possible," he said.

Hewitt, favourite at $3.25 ahead of Andre Agassi ($7), coughed often from the effects of a chest cold as he spent about two hours practising with Wimbledon runner-up David Nalbandian and gave a clinic for mentally disabled players.

Considering how Hewitt guards his off-court time, it was surprising and commendable that two days before the Open starts he spent 45 minutes in persistent light rain so mentally disabled athletes could hit tennis balls and chat amiably with him.

Hewitt will figure in campaigns in the US, Australia and China aimed at doubling the number of mentally disabled athletes (about one million from about 150 countries) who compete in Special Olympics sports.

Just as Hewitt has tennis history to overcome in New York, so too has 32-year-old Agassi.
Only Ken Rosewall, two months off his 36th birthday when he won his fourth and last US title in 1970, was an older man to win the championship.

Hewitt yesterday learnt the identity of the two qualifiers, Israeli Noam Okun and Russian Igor Kunitcin, vying to provide his second-round opposition, should he overcome the 103rd-ranked Coutelot.

END

great of Lleyton to do this for Special Olympics! :bounce:

Hope he doesn't have troubles with that chest cold... Don't get sick right now, Lleyton!

KaseyL
08-26-2002, 11:55 AM
This comes from the Daily Telegraph, August 26:

It's a sound analysis imo. I've highlighted a few things I really believe to be the case indeed.


How the Big Apple thinks Lleyton's a worm

NEW York may be in a sensitive mood with the approach of September 11 but I hope Lleyton Hewitt isn't relying on a break, writes JEFF WELLS.

Being the defending champion in the US Open isn't going to earn him any favours. He is not one of theirs and they don't like him.
They used to like Pat Rafter but they turned on him like spoiled brats who had been dudded on their tickets when, as defending champion, he had to pull out of his first round match against Cedric Pioline in 1999 with a torn shoulder.

The fat cats who get the ringside seats in the Arthur Ashe Stadium – which pushes the average sports fan up into the bleachers – booed him off despite having got four good sets for their money. It was disgraceful. But that was New York before the world started feeling sorry for it.

If Hewitt is to defend his title, and virtually guarantee himself the No. 1 for the second straight year, he will need to be as bloody minded as we have ever seen him – but in the form of controlled aggression. At the first sign of him losing his cool they will turn on him like piranha.

Hewitt needs good advice from his management team but he didn't get it last year and he hasn't been getting it lately.

Last year the unctuous American media savaged him when they sensed a chance to brand him a bigot.
Hewitt was playing black American James Blake and had problems being foot-faulted by a black linesman. When he complained to the chair umpire the press branded it as racism. There was a simple explanation but at the key press conference Hewitt had not been properly prepped and stumbled over his words.

If you think he has not been stigmatised you didn't read the e-mail I got from a US Tennis Association official after I wrote about the incident a while back, describing the linesman as "troublesome" to Hewitt. The USTA man, produced a dictionary definition to turn that into an insult and brand me racist too. The only "troublesome" person on the day, he said, was Hewitt, who was sticking his foot in the wrong place – even if only one linesman could spot it.

So they are waiting for the 21-year-old. With Pete Sampras having fallen in a heap, Hewitt having the measure of Andre Agassi, and Andy Roddick disappointing, they are not going to be happy about this half pint coming on strong again.

His massive fine for failing to give an interview to ESPN before the Tennis Masters in Cincinnati two weeks ago will probably come back to haunt him. Badly advised, he came out of it looking petulant.

Now he will have to play the diplomat and learn to handle the media with more aplomb.

If he goes well here he has the champions race at his mercy. He leads with 600 points to Marat Safin's 423 and Agassi's 414. His doubters will claim that he was handed 200 points for winning Wimbledon after the seeds collapsed around him and he was left to face overwhelmed Argentine David Nalbandian in the final.

But Hewitt has showed a lot of courage to fight his way back to the front after losing in the first round of the Australian Open after a bout of chicken pox. He picked up 100 points knocking over Sampras and Tim Henman to win the Tennis Masters series event at Indian Wells and 45 for making the semis – beating Safin before losing to Roger Federer – the following week in Miami in March.
He was a quarter-finalist in the Tennis Masters in Hamburg, for 25 points, and earned 30 with his three wins in the French Open. Then he won Queen's and Wimbledon.

Even if he fails here he can pick up big points in the Tennis Masters events in Madrid and Paris and be in a strong position for what could again be the decider, the Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai in November.

But nothing quite equals impressing Americans. He may figure he can take time out to play Aussie rules in the future but if he wants to maximise his profile and bank balance the corporate power is staring right at him from mezzanine level boxes on centre court.

Win one US Open and you could be a fluke. But keep on winning and they won't be able to ignore you.
Once more Hewitt has got lucky. When Australian Open winner Thomas Johansson and Hewitt's French Open conqueror Guillermo Canas withdrew it put Hewitt's probable second round opponent, former US Open finalist Greg Rusedski, who is pumped after beating him last week on the way to winning the tournament in Indianapolis, on the other side of the draw. And Australian Open semi-finalist Tommy Haas has just pulled out of Long Island with arm spasms.
But his third round opponent could be Blake, a recent winner, again. A nightmare, with the crowd in a frenzy against him and the media waiting to crush him for any indiscretion. And in the bottom half of his side are Agassi and his nemesis this year Carlos Moya.

So many times we thought we had seen the true steel in Hewitt. This time it has to be the polished variety.

END

What do you think of this article?

Nice thing of that USTA man btw... geez :fiery:

ikke
08-26-2002, 12:02 PM
Thanks for the articals

KaseyL
08-26-2002, 02:56 PM
Latest one, good example about Lleyton and the Aussie media.

But so sad to read that there were only, ONLY, 17 people on Saturday when Lleyton did the special Olympics clinic! :sad: :fiery:

He deserves better than this! :sad:

Here's the article, from The Age, August 26, 2002:

C'mon (give me a break)

Lleyton Hewitt should be a sports superstar, but isn't despite the fact that the public want to love him. Caroline Overington reports.

Imagine that you are the world's No. 1 tennis player. Now imagine that nobody cares.

Imagine that you show up for a free event in New York, two days before the US Open, and only 17 people turn up, and two of those are your parents.

That is what happened to Lleyton Hewitt yesterday.

He is the No. 1 tennis player in the world and he recently won Wimbledon. He is also defending champion at the US Open.

He should be a superstar, but he isn't.

His recent victories deserve a wild round of applause and yet, when he turned up to hit a few balls at Flushing Meadow, there were hardly any people there to put their hands together.

To put that in perspective, remember what happened whenever Pat Rafter turned up to practice in the days before any event, anywhere.

He had people hanging off the chain fences around the courts. If he took his shirt off, well, women would have tunnelled through the hardcourt to get near him.

The same was once true of Mark Philippoussis. Remember when he was still young and handsome and full of promise?

It isn't a parochial thing. Tennis fans have always mobbed the world's No. 1.

Andre Agassi had a flying wedge of support staff, to help him thrust his way through throbbing crowds.

Pete Sampras, who had a penchant for bruising five-set matches in hellish conditions, once moved a Melbourne audience to tears.

But with Lleyton, well, let's just say the men's tour hasn't had a problem like this on its hands since Thomas Muster was No. 1.

But then, at a memorable press conference in Melbourne in 1996, somebody asked Muster why nobody liked him and he laughed out loud, after which, things got better. Now that he's married to Jo-Beth Taylor, he's almost like an Australian son. So why is Lleyton so little-loved?

Actually, let's go back a step: is it even true that he isn't loved?

Maybe the public really adores him, and the Australian media just refuses to acknowledge it, because Lleyton doesn't do enough interviews? That is what his manager, Thomas Ross, tells people.

Indeed, at Flushing Meadow yesterday, Ross was overheard telling American journalists that the Australian public adores Lleyton, and it's only journalists who don't admire him, not that Lleyton could care less.

Sadly for Ross (but even more depressing for Lleyton), that it just isn't true.

Two weeks ago, Ray Morgan International conducted a poll to find out who Australia's most popular sporting heroes were.

Ian Thorpe topped the list. Then came Pat Rafter and Steve Waugh and Nathan Buckley. Lleyton Hewitt wasn't in the top five.

Then there are events like the one held yesterday, when Lleyton showed up to hit some balls around with a bunch of young people from the Special Olympics.

Can you imagine only 17 people turning up if Agassi had done that, when he was No. 1? They would have needed a SWAT team to keep people away.

So, whatever Ross thinks, there is a problem. The next question is: why?

Lleyton said some silly things when he was a boy (at the French Open in 1999, for example, he called a linesman a "spastic" which was stupid, but hardly a hanging offence.)

The media reported those comments and Lleyton got upset.

In the years since then, governments have fallen and ice caps have melted, but Lleyton's management still says that it wasn't fair, and Lleyton still won't talk to Australian journalists (in recent years, that ban has extended to some foreign journalists, since Octogan said they were now infected by bias from the Australian media).

And, of course, there have also been other incidents, such as the time Lleyton smashed up a bunch of geraniums on the court.

In the absence of real interviews with Lleyton, the media has had nothing to report but these incidents.

And so, when Lleyton attacks a box of flowers, it makes news.

When Lleyton has a tantrum on court (the best tennis players do), then that makes news, too.

Five years into Lleyton's magnificent career, the tension is terrific: many, many people are waiting for him to make an ass of himself, and he is waiting to be crucified for anything he might say or do.

Which brings us to this year's US Open. Lleyton won last year's event just 36 hours before the terrorist attack that killed 2819 people in New York. A fine time to bury the hatchet, one might think.

With good management, he could have used the goodwill he built up at Wimbledon to say things like: "I'm really excited to be here, at the US Open. It was shocking, what happened after I left last year. I hope to play some great tennis, because I reckon people are feeling pretty horrible in New York right now, and anything I can do to cheer them up, I will do."

Instead of that, Lley ton's management invited journalists to watch him take part in a publicity stunt at a shoe store ("but he can only talk about the product") and then to yesterday's event to promote the Special Olympics, which was attended by 17 people, not counting media, sponsors and players.

Ross blamed the light rain but this is bunkum: several thousand people were walking around Flushing Meadow yesterday and, in normal circumstances, they would have worked the rubber off their shoes to get in to see the world's No. 1 hit a few balls but not, it seems, if that No. 1 is Lleyton Hewitt.

It's enough to make you cry with frustation (and not only for the special olympians, who are doubtless working their hearts out, and who deserve all the publicity they can get).

It's more for Lleyton that you feel anguish. By many accounts, he's a pleasant kid who had to grow up in public (would you like it if everything you said when you were 19 was repeated, over and over, around the world, for years afterwards?)

It's true that he doesn't have Rafter's good looks, or Agassi's unbelievable skill, but he's a good tennis player with proud parents and a sweet girlfriend, so how has he managed to get into a position where he's the world's No. 1 but virtually bereft of fans?

Lleyton did speak to the media yesterday, albeit briefly.

He had a hit with the Special Olympics kids, then shuffled over to the waiting media, with his hat on backwards and his oversized shorts, looking all the world like a pleasant but nervous Australian kid, who likes looking at his shoes a lot.

Asked how he expected to fare at this year's US Open, Hewitt said: "We'll wait and see, I guess." He agreed that it was a "weird feeling", coming back to New York, since winning the Open had "changed my life."

He said the US Open was his first grand slam victory and that was a "a real burden off my back" and yet, when "all that happened" (the terrorist attacks) he had to "put everything in perspective".

About a metre away, Lleyton's coach, Jason Stoltenberg, was explaining to American journalists that Lleyton's on-court antics (the "C'mons" and the fist punching the air) "help him. It's his natural competitiveness. He puts a lot of effort and energy in. He has to let his emotions out".

Asked if he could win again, Stoltenberg said: "I think so," which left only one question hanging: will anybody care?

Well, we would love to care.

So here is a message for Lleyton, that his manager will hopefully let him read: Lleyton, we want to love you. We, the public, want to battle to get into your matches, and hang off the trees if we can't. We want to scream with desire when you tear off your shirt, and cheer madly when you do one of those splendid, double-fisted cross court winners.

So, why, why, why won't you let us?

END of article

fcap
08-26-2002, 03:08 PM
He dose let us and we do love him!!
OMG!! That article was soo rude and un called for!
Ingrid i hope you dont mind but Im posting it on Lleytonland!! Its the worst article!! :sad:

Scotso
08-26-2002, 03:14 PM
Originally posted by Lleyton's_Chick
Hewitt leaves brash demeanor on the court

Copyright © 2002 AP MegaSports

That's a good article.

What Lleyton said about that incident was true, you could hear it in his voice, but no one wants to believe him.

ikke
08-26-2002, 05:38 PM
it's a sad artical!!! :sad:
They have to imagine that they were lleyton!!! His life is not easy!! He's already 21 and that famous!! Everywhere he goes, they take pix etc of him. Ok he is shy, so what!!!
Lleyton, we love you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Just be who you are!
Thanks ingrid

C'mon_Lley
08-26-2002, 11:49 PM
That's sad....:sad: This woman seems determined to point out the negatives instead of applauding what he's doing for the special olympics. :rolleyes: :rolleyes: FUCK the aussie media.:( :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

On the other hand, we all LOVE Lleyton and he knows we always will. :angel: :angel: And I'm sure he's not too upset that only 17 people showed up. He's very private and doesn't do these things for publicity , so.....

All that matters is that he's doing this wonderful thing for special olympics. :D The truth is he's a great guy and if people can't see that then that's too bad. Its their loss.

WE LOVE YOU LLEYTON!!!!!!! :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

C'mon_Lley
08-27-2002, 12:03 AM
A pretty good article/interview with Lleyton from LA Times




August 24, 2002
U.S. OPEN

Other Side Is Mr. Hide

The Hewitt you don't see is shy 21-year-old who is miles from Connors-type character who prowls the court as if it's his war zone

By LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER (latimes.com)

PALO ALTO -- "Come o-n-n-n!" he squeals, sounding like a wounded wombat, pumping his fists and cursing at the imaginary adversaries he has invented on his way to the top of his sport. And his sport just sits there, wondering what to make of this impudent kid in the backward baseball cap who has turned men's tennis on its head.

"Come o-n-n-n!" Lleyton Hewitt shouts, and the rest of tennis does a double take, giving serious thought to a question that has yet to be sufficiently answered: If Hewitt's doing the leading, are we really sure we want to go with him?

There are champions of the moment--Marat Safin, Thomas Johansson, Albert Costa--instant lottery winners who take their prizes, do their news conferences and fade quickly into the background. Staying power is a rarity. Men's Grand Slam champions of late seem to come equipped with ticking clocks.

Hewitt has changed this time-share arrangement at the top, apparently having settled in for the long haul. Top-seeded this year, he won the U.S. Open last year, becoming the youngest No. 1 in ATP history at 20, then added a Grand Slam bookend with his Wimbledon title in July at 21.

He wins and he snarls. He loses, less frequently, but the snarl remains. Consistency is both Hewitt's strength and his weakness. His world is a simple one, divided neatly into casts of supporters and enemies. Chair umpires, linespeople, reporters, opponents, tour officials, who you are doesn't matter--if you're not with him, the way Hewitt looks at it, you are most assuredly against him.

"I'm competitive. I'm the first to admit that," he says. "That's me. It doesn't matter if I'm swimming against [Olympic champion] Ian Thorpe, I'll try and win. I know I can't, but I'll try and do my best.

"That's probably one reason why I've probably been able to do as well as I have, because I go out on the court and try and give everything I've got every time."

That much the rest of tennis learned long ago. But what else do we know about Hewitt, the economy-sized firebrand from Adelaide, Australia, with the formidable groundstrokes and the attitude to match?

Rather than providing clues, Hewitt's triumph at Wimbledon only heightened the mystery. Australian writers, deprived of easy access during the tournament, were holding secret meetings with his family to help improve the situation. Reporters from other countries joined the pursuit. One was spirited into the house of Hewitt's entourage at Wimbledon to speak with his parents, Glynn and Cherilyn, in the basement, but was asked to stay in hiding because Lleyton had unexpectedly arrived with his girlfriend, tennis pro Kim Clijsters.

The Wimbledon title--taken with the loss of only two sets in seven matches--accelerated the unveiling of Hewitt. Then, after he'd pulled out of an event in Los Angeles because he was sick, his people were willing to make him available at the Stanford women's tournament where Clijsters was playing.

There the Hewitt we've come to see on the court was missing.

Where was the tennis brat columnist John Feinstein had recently compared to Barry Bonds, calling them champions who were "absolute chumps as human beings?"

Where was that rumored chip the size of New Zealand on his shoulder?

The heir apparent to John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors and early Andre Agassi was polite, reflective and even modest about his abilities. :D :kiss:

This had an almost "Wizard of Oz" feel. On a bench near the practice courts at Stanford, Hewitt--the screaming, polarizing No. 1 who'd once called an umpire "a spastic" and had slid into a racially tinged controversy while playing African American James Blake at the 2001 U.S. Open--seemed more like a shy, skinny kid looking for the area's best skateboarding park.

"I think you learn from your mistakes now and then," Hewitt said. "Then again, sometimes people try to find the negative thing out of anything to write about. That's the disappointing thing."

So little was known about Hewitt, and outside of a couple of acquaintances in the media in Australia, he had little reservoir of goodwill when various controversies hit in the last year or so, including the break in December with respected coach Darren Cahill. He has been revealed in fits and starts, meaning that his story remains hard to tell.

"I'm probably more shy off the court than people probably think," he said. "I'm not the biggest fan of going there and standing up and telling stories about myself." :angel: :kiss:

To that end, he has spoken a couple of times to the most outgoing and affable of previous Australian champions, John Newcombe, who was also Hewitt's first Davis Cup captain.

"Talking about yourself, I find that a little bit tough," Hewitt said. "I spoke to Newk a couple of times about it because he talks so well. He has so many stories to tell over the last 50 years he's played this game. He said when I'm his age, I'll have stories to tell as well. It's tough for a 21-year-old to go out there and stand up in front of a lot of people. That comes with experience."

The dual Hewitts are not a new development. His agent, Tom Ross, learned this from Hewitt's mother when he was recruiting the youngster.

"She would often say there's two Lleytons," Ross said. "There was the Lleyton on court, who is this fiery personality and an incredible competitor.

"Off court, you wouldn't recognize him. He's this shy little kid who sits in the back of the class."

One consistent thread was his passion for winning--at everything.

Hewitt says he got his body type and endurance from his mother, who was a netball player, and his quickness from his father, a former Australian rules football player. Competitiveness came from both sides.

Oftentimes, junior players go through periods of petulance--tanking a match or throwing a set or simply retiring. Hewitt looked stumped when asked if that ever happened in his childhood.

"I always gave 100%. I can't remember once, I honestly can't," he said.

This, combined with his counterpunching abilities, makes him a fitting successor to Connors, who, like Hewitt, won his first Wimbledon at 21.

Beyond that, he shares Connors' fighting spirit on the court and the ability to raise his level in hostile circumstances.

"He's pretty strong-headed," said Patrick McEnroe, ESPN commentator and U.S. Davis Cup captain. "That's why he's No. 1 in the world. He's always reminded me of Connors. When he first came on the tour, the way he played, a me-against-the-world type of mentality.

"Which, quite honestly, isn't the worst thing to have for a tennis player. He thrives on that. Jimmy was like that in a lot of respects, 'I'm going to screw everybody, and show everybody.' In tennis, you can get away with that."

Said Hewitt: "There's a few times when people tried to hop on the train, and try bagging you. It doesn't worry me. It doesn't affect my tennis. I don't think people really realized that until probably the U.S Open last year.

"It's happened so many times in Davis Cup. I was getting bagged before I played in Spain. I went out there and beat [Albert] Costa in five sets in Barcelona. The crowd doesn't worry me when I go out there. I'm able, for some reason, to block it out and play my best tennis."

The similarities to Connors don't end there. When Connors won at Wimbledon in 1974, he was dating Chris Evert. Their engagement was viewed by many as the class rebel hooking up with the leader of the pep squad. Hewitt has been seeing Clijsters since he met her at the Australian Open in 2000, attending as many of her matches as possible. Clijsters is well liked by media and her peers on the tour.

:hearts: :hearts:"Watching Kim affects me," Hewitt said. "I want her to win every time she steps on the court. It's tough. When you're out there, you don't feel those same sorts of pressures. You're sitting off the court and you're thinking, 'Get a first serve in here,' and then they miss it. I couldn't do it week in and week out." :angel:

Like Hewitt, Connors had his media problems and conflicts with tour officials in his day, even filing a $40-million antitrust lawsuit against the ATP officials and others, charging a conspiracy to monopolize pro tennis.

Hewitt's difficulties with the ATP aren't quite of that nature, but even on the eve of his U.S. Open title defense he was prepared to spar with that organization. He was fined $105,650 by the ATP for refusing to conduct an interview with ESPN this month before his first-round match at Cincinnati.

There is an appeal pending, but Hewitt hired counsel in Indianapolis this week, Barnes & Thornburg, to handle the matter should legal action be required. His camp felt an arrangement with the parties had been reached before the matter exploded at the tournament.

"Based upon Lleyton's experience with the tour to date, it's not hard to understand he felt the need to engage a litigator," Ross said. "There was some extremely bad judgment used by certain tour staff--and Lleyton paid the price."

One of the members of the appeals panel used to be Patrick McEnroe. He has stepped down from the position, citing his Davis Cup position as well as his broadcast responsibilities. McEnroe speaks highly of Hewitt as a performer and personality, but says that being No. 1 carries extra responsibilities.

"The tour has got to have some power here," he said. "The Lleyton Hewitts of the world have a lot more being asked of them. You need to do more when you're at the top of the sport." :rolleyes:

For Hewitt, the good still outweighed the bad a few weeks ago at Stanford. This was before the ATP feud, long before he'd told an Australian newspaper that the men's tour was a badly run "circus."

On this day, there was still a Wimbledon afterglow and the thrill of holding the No. 1 ranking, talking about his favorite band, Midnight Oil, and getting to play on Tiger Woods' collegiate golf course.

So, what would the top tennis player want to ask the top golfer?

"The way that he handles himself every tournament he goes into, everyone expects him to shoot 65 every day," Hewitt said. "That's an extraordinary thing. The way he's been able to block everything out and concentrate on going out there and doing what he does best. If there is a secret for him doing that, I'd like to know it, to try and keep my ranking and majors going as long as I could."

luvbadboys
08-27-2002, 04:08 AM
Regarding that pathetic article, I'd like to pint out that the New York Daily News has a nice article on Lleyton and they mention the event and nowhere is it mentioned that Lleyton's clinic was not well attended. From the article it seems the exact opposite.
which means of course that the truth probably lies somewhere in the middle.

I must say Lleyton is to be commanded for his patriotism but if this kind of stuff continues he may emigrate to the US or someplace else. I mean even the New York Times which he dissed does not come down him quite as hard.

Most of the articles I've been reading about him from US papers so far have been pretty positive.

luvbadboys
08-27-2002, 04:10 AM
I have to copy and scan the article as I don't think it's online. This means another long process to figure out how to do this and get it posted. Bear with me.:)

duck
08-27-2002, 09:15 AM
Well, I wouldn't get too upset about the article. It was incredibly cruel but really should have been subtitled 'Give me an interview'. I think this journalist must have been blanked a few times too many and has decided to get some revenge. Appallingly emotionally manipulative and poor journalism. More often than not articles tell you far more about their writer than they do about their subject.

KaseyL
08-27-2002, 11:18 AM
Originally posted by duck
should have been subtitled 'Give me an interview'. I.

LOL @ "Give me an interview!"

KaseyL
08-27-2002, 11:20 AM
Luvbadboys, are you the one posting on LLland too?

Hey, don't mind, here will be plenty of people willing to help you how to do that if need be.

Thanks for telling us about the article!

KaseyL
08-27-2002, 11:27 AM
Lleyton article in TIME Magazine

This article will appear in the issue of Sept. 2:

Serving Up Some Attitude

On and off the court with No. 1-ranked tennis star Lleyton Hewitt, whose fans think his talent and personality can help save the men's game

By Jennie James

Monday, Aug. 26, 2002

There's something vaguely unsettling about the way Lleyton Hewitt, the top-ranked tennis player in the world, yells "C'mooannn!" at himself during matches. It's not the way the words are flattened by Hewitt's Aussie twang. It's the intensity with which they are delivered. Sometimes there's a variation, such as "C'mooannn, Rocky!", a salute to Hewitt's fictional fighting hero Rocky Balboa. He carries a dvd of Rocky IV on the road to crank himself up, although that seems unnecessary, considering the passion he puts into his game. "It helps me when I show some emotion out there," says Hewitt, 21. Emotion, even if it's negative, he says, "gives my opponent a bit of a snit."

Hewitt is the leading snit-distributor in men's tennis, a player whose take-no-prisoners attitude has produced two Grand Slam singles titles. This week he defends his U.S. Open crown, two months after conquering Wimbledon. It's the same attitude that has driven him to unseemly conflicts with fans, opponents, tour officials and umpires. At the French Open, he called the chair umpire "spastic," and he got into an ugly run-in with an umpire at last year's U.S. Open. More recently he rang up a $105,650 fine, now under appeal, for allegedly running afoul of ATP Tour rules. He called the tour's actions "an absolute joke."

No wonder John McEnroe likes him. Hewitt could be "the player the men's game has been searching for," McEnroe wrote recently. It had better find someone, fast. The women's game, which features the charismatic, hard-hitting Williams sisters, Serena and Venus, plus Jennifer Capriati, Lindsay Davenport and Martina Hingis, among others, has clearly captured the public's imagination. The men's game has plenty of terrific players, like Marat Safin and Tim Henman, and promising Americans, like Andy Roddick and James Blake.

But men's tennis is in a personality slump and needs a superstar with game and gumption who can connect with fans.
Hewitt has plenty of both, which has carried him through duels like his five-set quarter-final win against Roddick in last year's Open. Playing against an American in Arthur Ashe Stadium, Hewitt refused to crack. "I really don't carry that fear factor," he says. He wore out the 19-year-old Roddick with his pinpoint ground strokes and indefatigable desire. He then dismantled Pete Sampras in the final. He is neither especially big nor strong at 5 ft. 11 in. and 160 lbs. But he is especially relentless. "He doesn't have the big game to blow guys away," says his coach, Jason Stoltenberg. "He's got to use his mind strength and his legs and his ground strokes."

For the men's tennis establishment, Hewitt couldn't have arrived at a better time. With the reigns of Andre Agassi and Sampras drawing to a close — and colorful Europeans as plentiful as empty ashtrays in Paris cafes — there is a big void at the top of the sport. Worse, a vital ATP Tour marketing partner, ISL, went bankrupt last year, leaving men's tennis with a financial shortfall. The tour needs marquee players who can lure big sponsors back to the game.

For better or worse, Hewitt's off-the-court life isn't likely to land him in the tabloids. His parents frequently join him on the road, and when at home in Adelaide, he lives in a guesthouse on their property. "Lleyton is a Jekyll and Hyde," says his mother Cherilyn. "What you see out there on that court is not him."

He recently hired a hometown buddy as a one-man entourage to have someone to discuss Australian football with. (Apparently his tennis-pro girlfriend Kim Clijsters, a Belgian, isn't up to the task.)
Hewitt is bracing for the return to New York City.

He knows the crowd may well be pulling for a hometown hero like Blake, particularly in the shadow of the anniversary of 9/11. U.S. Tennis Association president Merv Heller concedes as much: "To me, a dream match would be four Americans in the singles finals." That's unlikely, at least for the men. At No. 6., Agassi is the highest-seeded American. Next, at No. 11, is crowd fave Roddick. Both would have to overcome contenders like German No. 3 seed Tommy Haas and Russian No. 2 Safin. And, especially, Hewitt.

After he won last year's Open, Hewitt spent the next day driving around in a limousine to photo shoots, reveling in his victory. Then he boarded a plane to Australia — on Sept. 10. "It's going to be a weird feeling going back," says Hewitt. "I don't know what to expect." New York City being what it still is, the usual U.S. Open etiquette will obtain: Hewitt can expect a pumped-up, howling mob of tennis fanatics looking for a champion. He might not even need to bring Rocky IV along.

With reporting by David E. Thigpen/Cincinnati

Goonergal
08-28-2002, 01:08 AM
No. 1 seed Hewitt Advances
by Laura Andriani
Tuesday, August 27, 2002


21 year-old Lleyton Hewitt entered Arthur Ashe stadium, the site of his 2001 US Open victory against Pete Sampras, with an air of confidence Tuesday evening. His opponent, No. 91 ranked Frenchman Nicolas Coutelot, in contrast, was making his debut.

Although Coutelot met Hewitt with equally strong groundstrokes throughout the match, the Aussie's 14 aces and mere 25 unforced errors verified his fan's belief that he is, indeed, the reigning king of tennis.

Where Coutelot seemed sluggish, Hewitt seemed pumped; when Coutelot flatly smacked his groundstrokes long, Hewitt showed agility and finesse in his setting up and execution of points.

Coutelot, who was playing in his first major hard-court tournament ever, committed 57 unforced errors and could not seem to gain any kind of edge over Hewitt, who averaged a 107-mph first serve.

After taking the second set 6-3, Hewitt kept his lead by serving up six aces.

In the fourth game, Hewitt approached the net to reach a short ball, and quickly recovered to hit a winner off of Coutelot's defensive topspin lob. Coutelot, looking worn-out, never took the lead, allowing Hewitt to finish the set with a fluid cross-court backhand.

Hewitt advances to the second round, where he will face Israel's Noam Okun.

KaseyL
08-28-2002, 12:08 PM
Thanks for the article!

Here's one from Ananova, August 28, 2002

Defending champ Hewitt off to winning start

August 27, 2002

Top seed and reigning champion Lleyton Hewitt showed flashes of his brilliant best to dispose of erratic Frenchman Nicolas Coutelot in the opening round of the US Open.
Hewitt produced some outstanding tennis when needed and generally outplayed his French opponent in his 6-2 6-3 6-3 victory.

Coutelot was well off the pace in the first set, dropping his serve four times, and the Australian looked likely to cruise through.
But that easy route into the second round suddenly looked a little trickier as Coutelot unveiled some superb shot-making in the second set.

In contrast to the first set, Hewitt could only break once as he took the set 6-3.
On serve at 1-1, the third set brought a classic moment of French flair, as Coutelot won a point courtesy of a mid-court volley between his legs.

However, the determined Hewitt did not falter and visibly upped his aggression and determination as he went on to take the set and the match.

KaseyL
08-28-2002, 12:13 PM
And two articles about his fight with the ATP:

First one:

Source: AAP, August 28, 2002

Hewitt calls ATP officials liars

World No.1 Lleyton Hewitt continued his fight with the Association of Tennis Professionals, accusing officials of lying.

Hewitt emerged from his straight sets win over unseeded Frenchman Nicolas Coutelot to describe the ATP's version of his failure to do a pre-match television interview at a minor tournament earlier this month as "crap".

ATP officials threatened Hewitt with a $A193,000 fine - the largest ever imposed on an Australian athlete - for failing to do a pre-match interview at the Cincinnati Masters.

But he said he was confident he would not have to pay.
"A lot of people lied. That's a known fact," Hewitt said. "I've got no doubt that I'm going to win, there won't be a fine at all. It was just absolute lies coming out. That was probably the most disappointing thing about it. I felt like I was copping the brunt. The ATP was riding the wave and there were so many guys just making stories up in there, just to throw it in, I guess to save their jobs."

Hewitt did not name those he said were lying. But he said they lied about the timing of the interview with US sports network ESPN, the length of the proposed interview and when he was notified of it.

ATP officials would not comment on the record but confirmed that his case will be heard by the appeals committee of three former players.

However, two of the members - Australian John Fitzgerald and American Patrick McEnroe - have already said they will not sit on the committee for Hewitt's case, leaving the ATP to find two others to join Frenchman Guy Forget.

Hewitt is battling a cold which affected his breathing. He said he was not 100 per cent fit.
"It probably got worse halfway through last week," he said. "At least if I feel like I can get through the first few matches, I'm only going to get better." However, he said it was not linked to his mystery breathing problems in the past. "It's just like the flu, basically," he said.

END

Hope he gets rid of that cold ASAP!

KaseyL
08-28-2002, 12:17 PM
And another article about that ATP business:

Source: Reuters, August 28, 2002

Hewitt reignites fine row, says ATP lied

By Ossian Shine

NEW YORK (Reuters) - World number one Lleyton Hewitt has vigorously stoked his row with the organisers of professional men's tennis by branding the ATP liars.

"The ATP people were lying," said the 21-year-old Australian at the U.S. Open when asked of his feud with the governing body over a fine imposed earlier this month.

"It was always 'ATP spokesperson' ... no one ever wanted to put their name to it. I think a lot of people lied, I think that is a known fact," he said.

Hewitt was handed a $103,000 fine in Cincinnati earlier this month -- half his runners-up prize money -- for refusing to conduct an interview with host broadcasters ESPN before his first round match.

The player said he had told the ATP he would attend the interview "just to get it all out of the way", but that nobody had got back to his coach Jason Stoltenberg until it was too late and a fine was inevitable.

"You know, I didn't really want to come out and make a big deal of it," said the top seed after sweeping past Frenchman Nicolas Coutelot 6-2 6-3 6-3 in the first round in New York.
"But it was all one-sided coming out ... it was just absolute lies coming out. I felt I was copping the brunt of it and the ATP was just sort of riding the wave. There were so many guys just making up stories just to ... save their jobs, I guess."

BADLY-RUN "CIRCUS"

Hewitt said earlier this month he was annoyed by the ATP's attitude over the ESPN incident because he had already agreed with the broadcasters to do the interview after the match.
"ESPN was satisfied with that," said Hewitt at the time. "(ATP chief executive) Mark Miles was satisfied with that and the tournament director was satisfied with that but there was one guy, the PR manager, who wasn't. When things happen like in Cincinnati, when you think about the way everything has been run, it's just not much fun," added the Australian, who is appealing against the fine.

Hewitt called the governing body of men's tennis a badly-run "circus" and said he could in future ignore ATP rules governing how many tournaments a player is obliged to compete in and that he would play where, and when, he wanted, regardless of what that would mean to his ranking.

"There are times when you feel like (walking away) ... it is a great sport if the ATP would just get out of the way," he said. On Tuesday, he cranked up the row

Explaining his annoyance, and why the row developed, he said: "It was basically about the timing of the whole situation, when they notified me ... the whole little details they put into it, which tries to make their story a lot stronger. Where in the end, it's basically just crap."

END

I hope they solve this, it's not really helping the sport if the ATP is doing this to its number one player in the first place.

Goonergal
08-28-2002, 02:06 PM
L. HEWITT/N. Coutelot

THE MODERATOR: First question for Lleyton, please.

Q. Is it a different feeling coming out there as defending champion this year?
LLEYTON HEWITT: In some ways, I guess. I think you can -- it's always nice, I've always found, to come back to a place that you've played well in the past, whether it's a small tournament or a big tournament. Obviously, as I said before, the tournament, this place changed my life for so many reasons, this time last year. This is where I got my big breakthrough. It's an extra special feeling to come back here.
Yeah, I think as soon as I walked on the court and sucked in a bit of the atmosphere, a few of the memories came back of the final against Pete last year. I think, for me, that's a plus, you know. A lot of people may get, you know, a little bit negative, I guess, about it or feel the pressure, but, you know, I enjoy coming back here and, you know, defending my title and see how I go this year.

Q. Does it make you any more or less hungry?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, I don't know. You're always hungry for the Slams, I guess. I've won a couple of them now. You know, it's a nice feeling to get more now, I guess.

Q. How's that cold? Are you able to take any medication for it?
LLEYTON HEWITT: No. You know, obviously you can tell I'm not quite 100 percent. But, you know, I've had it since I lost in Indianapolis, so I started feeling it coming here. Actually hung around for a long time.
Probably got worse half way through last week and, you know, I look back and it's nice it happened last week rather than this week. At least if I feel like I can get through the first few matches, I'm only going to get better.

Q. From time to time, you have conversations with Patrick Rafter. He's the last person to win this tournament twice in a row. I wonder whether he imparted whether or not there's any particular thing that's important to know when you're trying to repeat as champion here?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I haven't brought it up with Pat. You know, I think he's too worried about trying to be a father at the moment. I haven't even brought up, you know, trying to defend the title and be the next -- try and be the next person to try and do exactly what Pat did.
My mind, it's an extremely tough task, I guess, to come back to a place, you know, and have the pressure on you again and try and come through seven tough matches. But, then again, I think it sort of suits the way I play in the big matches as well. You know, I think I play the big matches as well as anyone these days.

Q. Was it hard to get into a rhythm against him?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah.

Q. He seems to be...
LLEYTON HEWITT: I've never seen him play. I only heard a little bit from a few of the other guys in the locker room. Yeah, you know, certainly surprised me a couple of times. Obviously, the first game said it all, he was 30-love up. Next thing, he sprayed four back fences basically and gave me the break.
But he's a good player. He's a typical French player, I guess, extremely talented, got every shot in the book and very flashy. And if they're on, they're very tough to beat.
That was pretty much -- I knew that sort of going into it. It's tough playing a guy you've actually never seen hit a ball before as well.

Q. How did you handle the long wait?
LLEYTON HEWITT: It was -- obviously, I was sitting in the locker room watching everyone cramp, I guess.
I didn't do a hell of a lot. It's obviously -- it's tough for players not knowing when they're going to go on. At least I pretty much knew Venus was going to go pretty quickly (smiling). (LMAO :p)
But then again, I got told that I may be moving courts, as well, for the night session. So, you know, I'm all of a sudden looking around at what's happening on Armstrong, Grandstand, in case they did move me and I had to prepare a bit quicker. It's tough, but that's tennis. Unless you're first match on, you never have a deadline when you're actually going to be out there. That's the ups and downs of tennis.

Q. When you're looking around at the other matches, did you see what happened to Mark?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I saw a little bit. I was having lunch at the time. I only saw the replay. I didn't see it actually happen. But it was a strange fall. I think, you know, looked very similar, I guess, to what happened in Wimbledon a few years ago.
I got no idea how bad it is. You know, I saw him icing his knee afterwards, then he left pretty much after that. I guess he's going to see, you know, if there's, you know, some serious damage done or not. Until then, I don't think anyone's got an idea how bad it is. I'm sure he probably, obviously, feared the worst, but then again it wasn't probably quite as bad as what happened Wimbledon three or four years ago because he kept playing a few more games. Could pull up, you know, I guess.

Q. As the No. 1 player in the world, do you get a tremendous amount of attention? Some say that you have some responsibilities. My question really relates to us as the media. What's your view, your philosophy on the media? Do you see us as a pain in the neck, as adversaries, as responsible, in part, for your fame? What's your approach?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I see it, you know, as a way to connect with the fans I think, is probably the biggest. Obviously, I guess responsible for, you know, if you're in the papers, then a lot of the publicity is going to be out there and you're going to be thrown in the spotlight a lot more than if you're not noticed I guess and not written about. In that way, obviously, I've been thrown in the spotlight, I guess, at a very young age. I've had to deal with, you know, being in the spotlight since 15 or 16 really.
But it's part of being a professional athlete. Yeah, I think, you know, the biggest thing is trying to connect to the fans I guess because the fans don't see that much of you off the court as, you know, they only basically see you play your matches and that. The media's probably the biggest way for people to find out about the person.

Q. Do you think you were treated unfairly with the whole brouhaha and fine relating to the ESPN interview? Do you think that was an unfair treatment of you?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I think a lot of people lied. I think that's a known fact. I've got no doubt that I'm going to win, there won't be a fine at all. I spoke to a few journalists from Australia. Everyone thinks I don't talk to them, but I do. For me, that was a way to get my side of the story. It was all one-sided coming out. It was just absolute lies coming out. So that was probably the most disappointing thing about it.
You know, I really didn't want to come out and make a big deal of it. It sort of blew off. I felt like I was, you know, coping the brunt of it. I felt the ATP was sort of just riding the wave and, you know, as I said before, there were so many guys just making stories up in there, just to throw it in, I guess to save their job.

Q. Who was lying?
LLEYTON HEWITT: The ATP people were lying. A lot of times there was -- always ATP spokesperson, no one ever wanted to put their name to it.

Q. They have a way of changing the stadium court every year, different speed.
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah?

Q. Anything different this year? Faster? Slower? About the same? If it has changed, does it suit your game better than it did last year?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I think it's probably, you know, a tad slower, I guess. I was listening to the commentary last night, I don't know if this is true, they said they put three layers instead of four or something on the court, I heard someone say. I think McEnroe said it. If that's the case, I don't know why they do it. You know, I don't know if it benefits me or makes that big a difference. It's probably going to quicken up, the more play it has on it over the two weeks.
I don't find it to be that big a difference, you know. I've spoken to a few guys. They've actually said some of the outside courts are playing pretty quick. I think the thing that tournaments have to do is put all the courts the same pace. You know, I think that's the biggest thing. I'm not that concerned about how the pace of the courts are playing, whether it's Australian Open or US Open, obviously the clay and grass is pretty much the same, I guess. But hardcourts, as long as there are 24 courts or whatever, are the same pace, I've got no problem.

Q. Don't the Slams try to accommodate their own players though? You go to Paris, maybe the speed of the clay courts there are conducive to their players?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. I haven't put any requests in for the Australian Open yet. Would be a good idea. Haven't thought about it.
I'm -- I don't know. Maybe Pete and Andre have spoken, Roddick, I don't know, here. To me, it's not a huge difference on last year. I don't think it favors one particular style of play too much.

Q. What CDs are you listening to these days to get yourself psyched for the matches?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Believe it or not, I still listen to Jimmy Barns (phonetic), went and saw his Raw tour end of last year, he gave me tickets. I got to meet him and, you know, that's probably my number one. Saw him live as well. (Who in the hell in Jimmy Barns :o)

Q. Some newspaper writers have suggested that you're the only serious contender for this title. Do you think that's right?
LLEYTON HEWITT: No, that's rubbish.

Q. Who do you think your main challenge is?
LLEYTON HEWITT: There's a lot of challengers. Most people know who they are. Obviously, Agassi, Safin are probably the two biggest. Roddick's up there, for sure. He plays -- obviously, I think we all saw how well he played here last year. Haas, Henman, Rusedski, Ferrero. There's a lot of guys. I think it's getting more and more open, considering so many of the good, typical clay court players are able to do well and win -- Moya was another one. I'm forgetting guys; I know I am.
But there's a lot of typical clay court players who are doing better and better on hardcourts these days and getting more confident. They see a guy like Carlos come out and win Cincinnati, and they spear each other on and say we can beat the big hitters and big servers. I think it's an extremely tough field this year.

Q. There were a lot of injuries today.
LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know.

Q. There's been seven today, which is a record.
LLEYTON HEWITT: What was it?

Q. Seven have gone out in the first round, a record.
LLEYTON HEWITT: Injuries?

Q. Yeah.
LLEYTON HEWITT: I got no idea. Obviously, you know, I've said in the past with the tournaments, I think there's too many. But whether that's why seven people went out today, I got no -- well, first round, I got no idea.

Q. Just to finish up on the previous questions, I mean, to say that the ATP was lying, obviously, is a strong comment. Could you tell me what their lies were?
LLEYTON HEWITT: It was basically about the timing of the whole situation, when they notified me, the whole little details they put into it, which tries to make their story a lot stronger. Where, in the end, it's basically just crap.

This is what you call a decent sized interview :rolleyes:

Goonergal
08-28-2002, 02:17 PM
Hewitt Rips A Winner


Men's titleholder Lleyton Hewitt opened the defence of his crown with a straightforward 6-2, 6-3, 6-3 win against Nicolas Coutelot. Hewitt said it felt very nice to be back in fact he says it is always nice to return to a site where you have done well.

"This place changed my life for so many reasons this time last year - this is where I got my big break through so it's a special feeling to come back here," said Hewitt. "As soon as I walked on the court and sucked in a bit of the atmosphere the memories came back of the final against Pete (Sampras) last year. I think for me that's a plus. Some people might get a bit negative about it, the pressure, but I enjoy coming back here and defending my title and see how I go this year."

Hewitt then lashed out at the ATP for telling "lies". Hewitt is slated to be fined in the vicinity of $US100,000 for not doing a TV interview according to the ATP. Hewitt says he has the evidence to show that the ATP is not correct with the facts. He says he will win the case and not pay a fine.

He said he didn't want to make a big deal of the matter but he was "coping the brunt of it" and it was time to voice his opinions.

"I think a lot of people lied. I think that's a known fact. I've got no doubt I'm going to win, there won't be fine at all," said Hewitt. "I spoke to a few journalists from Australia. Everyone thinks I don't talk to them but I do. That was my way to tell my side of the story. It was all one-sided coming out. It was just absolute lies coming out.

"I felt the ATP was sort of just riding the wave. There were so many guys just making stories up in there, just to throw it in, I guess to save their job.'

Hewitt is the only Aussie left in the mens because Wayne Arthurs was beaten by Juan Carlos Ferrero in four sets.

luvbadboys
08-28-2002, 09:59 PM
yep it's me kaseyl:)

KaseyL
08-29-2002, 11:20 AM
Kafelnikov talks Lleyton:

Source: The Courier-Mail, August 28, 2002

Yevgeny tips Hewitt burnout

By PAUL MALONE

RUSSIAN warhorse Yevgeny Kafelnikov, making what he says is probably his grand slam swansong, yesterday warned Lleyton Hewitt the Australian could burn out in his bid to stay on top of men's tennis.

Kafelnikov, who at 28 has pocketed $43 million riding the tennis gravy train, said he expected to retire at the end of the year, even if his only motivation left in tennis, helping Russia to its first Davis Cup, was unfulfilled.

"When he is older and there is no one in front (in the rankings), he's going to feel pressure," said Kafelnikov, who creaked into motion on a straightforward opening day of the US Open with a 6-2 7-5 3-6 6-4 win over Italian Davide Sanguinetti.

"Whether he can continue with this through the years, I don't know. He kind of reminds me of Chang, when Michael was winning the French Open at 17. Lleyton is that good at age 21, and believe me when I say you do have such responsibility on your shoulders, it's difficult to handle. If you look throughout my career, you can say I was burned out every year I played. I have no goals and it's much more difficult to play without any motivation."

Hewitt, who admits he has yet to define a new career goal after winning Wimbledon, has taken steps to reduce his workload, both to maximise his grand slam chances and to spite the ATP Tour organisers, who fined him $193,000 for not doing a TV interview.

Seeded fourth and the semi-final victim of eventual champion Hewitt last year, Kafelnikov said he stood little realistic chance of winning the US Open.

"There are a number of guys who are better, stronger and faster. It's hard to pick any favourite, except Hewitt, who can go all the way to win the tournament," Kafelnikov said.

Chang, after a 7-6 (8-6) 3-6 6-4 7-6 (7-3) win over Spain's Francisco Clavet, said he thought Hewitt's "great fighting spirit" and mobility would continue to serve him well against bigger players.

KaseyL
08-29-2002, 11:29 AM
This article is quite unbalanced, hard on Lleyton, not doing much justice imo. :mad: See for yourself:

(I've taken the part re Lleyton)

Source: Tennisreportersnet, August 28, 2002

MOST OF THEIR BATTLING IS IN MEDIA ROOM

Jennifer and Lleyton go to war with words

By Matthew Cronin, tennisreporters.net

FROM THE U.S. OPEN – Lleyton Hewitt and Jennifer Capriati are two of the most ferocious on-court fighters the tour has seen in the last decade so it should come as no surprise that they never back down off-court either.

On Tuesday, both the Aussie and the American went off in post-match press conferences; Jennifer took swipes at inappropriate comments made by the always ballistic Richard Williams and Hewitt again accused the ATP Tour of lying about the Cincinnati affair, where the ATP fined him for blowing off an interview.

THE WORLD ACCORDING TO LLEYTON
Hewitt’s world revolves around Hewitt and there’s little room for strangers: fans, media, tour officials. He’s perhaps the most well-insulated No. 1 in history and perhaps the most paranoid one. He can be evocative and thoughtful, but he’s still too immature to take even fair criticism or offer a reasonabale perspective on a conflict he is involved in.

Yesterday, he again spoke out against the ATP Tour, the very same tour that has helped line his pocket with millions of dollars. Hewitt was given a $103,000 fine in Cincinnati earlier this month for refusing to participate in an interview with host broadcasters ESPN before his first round match, even though he was given three days to do it. Hewitt said the ATP is duplicitous.

"The ATP people were lying," said Hewitt. "It was always 'ATP spokesperson' ... no one ever wanted to put their name to it. I think a lot of people lied. I think that is a known fact.”
Hewitt said that he had told the ATP he would attend the interview “just to get it all out of the way,”but that no one got back to him until it was too late. “I didn't really want to come out and make a big deal of it. But it was all one-sided coming out ... it was just absolute lies coming out. I felt I was copping the brunt of it and the ATP was just sort of riding the wave. There were so many guys just making up stories just to ... save their jobs, I guess.”

Whether it is Hewitt or the ATP who is right in this dispute, it is Hewitt who is acting irresponsably. (own note: :rolleyes:ahum, and what about the ATP?, also butter on their head, to say the least) by damaging the tour’s reputation. No one from ESPN or any other journalist have supported Hewitt’s version of the story, and why would they? He only does interviews because he is forced to, not out of choice. He is not a people person, so why he is trying to convince the world that he is defies logic. Just because he gets along with his girlfriend, Kim Clijsters, his parents, and his agent and spokesperson who are paid to paint him as a decent guy, doesn’t mean that he’s a jolly good fellow. What kind of person would threaten to submarine his own tour (and fellow players) just because he can’t follow the same rules that nearly every other player does?

“When things happen like in Cincinnati, when you think about the way everything has been run, it’s just not much fun," said Hewitt, who said he might not follow the rules about how many tournaments a player is obliged to compete in and could ignore the importance of the No. 1 ranking. “There are times when you feel like (walking away). ... It is a great sport if the ATP would just get out of the way.”

Actually, the sport would be a whole lot better if it’s top player would stop spraying the room with negitivity. (My Note: :rolleyes: Hello, forgotten about the ATP? who started with the fine) Men’s tennis would be in far better shape if Hewitt brought out the gentle, understanding side of his personality that Clijsters is so fond of talking about.(own note: yes, if they would let him)

But whether that happens or not, defending U.S. Open champion Hewitt is at home in New York, madly honking his horn and racing to cross a bridge before the gate closes. Remember that last year here in his run to the title, he fought the entire world over the James Blake incident, when it was alleged that he made racial remarks toward an African-America umpire, a charge he vehemently denied. The incident seemed to propel him to new heights as he slipped on his warrior’s mask, blocked everyone out and sliced up the field.

Like Capriati, Hewitt loves to go to war and just two days into the Open, he's already charging toward the front lines.

Angele
08-29-2002, 12:09 PM
I'm so sick of the media! They act as if Lleyton is the one who wants to keep talking about the fine and that the atp and the media are completely blameless and just want to drop the whole thing... yet they keep asking him about it in press conferences... and they bug Kim about it!

Angele
08-29-2002, 12:16 PM
Are they *GASP* admitting they were wrong? :eek: :eek: ;)

ATP chief says Hewitt fine likely to be reduced on appeal
Wed Aug 28,11:11 PM ET

NEW YORK - Lleyton Hewitt's dlrs 103,000 fine for refusing to give a required TV interview will likely be reduced on appeal.



Calling the amount of the fine unreasonable, ATP Tour chief Mark Miles said Wednesday at the U.S. Open ( news - web sites) that he expects the panel of former players that considers such appeals to reduce Hewitt's penalty, perhaps to as low as $10,000-$20,000.

Hewitt was docked half his prize money at the Tennis Masters Series event in Cincinnati this month because he didn't do an interview with broadcaster ESPN, which televised the tournament. He reached the final there.

"It wasn't a travesty and it wasn't particularly egregious. It's gotten overly complicated," Miles said. "He was expected to do an interview that would have taken 10 or 15 minutes, probably, so the host broadcaster would have it in the can for their coverage of his match. It didn't get done. In my mind that's not a dlrs 100,000 problem.

"But from all I understand, it was clear to his advisers that he was expected to do it."

Hewitt, whose appeal will be heard after the U.S. Open ends Sept. 8, lashed out at the tour Tuesday, saying the episode was handled poorly.

"I think a lot of people lied. I think that's a known fact," the reigning U.S. Open and Wimbledon ( news - web sites) champion said. "I've got no doubt that I'm going to win. There won't be a fine at all."

Players are required to do interviews as part of the ATP's program to promote the tour and the tour's rules call for a penalty of dlrs 20,000 or half of the player's prize money at the event, whichever is greater.

In Cincinnati, Hewitt turned down ESPN's requests in the days before his opening match. When he learned of the fine, he threatened not to play.

"It was all one-sided coming out. It was just absolute lies coming out," he said Tuesday, referring to the tour's account of what happened. "I felt the APT was sort of just riding the wave. There were so many guys just making stories up in there, just to throw it in, I guess to save their job."

Miles said those words don't violate the tour's "rules about statements damaging to the game."

"I'd rather it wasn't said," Miles said. "But we've been sued before and we've been condemned before. That comes with the territory."

KaseyL
08-29-2002, 12:45 PM
Thanks Angele!

Pfff @ Miles! They shouldn't have started bugging Lleyton with such a ridiculous fine in the first place! :rolleyes: Getting Lleyton angry is not a good idea. No surprise he slapped the ATP in public as a reaction.

Why can't the ATP talk things through decently behind closed doors without throwing fines around first of all? Think that this is somehow called "communication management", geezzz. :rolleyes:
It's a shameful display.



'Calling the amount of the fine unreasonable, ATP Tour chief Mark Miles...': aha, at least he admits that!

Goonergal
08-30-2002, 12:53 AM
Hewitt and Blake set up rematch

World number one Hewitt of Australia and rising American star James Blake advanced to a third-round rematch of last year's controversial clash with impressive wins.

US Open and Wimbledon champion Hewitt eliminated Israel's Noam Okun 7-6 (9-7) 6-4 6-1 and Blake advanced to the third round of Grand Slam for the first time in his career by dispatching Russia's Nikolay Davydenko 6-3 4-6 6-1 6-3.



Hopefully we will have another great match like we did last year without any of the other problems that happened

James Blake
A year ago in the second round, Hewitt won 6-4 3-6 2-6 6-3 6-0 but took control only after Blake began cramping in the fourth set and a controversial complaint about a line judge who called him for a pair of foot faults.

A black linesman called Hewitt for two foot faults and the angry Australian asked umpire Andres Egli to move the man, gesturing to his black opponent and the linesman and saying, "Look at him and look at him. You tell me what the similarity is."

Hewitt said his comments were directed at the calls being made by linesmen at either end of the court, but many took his remarks as a racial insult.

"I did what I was taught to do, give people the benefit of the doubt," Blake said.

"We talked about it afterwards in the locker room and we put it behind us and that's where it stayed.

'Great match'

"We will see how our games match up next round. Hopefully we will have another great match like we did last year without any of the other problems that happened."

Hewitt beat Blake 6-4 6-1 in the fourth round at Miami in March in their most recent meeting.

"I can play with him so I won't go in totally intimidated," Blake said.

"I feel like I can play well against him since I did last year.

"There might be a few jitters playing the number one player in the world. I have a feeling it will subside quickly and I will just go out and play.

"All the pressure will be off me because he is the best player in the world and defending champion."

KaseyL
08-30-2002, 12:00 PM
Thanks Cilla!

and again thanks for all the work you did in the CCLounge after Kim's win! :kiss:

Goonergal
08-30-2002, 01:36 PM
No probs :kiss: Anthing for the Kimaniacs ;)

Take two for Hewitt and Blake
By Steve Keating

NEW YORK (Reuters) - With the exception of girlfriend Kim Clijsters and coach Jason Stoltenberg, world number one Lleyton Hewitt can expect few fans in his corner when he clashes with American heart-throb James Blake in the U.S. Open third round.


Most of the 23,000 spectators expected in the Arthur Ashe stadium court on Saturday will be behind Blake and it is unlikely Mark Miles and ATP Tour officials will be cheering on the Australian, who branded them liars after he was fined $103,000 (66,500 pounds).


There is also the little matter of an ugly incident that occurred during a second-round meeting between the two players at last year's U.S. Open.


The fiery Hewitt appeared to suggest to the umpire that an African-American linesman was favouring Blake with his calls because of their colour.


"I don't think about it, James and I are fine about it," said defending champion Hewitt. "We spoke after the situation and that was pretty much the end of it.


"I had all that last year here, I know how to handle it.


"I played a young American Andy Roddick in the quarters last year, I had to play Pete (Sampras), the older guy everyone wanted to see back winning another (grand) slam.


OUTSIDE DISTRACTIONS


"I've had to deal with the crowd before. I feel pretty comfortable that I can block out all the outside distractions and get the job done.


"You never look forward to your opponent getting all the support and you getting nothing but it doesn't worry me.


"Like I said, everyone wanted to see a Roddick-Sampras final last year and I pretty much screwed that up for them."


One thing Hewitt will find different from last year will be his American opponent, who has developed into a legitimate title contender.


Last year Blake was just finding his feet on the professional tour having split his time between tennis, Harvard University and a modelling career.


This time he is back at Flushing Meadows as the 25th seed and brimming with confidence after collecting his first career title in Washington two weeks ago.


"I feel like all the pressure is off," said Blake. "I've done my best so far, I'm playing the number one player in the world, he's the defending champion. I really have no pressure.


"I have the confidence that I know I can beat a player like him."

C'mon_Lley
08-30-2002, 08:53 PM
From official USO site...

US Open Notes & Quotes
Friday, August 30, 2002

Courtesy of USA Network, from the television broadcast on Thursday, Aug. 29

Here are some comments from former tennis great and USA Network TV commentator Jim Courier and No. 6 seed Kim Clijsters on top-seed and world No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt:

COURIER ON LLEYTON HEWITT :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Jim Courier: He's got a lot on his shoulders right now, and I think for Lleyton Hewitt, his main focus is on the court. The only thing that matters to him in his life is between the lines, and that's why he's No. 1 right now. That's why you hear Pete Sampras talking about that's not my focus anymore, because I have a life. Well, Lleyton Hewitt doesn't. (Pathetic Jimbo :rolleyes: ) His life is between the lines.

Lleyton is very personable, Lleyton is very friendly. What Lleyton doesn't understand, and I didn't understand when I was 21, and I was ranked at the top, as well, is your responsibilities extend outside those lines. When you're No. 1, you're the ambassador for the game of tennis. And it's your responsibility to make sure people know tennis is out there, and you have to do extra things.

Don't get me wrong; the guy's got incredible demands on his time. I'm not going to take a shot at him and say he should do everything that people ask him to do because people are unreasonable, and he does have the main task at hand. But he's got to try a little harder, and I'll bet when he's my age, he's going to sit and look back and say, 'Maybe I could have done things a little differently and made things better for everybody else,' including himself.

Today I saw him upstairs, and I said 'Hey, Lleyton, it's raining. Do you want to come and talk with us, address America a little bit?' He's like 'I don't want to do it; I'm playing a match.' He said 'Would you do it?' I said, 'Y'know, actually I probably wouldn't.' At that age, I probably wouldn't have.

He's going to show that warmer side that he has. It's just going to take him awhile, and it doesn't help when people are taking shots at him. It doesn't help when the ATP fines him half of his prize money. I'm not saying that he didn't warrant it, but there's some kind of educational situation that has to happen here. Someone in his camp needs to soft pedal it and say there are some things that might help you, and, by the way, it might help everybody else.

KIM CLIJSTERS DISCUSSES HER BOYFRIEND LLEYTON HEWITT
With Michael Barkann

KC: A lot of people see him differently. He's so motivated. He loves to compete. A lot of people see him aggressive on the court. I like that about him. He's a completely different person on the court than off. Actually, he's really shy and very calm. He's completely different. :angel:

KaseyL
08-30-2002, 09:02 PM
Thanks for the article!

I wouldn't say that Jimbo is totally :rolleyes: as he has a few good points imo.

However I'd like to put a lot of :rolleyes: when it comes to Lleyton having no life. That's stupid by Jim, and he should know better.

The guy does have friends, family he stays in touch with, has a girlfriend since years,... erm... well, if that's not having a life... :rolleyes:

KaseyL
08-30-2002, 11:43 PM
This is in Adelaide based newspaper the Advertiser today:

Taciturnity the trouble with Lleyton

By PAUL MALONE
31aug02

FORMER world No.1 Jim Courier asked Lleyton Hewitt for an interview for the television network which employs him as a commentator.

Rain was cutting into the network's stockpile of matches from this and previous US Opens - including the one in which Barbra Streisand called Andre Agassi a "zen master" - and the producers needed talent.

Hewitt's girlfriend, Kim Clijsters, agreed to say a few words about nothing much. So did Americans Meghann Shaughnessy and Justin Gimelstob.

As it looked like Hewitt's second-round match would be delayed or even postponed, Courier approached him.

"He said, `Would you have wanted to do it?' and I thought, `No, probably not'," Courier said.

"I find Lleyton is very personable. What he doesn't understand is, your responsibilities as the No. 1 player extend to being an ambassador for tennis.

"People are unreasonable (when you are No. 1). But I bet you when he's my age he can see he could have made it easier for himself and everyone else."

The Wimbledon champion does interviews with the Australian media sparingly. Hewitt's American agent, Tom Ross, complained this week about the tenor and accuracy of a story which ran in two metropolitan newspapers in Australia last Monday.

The Hewitt camp saw it as part of a campaign by Australian newspapers to misrepresent him to the public.

But Ross dismissed the argument that Hewitt's disclosure that he had often hit with Special Olympics players was a perfect example of what greater media access could do for Hewitt.

And for the Australian public, much of which likes his drive and desire and has heard from those close to him of how likeable, sharp and loyal he is.

Goonergal
08-31-2002, 12:08 PM
Blake-Hewitt Rematch Should Be a Dogfight
by Matthew Cronin
Friday, August 30, 2002

It was the most harrowing part of his remarkable run to the 2001 US Open title, so when No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt was asked whether he was relishing facing the crowd and James Blake again when he takes the court against the young American in the third round on Saturday, the Adelaide street fighter was characteristically nonplused.

"I've had to deal with the crowd before. I feel pretty comfortable that I can block out all the outside distractions and get the job done," said Hewitt, who was accused of allegedly making racial remarks toward a linesperson and Blake during his dramatic, 6-4, 3-6, 2-6, 6-3, 6-0, victory over the American last year. "You never look forward to your opponent getting all the support and you getting nothing, but it doesn't worry me. Everyone wanted to see a Roddick-Sampras final last year, and I pretty much screwed that up for them." :p

Former Harvard No. 1 Blake wished people would recall more of the match, where had had Hewitt on the ropes before he began cramping.

"I played really great tennis, and we really did have a battle," Blake said. "If [the incident] is all they know me for, that's unfortunate. It's a little more motivation for me to make them know me for something else. Lleyton, I don't think he talks about it as much as I do. People keep talking about him winning. If you win Grand Slams, they're going to talk about that instead of just one other incident."

In 2001, Hewitt never backed down from his stance that he never made racist remarks about his opponent or the linesman, whom he was enraged at for calling foot faults on him. He spoke to Blake about the incident the day after it happened, and Blake seemed to accept Hewitt's version of what occurred.

"We put it behind us the next day in the locker room," Blake said. "Since then, I don't think we've really talked about it. We just moved on. At that point last year, I was hoping to make a name for myself on tour, trying to prove that I'm going to be someone competing with him the next 10 years. He's already proven himself."

Hewitt concurred, "I don't think about it. James and I are fine about it. We spoke after the situation, and that was pretty much the end of it. I had all that last year here. I know how to handle it."

But a large contingent of fans and media didn't buy Hewitt's version, and the crowd rode him during his next couple matches. Hewitt was defensive about the incident for the rest of the event but was very comfortable playing with his back against the wall. By the second week of the tournament, he was a new man.

"That Blake press conference was a nightmare for him," his former Davis Cup captain, John Newcombe, said at the time. "After that, he put his head down and played tennis. I think what Lleyton saw is if he puts his head down and concentrates on tennis and keeps inside himself, it works better than everything else going around.... It was after the match against Blake he turned it around, and he then willed himself to the top. He's got the temperament that doesn't mind the big occasions."

The ultra-intense Hewitt always seem to be involved in some controversy or another, and at the 2002 US Open, he's been engaged in active public war of words against the ATP Tour for a $103,000 fine he received a couple weeks ago in Cincinnati for allegedly blowing off a TV interview.

On Saturday, the 21-year-old Australian will not only have to put his negative memories of last year's incident securely away, but he also has to take down a much improved Blake, who has now risen to No. 25 in the world and recently won his first title in Washington.

Blake, who was taught to play in the National Junior Tennis League program in Harlem while he and his family resided in Yonkers, N.Y., has really tightened up his game, substantially improving his backhand, serve, volley and court awareness. Plus, his forehand is now considered one of the game's best.

"I feel like all the pressure is off," said Blake. "I've done my best so far. I'm playing the No. 1 player in the world. He's the defending champion. I really have no pressure. If I lose, I'm losing to a great player. I have the confidence that I know I can beat a player like him, since I was winning last year before I started getting sick. Also, I'm coming off my best win ever -- over Andre Agassi a week ago [in Washington]. I have confidence. I know it's possible."

If Blake can get his super-athletic, all-around game clicking, he is a threat to Hewitt, as he's a good enough shot maker to force Hewitt out of his comfortable counterpunching mode. But Hewitt has had success against all style of players this year, and, like he did when cruising to the Wimbledon title in July, he seems to be able to raise his level whenever he needs to.

"I don't think there's one style of play I prefer to play more," Hewitt said. "A lot depends how the guy plays on the day. I've lost to the best serve-and-volleyers, baseliners and guys who mix it up like James does. Then again, I've beaten a lot of different players, as well."

Blake knows that he's going to have to take it to Hewitt but cannot afford to try to force the action all day. Hewitt is not only considered one of the world's two top return-of-servers, but he has a sharp backhand, formidable leaping forehand and much-improved first serve.

"You can't just play him one way," said Blake, who is 0-3 against Hewitt, including a straight-set loss in Tokyo last fall and another straight-set defeat this year in Miami. "He changes his game so well. He can play offense and is very good at adjusting, changing pace. I need to play my game and not worry about that.

"If he plays different, I can't let it affect me like I did the last time. I have to play carefree and try to dictate with my forehand. He can move better than anyone out there, but I've got to make him beat me on the move. If he can do that, he'll prove why's he's No. 1."

Goonergal
09-01-2002, 12:41 AM
Hewitt sees off brave Blake

Top seed Lleyton Hewitt had to battle through another five-set match with James Blake before securing his place in the fourth round.

Hewitt prevailed 6-7 6-3 6-4 3-6 6-3 to book a fourth round tie with Jiri Novak of the Czech Republic.

The Australian was also forced the distance by Blake in a highly-charged match at Flushing Meadows last year.

This time around, Hewitt lost the first set on a tiebreak but broke Blake early in the second and then seemed to be cruising.


Blake's level of play dipped mid-match.

He won the second set, wrapped up the third and went a break up in the fourth as the wind went out of Blake's sails.

But then the 25th seed started going for his shots and he managed to break Hewitt for the first time in the match midway through the fourth set.

And another break saw him clinch that set and force a decider.

But Blake's level dipped again and Hewitt drew on his Grand Slam-winning experience to seize the initiative.

The world number on broke in the sixth game and held out, securing victory with an ace.

Last year's match had sparked controversy after a comment by Hewitt during an angry outburst was perceived by many to be racist.

Both men played down the incident after the game last year and they embraced warmly at the end of their match this year.

Hewitt said after the match that he had thrived on the atmosphere in the Arthur Ashe Stadium, where the crowd were mainly behind the local-born Blake.

"I went in there with the Davis Cup attitiude," said Hewitt.

"I play some of my best tennis in that type of situation.

"For some reason, I am able to block it out really well and play of my best tennis."

Blake put his defeat down to his lack of experience at Grand Slam level.

"It was just inexperience," he said.

"I haven't been in that many five-setters, especially against the number one player in the world on the biggest stage in the sport."

Goonergal
09-01-2002, 12:44 AM
Hewitt defuses Blake's cannons

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Defending champion Lleyton Hewitt stood firm in the face of James Blake's firepower to pound his way into the fourth round of the U.S. Open with a gruelling 6-7 6-3 6-4 3-6 6-3 victory.


The Australian top seed needed three hours 34 minutes to advance and set up a clash with Czech Jiri Novak.


The rematch of last year's five-setter here was a real thriller and Hewitt needed to be at his very best to edge the young American in front of a packed partisan crowd on Arthur Ashe stadium court.


"I knew it was going to be a bloody tough match out there," Hewitt said.


"I've seen him develop as a player and knew it would be tough especially in front of this crowd.


"I went out there with a Davis Cup mentality and just blocked it out."

Goonergal
09-01-2002, 01:00 AM
From the Official USO Website

Post Match Analysis

Day 6 - James Blake vs. Lleyton Hewitt

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DEF

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What happened?

Lleyton Hewitt-The No. 1 seed won a match as thrilling as the five-set affair he and Blake played at the Open a year previous. Hewitt wins this one 6-7, 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3. Hewitt held serve virtually all match, lacing 15 aces to go with 53 winners. Advancing to the round of 16, Hewitt dodges a bullet in dispatching the young American.

James Blake-Leaving everything on the court, James Blake came as close as you can get to upset a true champion in Lleyton Hewitt. Charging out to a one set lead that took nearly an hour to play, Blake was broken at key moments in the second and third sets that led to Hewitt gaining control of the match. Blake fought back admirably, but was done in by 86 unforced errors, 46 more than his adversary.

Stat of the match

Lleyton Hewitt-You just cannot attach a numerical value or statistic to the heart and guts Hewitt displayed on the court this afternoon. The highest complement you can give Hewitt is that he doesn't play or act like he's the number one player in the world. No matter how far ahead he is in a match, Hewitt will scrape, dive and hurdle for every point. A telling stat: Although he only converted 25% of his break points to Blake's 40%, Hewitt gave himself 11 more chances than Blake, all because of his endless hustle. Hewitt's four out of sixteen made more of an impact in the match than Blake's two out of five.

James Blake-86 unforced errors won't win you too many matches if you're James Blake - and certainly not against the top-ranked player in the world. But then again, 60 winners certainly don't hurt, either! All those big backhands, forehands and drop shots helped Blake extend the match to a pulsating five sets.

Turning Point

Lleyton Hewitt-During one memorable exchange with the match still in the balance in the third set, Hewitt reached for an impossible shot that Blake thought was over. Hewitt's backhand lunge clipped the net and dunked softly in bounds on Blake's side. In mock frustration knowing there was nothing he could do to try to reach the ball in time, Blake flung his racquet like a Frisbee in the direction of Hewitt's shot, but to no avail.

James Blake-At a critical juncture in the fifth set, Blake was let down by his own service game. On serve at 3-2, Hewitt broke Blake's serve to extend his lead in the set to 4-2. Hewitt then held serve and pushed the margin to 5-2. The deficit was more than Blake could overcome, and Hewitt closed out the set, 6-3.

What's next?

Lleyton Hewitt-The No. 1 seed survives to advance to the round of 16, keeping hope alive to repeat as US Open champion. Hewitt will now face No. 14 Jiri Novak in the second week of play. Novak was up two sets to none when his opponent, Marcelo Rios, retired with injury.

James Blake-"I like the fact that any kid watching the match can say, 'I want to be like one of those guys.' I think it's great for tennis," said Blake, who is now eliminated from the US Open singles draw and will play at the end of September in Davis Cup competition against France for the United States. "I think a year ago I played above myself. I'm slightly encouraged that I didn't play above myself and that I pushed the number one player in the world to five sets."

View from the crowd

Lleyton Hewitt-Hewitt's parents, Glynn and Cherilyn, made a rare appearance in the crowd. Lleyton's girlfriend Kim Clijsters, after winning her third round match against Vera Zvonareva, also sat courtside. An Aussie contingent of fans wearing yellow and waving the flag of Australia, sat high above in the promenade.

James Blake-The crowd at sold-out Arthur Ashe Stadium were decidedly pro-Blake. Blake's players box was filled with his mother, Betty, doubles partner (and brother) David, coach and friends. The self-proclaimed "net-heads," an insane group of American supporters, chanted "Go Blake Go!" the entire match while another faction of female supporters dubbed the "Blake-etts," rooted on their favorite player.

Goonergal
09-01-2002, 01:15 AM
Lleyton Hewitt


L. HEWITT/J. Blake
MODERATOR: Questions for Lleyton.

Q. It seems that at a Grand Slam you always have one of these turnaround matches where it goes, you're able to kick on. How do you feel about your prospects now, the way you're playing after this match?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I feel good. You know, hopefully the body is going to pull up pretty well in a couple of days' time. You know, I knew it was going to be an extremely tough match before I went out there. I was prepared to lay it all on the line. You know, in the end it's only a few points here and there in a five-set match like that. You've got to take your chances. In the end, I was able to.
I feel like I've stepped my game up, you know, since the first couple of rounds, as well. You know, for me, it's all positive.

Q. Cold is getting better?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah. It's not a huge factor.

Q. What did James say to you after the match?
LLEYTON HEWITT: He just said, "Congratulations. Sorry about some of the crowd," something. (I heard LL say "I really appreciate it mate)

Q. Did you hear what someone in the crowd said?
LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I didn't hear a lot of it. No, I didn't hear much. I was pretty focused out there today.

Q. You seemed very in control of your emotions all the way through, no shouts, screams. Did you feel that was an important element in the way you needed to play today?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I went out there with the same attitude that I've taken into Davis Cup matches. I really felt that in my head I just got it in that I was playing for Australia out there. That was my whole mindset, you know, as soon as I walked on the court. When I felt like getting fired up, looking over to my bench, I tried to use all my positive energy when I needed to in that way. Apart from that, I just tried blocking everything else out.
I worked a lot on going into that SpanishDavis Cup final a couple of years ago with Newk and Rochey. Newk and I sat down and had gone through a lot of things back then. I sort of drew strength from that, I guess, especially probably the match I played against Costa, winning in five, and also how I handled the situation down in Brazil against Guga.

Q. Talk about the fifth set. You had some shaky points there. Looks like you lost your rhythm.
LLEYTON HEWITT: I played well in the fifth. I got off to a good start. I knew I had to. I didn't want to go behind early and then, you know, him have the total momentum after swinging the fourth set around, getting on top early in the fifth. I was able to do that quite well. I was able to hold my serve quite well pretty easy in the first few games. I tried to step it up. He didn't give me too many chances to step it up too much on his service games. I felt like if I could have got a bit of a start in one of his service games, the opportunity was there, that's when I was going to try to nail it down and take it. Obviously that came when I got to Love-15, Love-30, then Love-40 eventually in that game. I was able to step it up, sort of raise the bar a little bit.
From there on, it's still tough to serve it out, though.

Q. What would you say would be the two or three points in the match which turned it?
LLEYTON HEWITT: You know, obviously when there's only one break in the fifth set, I guess that game obviously means a lot. You know, won it to Love. There wasn't one point. Getting off to a good start one of those first two points, I was able to get Love-15, Love-30, trying to take my chances from there.
Apart from that, I can't remember that long ago. Obviously, the first set I lost, I felt like I was in control of the first set early, then I felt like he was probably having the better session towards the end of the first set. He had a few set points there, at least one. In the breaker, I felt like I was the better player early. Hit a double-fault at 5-All. That sort of changed things. He got the first set. The momentum was with him.
To my credit, I was able to hang in there and try and get up an early break in the second.

Q. James said one of the things he was really proud of in the match was that any kid watching the game could watch it and enjoy it and say, "I want to be like either of those two players." Is that something that is in your mind, as well?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, when I'm out there playing, I'm concentrating on other things, I guess. But, you know, obviously for sure, I think it's great for the game to have, you know, tough matches, especially two young guys I guess going out there and giving everything they've got out there. I don't know how long the match was, probably three and a half, around that area. It's tough conditions out there. You know, to see us not give an inch the whole match for three and a half hours to four hours, I think it's something we can both be proud of.

Q. I don't think anyone wants to go on and on about this whole race thing. In the fourth set when the woman called out, a bunch of us were even further away than you were, it was really crystal clear what she said. You stopped before serving in your motion. (Oh is that what it was :o I was wondering why James stopped)
LLEYTON HEWITT: I didn't hear what she said. I stopped because James turned around. I was ready to serve. I've got no idea. I didn't hear a lot of what the crowd said all day.

Q. Would it disturb you to hear that she said, "Don't let him beat you, James, he's a racist"?
LLEYTON HEWITT: You're always going to get some nutters in the crowd. Can't do much about it.

Q. How do you like music during the changeovers?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Music? It's different. I'm not going to get up and dance, but it's all right (smiling) (LMAO :p). It is different. It's weird. I make myself not look at the score boards. I've got no idea what they're showing up there, whether it's - I don't know - video clips or what the hell it is.
I hear the music. Yeah, it's good for the game I think because it gets the crowd, you know, involved in change of ends, whereas a lot of sports don't have like a little bit of a time-out, I guess. In that way, I think it's good for the game.

Q. You weren't watching when they replayed the ball that was called out?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I didn't look at the screen once for my three matches or two matches that I played, and I didn't look at it last year.

Q. It's not distracting to have the action replay?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Not for me. For other players, maybe. I think somebody, maybe Agassi, got it turned off last year, the screen, at one stage during his match. For me, it hasn't been a problem. I don't even -- the whole time when I'm sitting down or playing my game, I don't look up there. I look to a couple of score boards now and then, that sort of situation, on the side of the court.

Q. Would you say that's the least emotional you've been in a big match?
LLEYTON HEWITT: No, not really, no. I think last year I wasn't that emotional probably in some of my matches, you know, towards the end of the tournament. I felt like I got fired up today when I needed to. I felt like I got fired up in some of those matches. Even away Davis Cup matches, as well. I don't know why.

Q. Early in your career, insiders have noted that you have kind of an affection for Patrick, especially in your early years.
LLEYTON HEWITT: Patrick Rafter?

Q. Yes. In recent years, you usually are a pretty tough customer on court. You were saying "nice shot" a couple times, applauding. Do you have a little bit of respect or even affection for James, even though he's a tough opponent?
LLEYTON HEWITT: He's a nice guy, no doubt about that. I think everyone knows that. Yeah, I say a lot of "good shots" to a lot of opponents. It's not just because I'm playing James out there. Maybe he hits more good shots than some other guys I play, I don't know.
Yeah, he's a nice guy. We get along fine off court.

(Note: this is a partial transcript)

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

Angele
09-01-2002, 02:18 AM
Originally posted by Lleyton's_Chick


Lleyton Hewitt-Hewitt's parents, Glynn and Cherilyn, made a rare appearance in the crowd.

LMAO!

duck
09-01-2002, 10:21 AM
New York Times. Very nice article

Match and Exclamation Points for Hewitt
By SELENA ROBERTS


n the middle of a first-set tie breaker, with the tension jagged to the touch, Lleyton Hewitt watched James Blake unleash a crosscourt forehand that practically growled as it passed by for a winner yesterday.

Hewitt clapped his hand against his racket strings. Well done, James.

Facing a critical break point in the fourth set, Blake watched as Hewitt skidded on his knees and flicked a backhand that defied logic by skipping over the net for a winner.

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Bending over in disbelief, Blake looked up and smiled at a man with the power to materialize anywhere, anytime. Incredible shot, Lleyton.

Whatever controversy was tethered to the match, whatever crass comment a fan made to disrupt the good vibes inside Arthur Ashe Stadium, Blake and Hewitt rose above it with a display of shot-making and effort that ended with the exclamation point the match deserved.

The No. 1 player in the world ripped an ace on match point. Hewitt did not shout "Come on!" or preen or pound his chest. Unusually subdued, he simply popped a ball into the crowd after advancing to the Round of 16 at the United States Open with a 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 victory against Blake.

After 3 hours 34 minutes, Blake approached Hewitt at the net, put his hand on his opponent's shoulder and offered a few gracious words.

"I just wanted to congratulate him and say he deserved it," Blake said. "He played better than me. I just apologized for any fans that were speaking negatively. That's something I was somewhat embarrassed by when a few fans did that."

Blake, the peacemaker. Yesterday, Blake slipped into the same role he held a year ago. In a second-round match at the Open last year, he gave Hewitt the benefit of the doubt after he made what was perceived to be a racially charged comment during his five-set victory over Blake, whose father is African-American.

Almost instantly, Blake put the incident behind him. At least one woman in the rowdy stadium yesterday could not let it go. Deep in the fourth set, with Hewitt serving at 3-4, a woman was heard to say: "James, don't let him win. He's a racist."


Blake turned around. Hewitt said he did not hear the remark, but he went on to double-fault, allowing Blake to serve out the fourth set.

"I didn't hear anything of what the crowd said all day," Hewitt said.

Hewitt understood he was in hostile territory, though. Blake was the beloved American; Hewitt was the prickly Australian. But neither player displayed anything but respect for the other as a national television audience tuned in.

"It's good for the game of tennis," Blake said. "I think this was a great match for the sport, being on CBS, being a feature match, a match I think a lot of people wanted to see.

"We both laid it on the line. We fought our hearts out. We fought until the end. He came up with great shots, I came up with great shots and he came up with a few more. I think the way we conducted ourselves, I really like the fact that if any kid was watching, they could say, `I want to be like either one of those two.' That's good for the game of tennis. I'm glad I was part of it."

Grace aside, Blake wanted this match in the worst way. It was not personal, just professional. In the months before the Open, Blake made progress that surprised many people. Blake barged into the top 25 with a slingshot for a forehand and an appeal that crossed every demographic.

"I'm happy with the progress," said Blake, who was ranked No. 98 at this time last year. "Right now, I'm a very competitive person. I don't like the feeling of losing."

One loose game doomed him. In the sixth game of the fifth set, Blake had a mental hiccup, unloading three unforced errors on his way to losing his serve at love. That was all Hewitt needed. He treats chances like a chew toy, clinching his teeth and never letting go.

"I know it's sudden death," Hewitt said. "I think I'm obviously in pretty good shape. Mentally, I'm as tough as anyone, I guess, on the Tour. I think those are the two biggest factors."

It took Hewitt four match points, but he produced.

The rest of the draw yesterday became background scenery to the Blake-Hewitt drama. Not even Andre Agassi drew as much attention. He quietly walked into Arthur Ashe Stadium after Blake's departure and made quick work of Ramon Delgado, 6-2, 6-1, 6-2. Not even Venus Williams turned as many heads. She dissected Martina Muller, 6-1, 6-2. Not even Jennifer Capriati generated as much intrigue. She pushed aside Meghann Shaughnessy, 6-2, 6-2, with little cause for concern.

Some top players did struggle. Hewitt's girlfriend, seventh-seeded Kim Clijsters, was stunned by Vera Zvonareva's initial attack, needing three sets to advance to the Round of 16, 1-6, 7-5, 6-4. Monica Seles experienced a lapse against the qualifier Yoon Jeong Cho of South Korea, botching two chances to serve out the match in the second set before winning, 6-1, 5-7, 6-3.

"If I'm mad, the only person to be mad at is myself," Seles said with a smile. "What can you do?"

Blake could only shrug at times, too. Often, Blake had to win a rally twice with the way Hewitt turned winners into gets. Hewitt's speed put a lot of pressure on Blake's copter-blade forehand.

It was winner or bust. When the forehand was on, Blake had Hewitt on his heels. He had 9 of his 23 forehand winners in the first set and another eight in the fourth. Over all, Blake had 60 winners to Hewitt's 53, but he committed 86 unforced errors to Hewitt's 40.

In or out, up in the match or down, Blake played aggressively. Eighteen months ago, he might have shied away from such a challenge. But last summer, after a tight loss to Patrick Rafter, Blake received some advice. At the net that day, Rafter asked Blake, "Now, do you believe?"

Yesterday, the confidence was there for Blake, just not the result.

"I definitely believed I could beat him," Blake said of Hewitt. "Before I go out to a match, I usually think about how I'm going to play and think about the feeling of winning it. I always want to think about that feeling, so it's never a surprise. I don't want to be surprised to win."

Chanting his name, raising Blake's energy, the crowd believed for a while, too. Almost all of them cheered for the right reason, to support Blake, not to tear down Hewitt. A few may have wanted to stir the controversy, but not Blake and Hewitt. They played above it.

"To see us not give an inch the whole match," Hewitt said, "I think it's something we can both be proud of."

duck
09-01-2002, 10:33 AM
LA Times

Good Will, Tennis From Hewitt
U.S. Open: Top-ranked player beats Blake in five sets, replacing last year's controversy with display of sportsmanship.

By LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER


NEW YORK -- This, as it turned out, was a sequel not with a snarl, but with a smile.

Quite simply, James Blake had to laugh after watching Lleyton Hewitt scurry across the court, again, to make another improbable retrieval.

The good will had legs. After all, it took Hewitt an hour and 24 minutes to unleash a trademark ear-splitting "Come on-n-n!!" after breaking Blake's serve for the first time.

Later, in the fourth set, one of Blake's forehand winners whipped across the court and Hewitt stunned the crowded house with his response. The toughest, fiercest of competitors acknowledged the shot by clapping his racket. And after his 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 third-round victory against Blake at the U.S. Open on Saturday, they exchanged pats on the shoulder.

Though these are universal gestures, they are not usually found in Hewitt's arsenal. Mutual admiration during an athletic contest isn't part of the script in his beloved "Rocky" movies.

An exorcism of sorts came down at Arthur Ashe Stadium. For 3 hours and 34 minutes, the defending champion and No. 1-seeded Hewitt and Blake traded good will and groundstrokes.

If the high quality of play didn't completely erase the bitterness of their match here last year, in which Hewitt made a remark thought to carry racial overtones, then Blake made sure he let Hewitt know he had moved on.

In the eighth game of the fourth set, with Hewitt serving at 3-4, a female fan was heard to shout, "James, don't let him beat you, he's a racist."

The words, which came from behind Blake, made him turn around. In that game, Hewitt lost his serve by double faulting for only the fourth time in the match. Blake then held at love to push it to a fifth set, in which the decisive break came in the sixth game when Blake played a series of loose shots, dropping his serve at love.

What happened in the fourth set stayed with Blake when they shook hands, and he apologized to Hewitt for the fan.

"I just apologized for any fans that were speaking out negatively," Blake said. "That's something that I was embarrassed by when a few fans did that. I hope that you guys [reporters] would treat him better this year, as well."

If anything, the 22-year-old Blake seems to have an uncanny sense about his role, almost in the mold of the late Ashe. Hewitt helped Blake make his name in last year's epic second-round match, and suddenly there was another top young American other than Andy Roddick. For his part, Blake helped Hewitt get back his name by taking the high road.

"He's a nice guy, no doubt about that," Hewitt said.

"I think everyone knows that. I say a lot of 'good shots' to a lot of opponents. It's not just because I'm playing James out there. Maybe he hits more good shots than some other guys I play.

"To see us not give an inch the whole match for three and a half hours to four hours, I think it's something we can both be proud of."

Said Blake: "We both laid it on the line. We fought our hearts out till the end....

"The way we conducted ourselves, I really like the fact that if any kid was watching that, they could say, 'I want to be like either of those two.' That's good for the game of tennis. I'm glad I was part of it."

Hewitt approached the Blake match like a Davis Cup adventure in hostile territory. He had only a couple of brief lapses in concentration, most notably losing a 5-2 lead in the first-set tiebreaker and double faulting at 5-5 to give Blake a set point, which he converted.

Their electric third-round match was the highlight on an otherwise ordinary day. Defending champion and No. 2 Venus Williams has lost six games in three matches, three of them in a 6-1, 6-2 victory over Martina Muller of Germany.

The only concern the Williams family seems to have these days is the German man who has been stalking Serena. He was arrested in the early hours Saturday morning, apprehended by police when he was spotted looking for Williams through a fence at the National Tennis Center.

Meanwhile, No. 6 Andre Agassi was in devastating form. Agassi defeated Ramon Delgado of Paraguay, 6-2, 6-1, 6-2, in 91 minutes in the third round. He has dropped 16 games in nine sets.

Sixth-seeded Monica Seles, a sentimental favorite, came close to losing to a 23-year-old qualifier from South Korea ranked No. 106 in the world.

Seles held a 6-1, 5-1 lead against Yoon-Joeng Cho, dropped seven straight games to lose the second set and trailed, 1-0, in the third before rallying to win, 6-1, 5-7, 6-3.

"My brain went away from the court," Seles said.

spiritfullfrog
09-02-2002, 10:25 AM
that's a very negative report!

KaseyL
09-02-2002, 01:23 PM
From The Advertiser, Sept 2, 2002

Cool Hewitt earns respect

02sep02
LLEYTON Hewitt yesterday fielded an apology from a vanquished James Blake over an abusive American spectator calling him a "racist" during their US Open thriller.

Hewitt said he had not heard a female spectator yell "James, don't let him win – he's a racist" in a game in which he was broken to have Blake drag their third-round match into a fifth set.

Hewitt said he relied on his experience of hostile crowds in New York last year and at Davis Cup away ties to help him close out a 6-7 (5-7), 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 win in a punishing three hours and 34 minutes.

Blake's African-American father and many US media outlets had been scathing 12 months ago in accusing Hewitt of demanding African-American linesman Marion Johnson be replaced because of a racial bias

"You're always going to get some nutters – can't do much about it," said Hewitt who will next confront Australian Open semi-finalist Jiri Novak, the 14th seed, in a fourth-round match tomorrow morning (Australian time).

"I didn't hear what she said. I stopped (serving) because James turned around. I didn't hear a lot of what the crowd said all day.

"It's not easy, but for some reason I'm able to block it out. It doesn't worry me, like the Rocky movie, (when) he goes to Russia."

Cheered on at several changeovers with chants of "USA, USA", the gentlemanly Blake put aside his intense disappointment to express his regrets to Hewitt about the barracking late in a contest played in good spirit.

"After we shook hands, I apologised. I was somewhat embarrassed by what a few fans did," said Blake, who shook his head in dismay at one point when spectators cheered Hewitt faults and errors.

"That's what you're always going to get at the US Open. I had hoped that you guys (the US media) would treat him better this year, as well. I said: `Good luck the rest of the way'."

Every observer who thought that Hewitt's occasionally frenzied on-court behaviour indicated he would stiff-arm his grandma for a point must have been impressed with his frequent applause and nods in response to Blake winners.

"He's a nice guy, but I say `Good shot' to a lot of opponents. Maybe he hits more good shots than some other guys I play," Hewitt said. Blake, 22, admitted Hewitt had won the mental battle by taking the pivotal sixth game of the fifth set on three unforced errors by the American and a forehand winner by Hewitt on break point.

Seeded 25th, Blake had begun to shape the contest in the fourth set with his big, erratic forehand, but eventually his aggression, demanded of him by Hewitt's defensive skills, resulted in a match-deciding 86 unforced errors.

"His game is one that can wear you down because he's so fast and he gets to so many balls," said Blake.

"There are guys you can take a little break against, but with Lleyton you can't do it. He finds a way to put the ball in the place that's going to give you trouble."

Goonergal
09-02-2002, 01:24 PM
One bad fan, two good sports
September 2 2002




Lleyton Hewitt and James Blake were playing tennis at its best until they were rattled by a racist cry from the US Open crowd. Caroline Overington reports from New York.


Lleyton Hewitt played American James Blake in the US Open on Saturday, and let me tell you what the similarity was: just like last year, they played a five-set match, Hewitt won and, to the dismay of both players, race became an issue.

It happened in the fourth set, at a time when most of the crowd was enthralled. Blake had won one set, Hewitt had two.

Hewitt went to serve and, in the silence, from a seat high in the stadium came a long, clear, female voice: "Don't let him beat you James. He's a racist."

Blake turned around, in apparent horror. Hewitt dropped the ball. The crowd rumbled its disapproval, and then play continued.

Hewitt served. He lost the next 12 points, and ultimately the set, which meant he had to play a fifth set, to advance to the fourth round.

After the match, Blake approached Hewitt, put his hand on his shoulder, and apologised on behalf of the aberrant fan.

"I just apologised for any fans that were speaking out negatively. I was embarrassed when some fans did that," Blake said afterwards.

Both players were reluctant to talk about the incident, with Blake saying it was "nothing of importance".

Asked if he was shocked, the sensible Blake tried to inject some humour, saying: "I think Heineken being a sponsor might have had something to do with it."

When the laughter subsided, he said: "It's fun to be part of a rowdy crowd, but I like it when it's more just in good fun."

Despite the woman's comment ringing clear across the stadium, Hewitt insisted he did not hear it.

Asked why he stopped mid-serve, he said: "Because James turned around."

When an American reporter told him what the woman had said, Hewitt shrugged: "You're always going to get some nutters in the crowd."

The incident marred what was otherwise the most absorbing match of the tournament.

The final score shows exactly how close the two men were: Hewitt won 6-7 (5-7), 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3.

The match was played under grey skies. A cold wind swirled through the half-full stadium.

The fans were unashamedly for the charismatic Blake, who is a Harvard-educated African-American with magnificent hair.

He saved a break point against Hewitt in the first set, which established a thrilling pattern for the match: both players were required to draw on reserves when set points were against them, to keep the match going for more than three-and-a-half hours.

It was such lovely tennis, everybody stood and cheered when it was done.

And it was not just the tennis that was so impressive: the spirit of the game was alive on centre court, moving the CBS commentators to suggest that this was a game for sportsmanship.

Blake thought so, too. "It's good for the game of tennis," he said of the fact that there were no histrionics, no fist-pumps (well, perhaps one), no cursing, no debating line calls (not even when the replay on the big screen showed that the call was incorrect) and no bouncing of racquets on the hard court.

"It was a great match for the sport," Blake said.

"It was a match a lot of people wanted to see. We fought our hearts out. We both fought until the end. He came up with great shots, and I came up with great shots.

"But I think the way we conducted ourselves, you know, any kid who was watching that could say, 'I want to be like either one of those guys'."

Tennis writers who had previously seen Hewitt lose his cool on court seem perplexed by his new ability to control a notorious temper, even as the crowd was bar racking strongly for Blake, but Hewitt said he "went out there with the same attitude that I take into Davis Cup matches. I felt that I was playing for Australia out there."

It must have seemed like that, since Blake's chanting fans were everywhere.

Hewitt had his own cheersquad: a small bunch of Australians in yellow T-shirts.

Their applause was drowned out by the sing-song Americans, but he thanked them after the match, by batting some balls in their direction.

It is in matches such as this that Hewitt's talent becomes so obvious.

He is remarkable under pressure, which was constant.

With the exception of the sixth game in the fifth set, which Hewitt won to love, he had to fight for each and every point and he did, chasing balls even when he was 40-0 down in a Blake service game.

It made the heart sing, to see somebody trying so hard.

"It wears you down a bit," Blake said.

"He scraps to win a point. Doesn't care about the situation. He gets so many balls. He's one of the fastest guys on the tour. A few breakpoints, he came up with aces, or service winners."

Shaking his head, Blake said: "When you add a big serve to the rest of his game, it really makes it difficult to beat him."

Watching from the wings was Andre Agassi, who has not dropped a set on his march to the fourth round.

"He's a phenomenal competitor," Agassi said, of Hewitt.

"He's got an all-around game that has no weaknesses. His greatest weapon is his speed. There's really no hole in his game. He's not making silly errors. His shot selection is very disciplined."

All being well, Lleyton will meet Agassi in the semi-final.

All being well, this will be the match that people call the real final

KaseyL
09-02-2002, 01:26 PM
And from the Australian:

Hewitt wins over hostile crowd
By Robert Lusetich, Tennis
September 02, 2002
THEY may have been the 214 New York minutes that changed Lleyton Hewitt.

It was not so much that the defending US Open champion overcame gallant young American, James Blake, in an epic five-set match to move into the round of 16 – where he faces 14th-seeded Czech Jiri Novak.

That was about winning and if Hewitt has taught us anything, it is he knows how to win big matches.

What was remarkable about yesterday's 3½ tension-filled hours inside Arthur Ashe Stadium was the manner in which Hewitt, unveiling a new-found maturity, prevailed.

If it were not for the backward cap and the reluctance to come to the net, it could have been Pat Rafter co-starring in a gripping two-man drama.

Hewitt, whose tenacity and combativeness have driven him to the world No. 1 ranking but not necessarily into the hearts of fans, may have finally understood that he could combine unrelenting fight with commendable sportsmanship and still win.

That he and Blake were cheered off court by the New York crowd showed how far Hewitt had come in an afternoon which began as if he were playing a Davis Cup tie behind enemy lines.

"I think the way we conducted ourselves . . . if any kid was watching that, they could say, 'I want to be like either one of those two'," Blake said.

Hewitt concurred, saying "we can both be proud" of the way the match was played.

If Hewitt's sporting gestures were a cynical ploy to win support after the public-relations disaster that shrouded his match with Blake last year, then he would have been exposed. In the heat of battle and with the crowd cheering his mistakes, it is hard to believe Hewitt is that good an actor.

Early in the pivotal second set, after losing the first in a tie-breaker, Hewitt hit what looked like a winner to Blake's weaker backhand.

The American, flat-footed behind the baseline, instinctively ripped the ball down the line for a breathtaking winner.

"Too good," said Hewitt, who is not renowned for praising opponents.

No-one could recall a match in which Hewitt's trademark, "come on!", was uttered only once – and fairly muted, at that. The fist pumps were rare and each one restrained, and his only other emotional reaction was to acknowledge Blake's winners.

Even when a woman in the crowd yelled at Blake not to let this "racist" win – a reference to their match at last year's US Open, which was marred by bickering and complaints about officiating – the Australian refused to take the bait.

"I didn't hear what she said. I was pretty focused out there," he said.

When told what the woman had yelled, Hewitt simply shrugged his shoulders.

"You're always going to get some nutters in the crowd," he said. "Can't do much about it."

Blake, who played down last year's incident and long ago made his peace with Hewitt over it, heard the comment and apologised to the Australian as they shook hands after the match. He said he was embarrassed by what some of the fans were yelling.

He could be far from embarrassed by his play.

Ranked at No. 26 in the world, Blake had a set point on Hewitt's serve in the first set, then held off Hewitt's own break point at 5-5 before playing some inspired tennis to come back in the tie-breaker.

Hewitt, who held serve until the fourth set even when his first-serve percentage fell below 50, won the next two sets and it seemed he would win the match in four after he broke Blake and was up love-30 in the sixth game.

But the American lifted and took four of the next five games to take out the fourth set 6-3.

Both players served well in the final set, except for the sixth game when Hewitt broke Blake to love. It was all he needed.

"It's really frustrating that the difference in the match is that one loose game I played," Blake said. "He just came up with some great shots, though."

Like Rafter, who twice won the US Open, Hewitt is becoming a force in five-set matches. He has played 11 five-setters since beating Albert Costa in the 2000 Davis Cup in Spain and has won eight.

He may have a hard time emulating Rafter in this statistic. From the 1995 Australian Open to the 1999 Davis Cup tie against the US in Boston, Rafter played in 11 five-setters and won them all – and he trailed two sets to one in all of those matches.

Hewitt yesterday recalled one of them, Rafter's heroic comeback against Cedric Pioline in the 1997 Davis Cup tie in Sydney. He said watching the way Rafter overcame the odds inspired him.

"You know, that basically said to me 'I want to be out there as soon as possible'. That was it," he said, "In that way, that five-setter of Pat's, maybe it helped Australian tennis a little bit."

Goonergal
09-02-2002, 01:27 PM
Oops we posted the same thing @ the same time :o :p I've deleted mine Ingrid! ;)

KaseyL
09-02-2002, 01:28 PM
LOL Cilla, we posted at the same time!

KaseyL
09-02-2002, 09:15 PM
This article comes from Sydney Morning Herald:

Hewitt brushes race caller's serve
September 2 2002

One American can't forget the racial drama at Flushing Meadows last year - but it's not James Blake, writes Caroline Overington in New York.

Lleyton Hewitt played James Blake at the US Open on Saturday. Just like last year, they played a five-set match, Hewitt won and, to the dismay of both players, race became an issue.

It happened in the fourth set, at a time when most of the crowd was enthralled. Blake had won one set, Hewitt had two, and they were playing for the fourth. Hewitt went to serve and, in the silence, from a seat high in the stadium came a long, clear, female voice: "Don't let him beat you, James. He's a racist."

Blake turned around, in apparent horror. Hewitt dropped the ball. The crowd rumbled its disapproval, and then play continued. Hewitt served. He lost the next 12 points, and ultimately the set, which meant he had to play a fifth set to snare a fourth-round berth.

After the match Blake approached Hewitt, put his hand on his shoulder and apologised on behalf of the aberrant fan.

"I just apologised for any fans that were speaking out negatively. I was embarrassed when some fans did that," he told reporters later. Both players were reluctant to talk about the incident. Blake said it was "nothing of importance".

Asked if he was shocked, the sensible Blake tried to inject some humour, saying: "I think Heineken being a sponsor might have had something to do with it." When the laughter subsided, he said: "It's fun to be part of a rowdy crowd, but I like it when it's more just in good fun."

Despite the fact that the woman's comment rang clear across the stadium, Hewitt insisted he didn't hear it. Asked why he stopped mid-serve, he said: "Because James turned around." When an American reporter told him what the woman had said, he shrugged and said: "You're always going to get some nutters in the crowd."

The incident marred what was otherwise the most absorbing match of the tournament. The final score shows exactly how close the two men were: Hewitt won 6-7 (7-5) 6-3 6-4 3-6 6-3.

The match was played under grey skies. A cold wind swirled through the half-full stadium. The fans were for the charismatic Blake, who is a Harvard-educated African-American with magnificent hair. He saved a break point in the first set, which established a thrilling pattern for the match: both players were required to draw on reserves when set points were against them in the 3-hour match. It was such lovely tennis that everybody stood and cheered when it was done. And it was not just the tennis that was so impressive: the spirit of the game was alive on centre court, moving the CBS commentators to suggest this was a game for sportsmanship.

Blake thought so, too.

"It's good for the game of tennis," he said, of the fact that there were no histrionics, no fist-pumps [well, maybe one], no cursing, no debating line calls [not even when the replay on the big screen showed that the call was incorrect] and no bouncing of racquets on the hardcourt.

"It was a great match for the sport. It was a match a lot of people wanted to see. We fought our hearts out. We both fought until the end. He came up with great shots and I came up with great shots. But I think the way we conducted ourselves, you know, any kid who was watching that could say, 'I want to be like either one of those guys'."

Tennis writers who had previously seen Hewitt lose his rag on court seem perplexed by his new ability to control a notorious temper, even as the crowd was "rooting" (as they say here) for Blake. Hewitt said he "went out there with the same attitude that I take into Davis Cup matches".

"I felt that I was playing for Australia out there."

It must have seemed like that, with Blake's chanting fans everywhere. The applause of Hewitt's own cheer squad, a small bunch of Australians in yellow T-shirts, was drowned out by the sing-song Americans but he thanked them after the match - by batting some balls in their direction.

It is in matches like this that Hewitt's talent becomes so obvious. He is remarkable under pressure, which was constant. With the exception of the sixth game in the fifth set, which Hewitt won to love, he had to fight for every point, chasing balls even when he was 40-0 down in a Blake service game. It made the heart sing to see somebody trying so hard.

"It wears you down a bit," Blake said later. "He scraps to win a point. Doesn't care about the situation. He gets so many balls. He's one of the fastest guys on the tour. A few break points, he came up with aces or service winners."

Shaking his head, Blake added: "When you add a big serve to the rest of his game, it really makes it difficult to beat him."

Watching from the wings was Andre Agassi, who has not dropped a set in his march to the fourth round.

Agassi said of Hewitt: "He's got an all-around game that has no weaknesses. His greatest weapon is his speed. There's really no hole in his game. He's not making silly errors. His shot selection is very disciplined."

All being well, Hewitt will meet Agassi in the semi-finals. All being well, this will be the match that people call the real final.

KaseyL
09-04-2002, 02:20 PM
from The Age, Sept 4:

Business as usual for Hewitt

By Caroline Overington
New York
September 4 2002

Lleyton Hewitt did not get to play his United States Open fourth-round match until 10 o'clock on Sunday night, so who could blame him for wanting to wrap it up quickly?

Hewitt, who gets nervous when he has nothing to do, had to spend the day in his hotel room, watching the rain outside and classic matches on the TV.

By the time he got on court, he was keen to quickly defeat Czech Jiri Novak, which he did in an hour and 45 minutes, 6-4, 6-2, 7-5. Hewitt served 19 aces and won 81 per cent of his first service points.

The only mistake he really made was in the second-to-last game, when he was serving for the match, and inexplicably, metaphorically, dropped the ball.

"I was a bit negative," he said, of losing his serve in that game.
He slapped some winners off my serve. He had (an) 'all or nothing' attitude in that game, I guess."

Hewitt recovered to serve three aces in the final game, including a lovely one on match point, and was able to get a rub down, into a news conference and back to the hotel close to 1am, which was his goal.

Unlike other players, he was unfazed by changes to his schedule and venues. "That's tennis," he said. "You can't do much about it. It's not big deal to me."

Asked to rate his performance, Hewitt said it was "pretty good". "I felt like I could chase down enough of his balls to make him go for the wrong sort of shot. I don't think he actually matches up great against me."

Novak said Hewitt appeared nervous at first, "but after he won the first set, he was showing me his real tennis, showing me why he's No. 1 in the world".

Of the last set, when Hewitt allowed Novak to break him, Novak said: "He just made a few mistakes. But his serving was excellent today. He's running much faster. He doesn't make errors."

The championship has been plagued by two days of rain. Some players will have to play matches on successive days, whereas others, such as Hewitt, will get a day's break. Of course, he knows it will help him.

"It's going to be a small advantage," he said.

If there is a player who threatens Hewitt, it is Andre Agassi, who is cruising through the same half of the draw. He defeated Jan-Michael Gambill 6-2, 6-3, 6-3 in well under two hours on Monday.

He has not lost a set on his march to the quarter-finals and said: "I feel pretty good about my game. I feel ready to go."

Asked what he had done right against Gambill, Agassi said: "Pretty much everything."

He agreed that he will be fresher when the finals come around. "My body can hold up to a pretty good beating but it is nice not to expend it if you don't have to."

Hewitt claims not to have watched any of Agassi's matches, saying, "He hasn't been on court long enough", which is true. "But he's like that," Hewitt said of Agassi's ability to cruise through, without losing a set.

"When he gets his nose in front, he's extremely tough to get back in the match with."

Goonergal
09-04-2002, 03:51 PM
Hewitt eyes Agassi clash

http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38233000/jpg/_38233938_hewitt300.jpg
Hewitt knows Agassi could be a semi-final threat


Lleyton Hewitt and Andre Agassi are expected to set up a semi-final showdown by winning their matches at the US Open on Wednesday.
World number one Hewitt faces 20th-seeded Moroccan Younes El Aynaoui while Agassi takes on 32nd seed Max Mirnyi of Belarus.

And Hewitt admits he is excited at the prospect of facing two-time Flushing Meadows champion Agassi in the last four.

"My game feels ready to shift to another gear"
-Andre Agassi

"If we both get there, it will be a good match. He's probably the best guy at rolling over guys very quickly," said Hewitt.

"Once he gets his nose in front, he's extremely tough to get back in the match with."

Agassi, who has yet to drop a set, is confident he can go on to take the title.

"If the situation calls for me to step it up, then I feel like I've been ready to do that," he said.

"My game feels ready to shift to another gear. I'm going to need to. I do believe I can do it."

Goonergal
09-04-2002, 11:08 PM
Hewitt into last four

Top seed Lleyton Hewitt reached the semi-finals of the US Open for the third straight year with an unconvincing win over Morocco's Younes El Aynaoui.
The Australian won 6-1 7-6 4-6 6-2 to set up a meeting with Andre Agassi, providing the American beats Max Mirnyi later on Wednesday.

Despite the victory it was a strange performance from Hewitt, who grew more frustrated and played worse as the game progressed. The main reason for that was the steady improvement from 20th seed El Aynaoui following a woeful start.

Hewitt raced through the first set in 25 minutes with some of his best tennis of the tournament. It may have proved too easy as his concentration slipped, allowing El Aynaoui to find some rhythm on his forehand.

The Morrocan dominated the second set but let it slip away, first when he dropped serve at 5-4 up and then at set point in the tie-break. Hewitt did not need a third invitation and took the set with a blistering backhand pass before letting out a trademark shout of "C'mon!"

The defending champion might have expected to run away with the third set. But El Aynaoui made him work hard and wasted three break points in the eighth game, before being handed the set when Hewitt double faulted at the crucial point in game 10.
It did not signal a major comeback as Hewitt broke in the next game.

But the Australian was far from happy with his form as he struggled through the next seven games, and he looked a relieved man when an El Aynaoui error brought victory.

Goonergal
09-04-2002, 11:08 PM
GAMEWATCH

SET 1

Hewitt 6-1 El Aynaoui
The first set is over in just 25 minutes as Hewitt forces more errors from El Aynaoui - he makes 12 compared to Hewitt's one in the set.

Hewitt 5-1 El Aynaoui
Hewitt is in no mood to hang about and races through the sixth game with two aces.

Hewitt 4-1 El Aynaoui
20th seed El Aynaoui makes several extravagant winners but even more unforced errors as Hewitt keeps him moving all over the court - and it's another break for the world number one.

Hewitt 3-1 El Aynaoui
A love game takes Hewitt two games clear and the Australian's underrated serve is already causing El Aynaoui problems.

Hewitt 2-1 El Aynaoui
The third game ends in controversy as umpire Egli calls El Aynaoui for touching the net on break point, and Hewitt gets the break.

Hewitt 1-1 El Aynaoui
The top seed levels comfortably, although the rallies are already long and it could be a war of attrition.

Hewitt 0-1 El Aynaoui
El Aynaoui takes the first game to 30 with an ace, after Hewitt poses some problems with a winning pass and a surprise rush to the net.

SET 2

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 El Aynaoui
El Aynaoui dominates the tie-break with his forehand and gets to set point at 6-5, at which point he comes up with two woeful backhands that allow Hewitt to steal the set with a magnificent pass.

Hewitt 6-1 6-6 El Aynaoui
The match looks to be slipping away from El Aynaoui when he twice faces set points, but the Moroccan holds his nerve to force the tie-break.

Hewitt 6-1 6-5 El Aynaoui
The confidence returns to Hewitt and he is all over the court again on his way to taking the game with a solid overhead.

Hewitt 6-1 5-5 El Aynaoui
Hewitt opens with a stunning lob and the nerves get to El Aynaoui, who throws in a double fault and an appalling forehand on his way to dropping serve - provoking the first "C'mon!" of the day from the Australian.

Hewitt 6-1 4-5 El Aynaoui
No problems for Hewitt as he gets back to his earlier form on serve, and the pressure is back on El Aynaoui.

Hewitt 6-1 3-5 El Aynaoui
The Moroccan supporters make themselves heard as El Aynaoui comes through a tight game to win to 30, and Hewitt must serve to stay in the set.

Hewitt 6-1 3-4 El Aynaoui
Out of nowhere El Aynaoui is back in the match as Hewitt throws in a disastrous game, following up a double fault with a terrible volley to drop serve.

Hewitt 6-1 3-3 El Aynaoui
A much more confident game from El Aynaoui, who mixes up his game with a variety of angles to keep Hewitt on the move.

Hewitt 6-1 3-2 El Aynaoui
A straightforward game takes Hewitt back in front and he produces a couple of volleys to keep El Aynaoui guessing.

Hewitt 6-1 2-2 El Aynaoui
El Aynaoui finds the corners with a couple of groundstrokes that he had been missing earlier and he looks ready to make a game of it.

Hewitt 6-1 2-1 El Aynaoui
El Aynaoui forces two break points but a big serve and a crosscourt forehand save Hewitt, who serves out the game.

Hewitt 6-1 1-1 El Aynaoui
The Moroccan stops the rot with his second game of the match as Hewitt looks to take a breather.

Hewitt 6-1 1-0 El Aynaoui
The closest to a crisis for Hewitt when he goes 15-30 down, but three big serves get him out of trouble.

SET 3

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 4-6 El Aynaoui
The first break of the set brings El Aynaoui unexpectedly back into the match, with Hewitt ending another poor game on a double fault.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 4-5 El Aynaoui
Despite being in a commanding position Hewitt is getting increasingly frustrated and El Aynaoui sends down a couple of aces on his way to taking the game.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 4-4 El Aynaoui
As in the second set Hewitt comes up with one poor game, making three errors to go down 0-40 before picking up the pace dramatically to reel off five straight points.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 3-4 El Aynaoui
More good serving from El Aynaoui keeps the set on course for another tie-break as neither player looks capable of raising their level at the moment.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 3-3 El Aynaoui
A wonderful backhand lob from El Aynaoui takes the game to deuce but Hewitt serves out with no further problems.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 2-3 El Aynaoui
El Aynaoui is not giving up without a fight and it is getting on Hewitt's nerves, provoking an unusual amount of errors from the Australian.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 2-2 El Aynaoui
A fierce forehand from the mid-court gives Hewitt the game, but he looks annoyed as he fails to dominate completely as in the first set.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 1-2 El Aynaoui
The best game of the match from El Aynaoui is over in under two minutes and both players look keen to get to the heart of the set.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 1-1 El Aynaoui
Hewitt levels with a comfortable game and El Aynaoui fails to threaten on the return.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 0-1 El Aynaoui
After such a disappointing end to the second set El Aynaoui does well to hold serve as the third begins.

SET 4

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 4-6 6-2 El Aynaoui
This time there is no mistake from Hewitt and El Aynaoui helps him out with a couple of wild backhands to end the match.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 4-6 5-2 El Aynaoui
The match looks all but over as Hewitt secures a second break in the set, but he again relies on his opponent making mistakes after failing to put away several chances.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 4-6 4-2 El Aynaoui
Hewitt is relieved to put away a high backhand volley on game point after missing an easier chance earlier in the point.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 4-6 3-2 El Aynaoui
Victory may be in sight but Hewitt is still struggling with his game and, for the moment, El Aynaoui is having little trouble keeping in touch.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 4-6 3-1 El Aynaoui
The match looks to be heading the way of the Australian after a more convincing service game, and El Aynaoui needs to find some inspiration.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 4-6 2-1 El Aynaoui
El Aynaoui stays in touch with a solid game, finished off with a forehand winner into the corner.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 4-6 2-0 El Aynaoui
It's hardly convincing stuff from Hewitt but he comes through another deuce game on serve to consolidate the break.

Hewitt 6-1 7-6 4-6 1-0 El Aynaoui
A scrappy game comes to a dramatic end as Hewitt comes up with the shot of the match to break - hurtling towards the net to pick up a brilliant drop volley and lobbing El Aynaoui.

Goonergal
09-04-2002, 11:44 PM
Love that hair

Rockin' Moroccan Can't Get Past Hewitt
by Laura Andriani
Wednesday, September 4, 2002


As the afternoon shadows fell across Arthur Ashe Stadium on Wednesday, one of the US Open's most surprising and anticipated matches took place. 2002 champion Lleyton Hewitt faced the No. 20 seed, Younes El Aynaoui. El Aynaoui has not had an easy ride thus far at the Open. The Moroccan's last match against Wayne Ferreira went to four sets and did not end until 2:14 a.m. on Tuesday, when he won, 3-6, 7-5, 7-5, 7-6 (3). His previous match against Fernando Vicente also lasted four sets. Hewitt, on the other hand, has had a rather easy trip, save his five-set marathon match against James Blake.

El Aynaoui has shown notable promise throughout the tournament. A towering 6' 4", he was expected to perhaps give Hewitt a run for his money. Today's match, however, seemed to be Hewitt's from the start. One fan in Arthur Ashe Stadium commented, "El Aynaoui -- I've seen him play. He's good but not good enough." Hewitt played confidently throughout the first set, committing only one unforced error and winning 17 of 22 net approaches. He finished the first set, 6-1, in just 26 minutes.

El Aynaoui improved his match play in the second set, matching Hewitt's infamous serve with equal muscle and keeping rallies alive with his broad reach. He hit four aces and 13 winners, while Hewitt, although skilled in his own baseline game, double faulted six times. The two fiercely battled it out, forcing a tiebreaker, which Hewitt barely won, 8-6.

Hewitt took some time to recover from the exhausting set, as the rockin' Moroccan broke him and took the lead, 2-1. Playing defensively, Hewitt punched backhands from the baseline as El Aynaoui's strong run, consisting of four aces, lead him to a 5-4 lead. El Aynaoui held on in the 10th game, and thanks to Hewitt's set point double fault, took the third set, 6-4.

The fourth set found Hewitt bombarding El Aynaoui with looping forehand winners and only seven unforced errors. Although El Aynaoui hit 13 winners himself, he suffered from a lack of control and committed 19 unforced errors. The No. 1 seed Aussie took a 4-2 lead with a high one-handed backhand volley and continued his run to trounce El Aynaoui, 6-2.

Hewitt will play either No. 32 seed Max Mirnyi or No. 6 seed Andre Agassi in the semis.

Goonergal
09-05-2002, 01:51 PM
It's Hewitt v Agassi

www.news.com.au
September 05, 2002

LLEYTON HEWITT set up a US Open semi-final meeting with Andre Agassi after a scrappy 6-1 7-6 (7-5) 4-6 6-2 win over Moroccan 20th seed Younes El Aynaoui.

Hewitt took the first set 6-1 in 26 minutes without losing a point on his serve but then struggled to put the tall Moroccan away over the next two hours.

El Aynaoui, who had strong support from the meagre crowd which gathered in the cavernous Arthur Ashe stadium on a sunny afternoon, took Hewitt to a tiebreak in the second set and then won the third before the Australian eventually triumphed 6-1 7-6 (8-6) 4-6 6-2 in 2hrs 40mins.

Hewitt made 42 unforced errors in the match, but he said the swirling wind in the stadium made conditions difficult.

"It felt like I was serving into a hurricane sometimes," the world No.1 said.

Later, Andre Agassi defeated Belarussian Max Mirnyi 6-7 6-3 7-5 6-3 to reach his eighth US Open semi.

It was journey into the last four that required all the 32-year-old's wit, guile and brute force against a 6 ft 5 ins serving machine who eventually ran out of rockets.

"He's a big guy who can use his size and force you to do something special on every point," the sixth seed said after a two-hour 51-minute battle.

"It was a high standard match from start to finish ... but once we were a set all I felt I raised it from there."

Hewitt is 4-2 against Agassi, having won four in a row, and 1-1 against Mirnyi, who knocked the Australian out of the Sydney Olympics.

Not since Pete Sampras in 1995 has a man won Wimbledon and the US Open back to back but Hewitt could turn the trick.

Hewitt broke El Aynaoui in the first game of the fourth set on a controversial point.

The Aussie ran to the net to play a drop volley and barely got his racket under the ball for a lob that landed beyond the African for a winner.

But Hewitt lost his balance and skidded feet-first toward the net, barely touching the barrier with his right foot. His body blocked the umpire's view and the point stood.

Hewitt broke again in the seventh game as El Aynaoui tired and then held serve to take the match as the African sent a backhand beyond the baseline after two hours and 40 minutes.

After rolling through the first set, Hewitt had to fight back in the second.

He broke back to force a tiebreaker, then fell behind 3-0 and 5-2 before taking six of the last seven points in the session.

The Moroccan hit a forehand long to pull Hewitt level at 5-5, but the Aussie netted a backhand on a ball off a net cord and went down a set point.

But El Aynaoui sent a pair of backhands long and Hewitt followed by zipping a backhand cross-court winner to claim the second set.

Hewitt handed El Aynaoui the third set, surrendering the break in the final game with a double fault after punching a backhand long.

AAP

Goonergal
09-05-2002, 01:52 PM
Ground Zero leaves Hewitt 'empty'

www.news.com.au
September 05, 2002

LLEYTON HEWITT says visiting Ground Zero left him feeling empty.

Hewitt, 21, has played at the US Open every year since 1999 but never visited the World Trade Centre before it was levelled in a terrorist attack last year, two days after he won his first Grand Slam.

Hewitt says New York changed his life last year and, although he's not much of a sightseer, he made a special visit to the scene of the atrocity where 2819 victims and 10 hijackers died.

While the huge site where the twin towers used to stand is now largely cleared and looks like a construction zone, pictures and memorials to the dead line the fence around a nearby church, while entrepreneurs sell soft drinks, T-shirts and souvenirs to tourists.

"It was interesting, but it was weird," Hewitt said, his voice trailing off.

"I had never been in the World Trade Centre before, so I didn't really know what it looked like.

"But it was just a huge space left empty. It sort of leaves you with an empty feeling when you walk away from the place."

It's the only sightseeing Hewitt is likely to do between now and Saturday's US Open semi-final.

Although he has two days off in one of the world's busiest cities, Hewitt admits he's in for a pretty boring couple of days.

"I'll sit in my room most of the time. I'll be here at the courts, not doing a lot for a couple of hours. But I don't want to hang around the courts all day. Just lucky it takes half-an-hour, 45 minutes to go to the hotel."

AAP

Goonergal
09-05-2002, 01:55 PM
L. HEWITT/Y. El Aynaoui Quarterfinal

THE MODERATOR: First question, please.

Q. The first set, if there's such a sort of thing as perfect, you were pretty perfect.
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I came out and, you know, tried to attack from the start, and I knew that for some reason that he was pretty slow out of the blocks, I felt as well. He didn't quite serve as well; I was sort of on his serve right from the start. He wasn't quite hitting the corners. Then he got better and better as the match went on, which I expected him to do.
But I was happy definitely to get off to a good start and get that first set under my belt.

Q. The wind seemed to be causing havoc with your serve?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, was tough out there. Tough conditions. Sometimes I felt like it was going directly down the court, straight down. Then it was other times where I felt it was swirling around and I didn't know where it was coming from. Tough conditions to play in.
But I've played actually a lot of matches here on that center court probably in worse conditions than today. So it's tough for both players. You can't do much about it.

Q. Did you feel that, you obviously knew he finished at 2:30 in the morning the other day. He went to bed at 7 or something.
LLEYTON HEWITT: Did he?

Q. Yeah. He worked out and had some food.
LLEYTON HEWITT: Worked out? (Doesn't he seem a little perplexed here :p)

Q. Went to bed at 7 o'clock. Did you know there was a likelihood that, you know, the longer it went on, the more tired he'd get?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, actually I didn't think he'd get tired. I've seen him before and I've seen him play a lot of tough five-setters, especially on clay, which is probably a more demanding surface. You know, his fitness is pretty good, I thought, in the past. I wasn't expecting him to get tired. Then again I thought maybe half way through the fourth set he was starting to struggle a little bit out there, which obviously had probably a lot to do with the other night - just throwing his whole routine out the window, I guess.
You know, so that was a little bit surprising to me, that, you know, a lot of those Moroccan guys are extremely fit guys.

Q. There's a good chance you'll play Agassi. Have you given that any thought, given he's the player that's the most likely to trouble you here?
LLEYTON HEWITT: It's gonna be a tough match. If I have to play Andre, I've got to play as well as I can if I'm going to win. But then again he's got to play as well as he can.
So, you know, we've had some pretty good matches in the past. We've never played at a Slam. That part will be interesting. But, you know, I got to go out there with the same attitude that I have to play my game and hopefully it matches up well on the day.

Q. Are you going to watch the match tonight to scout the players? Do you feel like you already know them pretty well?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I know them pretty well. I might watch a little bit on TV, but not a lot. You know, got a funny feeling that if Andre gets through, I won't be playing much like Max anyway. You can throw that strategy out of the window.

Q. Five sets, surely that must help you?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Some ways yes, some ways no. He's in great shape. I don't care what age he is. You know, he looks as fit as ever to me. He looks stronger than he's been probably in the past as well, and, you know, I can't recall too many matches that Andre's lost because of his fitness. So I throw his age right out the window. You know, I think he works as hard as, you know, anyone off the court and, you know, you got to put him probably in the top four or five guys I guess on tour, as the fittest guys around.

Q. When you guys both made your comebacks in San Jose, you played in the final. Coming into this, let's say you do play Andre, how much does that match give you confidence?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Not a lot. It was probably, as you said, it was our first matches back. It's a bit different scenario now, if we play in the semis of the US Open rather than the final of San Jose - best-of-five, best-of-three set match, totally different situation.
You know, I beat him a couple of weeks ago in Cincinnati, but I reckon, we both can throw all those past results out the window.

Q. What's your schedule?
LLEYTON HEWITT: It's a weird situation. Couple of days off then you play back-to-back matches if you get through. So I probably just will hit once tomorrow and once Friday or whatever it is, probably for, you know, half an hour, 45 minutes most.

Q. Back to Younes for a minute, how come you're playing him, he runs around that backhand the way he does, but you have such precise shots. Why is it so hard to get the ball past him when he's on the baseline? He's out of position.
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, sometimes, but his forehand is pretty big out there as well. When he gets around there and he can sort of whack it, it's not like you can just stand there and sort of bump it up the line. Most of the times he's attacking so you've got to actually, you know, you're running sort of to place the ball back. A lot of the times you're just happy to get it back over the net and deep to make him play another shot. Then you have to be very weary of if you push it down the line, don't quite get all of it clean, sitting there, ripe for his forehand just to whack away.

Q. Then you had to hit a drop volley.
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, was a big point obviously for the break. I just had a bit of a hunch, I guess, was anticipation more than anything. He hit a lot of sort of drop volleys. I made him play low volleys. I started running probably before he hit it. It was pretty quick.

Q. On the TV John McEnroe said he thought you were probably -- looked like you were saving yourself for the big ones. Is that something you do consciously?
LLEYTON HEWITT: No, you know, don't win all tough five setters and just scrape through. But I think I look forward to the bigger matches, no doubt about it. I know when to rise for the occasion, I guess. And, you know, it's not hard to get up for, you know, big matches. But I think I came out of the blocks well today and I sort of put it to him straight away that I'm defending champion here and it's gonna take a hell of a match from him to beat me out there today.
In the end -- second set was huge, for me to get out of that one. Then, you know, it's nice to get through not, you know, not in tight five-setters, I guess.

Q. Still got something in the tank?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I feel pretty good at the moment. We have to wait and see. Couple of days off shouldn't hurt.

Q. In that match today, especially in that second set when it was tight, there were a couple of line calls that were a bit iffy. You seemed to bite your tongue and didn't get into it. There were a couple balls that looked out. One in particular you looked at it again. But you didn't sort of get too emotional out there.
LLEYTON HEWITT: I can't actually remember. I don't know. But, yeah...

Q. As a whole, you didn't seem super emotional. You just sort of stayed steady. Is that something you're trying to do?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. I didn't even think about it. You know, couple line calls, I can't remember. You know, I know there were some, but I felt like there were some in the first set that was probably more critical. There was one particular point where I think I won it, had to win it three times to win the point. But apart from that, I can't remember that many obvious errors.

Q. Did you see him kick the net on that breakpoint?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I didn't see him, but I knew it was awfully close. Just at balls come over, the umpire said, "Touched," or something. I didn't know what was going on. Yeah, as soon as the umpire said it, then I realized.

Q. Do you sort of look at it in terms of, "Okay, I've won this many and this bloke won that many?"
LLEYTON HEWITT: No, not at all. I don't even -- doesn't enter my mind. I'm not even going to go close to putting myself in the same category as Laver, Sampras, Agassi, whoever. I've won two Slams and, you know, at the age of 21, been No. 1, which is fantastic. It's past my wildest dreams, I guess, just to have done that. But I'm not, you know, putting anything in myself to go out there and win the most Slams or whatever. If it comes, it comes.

Q. Do you have more respect for a guy who's a prodigy and always marked as a great, great player and becomes a great player? Or a guy like Younes who was never thought to have a chance and goes on to become a Top 20 player?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Not too much. I guess, it's totally different situation, I guess. Obviously, for the guy who gets nothing, I guess, and works so hard his whole career just to get into the Top 20, you got to take your hat off to that guy. But you got to take your hat off to a guy who's hailed as the next great thing and has so much pressure and expectation on their back. To come out and actually do it, that's another thing. You can't sort of weigh up the two things.
Obviously, the pressure's huge, I guess, for young guys coming up who, you know, get tagged as, "The next big thing," from their country or whatever. But if you're able to go and do that, then that's well done.

Q. What is the most dangerous part of Andre's game?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. He does everything pretty well. You know, I think just it's hard to say, to just pick one area out. But, you know, he obviously hits the ball extremely clean and extremely well from the back of the court. Dictating play from the back of the court, like he often does, with a lot of guys. It's tough to get too many cheap points off him.

Q. Is his serve underrated?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, very underrated. He's worked on his serve a lot over the last few years. He gets a lot of cheap points off of it. I think he uses his serve well for his game. A lot of guys, with different games, wouldn't be a great serve. He hits it in position where he's going to get that next short ball and pound his groundies, which he does so well.

Q. Can you imagine yourself playing a Grand Slam semifinal in ten years?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Don't know. It's a long way. Got no idea.

(Note: this is a partial transcript)

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

KaseyL
09-05-2002, 07:11 PM
Thanks for the articles, Cilla!

KaseyL
09-05-2002, 07:20 PM
Now little Lleyton adds a bit of muscle

The Daily Telegraph, Sep 5, 2002

By PAUL MALONE in New York
05sep02

LLEYTON Hewitt has fired down 54 aces in four matches at the US Open to shock his rivals with the power of his service game.
Hewitt, who made improving his serve a priority three years ago, is fifth in the ace count going into the quarter-finals early today.
Pistol Pete Sampras leads the ace count with 76, from Fernando Gonzalez (60), Max Mirnyi (58), Greg Rusedski (57 from three matches) and Hewitt.

"Lleyton is a very complete player now and can do almost everything. He is getting free points," said the world No. 1's quarter-final opponent Younes El Aynaoui.

"He might feel invincible. He has a huge amount of confidence and he is used to playing on the big courts "He's getting harder to play. You have to break the rhythm with slow balls and slices.
"The way to play Hewitt is to not rally with him from the back.
"He has a lot of people around him and I'm sure he's feeling great."

American Andy Roddick, now seeded to meet Hewitt in the final should they both keep winning, said the Australian had lost little in comparison with the white-hot Andre Agassi on form in the event.

"Andre and Lleyton are playing the best of everybody right now and they are on schedule for their showdown [in the semi-finals]," Roddick said.

Hewitt unleashed 19 aces, including four in one service game, in his fourth round win over 14th seed Jiri Novak two days ago. In his previous three appearances, the Australian banged down 14, six and 15 aces.

"Lleyton has more power. He now really believes he can beat anything," said his former Davis Cup captain John Newcombe.
"He is serving more aces than he did a year ago, but his first serve percentage is consistently around 48 per cent in his tournaments and that's got to hurt him if it doesn't improve. His second serve has gradually got better and better and it's pretty hard to attack his second serve."

Hewitt had a distinct advantage in preparation over El Aynaoui, who ran on a treadmill at 4.30am to stay loose after a fourth round win over Wayne Ferreira and eventually he fell asleep at 7am.

Goonergal
09-06-2002, 12:22 PM
Pete keen on Hewitt semi
By Maria Hawthorne in New York
September 06, 2002

TENNIS great Pete Sampras is predicting great things from Saturday's US Open semi-final between Lleyton Hewitt and Andre Agassi.

The highly anticipated match, the first time the two aggressive baseliners have met at a Grand Slam, should be something special.

"It's going to be a classic," Sampras said.

"I really believe they're going to have a lot of great rallies. It's going to be some good tennis out there."

Sampras, 31, won through to the other semi-final against Dutchman Sjeng Schalken - and a possible final rematch with Hewitt - with a 6-3 6-2 6-4 win tonight over Andy Roddick.

The match never lived up to its hype as the clash of the old and the new generations of US players as Roddick, 20, had no answers for the 13-times Grand Slam champion.

The young American also missed the total, vocal crowd support he enjoyed when he played Hewitt in an explosive quarter-final last year.

"I don't know if Lleyton made a lot of fans here last year - whether that was deserved or not, I don't know," Roddick said.

"The crowd was definitely on my side last year, gung-ho."

Roddick said he was unlikely to watch another ball of the tournament but predicted Sampras could beat either Hewitt or Agassi.

"He has the ability to, yeah," he said.

Hewitt was at the tennis courts today for a practice session and said he was looking forward to the match against Agassi, whom he beat last month in Cincinnati.

"It was a great match and if we have another one like that the crowd will be happy," Hewitt said.

Hewitt and Agassi have played six times since they first met in Adelaide in 1998 when the Australian, a scrawny 16-year-old, surprised the American 7-6 7-6 in the semi-finals.

Hewitt has won four of those matches, including the last three in a row.

But the defending US Open champion and reigning Wimbledon title-holder said the record meant nothing as he chased back-to-back Grand Slams.

"I'm not even going to go close to putting myself in the same category as (Rod) Laver, Sampras, Agassi, whoever," Hewitt said.

"I've won two Slams and, at the age of 21, been No.1, which is fantastic. It's past my wildest dreams just to have done that."

Goonergal
09-06-2002, 12:27 PM
Hewitt runs into his idol
By Robert Lusetich, New York
September 06, 2002

STILL hanging on Lleyton Hewitt's wall in Adelaide is a poster of his childhood idol. But if the 21-year-old Australian is to defend his US Open championship and claim his third grand slam in 12 months, he will need to take out his idol, Andre Agassi, on one of the sport's grandest stages.

Hewitt claimed one of the last four places in the men's draw yesterday with a sometimes brilliant, sometimes frustrating but always likely win over 30-year-old Moroccan Younes El Aynaoui, 6-1 7-6 (8-6) 4-6 6-2, in difficult, swirling winds.

Two-time US Open champion Agassi, who had not even looked like losing a set in his first four matches at this year's final major, also had his own adversity to overcome in the substantial form of 32nd seed Max Mirnyi.

The Belarussian played perhaps the match of his life in taking the sixth-seeded American to four close sets.

Since the draw was made, the buzz around Flushing Meadows has centred on Hewitt and Agassi – a match-up of arguably the best serve-returner and baseliner ever against a young man who has captured the essence of that winning formula and may one day eclipse the achievements of his idol.

They have met six times: Hewitt has won four, including the past three all in the past year. But they have never met at a grand slam. "We've never played for four hours," Agassi said, hinting at what may come.

He remembered his first match against Hewitt, then a skinny 16-year-old ranked outside the top 500 in the world in early 1998 in Adelaide.

"I remember that he was wearing a safety pin in his shorts to hold them up. I'm not kidding," Agassi said.

"I didn't believe it, that that was my opponent. He just seemed like he had a couple of strings hanging in his shoes. He was just very young and we went out there and ended up playing a great match."


Hewitt ran incessantly on a hot day and upset the American in two tiebreaks before going on to win his first tournament as a professional.

When asked about the similarities between them, Agassi said: "It's always the ultimate compliment when your peer has a certain amount of respect for what you've done and what you're doing.

"But I look at Lleyton not through those eyes but through the eyes of a professional who has to address him as a professional. He has a lot to respect out there. He's a disciplined tennis player (who) makes good decisions out there (and) moves really well."

Earlier, Hewitt went out of his way to say his past three wins against Agassi would not give him any real advantage against a man who has won every major at least once.

"We can throw those past results out the window," Hewitt said. "It's a bit different scenario now, the semis of the US Open."

Hewitt and Agassi will be forced to wait for two days until their match. Agassi said he would spend the time "giving Steffi a break" with their baby, Jaden; Hewitt envisioned a few "pretty boring" days.

"Not going to go sight-seeing," Hewitt said.

Hewitt did, however, visit Ground Zero in New York early in his visit. "It was interesting, but it was weird. Just a huge space left empty. Sort of leaves you with an empty feeling when you walk away from that place," he said.

The world's top-ranked player, who has won 17 of 18 past US Open matches, began flawlessly against the journeyman Moroccan.

He did not lose a single point on his serve in the first set and won 29 of the 42 points played to take the set 6-1 in 26 minutes.

"I think I came out of the blocks well today and I sort of put it to him straight away that I'm defending champion here and it's going to take a hell of a match from him to beat me out there," he said.

How they fared

MEN – quarter-finals

1-L Hewitt (Aus) d 30-Y El Aynaoui (Mor) 6-1 7-6 (8-6) 4-6 6-2; 6-A Agassi d 32-M Mirnyi (Blr) 6-7 (7-5) 6-3 7-5 6-3

Next matches

Quarter-final (overnight): 28-F Gonzalez (Chi) v 24-S Schalken (Ned)

Quarter-final (9am AEST start): 11-A Roddick (US) v 17-P Sampras (US)

Semi-final (Sun morning AEST): 1-L Hewitt (Aus) v 6-A Agassi (US)

Goonergal
09-06-2002, 12:35 PM
Hewitt to test staying power
By PAUL MALONE in New York
06sep02

ANDRE Agassi yesterday declared himself ready to enter Lleyton Hewitt's survival course and win their showcase US Open semi-final.

The super-fit Hewitt awaited the 32-year-old Agassi as his opponent for a semi-final after the American blunted the aggressive Max Mirnyi to take a 6-7 (5-7) 6-3 7-5 6-3 quarter-final win at Flushing Meadows.
The first best-of-five sets match between Hewitt and Agassi, to be played on Sunday, must be an asset to Hewitt against an opponent 11 years older and seeking to become the second-oldest US Open champ.

All six matches between the two players, in a career series led 4-2 by Hewitt, have been on hardcourts in best-of-three-set events and the Australian won both the 2002 meetings at San Jose, in March, and Cincinnati, last month.

"We've never played for four hours," said Agassi, who has given himself every chance by reaching the semis in 8hr 33min of play -- 3hr 47min less than Hewitt had been detained.

"He makes you play a great match with a lot of long points to beat him. But I want to be making sure I'm executing my game the way I can."

Hewitt said he had thrown the issue of Agassi's age "right out the window" after holding an inconsistent game together through blustery conditions and the challenge of Moroccan Younes El Aynaoui.

"We've never played at a slam, that part will be interesting," said Hewitt, who notched a 6-1 7-6 (7-5) 4-6 6-2 win in 2hr 40min. "Some ways yes (it is an advantage to play best-of-five), some ways no. He's in great shape and I can't recall too many matches Andre's lost because of his fitness."

The vanquished quarter-finalists were split on who would win. Mirnyi, Hewitt's former doubles partner, tipped his mate's superb US Open journey to end at Agassi's hands.

"I would guess Andre would win, the way he has been playing throughout summer and particularly this tournament," Mirnyi said.

"It's a matter of whether he can sustain that type of tennis for a tough three or four sets because Lleyton gets a lot of balls back.

"I admire the success Lleyton has reached and I wish him the best. It's very good for tennis in general to have such a great young competitor."

El Aynaoui forecast Hewitt to outlast Agassi. "He's moving better than Andre, he's in better shape. But Andre has nothing to lose," he said.

One of the defining matches in Agassi's career was against someone who lowered his colours as a 16-year-old in the semi-finals of the 1998 Adelaide tournament.

Hewitt says a poster of Agassi remains stuck to a wall of his family's garage in Adelaide -- not his bedroom, as so many articles have claimed over the years.

The Las Vegas showman recalled with mirth his first career meeting with Hewitt when he was fighting his way back from the challenger circuit.

"I remember he was wearing a safety pin in his shorts to hold them up. I'm not kidding. I think it was actually one in each side," said Agassi, who is now younger than only a 35-year-old Ken Rosewall (1970) in the list of US Open champions.

"I just didn't believe that he was my opponent. He seemed like he had a couple of strings hanging in his shoes, but he played a great match."

KaseyL
09-06-2002, 01:05 PM
Thanks a lot!

Goonergal
09-06-2002, 01:12 PM
:D No probs I love posting articles :o :p

A match for the ages

Agassi, Hewitt face off in semifinals
Posted: Thursday September 05, 2002 10:25 AM

NEW YORK (AP) -- Andre Agassi laughed the first time he saw Lleyton Hewitt, a scrawny, 16-year-old high school junior with straggly hair, backward cap and safety pins holding up his baggy shorts.

Hewitt was a runt, maybe 5-foot-9 (1.8 meters)in his sneakers and three pairs of socks. Ballboys were bigger and stronger. So were the ballgirls. He looked as if he had been picked out of the crowd in a cute public relations stunt: local kid meets his idol. If Hewitt had pulled out a pen and pad and asked for his autograph, Agassi wouldn't have been surprised.

They were in Adelaide, Australia, Hewitt's hometown, and the tournament was a tuneup for the 1998 Australian Open. Hewitt was crawling up the rankings between classes and had reached No. 550. Agassi had been No. 1 and would be again, but at the moment he was on a pit stop at No. 122, working his way back from injuries and a journey to the nether world of the Challenger tour.

"I didn't believe it, that that was my opponent," Agassi says now, smiling at the memory. "He just seemed like he had a couple of strings hanging in his shoes."

Two hours later, Agassi wasn't laughing anymore. He was ticked off. The kid was a cocky baseliner with fiery eyes who ran wind sprints all over the court on a broiling day, making Agassi dizzy just watching him. Hewitt served soft but he chased everything down, and when it was over he had beaten Agassi, 7-6, 7-6, to reach the final.

"I was like 0-for-17 on breakpoints," Agassi says. "We didn't break each other the whole match."

Hewitt went on to win the tournament, becoming the youngest tour winner since Michael Chang in 1988 and the lowest-ranked winner in tour history.

Now at No. 1, the defending U.S. Open champion and reigning Wimbledon champ, Hewitt is a tad taller, serves like the big boys and still chases down balls like a roadrunner, the way he did in that first match against Agassi.

When they meet Friday in the Open semifinals, their first Grand Slam match, Hewitt will be coming in with three straight victories over Agassi and a 4-2 lead overall.

The difference in their ages -- Agassi, at 32, is 11 years older -- means little. Agassi looked as if he could play all night when he won a four-setter against Max Mirnyi in Wednesday's quarterfinals.

"He's in great shape, I don't care what age he is," Hewitt says. "He looks as fit as ever to me. He looks stronger than he's been probably in the past as well. I can't recall too many matches that Andre's lost because of his fitness. So I throw his age right out the window."

Hewitt reckoned he also could throw out his last couple of victories over him -- in San Jose in February and Cincinnati last month. This time, it's best-of-five in a U.S. Open with a crowd that's going to be 99 percent for Agassi.

This is a match that has all the signs of a classic in the making. It's Hewitt coming on in his career and Agassi on his way out, yet both close to their peak. They're the dominant baseliners of their eras and, at this moment, their eras are colliding.

Hewitt has the edge in speed and range. He doesn't create points so much as he whacks winners every chance he gets. Agassi is stronger, a master tactician who tries to control points from midcourt and wear down opponents. Trouble is, Hewitt can run all day.

They both can crank up serves in the 125 mph range, though Hewitt may have a slight advantage with his accuracy as he peppers the corners.

"It's a fine line you walk against somebody like Lleyton," Agassi says. "You want to certainly take some chances, but you can't afford to take unnecessary risks. I think that's the balance that you always try to walk. ... You want to control points, but you don't want to press. It's about playing the right shot at the right time."

Hewitt sizes up the challenge this way:

"He obviously hits the ball extremely clean and extremely well from the back of the court. It's tough to get too many cheap points. His serve is very underrated. ... He hits it in a position where he's going to get that next short ball and pound his groundies, which he does so well."

The best matches are usually the ones between players of contrasting styles -- puncher vs. counterpuncher, baseliner vs. serve-and-volleyer.

This time, as similar as Agassi and Hewitt are, the sizzle will come from their long, brutal rallies and a history that began four years ago when Hewitt was still wearing safety pins.

Pfff @ double head mentioning the safety pins..Lleyt will never live it down :p

duck
09-06-2002, 04:20 PM
Old but good.

Grate expectations
By Patrick Hruby
THE WASHINGTON TIMES


NEW YORK — He is indisputably annoying on the court, a walking, talking irritation of the first degree. From his buggy eyes to his pumping fists to his excessive, incessant bleating, Lleyton Hewitt is perhaps the punkiest No.1 in men's tennis since the great — and grating — John McEnroe.

Which, of course, is half the reason he's so good.
"I'm the first to admit I am very competitive," Hewitt said. "As soon as I step on the court, I am intensity. I want to win."
That will to win — the heck with how it plays — has carried Hewitt to more than just a few victories. Behind his snarling, relentless style, Hewitt has emerged as the premier player in the sport, a Wimbledon winner and the prohibitive favorite (as far as that goes in the wild n' woolly men's game) to repeat as U.S. Open champion.
For a scrawny 21-year-old Australian who stands all of 5-foot-11 and weighs 150 pounds — or so the ATP media guide claims — that's no mean feat.
"[It´s] a certain attitude of not wanting to give up," said the equally undersized Michael Chang. "Lleyton has a great fighting spirit."
No kidding. An on-court Marty McFly, Hewitt is the sort of player who wouldn't back down from a scrap if you spotted the other guy a lead pipe and an Abrams battle tank. Like Jimmy Connors, he carries a glacier-size chip on his shoulder, turning every match into a hustling, self-exhorting, "C'moooon!"-shouting battle of wills.
Yet while Hewitt's punchy persona has served him well on the Tour, it's also gotten him into hot water with — and please, take your pick — the media, the ATP and the Australian public, whom he once dubbed "stupid."
In fact, Hewitt's first significant exposure to Stateside fans came during an imbroglio at least year's Open, more than a week before he pummeled a stunned Pete Sampras for the title. During a second-round match against American up-and-comer James Blake, who is black, Hewitt was called for a pair of foot faults by an African-American linesman.
Enraged, Hewitt approached the chair umpire, demanded that the linesman be removed and blurted "Look at him, and you tell me what the similarity is!"
The remarks touched off a media firestorm and accusations of prejudice. In a subsequent news conference, Hewitt said he meant nothing racial and that he and Blake has settled the matter in the locker room.
"It happened, and people saw it their way and everyone's got their opinion," Hewitt said. "I can't change that. I go out there and thank God I was able to be very mentally tough and block everything out."
More recently, Hewitt was fined $103,000 by the ATP for refusing to do an interview with ESPN before a first-round match in Cincinnati last month.
In the past, Hewitt has refused requests from the Times of London, the New York Times and Sports Illustrated; this time around, the Tour claims that Hewitt dodged a mandatory ESPN sit-down for more than a week, dating back to a previous tournament in Toronto.
Perhaps unsurprisingly, Hewitt is appealing the fine. In the interim, he has repeatedly ripped the ATP — calling the Tour a "circus," vowing to alter his schedule next year and blaming ATP leadership for the declining popularity of men's tennis vis-a-vis the women's game.
"A lot of people lied," Hewitt said of the Cincinnati incident. "That's a known fact. I've got no doubt that I'm going to win. There won't be a fine at all the ATP people were lying."
While Hewitt's media stonewalling has lead some members of the Australian press to dub him "Satan Hewitt," others paint a different picture. Girlfriend and Belgian tennis star Kim Clijsters calls Hewitt a "nice guy," an assessment shared by Davis Cup teammate Wayne Arthurs.
"I don't know how to put it, but I have really no problems with Lleyton back in the locker room," Arthurs said. "He's a really nice guy. [It´s] a little unfortunate that he has had a little bit of problems with the media."
Arthurs has a point: When Hewitt deigns to speak with the media, he can be quite engaging. And away from tennis, he comes off like a regular — if driven — bloke.
At home in Adelaide, Hewitt stays with his parents, Glynn (a former Aussie rules footballer) and Cherilyn (a phys ed teacher). On the road, he keeps the company of a small group that includes Clijsters, a childhood pal and his coach, former pro Jason Stoltenberg.
Hewitt's abiding passion off the court? The Adelaide Crows, an Aussie rules football squad.
"I think a lot of people perceive that [I´m] probably nasty off the court," Hewitt said. "I am actually pretty shy. When I went to school back in Adelaide I was shy. I didn't argue with anyone, I had a lot of friends there. But it's sort of the same on the Tour. In the locker room I sort of keep to myself. I do my own thing."
Though Hewitt's penchant for privacy won't put him in the company of, say, affable countryman Patrick Rafter — easily the Tour's most popular player before his pseudo-retirement — his dogged competitiveness has won him plenty of respect. As have his impressive results.
In a sport that favors size and power, Hewitt compensates for his puny frame with unmatched speed and a return of serve that rivals Andre Agassi's. Former world No.1 Jim Courier recently called Hewitt "Chang version 2.0," a remarkably accurate comparison.
Like the 1989 French Open champ, Hewitt gets to balls that others can't. Extends rallies that others won't. Punishes net rushers with pinpoint passing shots. And collects more cheap points on his serve than a player his size ever should.
For the season, Hewitt has four titles and a 46-10 singles record. He leads the ATP in return games won and is second in points won off opponents' first serves.
"He has a great sense for the court," said Agassi, who lost to a 16-year-old Hewitt in 1998. "He plays aggressively, he plays defensively. He knows when to take chances, when to make sure he makes the shot.
"He relies a lot on his wheels, his footwork, and that allows him to play with a high margin for error he does it over and over again where he gets in battles and finds a way. At the end of the day, he's tough to beat."
Perhaps with that in mind, Hewitt's management agency, McLean-based Octagon, is pushing him hard during the Open. Four days before the start of the tournament, the firm reportedly invited more than 100 corporate marketers, admen and publicists to a Hewitt meet-and-greet at a posh Manhattan hotel. This week's Time Magazine features a Hewitt story, as does CNBC.
(And in what has become the true measure of endorsement arrival for the modern athlete, Microsoft reportedly will announce Hewitt as the star of a new tennis video game later this year).
For his part, Hewitt admits he is still learning to cope with the responsibilities and demands — media-related and otherwise — that come with being the game's biggest star.
"I've been thrown in the spotlight at a very young age, had to deal with [it] since 15 or 16, really," he said. "It's part of being a professional athlete. I think the biggest thing is trying to connect to the fans, because they don't see that much of you off the court. They basically see you play your matches."
And as for the Hewitt seen there — a prickly, feisty, backward baseball cap-wearing spaz who makes rabies look tame and methamphetamines seem inadequate — don't expect any changes.
At least not when Hewitt's current personality works so well.
"I'm pretty hungry out there," he said. "I don't go out there and, you know, go easy on any points. It's not something that I've deliberately told myself to do. It's just in me."

C'mon_Lley
09-06-2002, 08:56 PM
He's not just great, he's superhuman


07sep02

AUSTRALIAN tennis legend Rod Laver has described Lleyton Hewitt as "superhuman" and believes he will welcome Hewitt to an elite club of men to win both Wimbledon and the US Open.

Laver said yesterday he expected Hewitt's desire and fitness to help him overcome veteran Andre Agassi in the semi-finals and become the sixth man in the Open era to hold the sport's two biggest titles.

"It's not that Andre is too old, but he could be tired late in the second week and this is where Lleyton starts to wear down his opponents," said Laver.

Laver won the "double" in 1969, the year of his unique second calendar-year Grand Slam.

"I think Lleyton has to be favoured. As a competitor, there is none better than Lleyton. He is superhuman," Laver said.

"He showed that by how he fought his way back against Wimbledon (to win a quarter-final against Dutchman Sjeng Schalken) and he is so confident."

Agassi had two lay-days since his quarter-final win over Max Mirnyi and he notably cancelled a planned practice session on the first day off.

"Andre is such a clean hitter, but from a mental standpoint, Lleyton wants to win every point and I felt that way when I played," Laver said.

"You don't let somebody up when you have them down – you keep pushing them down. That was the way I used to like to play.

"Being this good at this age, he will get a lot stronger and he's going to be a great champion."

Hewitt said his two wins over Agassi in as many matches this year could be "thrown out the window" as a factor in their showdown tomorrow morning because it will be their first career encounter over a best-of-five set distance.

The Australian said he had not thought about his place in tennis history if he kept chasing down Grand Slam titles.

"It doesn't even enter my mind. I'm not even going to go close to putting myself in the same category as Laver, (Pete) Sampras, Agassi, whoever," Hewitt said.

"I'm not putting anything on myself to win then Most Slams or whatever. If it comes, it comes.

"It's beyond my wildest dreams what I have done at the age of 21. I don't know if I'll be out there, running around the way he (Agassi) is and still have the motivation (at 32)." ( I reckon he'll have little Lleykis to keep him busy by then :angel: )

Agassi has gained knowledge of Hewitt's improving game during 2002 from his San Jose and Cincinnati losses to the world No 1, the American's coach Darren Cahill said.

"Every time Andre plays Lleyton he seems to learn a little more about Lleyton's game," said Cahill, an Australian who coached Hewitt to his maiden major title in New York last year.

"Andre's a complete professional and he's so fit because his work ethic hasn't dropped one bit."





Laver salutes super Hewitt

By PAUL MALONE
07sep02

AUSTRALIAN tennis legend Rod Laver has branded Lleyton Hewitt "super-human" and believes he will welcome Hewitt to an elite club of men to win Wimbledon and the US Open in the same year.

Laver said yesterday he expected Hewitt's fitness and desire to help him overcome veteran Andre Agassi in the semi-finals and become the Sixth man in the Open era to capture the sport's two biggest titles in the same year.

"It's not that Andre is too old, but he could be tired late in the second week and this is where Lleyton starts to wear down his opponents," said Laver, who won the "double" in 1969, the year of his unique second calendar-year Grand Slam.

"I think Lleyton has to be favoured," he said. "As a competitor, there is none better than Lleyton. He is super-human. He showed that by how he fought his way back against Wimbledon (to win a quarter-final against Dutchman Sjeng Schalken) and he is so confident."

Hewitt said his two wins against Agassi in as many matches this year could be "thrown out the window" as a factor in their showdown tomorrow morning because it will be their first career encounter at a best-of-five-sets distance.

Pete Sampras said: "It's going to be a classic. They're going to have a lot of great rallies."

He declined to tip a winner.

Laver said Agassi, 32, would probably eventually struggle with the mobility and retrieval skills which he thinks separates Hewitt from his rivals.

"Andre is such a clean hitter, but from a mental standpoint, Lleyton wants to win every point and I felt that way when I played," Laver said. "Being this good at this age, he will get a lot stronger and he's going to be a great champion."

Hewitt would join Laver, Jimmy Connors (twice), John McEnroe (twice), Boris Becker and Sampras (twice) as men to have pocketed the Wimbledon and US Open plums in the same year.

The Australian said he had not thought about his place in tennis history if he kept chasing down grand slam titles.

"It doesn't even enter my mind. I'm not even going to go close to putting myself in the same category as Laver, Sampras, Agassi, whoever," Hewitt said.

"I'm not putting anything on myself to win the most slams or whatever. If it comes, it comes.

"It's beyond my wildest dreams what I have done at the age of 21. I don't sort of worry about what other people think or put a tag on you."

Agassi has gained knowledge of Hewitt's improving game during 2002 from his San Jose and Cincinnati losses to the world No. 1, the merican's coach Darren Cahill said.

"Every time Andre plays Lleyton, he seems to learn a little more about Lleyton's game," said Cahill, the Australian who coached Hewitt to his maiden major title in New York last year.

"Andre's a complete professional and he's so fit because his work ethic hasn't dropped one bit."

Hewitt's Davis Cup team mate Todd Woodbridge feared Agassi's form in New York indicated he would end Hewitt's run of 17 US Open wins in 18 matches.

"I think Andre has looked better and is a little bit of a favourite," Woodbridge said.

"But every time I have ever thought something about Lleyton, he has come back to prove me wrong and I hope he proves me wrong again."


What a compliment from Rocket Rod Laver! :D I'm so proud of Lleyton.

Hania
09-07-2002, 02:45 PM
Perfect Match
Agassi must prove age is no barrier as he battles with life-long fan Hewitt for a place in the final

THE MAIL
From Ivan Speck in New York
As a wide-eyed kid growing up in Adelaide, Lleyton Hewitt had a poster of Andre Agassi pinned to the wall in the family garage.
As a 16-year-old in his first professional tournament at the city's Memorial Drive complex, Hewitt - shorts held together by a safety pin - recorded a stunning victory over the American.
Last November he beat Agassi on his way to becoming the world No.1 in Sydney - and again in the final in San Jose earlier this year.
Tomorrow at Flushing Meadows, the pair meet again. Only this time the implications run deeper. Should Hewitt triumph once more, he will prevent his idol from reaching what could be his last U.S Open final. The irony would be dark indeed.
Both players have come a long way since agassi, with streaky blond mullet, smiled out from that poster advertising his 'Rock 'n' Roll Tennis Camp'
While Hewitt's breathless rise to the top has been characterised by the unshakeable confidence of youth, Agassi has emerged strong from adversity.
At 32, his outlooks on both tennis and life have been fashioned by the acrimony of his divorce from Brooke Shields and the joy of fatherhood to son Jaden by new wife Steffi Graf. Being Hewitt's idol means only that he feels old.
Agassi said: 'It's the ultimate compliment when your peer has a certain amount of respect for what you've done and what you're doing. One of the biggest compliments I could get, as well as one of the biggest shocks, is when somebody tells me: "I've been watching you my whole life. I grew up..." Please stop right there. I don't need to hear any more or how long I've been playing'
'I look at Lleyton not through those eyes but through the eyes of a professional who has to address himself as a professional. He has a lot of respect out there. I need to pay attention to that.'
'What I first remember about that match in Adelaide was that he was wearing a safety pin in his shorts to hold them up. His legs looked like a couple of strings hanging in his shoes. It was a hot day and I was coming back from 140 in the world. It was my first tournamen in 1998 and I was still around 110. I was pretty nervous just to be back in a semi-final.
He was very young but he played a great match and beat me 7-6 7-6. He's difficult for everybody now. He's been No.1 for almost a year. He's a tough player who makes good decisions and moves really well.'
That last description applies to Agassi, too but then the similarities between their statures dictated Hewitt's approach to tennis as a teenager.
Hewitt, the Wimbledon champion, said:'Andre and Michael Chang were the guys I looked up to with my game because I knew I wasn't going to be the biggest guy around.
I had to move extremely quickly and have a good return of serve like those guys did to match it with the best players. Andre has such a presence out there. He believes, no matter what the situation, that he can come back.'
Agassi's coach Darren Cahill, was dismissed by Hewitt at the end of last year but has helped his new charge to titles in Scottsdale, Miame, Rome and Los Angeles.
Victory tomorrow is the one that will count more than those, however. Cahill, for personal pride. Agassi, because, at 11 years Hewitt's senior, beating his biggest fan on the way to a third U.S Open title will allow him to forget his age again.
THE END

So, is Lleyton the new Andre?

In purely tennis terms, yes.
The pair are recognised as the best returners of serve in the game. If you haven't got an overpowering serve, you'd better be able to land it on a postage stamp. And be able to break their serve, too.
Otherwise, forget it.


Is that the only similarity?

No. They are the same height, 5ft 11in, and both baseliners par excellence. But whereas Agassi attacks and likes to dictate rallies, Hewitt has an iron defence. He is the ultimate human blackboard. He'll keep the ball in play all day.

How do their trophy cabinets compare?

Andre's is much larger. Well, he is 32, compared to Hewitt's 21. Seven Grand Slam titles. He is one of five men to have won them all, with Budge, Laver, Perry and Emerson. Lleyton has two. He'll add many more but will he master red clay to win the French?

What about temperament?

Agassi has come a long way since his days as a brat. Still strong enough to get his own way, but now does it with piercing looks rather than words.

Will Hewitt mellow with time in the same way?

Let's hope so, given his ability to upset minority groups with his foot-in-mouth outbursts.

And away from the game?

Both men have women tennis players as partners, able to understand their moods, needs and the pressures they face. Agassi's view of wife Steffi Graf - 'I wish I had hunted her down 10 years ago' - finds its mirror in Hewitt's relationship with Kim Clijsters - 'Sometimes we don't have to say anything. We just know what each other is feeling.'

THE END

I REALLY hope you guys haven't read this cos it took me AGES to type out!

Angele
09-07-2002, 06:06 PM
Originally posted by Hermione
'Sometimes we don't have to say anything. We just know what each other is feeling.'
!


:hearts: :hearts: :hearts:

Thanks for taking the time to type that up Hannah, it's great!

Hania
09-07-2002, 06:55 PM
That's ok! And I love that quote as well, how cute?!

KaseyL
09-07-2002, 11:36 PM
Wow, thanks for this, Hannah!

Goonergal
09-07-2002, 11:50 PM
Thanx Hannah! Thanx also 4 the effort you put in :kiss: it was worth it 4 that quote :hearts:

Goonergal
09-08-2002, 12:30 AM
Lleyton Hewitt
09/07/2002

Transcribed Interview

A. AGASSI/L. Hewitt

THE MODERATOR: Questions.

Q. Obviously pretty disappointing?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, he was too good on the day, though. You know, I felt like I had chances there, obviously up a break in -- up a break in the first set. Just struggled in the wind there for a few games and basically that probably cost me the first set.
Then in the second set, serving for it 5-3, fought back, 15-40 down, back to deuce. Sort of let that one slip as well.
So could have been easily up two sets to one, I guess, rather than two sets to one down there.
I felt like I was starting to get on top in the fourth at 2-1, Love-30 I had in the fourth. Felt like I was starting to get another chance there. And, you know, to his credit, he came up with four big points then. I don't think I played too badly in those points.
Then I went 30-Love up in the next game. It was huge. Those two games were a huge swing there.

Q. Do you feel your serve let you down at all?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I didn't serve great. I served, you know, in patches, I think. I wasn't able to -- against a guy like Andre, you got to make a high percentage of first serves. I wasn't able to do that. I was battling it out with, you know, second serve.

Q. How did the crowd affect you, Lleyton? Obviously they were very pro-Andre?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I've played in a lot worse places (laughter).
Didn't worry me at all.

Q. Although you won't be there tomorrow, the sense of I guess history, having Sampras and Agassi in that final?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it's big for tennis. It's a great matchup. Don't ask me who's gonna win, 'cause I got no idea. It's one of those things, you know... Both -- their records speak for itself. But I'm not even going to go out -- and I've got no idea. I think it just depends on the day how both guys pull up. It's gonna be a great match.

Q. When you came into this US Open, there was still a lot of lingering stuff from last year. Do you feel in a way that at the end of it all, even though obviously you're not going to win the championship, do you feel in a way it's been a good experience for you?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it's been all right. I feel like I came here and I played as well as I probably could have. I've made the semis. I can be proud of myself for coming back here in tough situations and, you know, trying to defend your title here. Gutsing some tough matches out.
There's no, you know, shame for me in losing to Andre Agassi in a semi of a Slam. He's one of the greatest players ever to live. Sure, I'd love to be out there tomorrow, but, you know, I'm sure I'm going to get a lot more chances, too.

Q. To a lot of us it did look this week that you were considerably more subdued than you've been in the past in various places. Did you feel a little bit like the place was leaning in on you?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really.

Q. Like you had to be different?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I felt like I got pumped up when I needed to. Just in today's match, if I needed to get fired up when I broke back or went up a break, then I did it. It's hard to get fired up against a guy like Andre when you get 30-love up, he'll come back, smack four winners and it's a waste of energy.

Q. A lot of the commentators this week have been saying this was the match that was likely to trouble you. Did you go into this match today feeling that?
LLEYTON HEWITT: There's a lot of guys that can trouble you - I guess, trouble me out there, but obviously Andre's one of the best players in the world. Be silly thinking that you're going to have a pushover out there.
He was always going to be a big match. I think any semifinal in a Slam is a big match as well. I don't think just because I was playing Andre Agassi, it was any tougher than playing Tim Henman at Wimbledon.
They're all tough matches, you know. The situation as well as the guy at the other end.

Q. Does the fact that you made the semifinals and dug deep take some out of the sting of not defending your title?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. You know, I can be -- I laid everything I had out there on center court this week. I can't do anything else. I can look in the mirror tonight and, you know, know that I went out there and I gave everything I had trying to defend the title.

Q. Does it take some of the sting out of the hurt of not defending your title?
LLEYTON HEWITT: You know, I'm not the kind of person that goes out and tanks matches anyway. For me, as long as I put it all on the line every time, then I can be proud of myself. It's the same in a lot of tournaments when, you know, very rarely do you win tournaments.
A lot of my losses, I can still, you know, look at the way I played and, you know, knowing that I didn't, you know, go out there and tank any points. I played as well as I could and he was just too good on the day.

Q. The last three times that you've met you've beaten him. How different was it today to those three times?
A. It was funny, you know. He's actually started a lot better in the past than he did today. You know, just about every match that I've played him before, he's come out of the gates straightaway. You know, he was a bit slow out of the gates today. Then I started struggling with the wind a little bit, didn't quite -- wasn't quite aggressive enough when I went up that break early in the first set. That gave him the chance to -- Andre's the kind of guy you can't give a second chance to.
A. And, you know, he started pounding on me then, and, you know, I wasn't making enough first serves. You know, it's, of course, different. We never played a best-of-five-set match either. So in that way it was a lot different.

Q. Is it irritating or downright strange to look up and see someone who coached you for so long in his box?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. We played twice before, and... It's not that strange.

Q. Do you think that it gave Andre an advantage having a coach that knew your game so well?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Didn't work the two times before, so I don't know. You tell me.

Q. If it hadn't been at your expense today, would you think that an Andre-Pete final is a great story for tennis?
LLEYTON HEWITT: For sure. It's -- you know, as I said, you know, with me not being, you know -- if I'm not allowed to be in the final, then I'd love to see these two guys go for a final. I think everyone would. I think it's great for men's tennis.
But sooner or later, you know, when they do retire, the only downside is people are going to keep wanting to see Agassi-Sampras finals and it's not going to be there five, ten years' time.
But, you know, I think it's probably more so Sampras getting to the final more than Agassi. I think that, you know, it hasn't shocked me, but I think it shocked the media and the public more than anything.

Q. When you see the sort of hype surrounding that match and how people are talking about that match, you're the No. 1 player. Do you think you need somebody -- do you long to have somebody with whom you can build that kind of relationship and that kind of intensity over the rest of your potential careers?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it would be nice to have a rivalry going like Agassi, Sampras have had for so many years, to be in as many Grand Slam finals as those two have as well.
But who knows? I got no idea whether that will happen or not. You know, I've only made, you know, two Grand Slam finals. These guys have made so many. I've got to keep trying to give myself as good a possibility or good a chance every time going into Slams to get to the final. And then, you know, maybe I'll have, you know, Roddick or Federer or Safin or someone up the other end most times; I don't know.

Q. Would you like to? You'd like to have that?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, I think it's good for tennis. Connors, McEnroe, Borg, all these guys, personalties out there. Going for Grand Slams and big tournaments, you know. This year, we've had obviously Costa and Johansson winning Slams. We haven't had the big names like Agassi, Sampras in the spotlight.

Q. Who's your pick for tomorrow?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Didn't you hear me before or not...? I said I'm not gonna make a call.

Q. Along that same line, are you surprised that nobody's stepped up? I mean, it takes a guy from sort of, you know, who's got a long resume already to stop you rather than one of, you know, your contemporaries going head-to-head with you?
LLEYTON HEWITT: You know, I don't know. I think we all saw how Sampras disposed of Roddick a couple of nights ago. You know, he's just not quite ready for it. There's Safin. Obviously, he's there some weeks and not there others. You know, I feel like I'm putting myself in a good position to be in most Slams now. Obviously, the last two Slams have been great - the French, made the Round of 16; the Australian Open didn't go to plan.
So I feel like I'm putting myself there in a position. Whether other guys are going to step up, I don't know. I got no idea.

Q. What's your focus now? Is it year-end No. 1? To build for the Australian Open?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Trying to qualify for the Davis Cup. You know, that comes first I guess next, you know, what is it? A week and a half, two weeks' time.
We'll try and get through that match. And, yeah, then after that, you know, I'm playing Tokyo, Madrid and Paris. I give myself a good chance of getting No. 1. You know, if I get it, great. If I don't, then it's not the biggest deal.

Q. In the tiebreak in the third set, did you feel that was going to propel you into the fourth and change the momentum?
LLEYTON HEWITT: As I said before, I felt like, you know, I had 2-1, Love-30 in the fourth set, I felt that was a slight opportunity for me. He closed the door on me pretty quick in that game. I didn't feel like I played that bad a game. I made him play, made him come up with winners on those four points and he was able to do it.
The next game I had 30-Love, I was playing from the better end those two games. That was a big turning point in the fourth set.

Q. Do you think the people here have a more accurate idea of who you are than they did last year, who you are as a person?
LLEYTON HEWITT: In some ways I guess. They saw how I, you know, how I handled everything I guess when I had to play American players; and, you know, how I was able to block out, you know, all the attention and everything going into the Blake match; and how I was able to put my head down and work extremely hard and dig out an extremely tough match against a talented player. For that, I guess that's another thing I can be proud of myself.

Q. Is there any quality of yours that you think the tennis public misunderstands?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. I have to think about it.

Q. Would you be pleased when you turn 32 to be playing at the level that Andre's playing at now? What would that mean to you?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I would be happy to still be playing.

Q. With Davis Cup qualifying looming, are you heading straight back to Australia, or will you take some time out in New York?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I'm not sure what I'm doing yet. We have to wait and see.

Q. Have you actually been home since Wimbledon?
LLEYTON HEWITT: I haven't been home since San Jose, after the chicken pox.

Q. Are you looking forward to getting home?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it's gonna be great.

Q. Do you know whether there's anything planned for you on your return?
LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I'm not sure.

Q. Would you like there to be?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Doesn't worry me. I'm not thinking about it right at the moment.

Q. What are the first three things you're looking forward to doing?
LLEYTON HEWITT: Probably going, talking to the Crows, firing them up for next week.

Q. They need a talking to.
LLEYTON HEWITT: They struggled. Next week, we have Collingwood in the prelim. Pretty good.

Q. Did you check the result on the Internet, or do you phone home?
LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I saw it on the Internet this morning.

(Note: this is a partial transcript)

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

luvbadboys
09-08-2002, 07:49 AM
Scrappy Hewitt Loses Match, Wins Over Fans at U.S. Open
SportsTicker




NEW YORK (Sept. 7) -- Top-seeded Lleyton Hewitt failed to earn his second straight U.S. Open title but may have finally won over many of the fans whose ire he drew a year ago.

In his four-set semifinal loss to Andre Agassi, Hewitt showed plenty of the fight and resolve that has propelled him to the top ranking in the world.


Lleyton Hewitt is outdueled Saturday by Andre Agassi, but is secure in the fact he gave it his absolute all.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

And while Agassi and Pete Sampras will battle for likely the last time in a U.S. Open final on Sunday, both players realize that Hewitt is a force that will have to be reckoned with for quite some time.

"Lleyton has phenomenal strengths," Agassi said. "He's asked to bring those every time. It's a competitive spirit that he has shown that he does have so far."

"He's a very, very tough player," Sampras said. "He's competitive, moves well. He's got a great return and serves pretty well now."

Hewitt has successfully rebuilt his image after his alleged racist remarks towards American James Blake here last year.

It started when he trounced Sampras in straight sets a year ago for the title and continued when he won Wimbledon earlier this summer. Back at the Open, he outdueled Blake in the third round in a match where both players demonstrated great sportsmanship. Hewitt's on-court feistiness and plucky demeanor has endeared him to the fans at the National Tennis Center.

"They saw how I handled everything, I guess, when I had to play American players and how I was able to block out all the attention and everything going into the Blake match," Hewitt said. "How I was able to put my head down and work extremely hard and dig out an extremely tough match against a talented player."

Hewitt's ability to fight back was evident Saturday on numerous occasions. Agassi served for the second set at 6-5, but Hewitt immediately broke back to force a tiebreaker. Agassi was up a break at 4-2 in the third, but Hewitt rallied and eventually forced another tiebreaker, which he won.

"I laid everything out there on center court this week," Hewitt said. "I can't do anything else. I can look in the mirror tonight and know that I went out there and I gave everything I had trying to defend the title."

Hewitt has clearly stamped himself as the top young gun in the men's game and brings an extra dose of toughness to his game -- perhaps because of his affinity for Australian Rules Football.

While Hewitt appears to be on his way to becoming a regular in Grand Slam finals down the road, he is still waiting for another player in his generation to step up as a worthy challenger.

"I've got to keep trying to give myself as good a possibility or good a chance every time going into Slams to get to the final," he said. "And then maybe I'll have (Andy) Roddick, or (Roger) Federer or (Marat) Safin or someone up at the other end most times. I don't know."



09/07/02 2022EDT

luvbadboys
09-08-2002, 07:51 AM
There is also a short interview with LLeyton in this weeks Sports Illustrated magazine. He answers a question about Kim.

ikke
09-08-2002, 10:35 AM
Thanks to everyone who posted those articals :kiss:
and a especially thanks to Hannah for typing that artical :kiss: :kiss:
That quote just made my day!!!!
luvbadboys, what did lleyton said about kim, I want to know all the lleykie stuff

Goonergal
09-08-2002, 01:57 PM
Humble Hewitt bows to childhood inspiration
By Barry Wood

NEW YORK, 7th (Reuters) - Andre Agassi knocked defending champion Lleyton Hewitt out of the U.S. Open on Saturday, beating him 6-4 7-6 6-7 6-2, but if it wasn't for his conqueror the Australian might not be where he is today.


Hewitt may stand tall as the world number one, but when it comes to height the 21-year old from Adelaide clocks in at a modest 5'11 (1.80m).


But so does Andre Agassi and that is why Hewitt had particular respect for him as he set out on his own road to the top.


Even losing to him on Saturday was okay.


"I made the semis and can be proud of myself," Hewitt said. "There's no shame for me in losing to Andre Agassi in the semi of a slam. He's one of the greatest players ever to live.


"Because I'm not the biggest guy around and was never going to be, when I was growing up I adapted my game to the way he played.


"That really helped me out when I was younger. He knows everything about the game and has been around for so long."


Hewitt has never been faulted for the effort he puts into his game, and that is something he was able to pick up first hand from Agassi.


"I've hit a lot with him in the past and saw just how professional he is on and off the court," he said. "The practise sessions as just 100 percent right from the word 'go'. So I'm pretty hungry out there too.


"I don't go easy on any points. I try and hustle every ball down, and it doesn't matter if I'm diving over the hardcourt or whatever. I'm going to try and get that ball back and make the other guy play one extra shot."


Agassi became his inspiration, both because of what he had achieved and what he could do on the court.


In particular, Hewitt noted that Agassi proved you didn't have to be a serve and volleyer to win Wimbledon.


BIG MATCHES


"I looked up to him because he'd won so many big matches and grand slams, and I thought that I wanted to focus my energy on being like him," he said.


"He hits the ball so well from the baseline and never shanks a shot. He obviously returns extremely well.


"And the biggest thing is that he is able to win on all four surfaces."


It was that ability which provided much of the inspiration for Hewitt to claim the Wimbledon title earlier this year, an accomplishment that stands as the greatest triumph of a career that includes winning the 2001 U.S. Open and topping the rankings.


"It gave me a lot of confidence going into the grass court season," Hewitt said.


"That's one of the main reasons I believe I had it in me and was able to win Wimbledon. I was able to draw a lot of confidence from him.


"If I lost first round of every other tournament and you gave me Wimbledon this year, I'd take it.


"Whenever I go back there I fall in love with the place more and more. :angel: And, you know, Wimbledon means an awful lot back home.


"There's no doubt that in Australian tennis it's the biggest tournament of the year, and it meant an awful lot for me to hold up that trophy."


HOME GROUND


Not that he's writing off what he's done at the U.S. Open and what he still wants to do on home ground in Australia.


"The U.S. Open holds a very special place for me, being the first place I really performed well in a grand slam.


I made my first semi in a slam there, won the doubles there and my first grand slam singles title, so I hold that place pretty close as well," he said.


"And the Australian Open, I'd love to win that. It's no secret. I've been going there since I was 11 or 12 years old and it means a lot playing in your home country."


That will be his next individual goal, after competing in the Davis Cup against India in his home city of Adelaide later this month.

Goonergal
09-08-2002, 02:10 PM
Hewitt pays tribute to Agassi

http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38241000/jpg/_38241845_hewitt300.jpg
Hewitt fought hard before succumbing to Agassi

Outgoing champion Lleyton Hewitt said he had no regrets as he saw his dreams of defending his US Open title shattered by a rampant Andre Agassi.
Hewitt demonstrated all his familiar fighting qualities in a four-set battle with Agassi, but could not contend with the greater power and accuracy of the veteran American.

"There's no shame for me in losing to Andre Agassi in a semi of a Slam," said Hewitt.

"He's one of the greatest players ever to live. Sure, I'd love to be out there on Sunday, but I'm sure I'm going to get a lot more chances too."

And Hewitt, who captured the Wimbledon title in July, said he was proud of the way he had performed over the last fortnight, despite his semi-final defeat.

"I feel like I came here and I played as well as I probably could have," he said.

"I laid everything I had out there on court this week - I can't do anything else.

"I can look in the mirror tonight and know that I went out there and I gave everything I had trying to defend the title." :)

Final showdown

The world number one said he understood the desire of the American crowds to see one last showdown between Agassi and Sampras.

"If I'm not allowed to be in the final, then I'd love to see these two guys go for a final - I think everyone would. I think it's great for men's tennis," he said.

The 21-year-old looked forward to forming a similar rivalry with one of his contemporaries in the future.

"I think it's good for tennis - Connors, McEnroe, Borg, all these guys were personalities out there going for Grand Slams and big tournaments," he said.

"This year, we've had Costa and Johansson winning Slams and we haven't had the big names like Agassi, Sampras in the spotlight."

scooby15
09-08-2002, 03:37 PM
Does anybody know who is on the cover of this week's Sport's Illustrated magazine and what date it says on the cover?

KaseyL
09-08-2002, 03:45 PM
Little will stop Hewitt

By JOHN THIRSK
September 08, 2002

LLEYTON Hewitt is preparing for an all-out assault on the tennis record books as he steamrolls his way to a second straight year as the No 1 player in the world.

Not only would Hewitt become the only Australian to achieve the feat but he has some of the great modern champions in his sights.
And it appears little, if anything, can stop him. Already he has established himself as the most dominant leader of the ATP rankings since Pete Sampras eight years ago.

As he began his US Open semi-final against Andre Agassi overnight, Hewitt had defended 450 of the 1000 rankings points he received last year for winning the Open and only the most tumultuous of circumstances can prevent him finishing the year as world No 1 again.

An ATP spokesperson said it was almost impossible to imagine Hewitt losing top spot in the ATP Championship Race at the end of the year, when the top eight qualify for the Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai in November, and as No 1 on the Player Entry System (ATP rankings). By year's end Hewitt will have held No 1 for 59 consecutive weeks, putting him seventh on the all-time list – behind Jimmy Connors (160 weeks) and one ahead of the great John McEnroe.

When the Open finishes, Hewitt will be in 11th spot with 42 consecutive weeks, trailing ninth-placed Agassi (52 weeks).
In total number of weeks at No 1, Hewitt will be eighth behind 13-time grand slam champion Sampras (286 weeks) and one week ahead of Jim Courier (58).

After a three-week break which included a week off for a stomach virus and his withdrawal from a Los Angeles event, Hewitt returned for two Tennis Masters Series tournaments in Toronto and Cincinnati.

His first-round loss in Toronto had only a minimal points deficit following a second-round defeat in the same event last year.
He reached the semi-finals in Cincinnati last year but went one step better this year by reaching the final, thereby gaining an additional 125 computer points.

He did not play at Indianapolis last year but picked up five Champions Race points this year and didn't drop any computer points.

Hewitt reached another Tennis Masters Series semi-final last year in Stuttgart, where he has to defend a total of 225 computer points this year.

Another win in Tokyo last year earned him 250 points and as the Tennis Masters champion, there are another 750 points at stake this year.

Heading into the US Open, Hewitt had 5205 computer points as world No 1 in the rankings ahead of Marat Safin (3130), Tommy Haas (2945), Yevgeny Kafelnikov (2525), Tim Henman (2455) and Agassi (2425).

On the ATP Champions Race leaderboard, Hewitt leads with 600 points ahead of Safin (423), Agassi (414), Henman (405), Carlos Moya, Alberto Costa (386), Juan Carlos Ferrero (378) and Tommy Haas (355).

After the US Open, Hewitt returns to his home town of Adelaide for the promotion-relegation Davis Cup play-off tie against India from September 20-22.

Despite the bout of chickenpox which led to his first-round loss at the Australian Open last January, he has held off all challenges to the No 1 ranking he earned in November last year.

It was nine months ago that the 21-year-old became the third Australian behind John Newcombe and Patrick Rafter to be ranked No 1 since the ATP ranking system was introduced in 1973.

Hewitt has also distinguished himself as the first Australian to win the prestigious Tennis Masters Cup, played in Sydney last November.

After winning the Wimbledon title in July, his fourth triumph of the year, Hewitt is on top of the ATP Champions Race leaderboard.
He is on the money to finish No 1 again among the eight elite competitors who will contest the Tennis Masters Cup in November.

Sunday Telegraph

Hania
09-08-2002, 04:35 PM
Originally posted by luvbadboys
There is also a short interview with LLeyton in this weeks Sports Illustrated magazine. He answers a question about Kim.

What does he say? Sorry, slight obsession

KaseyL
09-08-2002, 07:55 PM
an interesting article:

source: the Daily Telegraph

Hewitt gains stature, even in a loss

By MICHAEL BEACH at Flushing Meadow
09sep02

LLEYTON Hewitt didn't move for 10 minutes. He sat in the locker room, often with his head in his hands, thinking alone. No one spoke to him.

Andre Agassi, untying his shoes seven metres away, didn't look at him or say a word.

Hewitt's father Glynn, who playfully kicked a Sherrin around this locker room after his son's first grand slam win last year, waited outside in the lounge. Even Hewitt's coach Jason Stoltenberg gave him a wide berth.

Everyone left the beaten semi-finalist to stew in peace. Hewitt didn't look angry. Just a little bewildered.

Such is the way of sport. One minute you're playing your guts out in front of 23,000 people who don't want you to win. The next you're on your own trying to figure out what went wrong.

When Hewitt walked into the locker room just before 5pm, the first thing he heard was Agassi's post-match interview blaring on the TV. "This is New York, baby!" the victor said to wild applause on centre court.

Hewitt didn't bother glancing up at the TV. He kept walking to Locker 278, stuffed with six pairs of tennis shoes and a pair of thongs, and sat on a bench.

Slowly he took off his shoes, an ankle support and the two socks on each foot. Then he just sat there staring at his taped up toes.

When Agassi walked in, Hewitt didn't look across at him. He'd already seen enough for one day.

Darren Cahill, who coached Hewitt to the title last year, walked in and exchanged grins with Agassi, his new paymaster.

But they kept their voices low.

Stoltenberg wandered in, gave Hewitt a quick pat on the back, then walked over and shook hands with Agassi and Cahill. Then he made himself scarce.

Throughout all this, Hewitt was lost in his own world. It's doubtful it had anything to do with him earning only $US250,00 compared with Agassi's potential pay packet of $US900,000. Losing just isn't much fun.

Even after Agassi went out to do his media press conference, Hewitt kept sitting there. He wasn't ready to let go of this loss just yet.

Boris Becker, looking like a rock star in faded jeans, came in with an entourage of blokes. At the other end of the room, John McEnroe looked like a little kid as he sat on the carpet putting on his shoes. He and Becker were getting ready for an exhibition match before the women's final.

The pair both know what it's like to lose a big match. They knew to leave Hewitt alone, as well.

Finally, about 15 minutes after the match ended, Hewitt got up. After a shower, the black cloud seemed to have lifted. By the time he got to the media interview room soon afterwards, the world No. 1 looked fine.

Straight away he spoke about the match's crucial moments, the ones he seemed to be thinking about in the locker room. Easy points had been rare out there.

Hewitt recalled how he'd been up a break in the first set, but struggled when he changed ends into the wind.

"Then in the second set, serving for it 5-3, fought back, 15-40 down, back to deuce. Sort of let that one slip as well. So could have easily been up two sets to one."

Hewitt was talking in tennis shorthand. The match was still rattling around his head, like a car crash that wouldn't go away.

By the end of the media conference, Hewitt's head was clear. He had no trouble admitting that Agassi had simply been too good. It happens.

Especially against a guy who plays the same style of game. Why, he was even wearing the same tennis shirt as Hewitt.

"It always felt like I was fighting the whole time from behind," he said.

"He's probably the best frontrunner in the game.

When you give him that advantage, it's very tough to come back."

CLOCK WINDS BACK AS NEW GENERATION FALTERS

BORIS Becker says Lleyton Hewitt and his beaten band of new generation players have nothing to be sorry about for being unable to prevent tennis from hurtling back to the 1990s yesterday.

Hewitt paid for his gambler's mentality with his serve after it had emerged as his only regret from the courageous loss of his US Open title, to be decided by the veterans Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras.

After Agassi's 6-4 7-6 (7-5) 6-7 (1-7) 6-2 win in the semi-final, Hewitt cut a gracious figure, saying he was glad for men's tennis that Agassi, 32, and Sampras, 31, made the final if he was to miss it.

Sampras defeated Dutchman Sjeng Schalken 7-6 (8-6) 7-6 (7-4) 6-2.

Twelve years and several million hair follicles have passed since Sampras won the first of their two previous finals at Flushing Meadow.

"The only downside is that people are going to keep wanting to see Agassi-Sampras finals," Hewitt said. "It hasn't shocked me, but I think it shocked the media and the public."

The US Open final now boasts the oldest competitors since 1929.

It was transformed in the space of one afternoon from a young man's tournament with 20-year-olds Hewitt and Marat Safin as the most recent champions to one having a final with the two great veterans of the game.

"It says a lot more about Pete and Andre more than it says about the younger players," said Becker, one of five players to have achieved the feat of a Wimbledon-US Open double in the same year.

"If you have Pete and Andre in finals and playing guys like Lleyton Hewitt, it's what tennis needs.

"The pressure wasn't on Lleyton today. Andre was the one who really needed to win. Lleyton has an incredible year so far and you can't win them all."

Hewitt's former coach Darren Cahill said there was no tension between he and his former pupil now Cahill was in the Agassi camp.

There has been speculation about the state of relations between the pair since they parted company last year after Hewitt's maiden US Open title and surge to the top of the world rankings at a record young age of 20.

"There's no problem. Leave it at that," Cahill said after Agassi marked his seventh month of working with the Australian with his victory yesterday.

Hewitt said it had not been a strange experience to see his former mentor sitting in the courtside box of an opponent and denied any inside knowledge Cahill carried might have tipped the balance.

"It didn't work the two times before [when Hewitt beat Agassi this year], so you tell me," Hewitt said.

A rejuvenated Sampras will seek to end a 26-month title drought with his 14th Grand Slam championship this morning (Australian time) against Agassi after he had conserved energy with a 7-6 (8-6), 7-6 (7-4), 6-2 over Dutchman Sjeng Schalken.

Sampras's coach Paul Annacone said he would not be surprised if he decided to retire with a fifth US Open, but Sampras said he remained committed to a full schedule in 2003.

Hewitt's 40 per cent average on putting his first serves into play gave tennis magician Agassi too many swings on the return and the chance to dictate play with his deep and line-grazing shots which he sustained for.

For months, Australian colleagues and Hewitt boosters such as John Newcombe and Fred Stolle have been encouraging the world No1 to get his first-serve percentage above 50 per cent more often in matches.

"Against a guy like Andre you have to make a high percentage of first serves and I wasn't able to do that. He started pounding on me," said Hewitt, a favourite after beating Agassi in two best-of-three hardcourt matches this year.

"I can be proud of myself for coming back here in trying situations and gutsing some matches out. He was too good on the day."

Newcombe said: "It seemed like he was throwing his ball toss a little to the left on the first serve. But he got off the canvas and got Andre a little anxious."

A determined Hewitt shook Agassi by retrieving a deficit of two sets and 1-4 to win a third-set tiebreak. The Australian thought the semi-final turned when Agassi held serve from 0-30 at 1-2 in the fourth set, breaking Hewitt and eighth and ninth time.

Hewitt rued being unable to serve out the second set at 5-3 due to two of his 11 double-faults.

"I could have been two sets to one up, but he played really well on the big points. I think I took my chances a little bit better (in Cincinnati last month)," Hewitt said.

Hewitt said his next priorities were to keep Australia in the Davis Cup world group in a qualifying tie against India in Adelaide starting Friday week and then playing three indoor tournaments to defend his position as the top-ranked player.

Hewitt retains one of the biggest leads in the history of the ATP rankings from new No2 Tommy Haas and will lead Agassi by a useful 80 points in the ATP champions race even if Agassi wins the final.

"I give myself a good chance of getting No 1. If I don't, then it's not the biggest deal," Hewitt said.

With American patriotism stirred in the countdown to Wednesday's first anniversary of the September 11 attacks, Agassi and Sampras delivered the oldest line-up in a US men's final since Bill Tilden, 36, beat Francis Hunter, 35, in 1929.

Agassi said no one, not the game or either opponent, would lose from the final.

"There's been nothing like it in my career that compares to playing against Pete," he said.

KaseyL
09-08-2002, 08:01 PM
and another article:

Gracious Hewitt salutes remarkable golden oldies

Paul Malone in New York
09sep02

BORIS Becker says Lleyton Hewitt and his beaten band of new generation players have nothing to apologise for after they failed to stop tennis from hurtling back to the 1990s yesterday.

Hewitt finally paid for gambling with his serve after it had emerged as his only regret from the courageous loss of his US Open title, to be decided by veterans Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras.

After Agassi's 6-4, 7-6 (7-5), 6-7 (1-7), 6-2 win in a gripping semi-final, Hewitt cut a gracious figure, saying he was glad for men's tennis that Agassi, 32, and Sampras, 31, made the final if he were to miss it.

Twelve years and several million hair follicles have passed since Sampras won the first of their two previous finals at Flushing Meadows.

"The only downside is that people are going to keep wanting to see Agassi-Sampras finals. It hasn't shocked me but I think it shocked the media and the public," Hewitt said.

The US Open was transformed in the space of one raucous afternoon from a young man's tournament, with 20-year-olds Hewitt and Marat Safin as most recent champions, to one featuring a final with the oldest competitors since 1929.

"It says a lot more about Pete and Andre than it says about the younger players," said Becker, one of five players to have achieved the Wimbledon-US Open double in the same year, which eluded Hewitt.

"If you have Pete and Andre in finals and playing guys like Lleyton Hewitt, it's what tennis needs.

"The pressure really wasn't on Lleyton today. Andre was the one who really needed to win. Lleyton has had an incredible year so far and you can't win them all."

A rejuvenated Sampras will seek to end a 26-month title drought with his 14th Grand Slam championship this morning (AEST) against Agassi after he had conserved energy with a 7-6 (8-6), 7-6 (7-4), 6-2 over Dutchman Sjeng Schalken.

Sampras's coach Paul Annacone said he would not be surprised if the veteran decided to retire with a fifth US Open, but Sampras said he remained committed to a full schedule in 2003.

Hewitt's 40 per cent average in putting his first serves into play gave tennis magician Agassi too many swings on the return and the chance to dictate play with his deep and line-grazing shots.

For months, Australian colleagues and Hewitt boosters such as John Newcombe and Fred Stolle have been encouraging the world No. 1 to get his first serve percentage above 50 per cent more often.

"Against a guy like Andre you have to make a high percentage of first serves and I wasn't able to do that. He started pounding on me," said Hewitt, favourite after beating Agassi in two best-of-three hardcourt matches this year.

"I can be proud of myself for coming back here in trying situations and gutsing some matches out. He was too good on the day."

Newcombe said: "It seemed like he was throwing his ball toss a little to the left on the first serve. But he got off the canvas and got Andre a little anxious."

A determined Hewitt shook Agassi by retrieving a deficit of two sets and 1-4 to win a third-set tie-break. The Australian thought the semi-final turned when Agassi held serve from 0-30 at 1-2 in the fourth set, breaking Hewitt an eighth and ninth time.

Hewitt rued being unable to serve out the second set at 5-3 because of two of his 11 double faults.

"I could have been two sets to one up, but he played really well on the big points. I think I took my chances a little bit better (in Cincinnati last month)," Hewitt said.

He said his next priorities were to keep Australia in the Davis Cup world group in a qualifying tie against India in Adelaide starting Friday week and playing three indoor tournaments to defend his position as the top-ranked player.

Hewitt retains one of the biggest leads in the history of the ATP rankings from new No. 2 Tommy Haas. He will lead Agassi by a useful 80 points in the ATP champions race even if Agassi wins the final.

With American patriotism stirred in the countdown to Wednesday's first anniversary of the September 11 attacks, Agassi and Sampras delivered the oldest line-up in a US men's final since Bill Tilden, 36, beat Francis Hunter, 35, in 1929.

(from the Courier Mail)

Goonergal
09-08-2002, 08:05 PM
RE:Hewitt gains stature, even in a loss

Poor Lleyt :( Defeat is hard to take-But I'm glad after some reflection he was ok again :)

KaseyL
09-08-2002, 08:11 PM
a third article:

Defending champion reflects on loss

By MICHAEL BEACH in New York
09sep02

LLEYTON Hewitt didn't move for 10 minutes. He sat in the locker room, often with his head in his hands, thinking alone. No one spoke to him.

Andre Agassi, untying his shoes seven metres away, didn't look at him or say a word.

Hewitt's father Glynn, who playfully kicked a Sherrin around this locker room after his son's first Grand Slam win last year, waited outside in the lounge. Even Hewitt's coach Jason Stoltenberg gave him a wide berth.

Everyone left the beaten semi-finalist to stew in peace. Hewitt didn't look angry. Just a little bewildered.

Such is the way of sport. One minute you're playing your guts out in front of 23,000 people who don't want you to win. The next you're on your own trying to figure out what went wrong. When Hewitt walked into the locker room just before 5pm, the first thing he heard was Agassi's post-match interview blaring on the TV.

"This is New York, baby!" the victor said to wild applause on centre court.

Hewitt didn't bother glancing up at the TV. He kept walking to Locker 278, stuffed with six pairs of tennis shoes and a pair of thongs, and sat on a bench. Slowly he took off his shoes, an ankle support and the two socks on each foot. Then he just sat there staring at his taped up toes. When Agassi walked in, Hewitt didn't look across at him. He'd already seen enough of him for one day.

Finally, about 15 minutes after the match ended, Hewitt got up. After a shower, the black cloud seemed to have lifted. By the time he got to the media interview room soon afterwards, the world No. 1 looked fine. Straight away he spoke about the match's crucial moments, the ones he seemed to be thinking about in the locker room. Easy points had been rare out there. Hewitt recalled how he'd been up a break in the first set, but struggled when he changed ends into the wind.

"Then in the second set, serving for it 5-3, fought back, 15-40 down, back to deuce. Sort of let that one slip as well. So could have easily been up two sets to one," he said. "It always felt like I was fighting the whole time from behind.

"When you give him that advantage, it's very tough to come back."

(source: the Advertiser)

Angele
09-08-2002, 08:22 PM
Thanks for the articles Ingrid!

Poor Lleyton :sad: He sounded a bit annoyed in his press conference too! I hope he's better today :)

KaseyL
09-08-2002, 09:02 PM
from The Age

Hewitt answers prayers of 23,000 Americans

By Caroline Overington

New York, September 9 2002

It is one thing to win the United States Open, quite another to defend it. Only six players have done it. Lleyton Hewitt will not be the next. Not yet, anyway.

Hewitt was beaten by Andre Agassi in Saturday's semi-final. There is no shame in that. After all, it took some courage just to walk on court, where 23,000 foot-stomping, flag-waving fans had gathered, to pray for his demise.

Hewitt has few friends in New York. The stadium at Flushing Meadows was tilted firmly against him. Enormous stars-and-stripes banners were swirling through the heat. The crowd was not so much cheering for Agassi, as braying for the downfall of the world's No. 1. One man in a large, orange shirt kept screaming: "Finish off the kang-a-roo!"

Agassi's anxious wife, Steffi Graf, was pressed up against a wall, her face tense with anxiety. Whenever she was shown on the screens, the crowd cheered. Lleyton's parents were courtside, two sun-kissed Australians in a sea of delirious Americans. They cheered as their boy was introduced.

Hewitt broke Agassi in his first service game. Before long, it was 3-0, in Hewitt's favour. But then, at 3-1, Agassi won 11 consecutive points. Hewitt's serve began to fail him. Before long, he was getting fewer than 40 per cent of first serves in. As he later said, one cannot win a match against Agassi without a decent serve.

And so he lost the first set, and then the second. He doesn't give up easily. He won the third set. But then he failed again. The final score was 6-4, 7-6 (7-5), 6-7 (1-7), 6-2.

After the match, Hewitt waved a microphone away, which made nervous reporters wonder whether he would cancel the post-match press conference, but he came along, had a chat, betrayed no bitterness.

"He was too good on the day," said Hewitt. "I had my chances there. I could easily have been up two sets to one, rather than two sets down."

Despite losing a match that was obviously very important to him, he seemed just fine. He took a shower, and then left the stadium, crunching through a green apple as he went. John Fitzgerald walked by, reached over and rubbed his crew-cut skull, which he seemed to appreciate.

The only thing Hewitt seemed reluctant to discuss was the presence of his former coach, Australian Darren Cahill, in Agassi's coaching box. Asked if it felt strange, to look up and see Cahill there, barracking for Agassi, Hewitt said: "It's not that strange."

Did he think it helped Agassi, having a coach who knew Lleyton's game so well? "Didn't help the two times before," he said, referring to recent wins over Agassi.

Peridotpixie
09-09-2002, 03:42 AM
uh...in Australia, thongs are sandals, right? (giggles to herself)

Goonergal
09-09-2002, 06:45 AM
Originally posted by Peridotpixie
uh...in Australia, thongs are sandals, right? (giggles to herself)

LMAO! I was thinking the same when I read it "Thongs"?! but like didn't want to ask :o :p *sniggers heartily* ;)

Jackie
09-09-2002, 01:18 PM
Being Australian, I didn't even see the funny side until you mentioned it........where is the article where he talks about Kim? What did he say?

Nina
09-09-2002, 03:50 PM
Originally posted by Peridotpixie
uh...in Australia, thongs are sandals, right? (giggles to herself)

:D :o noticed that too

Peridotpixie
09-09-2002, 05:14 PM
I bought the magazine this morning, so I typed this up for you guys.

Sports Illustrated, Sept. 2nd

Q & A Lleyton Hewitt

As he got ready for this week's tournament, the U.S. Open's top seed--and only seeded Australian--took time to volley with SI.

SI: You won last year's Open two days before Sept. 11th. Did that have an impact on you?

Hewitt: I was on cloud nine after winning my first major. I'm on an airplane going from LA to Sydney, going home to celebrate, and the pilot came on and told us. It wasn't until I got in front of a TV that I realized how bad it was. Suddenly winning the US Open didn't mean anything.

SI: It's rare for a little guy [Hewitt's 5'10", 145 pounds] and a counterpuncher to get to Number 1. You've gotten there at age 21. What's your secret?

Hewitt: I'm not the biggest guy out there or the biggest server, so I've got to win another way. My return of serve is one of my strengths, and my quickness around the court. I put those things together and make a decent package out of it.

SI: You don't fit the laid-back Aussie tennis stereotype. How come you're not more like the affable Pat Rafter?

Hewitt: On court I'm very intense. I love to compete--the one-on-one aspect gets me fired up. Off the court, though, I'm pretty laid-back. I'm actually a lot shyer than people realize.

SI: You had a ponytail for years, but now it's been shorn. Any psychological edge, like a swimmer shaving before a big meet?

Hewitt: Not at all. I just got sick of brushing my hair all the time.

SI: You've been dating WTA Top 10 player Kim Clijsters for two years. If you spotted her a set and a 5-love lead, could she beat you?

Hewitt: She could probably hit four winners, I guess, and do it.

SI: You made more than $4 million in 2001. What are you spending it on since you still live with your parents?

Hewitt: Not a lot. I've got a piece of land in Australia, in Adelaide, and other than that I haven't spent a whole heap of money. I'm not the kind of guy to buy six sports cars or an expensive house.

SI: Do the Aussie fans who paint their faces green and gold and shout, "Aussie, Aussie, Aussie, Oy, Oy, Oy" at your matches scare you just a little?

Hewitt: No, they're actually good blokes. I know most of them.

Goonergal
09-09-2002, 05:27 PM
Originally posted by Peridotpixie
SI: You won last year's Open two days before Sept. 11th. Did that have an impact on you?

Hewitt: I was on cloud nine after winning my first major. I'm on an airplane going from LA to Sydney, going home to celebrate, and the pilot came on and told us. It wasn't until I got in front of a TV that I realized how bad it was. Suddenly winning the US Open didn't mean anything.

That's a real shame :(

Hewitt: On court I'm very intense. I love to compete--the one-on-one aspect gets me fired up. Off the court, though, I'm pretty laid-back. I'm actually a lot shyer than people realize.

It's so true, shame ppl don't realise this.

SI: You had a ponytail for years, but now it's been shorn. Any psychological edge, like a swimmer shaving before a big meet?

Hewitt: Not at all. I just got sick of brushing my hair all the time.

ROTFL! :D A real serious question and he comes up with an answer like that! :D

SI: You've been dating WTA Top 10 player Kim Clijsters for two years. If you spotted her a set and a 5-love lead, could she beat you?

Hewitt: She could probably hit four winners, I guess, and do it.

Aww Bless :)

Thanx 4 taking the time to type the article Jilli :)

ikke
09-09-2002, 05:30 PM
Thanks for posting it!!!!

luvbadboys
09-09-2002, 07:58 PM
Here is the Sports Illustrated interview I was referring to. Its from the Sept 2, 2002 issue.


As he got ready for this weeks' tournament, the U.S. Open's top seed-and only seeded Australian-took time to volley with SI.

SI: You won last year's Open two days before Sept 11. Did that have an impact on you?
Hewitt: I was on cloud nione after winning my first major. I'm on an airplane from L.A. to Sydney, going home to celebrate and the pilot came on and told us. It wasn't until I got in front of the TV that I realized how bad it was. Suddenly winning the U.S. Open didn't mean anything.

SI: It's rare for a little guy [Hewitt's 5'10", 145 pounds] and a counterpuncher to get to number 1. You've gotten there at age 21. What's your secret?
Hewitt: I'm not the biggest guy out there or the biggest server, so I've gotto win another way. My return of serves is one of my strengths, and my quickness around the court. I put these things together and make a decent package out of it.

SI: You don't fit the laid back Aussie stereotype. How come your're not more like the affable Pat Rafter?
Hewitt: On court I'm very intense. I love to compete- the one-on-one aspect gets me fired up. Off the court, though, I'm pretty laid back. I'm actually a lot shyer than people realize.

SI: You had a ponytail foryears, but now it's been shorn. Any psychological edge, like a swimmer shaving before a big meet?
Hewitt: Not at all. I just got sick of brushing my hair all the time.

SI: You've been dating WTA top 10 player Kim Clijsters for two years. If you spotted her a set and a 5-love lead, could she beat you?
Hewitt: She could probably hit four winners, I guess, and do it.

SI: You made more than $4million in 2001. What are you spending it on since you still live with your parents?
Hewitt: Not a lot. I've got a piece of land in Australia, in Adelaid, and other than that I have't spent a whole heap of money. I'm not the type of guy to buy six sports cars or an expensive house.

SI: Do the Aussie fans who paint their faces green-and-gold and shout "Aussie, Aussie, Aussie, Oy, Oy, Oy" at your matches scare you a little?
Hewitt: No, they're actually good blokes. I know most of them.


-David Sparrow



Enjoy!!

luvbadboys
09-09-2002, 08:00 PM
Damm I did not see someonelse posted it already. Oh well can't have to many LLeyton articles.:)

KaseyL
09-09-2002, 08:05 PM
Thanks y'all! :kiss:

Hania
09-10-2002, 10:36 AM
Hi y'all here's an article I found from Wimb and I think it's quite interesting, hope you haven't read it

HEWITT SHOULDERS DOUBLE LOAD

By BARRY FLATMAN

The Mirror

There is more on Lleyton Hewitt's mind than just being the top seed at Wimbledon. He has got the well-being of his girlfriend Kim Clijsters to worry about.
Though Hewitt cruised through to the third round in straight sets, he rarely looked like the world's
No.1 player in disposing of French qualifier Gregory Carraz.
But while Hewitt was winning on No.1 Court, Clijsters was struggling with an injured shoulder as she slumped to defeat over on No.2 against elena Likhovtseva.
This time last year the Belgian girl was the talk of women's tennis after reaching the French Open final. Now, debiliated by her injury, she has suffered early losses at both Roland Garros and Wimbledon.
"The doctors gave me a few options when they diagnosed the problem and the last one was surgery," said the 19-year-old fifth seed, who had lost 7-6 6-2. "They couldn't promise me that was going to help either.
"At the moment I don't want to take a risk and be out of the game for a year and then not be fully recovered afterwards. i like to travel and play tennis but at the moment I just can't play as much as I have done."
Clijsters is the latest big name to suffer in the wake of former champions Lindsay Davenport and Martina Hingis, whose futures are both threatened by injury.
Davenport has been sidelined for almost six months with knee problems while Hingis recently underwent ankle surgery.
Hewitt seems to have shaken off the stomach virus that forced him to quit last week's warm up tournament in Holland but he could not help but notice his girlfriend's demise.
"I saw the scoreboard although I didn't see a ball hit," said the australian who next meets Austrian Julian Knowle.
"I just tried to concentrate on my game. I'm mentally tough."
The US Open champion is guarded on his chances. He added: "There's still a lot of good players left in the tournament and as far as I'm concerned, I've only won two matches with five to go."

Angele
09-10-2002, 11:31 AM
Lleyton is back in Australia :D No mention of Kim though :confused:

Hewitt wants local Open under his belt
| Sports Watch ... 10 September 2002 |
He's achieved his Wimbledon dream, won the US Open and gained the world No.1 ranking by age 21, but Lleyton Hewitt remains mystified by his miserable record at the Australian Open.



Hewitt has identified winning next January's tournament at Rod Laver Arena as a major goal, along with winning the September 20-22 Davis Cup tie against India, and retaining the year-end No.1 ranking.

He flew home to Australia on Tuesday, for the first time since February, following his US Open title defence which ended in a semi-final loss to Andre Agassi.

Asked about his goals, Hewitt said winning his national grand slam title was a priority.

"If I can win the Aussie or the French, I'd love to win the Aussie next, that's for sure, out of the two left for me," he told reporters at Adelaide Airport.

"The Australian Open means an awful lot, some of my worst results have been at the Australian Open when you look back on it now."

Suffering from chicken pox, Hewitt lost in the first round this year, which followed losses in the fourth round, second round and first round in his previous three cracks at the event.

Those results are difficult to understand, given he made his name with stunning showings on the same surface at the Adelaide ATP lead-up event.

"It's hard to believe when rebound ace is one of my favourite surfaces and I grew up playing here and I play so well in Australia," he said.

But Hewitt's immediate focus is helping Australia avoid relegation against India on his beloved Memorial Drive centre court.

While disappointed Mark Philippoussis was out with a knee injury, he was confident Scott Draper and Wayne Arthurs both had the form to successfully fill the second singles berth.

The biggest question mark was which doubles pairing Australia would pit against dual two-time French Open and Wimbledon doubles champions Leander Paes and Mahesh Bhupathi.

Hewitt said that decision was likely to wait until the Friday night of the tie, but he could partner doubles specialist Todd Woodbridge.

"We played once before three or four years ago and I think we could match up well," he said.

Hewitt said he was extremely satisfied with his year so far, capped by his Wimbledon title in July, which he said would be almost impossible to top in his career.

He also won at Indian Wells, San Jose and Queens this year.

"When I left here eight or nine months ago after I had the chicken pox at the Australian Open, if you were to come and tell me back then just before I left that I was going to win Wimbledon and make the semi-finals of the US Open I would have taken it any day of the week," he said.

He said he was determined to capitalise on a massive lead in the ATP rankings and end the year at No.1.

But that did not mean he was backing down from his criticism of the sport's ruling body, or his plans to cut down on ATP events next year.

He maintained that the ATP had it wrong when it claimed he had turned down repeated requests to do a compulsory pre-tournament television interview at last month's Cincinnati Masters event.

Hewitt's non-show for the interview resulted in a massive $A187,000 fine, expected to be decreased significantly on appeal.

"Their story's not quite backing up that great, I don't think," Hewitt said of the ATP.

"They pretty much have no case and I've got no problems if we go to court, I'm sure we're going to win."

KaseyL
09-10-2002, 02:47 PM
To calm down Angele, :angel: :kiss:
and for all the goobers in here who are in/out the closet ;):

here's what you need to read!

And if you can't wait LOL, Kim is in Australia!

Hewitt back home and taking a break

A tired Lleyton Hewitt says his next focus is Australia's Davis Cup tie with India at Memorial Drive, later this month, but he is looking forward to a break first.

World tennis number one, Lleyton Hewitt, is confident that Australia will defeat India when the sides meet in a Davis Cup qualifying tie later this month.

Hewitt arrived home to Adelaide late this morning with girlfriend Kim Clijsters, the first time he has been back in his hometown since February.

He says he plans to take a week off from training and maybe fit in some golf.

Although a rejuvenated Andre Agassi ruined Hewitt's hopes of defending his 2001 US Open crown, the 21-year-old is not too disappointed.

"When I left here eight or nine months ago after I had the chicken pox at the Australian Open, if you were to come and tell me back then just before I left that I was going to win Wimbledon, and I was going to make the semis of the US, I would have taken it any day of the week," he said.

"I'm leading the number one points [race] by 500 points I think at the moment, I've got another great opportunity to finish number one and hold on to that for another year, which to me really means a lot."

Hewitt is confident Australia can defeat India in the Davis Cup qualifier without the injured Mark Philippoussis, and is hopeful of a vocal Adelaide crowd.

Hewitt will take one of the two singles places on offer, with Scott Draper or Wayne Arthurs likely to fill the other.

Hewitt says India's Leander Paes will lead a side that will be tough to beat.

"He's a serve/volleyer who's going to attack the whole time," he said.

"He puts pressure on me and I'm going to go out there and just concentrate and I know [if I play] as well as I can play then I'm going to come away with the victory."


source: ABC News, Sept. 10, 2002


I suppose that Australian newspapers will have more articles tomorrow.

KaseyL
09-10-2002, 03:01 PM
Then there were articles in Belgian press today; interviews with Elke.

Re Kim: she was asked how she felt that Kim didn't stay to watch her play in the final at the US Open juniors doubles.

She said that she felt a bit pity that Kim couldn't stay to watch her playing with Kirsten Flipkens on Sunday but then she said that she understood Kim, because Kim and Lleyton don't have much time as it is, that it was normal that Kim and Lleyton had already left to fly to Australia after all.

Furthermore, Elke was grateful that her 'big sis' had helped Kirsten and Elke. What happened?

They first were scheduled to play their doubles final third on court on Sunday, but that would mean risking trouble with the take-off time of their flight, so Kim intervened to get the junior doubles final rescheduled for the girls. They did, what made that Elke and Kirsten could play on another court! So Elke and Kirsten could catch their flight as scheduled, not risking to miss it!

Elke said: 'It's fantastic to have an older sis like that, isn't it?'

freakske
09-10-2002, 04:05 PM
yeah there was also something 'bout elke and kirsten :they are very close friends , and Kim bought a blue watch for Kirsten and Kirsten was very happy with it and was whole the time wearing it and stuff like that.....

C'mon_Lley
09-10-2002, 08:24 PM
LMAO! Lleyton "the motivator" and his damned footy! :p :D

Hewitt to fire up Crows before final


World No.1 tennis player Lleyton Hewitt will give the Adelaide Crows a motivational talk before next weekend's second semi-final.

Hewitt, 21, who lost his US Open semi-final, said his first priority when arriving home this week would be to talk to the players - "Firing them up for next week".

The Brisbane Lions rocketed into outright AFL premiership favouritism after thrashing Adelaide by 71 points in their qualifying final at the Gabba.

Adelaide will face either Melbourne or the Kangaroos in the second semi-final.

"They struggled," Hewitt conceded.

"They've got their one bad one out of the way now."

Hewitt checked the result on the internet before taking to the court against sixth seed Andre Agassi.





Hewitt offers Crows a serve of advice

Lleyton Hewitt believes he can teach his beloved Adelaide Crows a thing or two about winning in front of hostile crowds.

After being thrashed by Brisbane by 71 points at the Gabba on Saturday night, Adelaide must win three straight interstate matches to take this season's AFL premiership.

Hewitt, a devoted Crows fan and club ambassador who arrived in Adelaide for Davis Cup commitments, said he had spoken informally to Crows officials about giving the players a motivational talk.

"I've spoken to a few of the guys behind the scenes ... and I think they'd be more than happy if I did go down and have a chat to the guys at some stage," Hewitt told reporters.

He admitted he had little to offer in the way of direct footballing advice, having not seen a game this season, but had plenty of tips about travelling and succeeding on opposition territory.

"The Crows have obviously got to play away matches the whole way in now," Hewitt said.

"I've played a lot of away matches - the semi final against (Tim) Henman at Wimbledon with the whole crowd against you.

"I guess beating Gustavo Kuerten down in Brazil last year in the Davis Cup, beating (Albert) Costa in Spain, I could obviously draw from those and explain that sometimes playing away from home makes you concentrate and dig deeper sometimes.

"You can try and turn it into a positive and try to use it in a positive way and just focus your energy on your support crew on the side."

As for the Crows' premiership chances:

"It's very hard when I haven't been home all year, obviously I'd love to see them win, but I've got no idea," Hewitt admitted.

C'mon_Lley
09-10-2002, 08:25 PM
Hewitt homes in on next title

September 11 2002

:angel: :D
http://www.theage.com.au/ffxImage/urlpicture_id_1031608244662_2002/09/10/20011hewittpm,0.jpg

He has achieved his Wimbledon dream, won the US Open and gained the world No. 1 ranking by age 21, but Lleyton Hewitt remains mystified by his miserable Australian Open record.

Hewitt yesterday identified winning next January's tournament at Rod Laver Arena as a major goal, along with winning the September 20-22 Davis Cup tie against India, and retaining the year-end No. 1 ranking.

He flew home to Australia yesterday, for the first time since February, following his US Open title defence which ended in a semi-final loss to Andre Agassi.

Asked about his goals, Hewitt said winning his national grand slam title was a priority.

"If I can win the Aussie or the French, I'd love to win the Aussie next, that's for sure, out of the two left for me," he said in Adelaide. "The Australian Open means an awful lot; some of my worst results have been at the Australian Open when you look back on it now."

Suffering from chickenpox, Hewitt lost in the first round this year, after losses in the fourth, second and first rounds in his previous three attempts at the event. Those results are difficult to understand, given he made his name with stunning showings on the same surface at the Adelaide ATP lead-up event.

"It's hard to believe when Rebound Ace is one of my favourite surfaces and I grew up playing here and I play so well in Australia," he said.

But Hewitt's immediate focus is helping Australia avoid relegation against India at Memorial Drive.

While disappointed Mark Philippoussis was out with a knee injury, he was confident Scott Draper and Wayne Arthurs both had the form to successfully fill the second singles berth.

The biggest question mark was which doubles pairing Australia would pit against dual two-time French Open and Wimbledon doubles champions Leander Paes and Mahesh Bhupathi.

Hewitt said that decision was likely to wait until the Friday night of the tie, but he could partner doubles specialist Todd Woodbridge.

"We played once before, three or four years ago, and I think we could match up well," he said.

Hewitt said he was extremely satisfied with his year so far, capped by his Wimbledon title in July, which he said would be almost impossible to top in his career. He also won at Indian Wells, San Jose and Queen's this year.

"When I left here eight or nine months ago after I had the chickenpox at the Australian Open, if you were to come and tell me back then just before I left that I was going to win Wimbledon and make the semi-finals of the US Open I would have taken it any day of the week," he said.

He said he was determined to capitalise on a massive lead in the ATP rankings and end the year at No. 1.

He repeated his criticism of the ATP over the issue of a pre-tournament interview at last month's Cincinnati Masters, when Hewitt's non-show for the interview resulted in a massive $187,000 fine.

"They (the ATP) pretty much have no case and I've got no problems if we go to court. I'm sure we're going to win," said Hewitt.

- AAP

KaseyL
09-10-2002, 10:18 PM
thanks for the articles and the nice pic! :kiss:

luvbadboys
09-11-2002, 07:14 AM
Do you already have this?

Slam bam, Lleyton's the man

08sep02
LLEYTON Hewitt can mirror Andre Agassi by winning a career Grand Slam and as many as 10 major titles, Australia's former Davis Cup player Fred Stolle has predicted.

Former triple Wimbledon champion John Newcombe admits he would not he surprised if the world No 1 does not win at least five and his Davis Cup team-mate Todd Woodbridge thinks six is not out of the question.

They are but three contestants in the great guessing game of Australian tennis: "How much can Hewitt dominate?"

The debate has gained momentum with Hewitt's extraordinary achievement at winning two Grand Slam titles and a year-end No 1 ranking by the age of 21 and an inconsistent year in 2002 for his experienced rivals and youthful challengers alike.

Hewitt said Agassi's feat in winning all four Grand Slams among his seven career majors, the only man since Rod Laver to do so, gave him hope he could also win on all surfaces.

"A lot of people spoke about how I was the (first man) since Andre to win from the back of the court at Wimbledon and I draw a lot of confidence from a guy like Andre being able to win all four majors," he said.

Living at his family home and committed to girlfriend Kim Clijsters, the Adelaide baseliner appears well placed to avoid becoming a victim of the "good life" syndrome which brings many sports stars back to the field. This is despite his $A15million in career prizemoney and even more in endorsements with Nike, Microsoft and other corporate giants.

"While he stays fit and committed, I can't see why he won't win all four in his career," said Stolle, a former Australian Davis Cup player and winner of the French title.

Newcombe said injury or unseen difficulties with opponents, such as Hewitt's perplexing streak of three consecutive losses to Spaniard Carlos Moya would be among his barriers.

"There could be some players come along who he has troubles with but I'd be surprised if he didn't finish up with at least five," Newcombe said.

Both Stolle and Woodbridge believe the biggest challenge to Hewitt would come from the demands of his own physical baseline game impacting on his body and energy in his mid-twenties.

KaseyL
09-11-2002, 08:20 AM
thanks!

LOL @ some headlines sometimes

KaseyL
09-11-2002, 08:23 AM
Lleyton bringing the loot in

Source: AAP, September 11, 2002

Defending champion Lleyton Hewitt is well on track for another multi-million dollar payday after he became the first player to qualify for the 2002 Tennis Masters Cup.

Hewitt may have come up short in his US Open title defence, but reaching the semi-finals was enough to assure him of a berth in the highly-lucrative season-ending event in Shanghai with two months still to go. :bounce:

The 21-year-old Australian is 136 points clear in the ATP Tour Champions Race with 690 points following a season which has already yielded the Wimbledon crown and three other tournament titles.

He's on track for a reprise of last year's great finale when he became the youngest-ever year-end No.1 on the way to winning the eight-man Masters Cup in Sydney.

Hewitt set a weekly tour earnings record of $A2.78 million for his success at that event and also collected a $A3.2 million bonus for winning the Champions Race.

Andre Agassi (554 points) is next closest to qualifying for the Cup, which runs from November 12-17, after reaching the US Open final.
Pete Sampras leapt from 32nd to 12th in the Champions Race, collecting 200 points, when he overcame months of poor form to win the Open in New York on Sunday.
Sampras could easily qualify for the eighth spot in Shanghai as a grand slam winner within the top 20.

The first seven spots go to the top seven finishers in the points race while the eighth place goes to the highest-placed grand slam champion who finished between eighth and 20th.

French Open champion Albert Costa (393) is currently locked in a three-way tie for fifth place with countrymen Carlos Moya and Juan Carlos Ferrero, while Australian Open champion Thomas Johansson (312), who missed the US Open due to injury, is behind Sampras in 14th place.

The battle for the Cup berths is the closest in the three-year history of the Champions Race, with just 83 points separating third and 12th positions.

Behind Hewitt and Agassi are:- Marat Safin (430), Tim Henman (420), Ferrero, (393), Costa (393), Moya (393), Tommy Haas (385), Andy Roddick (383), Roger Federer (356), Jiri Novak (349), Sampras (347), Guillermo Canas (329), Johansson (312) and Alex Corretja (296).

Peridotpixie
09-12-2002, 02:24 AM
This is from US Weekly magazine, a sort of more gossipy version of People. The article is called (rolls eyes) "Manslam!" I'll just type up the section on our guy. Sort of bittersweet.

Andre who? A new generation of hunks is taking over center court. For Us, it's love-all!

Lleyton Hewitt
Age: 21 US Open: Seed 1
Hometown: Adelaide, Australia
A.K.A.: Satan Hewitt, a nickname the Australian press, frustrated by the star's inaccessibility, bestowed upon him
Best Known (On the Court) As: The most agile player in tennis
If Only He Hadn't: Asked to have a black official removed during a match against James Blake at the 2001 US Open, implying that he favotred Blake because of his race. Yuck.
[Yuck yourselves. Let it go already!!!]
Reminds Us of: That original hothead, John McEnroe
A Sucker For: Full-figured blondes, if his girlfriend, Belgian tennis pro Kim Clijsters, is any indication
When He's Not On the Court, They Like To: Watch Webcasts of the Adelaide Crows football team

Has the picture of Lleyton watching Kim in Stanford, and a smaller pic of young Johnny Mac.

Other featured players were: Jan-Michael Gambill, James Blake, Tommy Haas, Andy Roddick, and Marat Safin
Also has a small section assessing the effect of Sampras and Agassi's love lives on their careers
Amusing note: One of the featured pictures of Tommy was the naked one with his gf. According to this article, Blake is single, Andy may or may not be seeing Mandy Moore (for the record, they both deny it), and Safin is a hothead playboy who enjoys being manly.

Goonergal
09-12-2002, 07:51 AM
Originally posted by Peridotpixie

Lleyton Hewitt
A.K.A.: Satan Hewitt, a nickname the Australian press, frustrated by the star's inaccessibility, bestowed upon him

Satan! :o

A Sucker For: Full-figured blondes, if his girlfriend, Belgian tennis pro Kim Clijsters, is any indication

:o

and Safin is a hothead playboy who enjoys being manly.

:o :o

MANSLAM!?! :o :rolleyes: lmao!

Thanx 4 the artricle Jilli!

KaseyL
09-12-2002, 07:55 AM
What kind of stuff is that in US Weekly, pfff

:rolleyes:

A Sucker For: Full-figured blondes, if his girlfriend, Belgian tennis pro Kim Clijsters, is any indication

congrats to the level of this so-called journalist!


and oh surprise, surprise, the Blake incident, again...
:rolleyes:

this article is good for one thing: wrap garbage in it, is the only fitting thing to do with it! Geeez.

KaseyL
09-12-2002, 08:02 AM
New article from Australian newspaper the Daily Telegraph:

Let steam out on court, not in court

By JEFF WELLS

September 12, 2002

COME on Lleyton. As in more "come on" on the court and less "come off it" off the court.

Lleyton Hewitt needs to go back to what got him to No.1 if he is to stay No.1.
And that means not bottling up his emotions on the court and not letting off-court dramas mess with his head.

Hewitt must have been biting his lip after the US Open final, knowing he should have been there.

Grinding them down is his strength and in the fourth set Pete Sampras, 31, and Andre Agassi, 32, looked like old-time heavyweights in the 15th round, unable to throw combinations, just sending in one prayer of a punch at a time, with their legs turning to jelly.

Sampras was taking so much time between points that Andre could have had a cup of tea and a chat to Steffi in the stand.
Pete was playing the percentages to the maximum, relying on his serve to be unbreakable, and refusing to get into rallies.
The match could easily have swung the other way when he had to fight for 12 minutes to hold serve early in the fourth set but Agassi, who had been softened up by Hewitt, didn't have the legs to come at him again. Rarely have we seen him as flatfooted against the deep ball.

The final will be remembered for Sampras' blown volley that cost him the third set, and the dogfight in the fourth, and not much else.

The old fired-up Hewitt should have been in there but in his semi he looked more intent on not upsetting anybody than on jolting himself out of the zombie zone.

There was no fire, no trigger to kickstart him, even when Andre looked fragile. Every player needs some mechanism to release the pressure.

Hewitt started the "come on" thing but now, when others are copying it, he is abandoning it when he needs it.

Hewitt and Agassi play much the same game but Hewitt was being pushed behind the baseline and Agassi cashed in time after time by putting the ball into the forehand corner.
Hewitt looked mentally and physically vacant. Even his feet weren't thinking.

And his serve was atrocious -- only 47 per cent (to Agassi's 84 per cent) on first serve and 11 double faults.

It sent a dangerous signal to the rest of the tour. Did the critics get it right? Is he a shooting star, an interim No.1 who doesn't have the weapons to stay there? Will his body give out on him?
Will you still get run into the dirt any time you go up against him? Or will his mind be elsewhere? Has he become too paranoid about his blues with the ATP over fines and schedules? Is his bloody-mindedness now in the wrong arena?

When he accused players such as Marat Safin and Yevgeny Kafelnikov of tanking when they were forced to play against their wishes he may have been right -- but it was an unnecessarily provocative statement that could rebound on him.

Does Hewitt have managers giving him good advice? Or, if they are, is he too stubborn to listen?

He was given enough feting by sponsors in New York to know the value of No.1 but he is still threatening to cut back on his schedule to teach the ATP that he is his own man.

Cutting back next year, while staying sharp, and still picking up enough points to win the Champions Race for No.1 will be a gamble requiring a lot of maturity.

He has the talent and the intelligence but he needs to make good use of this cooling-off period to think about his future.

Meanwhile, for this year, he has 690 points to Agassi's 554 and is the first to qualify for the Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai in November, but there are two Tennis Masters Series, worth 100 points to the winner, in Madrid and Paris next month.


END of article


This writer is making a good point imo (for once I am inclined to agree LOL).
I've marked the best question he puts forward in this article, that is the question re one of the key factors that will make or further break Lleyton's image; his management (PR).

What do you all think?

Goonergal
09-12-2002, 08:10 AM
Thanx 4 the article Ingrid! Yes That is a very good question, I think some serious thought needs to go into the management sitauation, I believe he gets bad advice from the *cough* management so maybe he should look elsewhere. I mean look at the interview he gave 4 that AFL Footy show, ok that's not the same as the official post match press conferences but in the relaxed environment he copes fine and comes across wonderfully.

KaseyL
09-12-2002, 08:17 AM
I def. have my doubts re his management. The least one could say is that they aren't doing enough to turn around the bad perception he usually gets in the media.

I don't mean you can control what gets in the media, but at least you can do clever things as a PR manager to influence a better presentation in the media.

So far it rather looks to me that they are running behind facts instead of setting up a smart media strategy.

Anyway, that's how I analyse it, based upon what we can see for ourselves.

And Cilla, you're so right re that interview in the show.

C'mon_Lley
09-12-2002, 08:11 PM
Ingrid, don't get worked up about anything from NY post and US weekly. Us weekly used to be a legit magazine but since last 4-5 yrs its become very tabloidesque. And NY post is a tabloid. Just ignore it. They just sensationalize everything.

:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: But Pfff @ A Sucker For: Full-figured blondes, if his girlfriend, Belgian tennis pro Kim Clijsters, is any indication.

KaseyL
09-12-2002, 10:12 PM
Originally posted by C'mon_Lley
Ingrid, don't get worked up about anything from NY post and US weekly. Us weekly used to be a legit magazine but since last 4-5 yrs its become very tabloidesque. And NY post is a tabloid. Just ignore it. They just sensationalize everything.

:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: But Pfff @ A Sucker For: Full-figured blondes, if his girlfriend, Belgian tennis pro Kim Clijsters, is any indication.

I def. don't: it's just :rolleyes: re the quotes I've marked (or better, the whole article, in fact.... geee)

Murkofan
09-13-2002, 08:31 PM
Calling someone "full-figured" is not, imo, an insult.

If this guy had called Kim a fat cow or something, then yes, I would be annoyed and start busting out the :rolleyes: and :fiery:. But as it is, saying that Kim is full-figured is the truth. She's not fat at all, but she's no Calista Flockhart, either.

Barrie_Dude
09-13-2002, 09:32 PM
:wavey: :kiss: @Dr Marly

KaseyL
09-13-2002, 09:38 PM
Originally posted by Dr. Marly
Calling someone "full-figured" is not, imo, an insult.

If this guy had called Kim a fat cow or something, then yes, I would be annoyed and start busting out the :rolleyes: and :fiery:. But as it is, saying that Kim is full-figured is the truth. She's not fat at all, but she's no Calista Flockhart, either.


Don't agree, though. Okay, it's normally no insult at all, just a fact.

But the way I read it in that article, it can only mean a negative remark of the writer imo. "a sucker for full-figured...": can't be anything else than ridiculising Lleyton's choice.

Murkofan
09-13-2002, 10:04 PM
Originally posted by KaseyL



Don't agree, though. Okay, it's normally no insult at all, just a fact.

But the way I read it in that article, it can only mean a negative remark of the writer imo. "a sucker for full-figured...": can't be anything else than ridiculising Lleyton's choice.

:wavey: :kiss: @ Barrie.

Well, the writer certainly could have meant it as an insult, but I didn't read it that way.

Calling someone a sucker for something is an American idiom. For example, you could say of me, "Gee, Dr. Marly sure is a sucker for Vanilla Coke!" It's not implying anything negative.

"Angele is a sucker for gooberish stories."

"Barrie is a sucker for Angele."

"Ana is a sucker for virtually every player in the WTA and ATP."

And so on and so forth. It's just a way of making a point. I suppose it's one of those things that doesn't translate well.

Goonergal
09-13-2002, 10:36 PM
Originally posted by Dr. Marly
"Ana is a sucker for virtually every player in the WTA and ATP."

ROTFL :p

Peridotpixie
09-13-2002, 11:21 PM
Ok, quick quote from another part of the article, just to help clear this up:

Jan Michael Gambill
A Sucker For: Tall, dark models, judging by girlfriend Branden Crutcher, 23. The two met at a Wilhelmina modeling agency party a few years ago and reconnected when Gambill arrived in New York for the US Open. "She's 'it'," he tells US.

Marat Safin
Age: 22 US Open Seed: 2
Hometown: Monte Carlo, Monaco
Best Known (On the Court) For: Smashing rackets (More than 50 a year).
A Sucker For: Blondes. Marat's maidens, as they are known, fill the players' box at tournaments.
When He's Not On Court He's: Tooling around in Monte Carlo in one of his sports cars.
On Being a Sex Symbol: "[I am] a man, first of all, and then a player," Safin said after his surprise victory over Pete Sampras at the 2000 US Open. "You have to show people you have something between your legs--you're not just a good looking face."

Ok, I typed all of Marat's up, because...hee.

Goonergal
09-14-2002, 01:53 PM
Dunno if this has been posted here. It was posted on LLand

Hewitt: Boorish, fiesty and No.1


Aussie's play wins matches, not fans
By Neil Schmidt
The Cincinnati Enquirer

He is at times friendly and ferocious, brilliant and bratty. He is the best player in his sport and the least accessible.

He is Lleyton Hewitt, and he is who he is.

“I'm not backing down from anybody,” the 21-year-old Australian once said. “You don't play this game to win. You play to kill people out there.”

He comes to the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters this week with a curious lack of hype, mostly because he avoids the attention due his status in the sport. ESPN Magazine said Hewitt “became No.1 without sacrificing his anonymity.”

Hewitt has turned off many fans in his homeland, topping a national magazine poll in 2000 for most hated sportsman of the year. His management minimizes his time in public and with the media. He no longer speaks with the Australian press, which has nicknamed him Satan Hewitt.

“The celebrity stuff?” Hewitt has said. “I don't have much use for that kind of thing.”

What he has use for: intense, intimidating tennis. The 5-foot-10, 150-pound Hewitt is a unique breed of player, one that wins by frustrating opponents with relentless returns, or by ticking them off.

He snarls, swears and stares down opponents. He pumps his fist, thumps his chest and screams “C'mon!” constantly. He'd be Jimmy Connors if Connors had turned the crowd against himself.

“He doesn't play to the crowd much, doesn't smile much,” ESPN analyst Cliff Drysdale said of Hewitt. “He's like a professional hit man on the court; he's only interested in winning and getting off. I guess that's not very endearing.”

But it's surely impressive. Hewitt has exceeded expectations at every step.

In 1997, at 15 years and 11 months, Hewitt became the youngest Australian Open qualifier. He turned pro the next year and became the lowest-ranked winner in tour history -- at No.550, winning in his hometown of Adelaide -- and the youngest winner of an ATP event since Michael Chang in 1988.

By age 20, Hewitt had achieved the tennis triumvirate of winning a Grand Slam event, the Davis Cup and becoming world No.1, the youngest ever to do so. In the past year, he became the youngest U.S. Open champ since 1990 and the youngest Wimbledon winner since 1986.

“I've done everything a little bit quicker than a lot of people have expected, so it's a bit surprising to me,” Hewitt said. “(But) I'm a very driven person. I'm very competitive. I don't enjoy losing. So I'm going to go out there still and be as hungry as ever.”

The men's game is eager for a charismatic champion, which is something Hewitt isn't. When not playing, he returns to Adelaide, where he still lives with his parents. He doesn't even own a car.

On the road, Hewitt spends his free time lounging around rented homes, watching Webcasts of his favorite Australian Rules football team, the Adelaide Crows. He hangs out with a very tight-knit inner circle: Parents Glynn and Cherilyn; coach Jason Stoltenberg, girlfriend and Belgian tennis star Kim Clijsters, and his best friend from home, Haydn Eckermann, whom Hewitt is paying to keep him company during the endless grind of the tour.

He also is tight with John Newcombe, a three-time Wimbledon champ whom Hewitt seeks out before and after every match.

“People see Lleyton on the court, and he's this competitive beast,” Australian Davis Cup captain John Fitzgerald told Sports Illustrated. “But he's really just a normal kid, maybe a bit shy.”

Hewitt's results have surprised most observers, many of whom figured scrappiness could go only so far.

He's the fastest player in tennis, the best lobber and arguably the best returner. He draws countless comparisons: the athleticism of Bjorn Borg, the combativeness of Connors, the foot speed of Chang. Yet he's really his own creation, remarkable in that he doesn't possess a true killer shot.

“He has an incredible spirit of fight and not giving up,” Chang said. “That maybe overshadows some of his other talents.”

Hewitt is the first backcourt player to win Wimbledon since Andre Agassi In 1992. But Agassi comparisons are unjust.

Agassi can dictate pace from the baseline, but Hewitt is a human backboard. He'll wait all afternoon for a short ball he can attack.

“(Mats) Wilander and Borg were the greatest of counterpunchers,” Newcombe has said. “Opponents knew they were in a fight for hours. This kid is the same way.”

This time last year, Hewitt hadn't yet won a Masters Series event, only once reaching a final, and hadn't reached a final of a Grand Slam event. He was ranked No.5.

Yet entering last week, Hewitt held a 2,000-point lead over Marat Safin in the rankings, a giant margin. If not for suffering from chicken pox in the Australian Open -- leading to a first-round loss -- he might be even further ahead.

Hewitt isn't resting on his ranking. After last year, he fired his former coach and hired Stoltenberg. Hewitt has spent more time in the gym, hoping more muscle will make for more efficient victories.

Grinding out points can take a toll. Chang, Wilander and Borg all were finished as Slam contenders by their mid-20s.

“It's going to be tough for Lleyton to have that (invincible) status,” countryman Patrick Rafter said last year. “He just has to work so hard the whole time.”

“If I burn out, I burn out,” Hewitt countered. “In the next few years, I feel like I'm going to be a threat at all the Grand Slams. Whether I'll be around in 10 years' time, who knows?”

Rafter has been a tough act for Hewitt to follow. The affable former No.1 recently was named Australian of the Year.

Hewitt's brash style grated on many Australian fans. He has been fined for using foul language on court and for calling a chair umpire at the French Open “spastic.” He abused his hometown crowd in Adelaide for booing him, saying, “That's just the stupidity of the Australian public.” Playing Boris Becker at Wimbledon in 1999, Hewitt muttered to the pro-Becker crowd, “Shut the (bleep) up.”

The low point happened while playing James Blake last year at the U.S.Open, when Hewitt made a comment to an umpire that was interpreted as racist.

Is it backlash? Spanish star Alex Corretja described Hewitt as lacking education, odd and arrogant. Australian columnists have labeled Hewitt “appalling,” “graceless,” a “boor” and “an embarrassment to tennis and Australia.” Former player Brad Gilbert once said he would be “amazed if someone doesn't whack him in the locker room.”

“He's not endearing himself to the press because he's not cooperative,” said Hall of Famer and Cincinnati native Tony Trabert, who does TV work for an Australian station. “As a result, sportswriters are not going to eulogize him.”

W & S tournament director Bruce Flory offers this reminder: Pete Sampras initially drew an apathetic response from fans, but that changed the longer he kept winning. Hewitt can help himself most by staying No.1.

“It takes awhile to catch on,” Flory said. “It's still early in Hewitt's career.”

http://enquirer.com/editions/2002/08/04/hewittput.jpg

Lleyton Hewitt cheers as a 15-foot putt falls into the hole at the Jack Nicklaus Golf Center. Hewitt was among several tennis pros playing in a golf outing prior to the beginning of the Western-Southern Financial Group Tennis Masters Series in Mason.
(Photo by Michael E. Keating)

(Pffff look @ the way he reacts to golf too :p)

fcap
09-14-2002, 01:57 PM
ahahahahaha What a classic pic of LL!!! :p:p

Jackie
09-14-2002, 03:12 PM
"He no longer speaks with the Australian press"
...then how do we keep getting interviews?

KaseyL
09-16-2002, 07:39 AM
Article re Davis cup tie Australia-India: (mentioning Kim and Lleyton too :)).

Indian ace goes AWOL

By DOUG ROBERTSON

September 16, 2002

INDIA's No.1, Mahesh Bhupathi, is a shock no-show for the critical world group qualifying tie against Australia in Adelaide from Friday.

The US Open doubles champion earlier this month and long-time Davis Cup doubles partner of Leander Paes, Bhupathi did not arrive with the Indian team at Memorial Drive yesterday.

Tennis Australia officials said they had no prior warning of Bhupathi's late withdrawal but India will now go into the tie to decide which country stays in the higher-ranked world group next year severely weakened.

Bhupathi, with a ATP doubles ranking of No.4, and Paes have together won three Grand Slam titles including last year's French Open and Wimbledon.

The Indians had a solid hit out for about three hours yesterday and will practise at Memorial Drive from noon today after the Australian team goes through its paces from 9.30am.

The crucial draw for the tie will be made at 11am on Thursday.

Adelaide's world No.1 Lleyton Hewitt had his first workout since the US Open semi-final yesterday as Australia's Davis Cup preparations stepped up a notch.

Hewitt was also at The Drive with girlfriend Kim Clijsters on Saturday supporting Todd Woodbridge who joined the team for the first time.

Hewitt opted to rest for one more day after nine months on the international circuit.

Certain to be Australia's anchor in the critical doubles rubber, Woodbridge worked out strenuously under the watchful eye of Cup captain John Fitzgerald, who arrived in Adelaide from Melbourne on Friday.

Fitzgerald acknowledged the supremely fit Hewitt doesn't need much work to hone his superb skills or his innate competitive spirit.

Fitzgerald said he had not yet settled on Australia's line up for the opening singles matches on Friday.

"Lleyton hasn't hit a ball since the US (Open) so I don't know if he can pay three (matches)," Fitzgerald said. "There's a chance that Wayne Arthurs could play doubles. There's a chance Wayne could play three matches but there's also a chance Wayne could play just doubles and Scott Draper could play singles.

"Deep in my mind I've got an idea but the players don't know what, it's got to evolve. Current form is also important. They can win their spot here."

Fitzgerald admitted the Indians would be toughest in doubles but he had some knowledge of the little known newest members of Cup team in Rohan Bopanna and Asian junior champion Sunil-Kamir Sipaeya.

"(Hitting partner) Peter Luczak has played satellites against a couple of them so we have information on them," Fitzgerald said.

"I don't know what they'll do but I'd imagine Paes would play three matches."

The Daily Telegraph

Goonergal
09-16-2002, 10:21 PM
Thanx 4 the article Ingrid!

Hewitt doesn't scare us

By DOUG ROBERTSON
17sep02

INDIA is not intimidated by facing the world's best tennis player Lleyton Hewitt and will not concede the singles rubber to the world No. 1 in the Davis Cup qualifying tie in Adelaide from Friday, its captain said.

India's Davis Cup captain, Ramesh Krishnan, said his mostly inexperienced outfit would force Hewitt to produce his best when he opens Australia's assault at Memorial Drive from 10.30am on Friday.

Krishnan conceded India was rank underdog to win the tie, to decide which country plays in the world group next year, but said many battles were won against the odds.

"We've won a few of them ourselves," said Krishnan, who has beaten Australia's Davis Cup captain John Fitzgerald and coach Wally Masur in Cup ties. "We're not going to concede anything. Lleyton has done well in Brazil in Davis Cup and in Spain so he's been through the grind. The thing is not to just give it up to him, let him come up with it.

"We know we're in over our heads but we'll give it our best shot."

Krishnan said he would not decide India's four-man team until Thursday. He did not give any hint of the line-up although veteran Leander Paes is likely to play singles and doubles – possibly the second singles to avoid an early clash with Hewitt.

"Leander has been through this many times. He's been doing that (three matches) for 15 years so he's used to it. Nobody is expecting us to win so . . . there's no pressure on him and he can go out and play freely."

India's Vishal Uppal, ranked 760 in singles and a late inclusion for injured No. 1 player Mahesh Bhupathi who aggravated a shoulder injury in winning the US Open doubles title, Rohan Bopanna (363), Sunil Kumar Sipaeya (539), Harsh Mankad (831) and Paes (980, 22 in doubles) went through a five-hour test yesterday.
Earlier a heavy shower of rain sent the Aussies scurrying off the court a few minutes early but not before Hewitt had a strong workout. Ramesh said he was conscious of Hewitt's keenness to feed from the energy of his home-town crowd.

Goonergal
09-16-2002, 10:23 PM
Hewitt chance of playing doubles

Paul Malone, tennis
17sep02

AUSTRALIAN Davis Cup captain John Fitzgerald will decide on Friday night whether to pursue a quick kill in the qualifying tie against India by playing Lleyton Hewitt in the doubles rubber.
Australia is overwhelmingly favoured to take a 2-0 first-day lead on Friday with singles wins from Hewitt and Wayne Arthurs at Adelaide's Memorial Drive.

Hewitt's confidence is such that the Wimbledon champion has spoken about playing a charity football match in his home city on Sunday afternoon after what would be a best-of-three-set match that morning if the tie was decided in the doubles on Saturday.
Fitzgerald said he had not yet settled on Australia's line-up for the opening singles matches on Friday, but he is certain to choose Arthurs as No. 2 singles player behind Hewitt.

None of the Indians is ranked in the world's top 400 in singles and Rohan Bopanna, their leading player at No. 405, has played only one ATP Tour match this year – which he lost. Bopanna is likely to play Arthurs on Friday.

Hewitt said a decision on Australia's doubles team was likely to wait until the Friday night of the tie, which will determine which team makes the elite 16-nation world group for next year's Davis Cup.

Doubles specialist Todd Woodbridge this month touted a cup doubles association with Hewitt so they could build an understanding towards the 2004 Olympics. Woodbridge has a 1-2 win-loss record in cup doubles with Wayne Arthurs and would prefer to partner Hewitt.

"We played once before three or four years ago and I think we could match up well," Hewitt said. Fitzgerald said he did not know if he would play Hewitt in the doubles, as he did in Australia's 3-2 loss to France in the cup final last November.

"There's a chance that Wayne could play doubles. There's a chance Wayne could play three matches but there's also a chance Wayne could play just doubles and Scott Draper could play singles," Fitzgerald said.

India's doubles specialist Mahesh Bhupathi withdrew from the team last weekend, citing a shoulder injury.
Bhupathi, who won the US Open doubles title with Max Mirnyi earlier this month, was to have reformed his successful partnership with Leander Paes for the tie. He has been replaced by Vishal Uppal, 25.

Beyond the cup tie, Hewitt's priorities remain his first Australian Open title in January and retaining his year-end world No. 1 ranking.

Hewitt lost in the first round at Melbourne Park this year after recently recovering from chickenpox, and his best finish was a fourth round appearance in 2000.

"If I can win the Aussie or the French, I'd love to win the Aussie next, that's for sure, out of the two left for me," he said.

KaseyL
09-16-2002, 10:41 PM
Thanks!

duck
09-17-2002, 04:34 PM
From tThe Age

Hewitt the Davis Cup pupil now the master
By Linda Pearce
Adelaide
September 18 2002





Having learnt about Davis Cup passion and commitment at the knee of Pat Rafter, Lleyton Hewitt nows finds himself in the role of teacher. The world No. 1 is undeniably the marquee attraction at this week's humble qualifying tie against India, but Australian captain John Fitzgerald believes he is also schooling the next generation by his presence and example.

While US Open champion Pete Sampras and the beaten finalist Andre Agassi are among the high-profile players to eschew this weekend's round of world group semi-final matches, let alone relegation bouts, so soon after the demanding American hardcourt season, Hewitt's devotion to national duty in his home town has been unwavering.

"I'm biased towards him because he is a unique kid, I think," Fitzgerald said yesterday. at Memorial Drive. "If you look at guys in the top 10 or 20 in the world, not all of them would do this.

"When he makes his schedule each year he looks at the four majors first and the Davis Cup, together, so that's what he bases his schedule on and then he works around that. I think what he does for Davis Cup is really exceptional and we have to be - I don't know if thankful's the right word - proud of him, I think. I am."

Indeed, such is Hewitt's dedication to the Australian cause - he had not missed a tie since his 1998 debut until chickenpox scuttled his plans of making the doomed first-round trip to Argentina in February - that coach Wally Masur claims not to consult the International Tennis Federation about Davis Cup matters, permutations and possibilities, but to simply contact Hewitt instead.

"We say, 'What's the possibility, you know, if we win this tie and Chile win and da da da da?', and he tells us," Masur said. "He's so on top of everything that we just give him a call and say,'Lleyton, what do you think, what are our chances like?' His focus is terrific, and that the No. 1 player in the world would play a relegation tie just shows the level of respect that we and our players have for this competition."

Hewitt is apparently in a particularly relaxed frame of mind on his first visit home since well before his Wimbledon triumph. He has moved into the team hotel after a few days with his family at the Hewitt compound in West Lakes, and has been indulging his obsession with Adelaide's Crows in AFL preliminary final week.

He is happily preparing with his usual gusto for singles on the opening day and possibly doubles with Todd Woodbridge on the second as Australia seeks to retain its place in the 16-nation world group for 2003.

That will be a formality, particularly since Monday's withdrawal of India's doubles specialist Mahesh Bhupathi. Still, one of the bonuses of the week-long build-up, apparently, is the fact that Hewitt's hitting partners include developing squad members Peter Luczak and Ryan Henry.

Luczak is a talented late bloomer still seeking to graduate from the Challenger circuit; Henry, 18, lost a close match to French wonderboy Richard Gasquet in the semi-finals of the US Open juniors and is regarded as among Australia's brightest hopes for the future.

"The kids are so excited about hitting balls with Lleyton and being on the court with him and learning from him," Fitzgerald said. "Ryan is just absolutely rapt; he's got a smile on his face every morning because he's getting to hit with Lleyton most days."

Masur, too, spoke of Henry's genuine excitement when he discovered he would be Hewitt's Monday morning practice fodder on the South Australian's favourite Rebound Ace court. "Ryan hit with Lleyton for two hours and it was very good quality stuff, and then he had to go and lie down for four hours in the afternoon because he was exhausted by it, it was such an emotional roller-coaster."

Call it education, said Fitzgerald. The lesson Hewitt learnt from Rafter five years ago, when just an orange boy getting his first taste of Davis Cup against France in Sydney, he is now, by example, passing on.

duck
09-17-2002, 04:38 PM
There is also a really nice photo of LH and Leander Paes on the Age website but my mouse refuses to right-click so I can't cut and paste but http://www.theage.com.au and it's on the front page.

KaseyL
09-17-2002, 04:48 PM
I've got it here for you:

KaseyL
09-17-2002, 04:53 PM
Thanks for that good article, duck!

Goonergal
09-18-2002, 11:03 AM
Well looks like we'll have to get used to seeing less of LL next yr :sad: He is wise though.

Hewitt to play less events in 2003

ADELAIDE (Reuters) - World number one Lleyton Hewitt says he will reduce the number of tournaments he plays next year to protect himself from burnout.


The 21-year-old Australian told reporters that he needed to cut back on his playing schedule if he wanted to prolong his career.


"Next year I'll probably try to concentrate a little bit more on Grand Slams and Davis Cup," Hewitt said.


"I think I'll probably have a longer career because of that, if I make some smart scheduling moves within the next couple of years."


Hewitt, the youngest man ever to finish the year ranked number one in the world, recently threatened to quit the sport because of a dispute with the ATP, the governing body for men's professional tennis.


But he said his decision to cut back on his programme had nothing to do with his row with the ATP and would ultimately help him stay involved in the sport for longer.


"I've got to sit down and think about what's right for me," he said.


Hewitt, preparing for this weekend's Davis Cup World Group qualifier against India, said his decision could cost him the number one ranking but his main ambition now was to win the Australian and French Opens, the two grand slams to elude him.


He was bundled out in the first round of this year's Australian Open after contracting chicken pox during the buildup to the tournament and wants to take things easier next year.


As the biggest drawcard in Australian tennis, he is likely to face strong pressure to compete in as many lead-up events as possible but said he would have to choose carefully.


"I've got to make tough decisions to find out what's the best situation for me going into the Australian Open in Melbourne," he said.

Goonergal
09-18-2002, 11:04 AM
Australians warned not to underestimate India


ADELAIDE (Reuters) - Australian Davis Cup captain John Fitzgerald has warned his players not to underestimate India in this weekend's Davis Cup World Group qualifier.


Although the Australians, led by world number one Lleyton Hewitt, are heavy favourites to win the tie, Fitzgerald said his squad could not afford to take the Indians lightly.


"We are not going to underestimate them at all, we believe that we have got a competitive opposition," Fitzgerald told reporters. "We want to win this tie badly so we are going to leave no stone unturned in trying to do it."


Australian coach Wally Masur said his team could not afford to show any sympathy to an Indian team without a singles player ranked in the top 400.


"We just see it as a means to an end," Masur said. "It's a relegation tie and that's not the situation Australia would like to be in."


Both countries have refused to give away secrets about their likely teams before Thursday's official draw although Fitzgerald has hinted Hewitt may play both singles and doubles as Australia chase a quick kill.


India's slim hopes of causing an upset suffered a major setback when their U.S. Open doubles champion Mahesh Bhupati announced last week he was pulling out of the tie because of a shoulder problem.


Indian captain Ramesh Krishnan tried to persuade Bhupati to travel to Adelaide with the squad in case there was a late improvement but Bhupati elected to stay behind and save himself for the Asian Games in South Korea.

Goonergal
09-18-2002, 05:07 PM
Lleyton wants Pat back
Wednesday, 18 September, 2002

ADELAIDE, Sept 18 AAP - Lleyton Hewitt still holds an ambition of holding up the Davis Cup with Pat Rafter.

Rafter said yesterday the chance to win the Cup was the one thing that could rekindle his passion for tennis and bring him out of retirement. He missed the 1999 Davis Cup final victory over France through injury and suffered with cramps during the following year's final loss against Spain. It appeared Rafter would finally hoist aloft the coveted trophy last November in Melbourne only for Australia to capitulate to France.

Hewitt said today he would love to see Rafter back in the Australian team next year. "It would be fantastic," he said. "I'm welcoming anyone who can strengthen our line-up and he's one guy who I'd love to win the Davis Cup with, there's no doubt about that. He's done a lot for my career."

Hewitt, who is in his hometown Adelaide to prepare for the Cup tie against India starting on Friday, said he had loved his experiences playing in the team with Rafter. "It's disappointing the way that it finished last year, I guess, but we had such a great year anyway," Hewitt said. "For us to make another final was fantastic.

"I still feel like Pat's a fair way away though, he hasn't picked up a racquet for nine or 10 months, since that Davis Cup tie last year. My guess is as good as yours whether he's going to be back or not."

duck
09-18-2002, 05:51 PM
Advertisement:
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Sydney Morning Herald

Australia seek an end to double faults
September 19 2002

John Fitzgerald is trying another combination this weekend in an attempt to end a bout of double trouble, writes Linda Pearce.


When Mark Woodforde and Todd Woodbridge combined for their farewell Davis Cup match in the 1999 final in Nice, a famous cup partnership was not all that ended. With the Woodies' departure went Australia's doubles stranglehold; only four wins have come from the nine attempts since.

Woodforde continued for another year and Woodbridge returned in 2001, but Australia's great strength has become an obvious vulnerability, as results in the past two finals have showed. And so in this weekend's qualifying tie against India at Memorial Drive in Adelaide, yet another combination, a sixth, will be tried: Woodbridge and Lleyton Hewitt.

They have teamed just once before, for a three-set tournament defeat in Sydney some years ago. But, barring injury or exceptional singles circumstances, captain John Fitzgerald will opt for his new pair to a) try to clinch the tie on Saturday if, as expected, Hewitt and Wayne Arthurs sweep tomorrow's singles; and b) experiment, for there are more formidable opponents ahead.

"Lleyton and I are going to have a good chance of breaking [serve] a lot. That's the key for us, where Wayne and I hold serve easily," Woodbridge said yesterday. "The holding serve part's going to be more difficult, but we're going to have a team under a lot of pressure and, depending on the style of opponents, it's good to have those options in other matches.

"If you have me, who has a great record in doubles, and you have Lleyton, the No1 player in the world, on the court, there is a lot of pressure on the other end. If Mark Woodforde and I were playing against Pete [Sampras] and someone, there's always the expectation Pete can raise his level a little more than other people, and that's the case with Lleyton at the moment ..."


Woodbridge is aware Hewitt wants the match over by 2pm, the starting time on TV of his beloved Crows' AFL preliminary final against Collingwood.

As ever, Woodbridge has also been struck by Hewitt's competitive streak and determination to excel, even on the practice court, "and I'm enjoying playing with him because it's a bit like a feast at the net sometimes.

"Every return gets put on the [server's] shoelaces, so I feel bad if I don't pick it up.


"I think he's played so much tennis this year and been under a lot of pressure, that the fact he's on the court doing something else that he's not probably expected to be as good at is a bit of a relief for him."

Hewitt, the 2000 US Open doubles winner, and Woodbridge hit yesterday against Peter Luczak and Scott Draper - the latter a likely substitution in Sunday's reverse singles if Australia leads 3-0. The morning session was continually disrupted by rain, but that is no concern, as the timing of the tie ensured this was always intended to be a lighter preparation than most.

India's best chance had appeared to rest with spearhead Leander Paes contriving an upset against Hewitt tomorrow, and then teaming with fellow doubles star Mahesh Bhupathi - also the visitors' highest-ranked singles player - on Saturday.

Bhupathi withdrew at the weekend, citing a shoulder injury, although the suspicion is that his reasons were more political than physical. Regardless, what slim chance existed now appears to have gone, to the extent that some bookmakers are not even fielding on the result.

"It was a big surprise for [Bhupathi] not to show, I must admit. In New York he looked 100 per cent fit," Woodbridge said. "They're still going to be difficult, and we'll still have to play our best ... but it's taken a lot out of their campaign to win the tie."

HEAD TO HEAD

Australia v India: Davis Cup world group qualifying tie in Adelaide. Friday-Sunday

Likely teams (rankings in brackets):

AUSTRALIA: Singles: Lleyton Hewitt (1), Wayne Arthurs (53). Doubles: Hewitt (230) and Todd Woodbridge (5)

INDIA: Singles: Leander Paes (980), Harsh Mankad (831) Doubles: Paes (22) and Rohan Bopanna (318)

duck
09-18-2002, 05:52 PM
Advertiser:
TENNIS: Yonex signs Hewitt in long-term sponsorship
By Sports Affairs Wrtiter BRONWYN HURRELL
19sep02
WORLD No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt has signed a multi-million dollar sponsorship deal with Japanese tennis racquet maker Yonex.

Hewitt's contract with Yonex started in 1999 – when he was ranked in the 100s – and he has re-signed until at least 2005.

Announcing the deal in Adelaide yesterday, Yonex president Kosaku Yoneyama said he was "delighted" Hewitt had extended the deal, with options for both parties to further extend beyond the term.

"Lleyton's contract is a US seven-figure sponsorship deal with bonuses . . . which will see Lleyton sponsored to the level that is appropriate as the world No. 1 player.

"Yonex will continue to give our all in the support of Lleyton and will strive to give him the very best equipment," he said.

Hewitt's career prize money is more than $15 million.

His endorsement deal with Nike is understood to be worth $30m and Yonex several million.

Yonex yesterday also announced Gray-Nicolls Australia has been appointed the official distributor for Yonex products in Australia.

Hania
09-18-2002, 07:34 PM
*sob* :sad:

Goonergal
09-18-2002, 11:27 PM
Hewitt casts Cup doubt
http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38262000/jpg/_38262742_hewitt150.jpg
Lleyton Hewitt leads Australia against India


Australian Lleyton Hewitt believes there may be a feud within India's Davis Cup squad following Mahesh Bhupathi's surprise withdrawal.

Bhupathi, who has represented India in Davis Cup since 1995, pulled out of the World Qualifying tie in Adelaide on Sunday, with India captain Ramesh Krishnan claiming the player had a shoulder injury.

"We want to win this tie badly"
-Australia captain John Fitzgerald

But Hewitt said that Bhupathi did not appear to have a problem when he won the US Open doubles title with Max Mirnyi of Belarus.

"It was a big surprise that Mahesh didn't come," Hewitt said. "He's pulled out with a shoulder injury but I don't know how bad his shoulder is.

"Just on the fact that he came off the US Open win two weeks ago, it mustn't be too bad.

"It's obviously something in the camp there, or he didn't want to make the long trip."

There is speculation that Bhupathi may have withdrawn because of personal differences with former doubles partner Leander Paes.


Bhupathi and Paes, who won Wimbledon and French Open doubles titles in 1999, terminated their partnership in March.

Bhupathi's absence means that apart from doubles specialist Paes, the Indian team contains little-known players.

But despite their lowly ranking, Australian captain John Fitzgerald has warned his players not to underestimate their opponents.

Fitzgerald said his squad could not afford to take the Indians lightly.

"We are not going to underestimate them at all, we believe that we have got a competitive opposition," Fitzgerald said.

"We want to win this tie badly so we are going to leave no stone unturned in trying to do it."

KaseyL
09-19-2002, 11:58 AM
The Age, Sept 19, 2002

Australia looks to double adaptors for a power boost

By Linda Pearce
Adelaide, September 19 2002

Lleyton Hewitt is expected to partner Todd Woodbridge in the doubles on Saturday at Memorial Drive.

When Mark Woodforde and Todd Woodbridge combined for their farewell Davis Cup match in the 1999 final in Nice, a famous cup partnership was not all that ended. With the Woodies' departure went Australia's doubles stranglehold; only four wins have come from the nine attempts since.

Woodforde continued for another year, and Woodbridge returned in 2001, but Australia's great strength has become an obvious vulnerability, as results in the past two finals have shown.

And so in this weekend's qualifying tie against India at Memorial Drive, yet another combination, a sixth, will be tried: Woodbridge and Lleyton Hewitt, who yesterday signed a multi-million dollar endorsement deal with Japanese manufacturer Yonex to continue using its racquets until 2005.

Woodbridge and Hewitt have teamed only once previously, for a three-set tournament defeat in Sydney some years ago. But, barring injury or exceptional singles circumstances, captain John Fitzgerald will opt for his new pair to a) try to clinch the tie on Saturday if, as expected, Hewitt and Wayne Arthurs sweep tomorrow's singles; and b) experiment, for there are more formidable opponents ahead.

"Lleyton and I are going to have a good chance of breaking (serve) a lot. That's the key for us, where Wayne and I hold serve easily," Woodbridge said.

"The holding serve part's going to be more difficult, but we're going to have a team under a lot of pressure and, depending on the style of opponents, it's good to have those options in other matches.

"If you have me, who has a great record in doubles, and you have Lleyton, the No. 1 player in the world, on the court, there is a lot of pressure on the other end.

"If Mark Woodforde and I were playing against Pete (Sampras) and someone, there's always the expectation Pete can raise his level a little more than other people, and that's the case with Lleyton at the moment, so we're trying to use him to our advantage."

As ever, Woodbridge has also been struck by Hewitt's competitive streak even on the practice court, "and I'm enjoying playing with him because it's a bit like a feast at the net sometimes. Every return gets put on the (server's) shoelaces, so I feel bad if I don't pick it up.

"I think he's played so much tennis this year and been under a lot of pressure, that the fact he's on the court doing something else that he's not probably expected to be as good at is a bit of a relief for him."

Hewitt, a former US Open doubles winner, and Woodbridge hit yesterday against Peter Luczak and Scott Draper - the latter a likely substitution in Sunday's reverse singles if Australia leads 3-0.

India's best chance had appeared to rest with Leander Paes contriving an upset against Hewitt tomorrow, and then teaming with fellow doubles star Mahesh Bhupathi on Saturday.

Bhupathi withdrew at the weekend, citing a shoulder injury, although the suspicion is that his reasons were more political than physical. Regardless, what slim chance existed now appears to have gone, to the extent that some bookmakers are not even fielding on the result.

"It was a big surprise for (Bhupathi) not to show, I must admit. In New York he looked 100 per cent fit," Woodbridge said. "They're still going to be difficult, and we'll still have to play our best . . . but it's taken a lot out of their campaign."

KaseyL
09-19-2002, 12:04 PM
another one, and it seems like Lleyton will be in a hurry to finish his match! :)

Hewitt to play singles, doubles against India

Sept. 19, 2002

ADELAIDE, Australia (Reuters) - Lleyton Hewitt will play both singles and doubles as Australia chase a quick victory in their Davis Cup World Group qualifier against India.


The world number one will open the September 20-22 tie at Adelaide's Memorial Drive when he takes on Harsh Mankad in the first singles rubber.


He will then partner Todd Woodbridge in the doubles against Leander Paes and Vishaal Uppal the following day.


Hewitt said he wanted to win the opening match against the lowly ranked Mankad as quickly and as convincingly as possible to set the tone for the rest of a match Australia are expected to dominate.


"It's nice if I can get the job done quickly, it will be a confidence-boost for the boys," he told reporters on Thursday. "I go out there and I give everything I've got every time I step on the court."


Hewitt is also scheduled to face Indian number one Paes in Sunday's opening reverse singles, but could be replaced if Australia hold an unbeatable 3-0 lead going into the final day.


Australia's non-playing captain John Fitzgerald told Hewitt after his Wimbledon victory in July that he would consider giving him the day off to play an Australian Rules charity match if the tie was already decided.


Wayne Arthurs, who lost the deciding rubber in last year's Davis Cup final against France after Pat Rafter withdrew injured, was selected as Australia's second singles player.


The big-serving left hander faces Paes on Friday before tackling Mankad in Sunday's concluding match.


"I'm really excited to be back playing singles," said Arthurs, who is ranked 51st in the world.


"I want to get that monkey off my back from Melbourne, and here I have a very good opportunity to do that, I think."


The Australians are heavy favourites to win the best-of-five tie and retain their position in the World Group for next year.


The Indians do not have a singles player ranked in the top 400 and their slim hopes of causing an upset suffered a major setback when their U.S. Open doubles champion Mahesh Bhupathi pulled out because of a shoulder problem.


Hewitt's biggest concern is likely to be whether his doubles match on Saturday finishes in time for him to watch his beloved Adelaide Crows play Collingwood in an AFL finals match on television the same day.


"The boys know where I stand on that, we definitely don't want to go over three hours," Hewitt said.




:)

KaseyL
09-19-2002, 12:12 PM
and more...

from the Daily Telegraph, Sep 19, 2002

Lleyton planning less-hectic schedule

By SAM LIENERT

WORLD No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt is to reduce his hectic ATP Tour playing schedule in a move to increase his chances of winning grand slams and the Davis Cup next year.

Hewitt said yesterday retaining his year-end world No. 1 ranking, after last year becoming the youngest ever player to achieve that position, had been a driving ambition this year.

But that would take a backseat in 2003 to winning the two grand slam titles – the Australian Open and the French Open – that have so far eluded him, and another Davis Cup trophy for Australia.

And that means cutting back on some ATP Tour events.
"Last year, to finish the youngest ever No. 1 in the world it really meant a lot to try to back it up again two years in a row," Hewitt told reporters in Adelaide.

"Next year I'll probably try to concentrate a bit more on grand slams and Davis Cup."
Hewitt said cutting some events would also prevent him from burning out in the course of what's likely to be a long career, after starting on the professional circuit as a 16-year-old.

"I think I'll probably have a longer career because of that, if I make some smart scheduling moves within the next couple of years," he said.

While he didn't say so, the move to cut ATP Tour events is also in line with a threat he made in response to a $US103,000 fine he received from the tour last month for failing to front for a pre-tournament interview.

"I'll change my schedule next year if the ATP keep up with this garbage," Hewitt said at the time.
That fine is expected to be reduced on appeal though Hewitt says it should be thrown out.

The grand slams and the Davis Cup are run by a separate body, the International Tennis Federation (ITF), while all other events are run by the ATP Tour.

Hewitt played 20 tournaments plus four Davis Cup ties in 2000 and 22 plus four cup ties last year, and his schedule is made the more draining because of his baseline running game and his success which means he often plays through to semis and finals.
This year he's already played 16 tournaments plus a cup tie, having had a slow start to recover from chicken pox.

Hewitt also said he would have to plan carefully what tournaments he played to prepare for next January's Australian Open in Melbourne, after struggling there in the past.

Still getting over chicken pox, Hewitt lost in the first round of the Australian Open this year, which followed losses in the fourth round, second round and first round in his previous three cracks at the event.

Hewitt said he was yet to decide whether to repeat this year's preparation by playing the Hopman Cup in Perth, or to play the ATP event in Adelaide, as he has done in previous years, in the lead-up to next year's Open.
"I've got to sit down and think about what's right for me," he said.
"I'd love to play in Adelaide but at the end of the day the Australian Open's the big one for me now.

"Sitting at No.1 in the world, I'm going to be seeded one or two, I guess, again and that's probably the closest to heart I guess.
"I've got to make tough decisions to find out what's the best situation for me going into the Australian Open in Melbourne."


END


We'll see less of Lleyton, I suppose but it wil be better for him (and good for the couple too :angel: ) I hope he'll play Hopman, though (Kets!!!)

KaseyL
09-19-2002, 12:18 PM
and another article re Lleyton 's latest deal: :cool:

This is in the Herald Sun, Sept 19, 2002

Hewitt $26m man

By SHAUN PHILLIPS

LLEYTON HEWITT has cashed in on his world's best ranking, signing a new deal that will push his annual pay cheque towards $26 million.

The young Australian is now hot on the heels of Andre Agassi as the top-earning player in tennis.

A lucrative new contract with Japanese racquet manufacturer Yonex will boost the 21-year-old's annual off-court earnings above $20m. :eek:

The Yonex contract alone is believed to be worth $12m a year.
It now dwarfs a $6m annual deal, which still has three years to run, with global sporting giant Nike.

The Wimbledon champion yesterday said his growing fortune would not divert his focus, which was to win more grand slam and Davis Cup titles.

In stark contrast to fellow Australian star Mark Philippoussis, Hewitt does not own a car.
"I haven't been home since January, so it would just sit in the garage," Hewitt said in Adelaide yesterday.
"For me, owning cars is not a huge thing.
"It's great to be getting the amount of money I'm getting for playing a game that I love, that I'd play for nothing."

Hewitt will spearhead Australia's Davis Cup qualifier tie against India in his home town from tomorrow.

Yonex signed Hewitt in 1999, when he was ranked 170, for an estimated $5m a year.
In 2001, Hewitt won the US Open and became the youngest season-ending world No. 1.

In July he became the first Australian to win Wimbledon since Pat Cash in 1987, and is again on track to finish the year as the world's best.

The new Yonex deal runs to 2005, the same year that Nike's contract expires.

Several small endorsements and commercial arrangements are believed to earn Hewitt upwards of $3m a year.
Hewitt has pocketed just under $4m in prizemoney this year, and could top $5m before season's end.
Last year Hewitt earned $16.5m, according to an annual BRW survey of sports stars.

Greg Norman was at the top of the Australian cash pile, with $48m, while England-based soccer star Harry Kewell earned $20 million.
Swimming great Ian Thorpe earned $2.5 million, the report said.

Yonex president Kosa ku Yoneyama said Hewitt's passion was a big part of his appeal.
"He's got a huge heart," Mr Yoneyama said. "We believe Lleyton will always want to be No.1. He has a great desire."

Goonergal
09-19-2002, 12:25 PM
A lucrative new contract with Japanese racquet manufacturer Yonex will boost the 21-year-old's annual off-court earnings above $20m :eek:

:eek: Who's a rich boy then :eek: You really are in the posting mood today Ingrid ;) Thanx 4 all the articles :D

Goonergal
09-19-2002, 01:50 PM
Found this on LLand *cough* Tissues lmao! :p

Author: Stef , Sep/19/2002 12:59:35 [+02]

LLeyton Hewitt will be in a Sorbent tissue commercial and will be shot 25th-26th September in Sydney. *lol* It's expected to get a few laughs ans gags. Wozza (Fanatics Manager) is looking for a few patriotic fans to come down to Sydney and be available for the commercial. If you're interested, email him or go to www.thefanatics.com The first priorities will obviously be past fanatics but you can give it a go. You's get paid $160.50 Australian.Of course, I'd do it for nothing but the money's an added bonus!!!

duck
09-19-2002, 03:31 PM
Y'know, you can never have too many tissues.....

Melbourne Age

Hewitt out to do a Mankad
By Linda Pearce
September 20 2002




"I've seen him hit a few balls, . . . but I'm going to go out there and try to make him worry," Lleyton Hewitt. PICTURE: GETTY IMAGES.


For Lleyton Hewitt, known for his elephantine memory and remarkable attention to detail, it was an uncharacteristic lapse. Usually, when asked about an opponent, or a particular cross-court backhand in the fourth game of the third set, or even what he ate for breakfast on this day two years ago, the answer would come without hesitation.

So, Lleyton, do you remember much about playing a junior match against Harsh Mankad, your opening opponent in today's Davis Cup qualifying tie against India at Memorial Drive?

"Did I play him?" said a flummoxed Hewitt, needing some further prompting. Grass. England. Six years ago. Straight sets. At Wimbledon, he was told, although the venue was later discovered to be the junior lead-up event at Surbiton. "Actually, I do vaguely remember it," Hewitt continued. "That's strange. Normally I remember most of my matches. Well, it's going to be a bit different to that, I think. Hopefully it's the same result."

Then a last, mystified admission: "Well, that's surprising."

Yet perhaps not as unexpected as how far Hewitt has come in six years.


He is, of course, is now the world's top-ranked player and a double grand slam winner, while the diminutive 22-year-old Mankad, despite lifting his ranking by 417 places to No. 831 last week, is still more famous as the grandson of Vinoo Mankad, the cricketer for whom sneaky bowler's-end run-outs were named after Australian Bill Brown's unorthodox dismissal in 1947.

That SCG Test ended in a draw, but this tennis contest looms as a monumental mismatch, even though Hewitt was not bothered by the fact that a defeat would be seen as one of the great Davis Cup upsets of all time. He is, after all, now favourite each time he plays.

"It's nice if I can go out there and get the job done quickly," Hewitt said. "But I'm going out there very wary; I've seen him hit a few balls, not a hell of a lot, but I'm going to go out there and try to make him worry about how he's going to beat the No. 1 player in the world as well."

Anything less than a commanding three-set win - which would hand a 1-0 lead to Wayne Arthurs against Indian spearhead Leander Paes while Hewitt and Woodbridge prepare for tomorrow's doubles against Paes and late inclusion Vishaal Uppal - would be almost unthinkable.

For all the Indians' cheery determination, perhaps the most telling comment of the week came on Monday. Doubles star Mahesh Bhupathi had withdrawn, leaving Indian captain Ramesh Krishnan to remark that whether the Australians were beatable was one thing, but whether they were beatable by India, probably quite another.

"The odds are definitely in the Australians' favour playing at home, having the No. 1 singles player in the world, having Todd Woodbridge as one of the formidable doubles players over the years," said Paes. "But as far as we go, it's our responsibility to put out best foot forward for the country, and that's what I take pride in."

Paes, certainly, is given a greater chance of singles success than Mankad, for not only is the veteran not playing Hewitt on day one, but his Davis Cup record is an impressive 38-19. Paes lost to Arthurs on grass in 1999, the only previous time they have met, but has regularly saved his best for representative play.

Arthurs' cup career is more chequered. He is 3-2 in singles, and most recently lost the deciding fifth rubber in last year's final against France's Nicolas Escude when summoned to replace the injured Pat Rafter. That experience could have crushed a player of flimsier resolve, and Arthurs admits it haunted him early in the year, bruising his results and ranking.

But the revival began before Wimbledon. With a ranking down in the 130s and desperate times threatening, the 31-year-old reached the Nottingham final. He then let slip a precious chance by losing to David Nalbandian in the fourth round at Wimbledon. A strong United States hardcourt season has left Arthurs on the verge of a return to the top 50 - and now with the chance to exorcise any remaining Davis Cup ghosts.

"I'm just really excited to be back and playing singles. I just want to get that bit of a monkey off my back from Melbourne and here I have a very good opportunity," he said. "I think I've put those demons away.

"At the time, it was very, very difficult, and (I thought) maybe I'd never get another chance. It was very emotional . . ., but I think at the end of the day, it made me much stronger."

Goonergal
09-20-2002, 07:13 PM
Aussies eye quick kill over Indians

By Linda Pearce
Adelaide
September 21 2002

This is the city, and the court, where it all began for Lleyton Hewitt, who was 16 when he won his first tournament at Memorial Drive.

At 21, he has returned home as the world No. 1 and Wimbledon champion, launching Australia's quest to remain in the Davis Cup world group with a straight-sets victory to open yesterday's qualifying tie against India.

Adelaide is also where everything started for Wayne Arthurs, at least technically, although he left his birthplace for Melbourne aged eight, and then moved to Middlesex as an adult to carve out a tennis career remarkable for its late-blooming nature.
Yesterday, a little more lost time was recovered, through a testing four-set victory over veteran Leander Paes.

Australia thus ended day one ahead 2-0, and with Hewitt preparing to back up with Todd Woodbridge in today's doubles against Vishaal Uppal and a slightly weary Paes.
A quick kill appears imminent. "We'd definitely like to," said captain John Fitzgerald. "No good prolonging a win if you can help it; you may as well finish it, and we'll be trying to do that."

Hewitt committed a few more unforced errors than usual and served at below 50 per cent in prevailing 6-1, 7-6 (7-2), 6-1 against Harsh Mankad.

The Indian has never played a grand slam match, compared with Hewitt's two major singles titles in the past 13 months, although the gulf was not as vast as records and rankings - Hewitt No. 1, Mankad 831 - would suggest.

Perhaps it was the lack of pace generated by his opponent that stymied the Australian's rhythm in his first match in two weeks, for the second set took 49 minutes after Mankad had failed to hold his serve once in the first.

But, in the tiebreak, "I was able to take my game to another level and really try to secure that two sets-to-love lead," said Hewitt, "and that really burst the balloon for him a little bit as well."

Paes' defeat popped India's bubble altogether. Any hope the visitors had of conjuring an upset rested with their talented, unorthodox No. 1, who chose to concentrate on doubles at the end of 1998 and has played only one singles match on tour all year.

Against Arthurs, the inactivity showed, and the Australian admitted his superior conditioning was a source of confidence the longer the match went.
It ended at 6-4, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4 after two hours 25 minutes; a relieved Arthurs belting four aces in the last game to take his match total to 30.

"It was a little bit hard to relax today," he admitted. "I just felt a little bit of pressure being the favourite in that match and also coming back and playing in Australia again, and expecting to win, and everyone else expecting me to win."
So he did, in his first cup singles match since last year's final, to cap a day of happy returns.
Hewitt's green and gold outfit last got an airing in last year's Davis Cup final, and it is significant that Australia did not win a point between Hewitt's two most recent singles matches, played -due to a bout of chickenpox - more than nine months apart.

A 5-0 drubbing in the first-round tie in Argentina, contested without the Big Three - Hewitt, Mark Philippoussis and Pat Rafter -sentenced Australia to a world group survival tie after three consecutive years as a finalist. India at home was not the most challenging among all possible scenarios - Ecuador away on clay would have been a candidate - but the degree of difficulty eased with the withdrawal of Indian No. 1 Mahesh Bhupathi.

That left more responsibility with the younger Indians, including Mankad, who is more than a year older than Hewitt, but just eight centimetres shorter and of a similarly slight build.

"I need to try to look at him and make him my idol and work towards that," said Mankad.

Hewitt admits it is a little odd to be considered a hero by an opponent younger than himself, but such is life at the top. "I don't know about Indian tennis, but Australian tennis, I love to see young kids running around with their hats backwards and getting fired up on the court," he said.

"I think that's good for tennis . . . a few people were running around with ponytails out there, trying to be Pat."
Without Rafter this year, Hewitt is the team's mainstay, and today will be called on to play doubles as well as singles for only the third time in his Davis Cup career. It will be Hewitt's second match with Woodbridge, meaning the world's top singles player will team with one of its greatest doubles exponents, and all the signs are that a formidable combination could result.

"I think Wayno deserves a rest, and I think Lleyton's keen just to try something different," Fitzgerald said. "We haven't thrown Woodbridge and Hewitt at anyone before, so I think it's their time to have a crack at it.

"This is a chance to maybe blood those two guys and then give us some options down the road."

duck
09-20-2002, 08:35 PM
Much the same but nice stuff about Woodbridge. If anyone can get the Herald-Sun there is a feature I can't access on 'how Hewitt got to the top'. Might actually need a copy of the paper! (who would have thought?)

No idle moments as Hewitt impresses
By Margie McDonald
September 21, 2002
ON his way to successfully launching Australia's campaign to be readmitted to the world group of the Davis Cup, Lleyton Hewitt found an unexpected admirer on the other side of the net.

His 6-1 7-6 6-1 win over India's Harsh Mankad in the opening singles rubber in Adelaide yesterday left quite an impression on the 22-year-old, even if the match only lasted 1hr 45min.

"I might make him my idol and work towards that," Mankad said.

"If I can get 25 to 30 miles an hour more on my serve and get his speed, I can really do some things."

The facts suggested Mankad's legs should have been jelly.
Hewitt is the world's No. 1; Mankad is ranked at 831. Hewitt has won two singles grand slams and one doubles; Mankad has never played in a grand slam.

In fact, he's been playing mainly college tennis for the past three years at the University of Minnesota while finishing an economics degree.

"I have everything to take from this match," he said.

"Over the next six months I will learn from this."

Mankad's grandfather Vinoo left his own impression on the game of cricket.

A run-out of a batsman at the non-striker's end by the bowler was named the Mankad.

Mankad used it to great effect in Australia in 1947-48 when India drew the second cricket Test at the SCG.

As Hewitt was digesting the fact someone wanted to idolise him instead of plotting to annihilate him, Wayne Arthurs was on centre court finishing off India's Leander Paes, 6-4 3-6 6-3 6-4, to lift Australia to 2-0 with the doubles today.

Australia need to beat India to remain in the 16-nation world group; India are trying to return after an absence of four years.

With that mission burned into Hewitt's brain, he was a little taken aback that Mankad was so kind.

"I don't know what to say," Hewitt said.

"I suppose a lot of kids are running around with their hats backwards and wearing long shorts.

"I enjoy it . . . not sure about Indian tennis but for Australian tennis I like seeing kids with their hats backwards, getting fired up on the court, it's good for tennis.

"A few years ago people were running around with their hair in ponytails, trying to be Pat (Rafter)."

If Hewitt was looking for an idol, it would be the lanky Queenslander and brand new father, Rafter, at least in singles.

In doubles, Hewitt has christened Todd Woodbridge his idol.

"Obviously, I've looked up to Pat Rafter so much . . . in the sense of a singles role model, being a grand slam singles champion and world No. 1.

"But Todd has gone out of his way so many times to practise with me when I was a young guy.

"I've stayed at his house many times. I'm not as confident on the doubles court as I am on the singles and there's little things about doubles.

"Todd knows just about everything that will help me improve as a tennis player."

Arthurs let loose with four aces to wrap up his match in 2hr 25min. "It's a great craft he's got," captain John Fitzgerald said of Arthurs' serve.

"He has several different types of serves but he uses exactly the same ball toss and exactly the same action – very difficult to pick.

"It's just a pleasure to be able to sit there and watch someone do that."

Paes agreed that the Arthurs serve was a fierce weapon.

"He's a top-class player with a world-class serve," Paes said.

The 1996 Atlanta Olympic singles bronze medallist, Paes has only played one singles match on the ATP tour this year, but he is ranked No. 22 in the world for doubles.

Now Australia have gained the upper hand, Fitzgerald said it was time to move in for the kill.

He wants the tie wrapped up in two days.

"We'd like to . . . no use prolonging the win if you can help it," he said.

"You might as well finish it."

Hewitt and Woodbridge are confident of winning the doubles, despite the fact they've never played together before in Davis Cup.

Murkofan
09-21-2002, 03:41 PM
Hewitt, Woodbridge put down India's doubles squad

ADELAIDE, Australia -- Lleyton Hewitt, the world's top-ranked player, has combined with Todd Woodbridge to give Australia a winning 3-0 lead over India in their Davis Cup qualifier.

The doubles victory means the Davis Cup runners-up last year have avoided failing to qualify for the 16-nation World Group next year and relegated India to the second tier.

Hewitt and Woodbridge beat Indian veteran Leander Paes and newcomer Vishaal Uppal 6-3, 7-6 (7-5), 6-1 at Memorial Drive as the home team finished strongly after a tight second set.

Hewitt and Wayne Arthurs won the opening singles matches on Friday. The reverse singles in the now dead rubber will be played Sunday.

"I felt like we raised our game at the right time. The second set could have gone either way," Hewitt said in an on-court interview after the doubles match.

Down 4-5 and 0-30 on serve, the 21-year-old showed his fighting qualities.

"Yeah it was tight. I made four tough first serves so I was able to get out of that game pretty well," Hewitt said.

Woodbridge, the Wimbledon doubles champion, and Hewitt, the Wimbledon singles champion, breezed through the first set in 29 minutes.

The Indians forced a tiebreak in the second set before a clearly nervous Uppal, ranked No. 703, double-faulted to give the Australians the set in 44 minutes.

Uppal, playing in his second Davis Cup, dropped serve twice in the third set before Hewitt served it out in just 21 minutes.

India's U.S. Open doubles champion Mahesh Bhupathi had pulled out of the tie with a shoulder injury while Australia were without former U.S. Open singles finalist Mark Philippoussis, who has a knee problem.

Hewitt, the U.S. Open singles champion last year, said he was keen to continue playing Davis Cup doubles.

"Obviously playing singles throughout the year, it makes it extremely tough for me to play a lot of doubles matches on the tour," he said. "But I love playing the big doubles matches."

Australia's non-playing captain John Fitzgerald said complacency was always going to be the home team's biggest danger against their lowly-ranked opponents.

"It's a relief today to get over this Indian team. I just can't be more thrilled," he said, highlighting Hewitt's decision to make himself available for the tie.

Murkofan
09-21-2002, 04:01 PM
Hewitt leads Australia to 3-0 victory

ADELAIDE, Australia (AP) -- Doubles pair Lleyton Hewitt and Todd Woodbridge crushed India's Leander Paes and Vishal Uppal on Saturday to give Australia an unassailable 3-0 lead in its Davis Cup World Group qualifying match at Adelaide's Memorial Drive tennis center.

World No. 1 Hewitt and doubles ace Woodbridge, playing only their second match together, were too strong for the veteran Paes and his young partner, winning 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-1 in just 94 minutes.

Paes was playing his 31st career Davis Cup doubles match, Uppal was only in his second match.

Australia took a commanding 2-0 lead in the best-of-five match on Friday when Hewitt crushed world No. 831 Harsh Mankad and big serving Wayne Arthurs beat doubles specialist Paes in four sets.

The victory Saturday -- with two singles matches still to play Sunday -- means Australia will be back in the 16-nation World Group next year, challenging again for the Davis Cup it has won 27 times.

"We looked upon this weekend as the start of what we are trying to do next year and that is win the Davis Cup," Woodbridge said.

Hewitt, an avid Australian Rules Football fan, was keen to wrap up the match quickly so he could watch his favorite team, the Adelaide Crows, play in the semifinal of the domestic cup competition. He drew loud cheers from the 3,805-strong crowd when he took to the court wearing a Crows shirt, which he took off before play started.

It was not immediately clear whether Hewitt would play singles Sunday -- he is scheduled to take part in a charity Australian Rules Football match later in the day.

Hewitt and Woodbridge had played only one doubles match together before Saturday but playing with other partners they hold 14 grand slam titles; Hewitt won the U.S. Open doubles in 2000 with Max Mirnyi of Belarus and Woodbridge has 13 titles, most of them with former partner Mark Woodforde.

Now Hewitt and Woodbridge say they want to play a few more doubles tournaments to hone the partnership for future Davis Cup matches.

Paes owns the 1999 Wimbledon and French Open doubles titles and with partner Mahesh Bhupathi reached the finals of the other two grand slams in that year. Uppal was playing in only his second Davis Cup doubles match.

Bhupathi pulled out of the Indian team last week. The team said he had a shoulder injury, but there has been intense speculation he is not injured.

Uppal's inexperience showed when Australia broke his serve in the fourth game of the first set, setting up a 6-3 set victory in just 29 minutes. Woodbridge said after the game the Australians deliberately targeted him as the weaker Indian player.

And Uppal was responsible for three errors in the tiebreaker that gave Australia the second set.

First he mis-hit a simple smash to give Australia a 5-3 lead, then he pushed a backhand volley wide to make it 6-5 before serving a double fault to give Australia the tiebreaker. He smashed his racket into the court in disgust as he walked to change ends.

India won two break points in the first game of the third set but could not convert them as Woodbridge fought back to hold serve.

"When they were under pressure they were able to pull out the goods," said Paes, who added he was "a little bit sore" from his Friday match with Arthurs.

Australia won two break points in the next game and Woodbridge converted the first with a crosscourt forehand.

That broke the Indians' resolve and Australia rushed to a 6-1 set victory and the match.

In comments after the match, Woodbridge sparked controversy by suggesting Bhupathi should have played.

"I did happen to watch the U.S. Open final and I thought he played pretty well," Woodbridge said after he and Lleyton Hewitt beat Leander Paes and Vishal Uppal to give Australia an unassailable 3-0 lead in the best-of-five Davis Cup World Group qualifier.

He added that he believes Bhupathi is scheduled to play in a tournament next week at the Salem Open in Hong Kong. "If you can play the tournament next week, you can play this weekend," he said.

"It was a bit of a surprise I think," Woodbridge said of Bhupathi's absence. "If you have some difficulties you've got to play for your country if you get an opportunity. They are great moments in your career. I think at the end of the day he may regret that he hasn't played here."

Bhupathi and Paes are a strong doubles partnership that won two Grand Slams and lost the finals of the other two in 1999. They ended their successful tournament partnership in March this year, for undisclosed reasons, although they played Davis Cup doubles together against New Zealand in April and won.

The Indian team was unwilling Saturday to be drawn into the debate over Bhupathi, but team captain Ramesh Krishnan admitted he was missed in the doubles.

Krishnan dismissed Woodbridge's comments as "speculative."

"Whether Mahesh plays or not is our business," he said. "Mahesh has done well over the years ... he has had some injury problems over the last two or three years so I wouldn't read too much into that."

Paes declined to comment on the absence of his longtime partner.

duck
09-22-2002, 10:03 PM
The Australian:


Lleyton can only improve: Fitz
By Margie McDonald, Davis Cup
September 23, 2002

AFTER Australia secured their place in the Davis Cup world group for 2003, captain John Fitzgerald issued a warning to the other 15 nations: Lleyton Hewitt can only get better.

"Frighteningly enough, I think Lleyton has a lot of improving to do in several facets of his game," Fitzgerald said yesterday, after Australia beat India 5-0 in their qualifying round tie at Adelaide's Memorial Drive courts.

"I think he'll learn to hit the ball a bit heavier. I think he'll learn to maybe serve better, even though his serve has improved out of sight already.

"I think he'll get stronger, get more miles in his legs and be more physical. I think his game can still improve which is a bit scary for some of the other guys around the world."

Hewitt's passion to play for Australia is also intimidating for anyone on the other side of the net.

The memories of falling to France in Melbourne in last year's final are still strong. Fitzgerald, Hewitt and other team members spoke over the past three days of how they considered the tie against India in 2002 as the first of five ties needed to claim their 28th Davis Cup title in 2003.

"The fact that we're not in the running to take the trophy this year hurts. So this is the beginning of our campaign for next year," Fitzgerald said.

Australia's opponents in the opening round next year will be decided in a ballot on October 3.

Just as chicken pox ruled Hewitt out in February, deep bruising to his left knee ruled Mark Philippoussis out of the India tie after he was set to make his return to Davis Cup for the first time in 2½ years.

A reinvigorated Australian side in 2003 would have the bonus of a fit Philippoussis.

"Mark intends to put his hand up and he made that clear to me and this team's delighted about that. It can only help strengthen us and move us towards the common goal and that is to win the cup for Australia," Fitzgerald said.

Philippoussis's return might mean the two reverse singles winners for Australia yesterday – Scott Draper and Wayne Arthurs – will find it harder to grab the second singles berth. But that does not worry them.

"I want to get my ranking down. I've got to prove to (coach) Wally (Masur) and Fitzy in future ties that my ranking, my form and my belief is there," Draper said.

"For me, Davis Cup is the pinnacle of tennis."

Another difference in 2003 will be to see the Australians in similar team uniforms after the sight of Hewitt in yellow and green on Friday, Arthurs in navy blue and white and Hewitt and Todd Woodbridge playing doubles in grey and white outfits.

Hewitt also wore a Nike brand tracksuit, which he had especially made with the word "Australia" embroidered on the back, as opposed to the no-name green and gold tracksuits Tennis Australia supplied to the other players.

duck
09-22-2002, 10:13 PM
Lleyton Hewitt swapped his tennis racquet for a pair of football boots yesterday and the crowd went wild.


Ace Aussie rules, but only over blokes
Jill Pengelley
23sep02
IN famous centre-court style, Lleyton Hewitt double-pumped his clenched fists, yelling at the crowd to cheer him on. Before 20,000 fans, the world's No. 1 tennis player had just snapped a goal at the scoreboard end of the Adelaide Oval.


Over four quarters of yesterday's charity Slowdown III, one of the country's most famous athletes impressed with his footy skills and his ability to keep out of the tackles.

Like a greyhound racing a basset, he left stocky Port Adelaide legends George Fiacchi and Russell Ebert in his dust.

Erin Phillips proved to be another story.

The 17-year-old daughter of Port Adelaide great Greg Phillips dragged Hewitt all over the ground.

At half-time in what had otherwise been a lazy game – lazy handpasses, lazy tackling, lazy umpiring – the sweat in the Crows' change-room told a different story.

"She's one of the best girl footballers I've ever seen," Hewitt conceded.

"She reads the play better than I do and she seemed pretty quick.

"I'm definitely not the greatest footballer out there but it's great to be playing with people I idolised as a kid."

With that, it was back up the race for the second half and two more Hewitt goals to enable him to finish top scorer for the match.

When he wasn't kicking them, he was setting them up.

A handsome stab pass from Hewitt was converted to an easy six points in front of the Bradman stand.

A Crows fan, Hewitt once aspired to play football but at 12 chose tennis.

Nervous parents Cherilyn and Glynn Hewitt watched from the stands.

"I thought he played pretty well," said Glynn, who played more than 300 Australian rules games.

The score hardly mattered but at the final siren the Crows Legends were one point up on the Port Legends.

A minute before the siren, Hewitt was whisked from the ground, security having assessed that the crowd which stormed the centre posed more threat than four quarters of footy.

Goonergal
09-22-2002, 10:24 PM
The 17-year-old daughter of Port Adelaide great Greg Phillips dragged Hewitt all over the ground.


ROTFLMAO! :o :o Thanx 4 the Article Duck! & all the articles you post her btw! :)

duck
09-22-2002, 10:29 PM
You are most welcome.

That bit about LH being dragged all over the ground is a bit embarrassing but at least he was gracious about it and didn't have a macho hissy fit.:cool:

Static
09-22-2002, 10:30 PM
LoL thnx for the article :) That's kind of funny!

Scotso
09-22-2002, 10:36 PM
lol :D I'm glad he had fun :)

Angele
09-22-2002, 10:44 PM
:o at that girl dragging Lleyton all over the ground... can't really blame her though :cough:

KaseyL
09-23-2002, 11:01 AM
Originally posted by angele87
:o at that girl dragging Lleyton all over the ground... can't really blame her though :cough:

ROFL


Thanks, Duck!

KaseyL
09-23-2002, 11:05 AM
here's an article from the Advertiser:

Sep 23, 2002

Hewitt our next grand champion

By DOUG ROBERTSON

AUSTRALIA is capable of winning the Davis Cup next year and world No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt is most likely to be the first man since Rod Laver in 1969 to win the four major tournaments, Cup captain John Fitzgerald said after Australia's 5-0 clean sweep of India yesterday.

Hewitt, 21, was certain to gain natural strength, hit heavier, serve better and pick up critical experience with every game on the circuit, Fitzgerald said.

"I think he can win all four majors. I'm not sure if anyone can do it in one year, if they do they'll be a freak," Fitzgerald said. "I think the French is going to be the last one (for Hewitt). He can win Wimbledon (grass) and the US Open (hardcourt). He can certainly win the Australian Open (hardcourt) and I think he can win the French Open (clay), too, if he can generate just a little bit more power because the French is a different story. No-one's won the Grand Slam (four majors) on these four different surfaces and that's very significant."

Fitzgerald said the modern clay surface at Roland Garros was different in composure to clay courts in the past. The game had also evolved to produce clay-court specialists with well-honed styles. Lighter tennis balls in the past allowed champions such as Laver and Don Budge, who won the Grand Slam in 1938, to play a serve-volley game on grass and clay, he said.

Hewitt's expected development was a huge bonus for Australia and it's Davis Cup future.
"When I say get miles in his legs I mean stronger and he'll get more physical. I think his game can still improve which is a bit scary for some of the younger guys around the world," Fitzgerald said. "He'll continue to marginally improve what he's got and I think that's great for this team."

The maturity shown by Wayne Arthurs and Scott Draper in winning the reverse singles even though they were dead rubbers gave Australia a gilt-edged opportunity to add to its 27 Cup titles.ROBUST Queenslander Scott Draper says he is still developing as a player and he has thrown out a challenge to all the Aussies that he is serious about remaining in Davis Cup contention.

Draper, who had his first Cup victory in quashing India's debutant Rohan Bopanna 6-3, 7-5 in less than an hour in the first of the reverse singles yesterday, said playing Davis Cup was the pinnacle of tennis for him.

He flagged his interest in being considered for singles or as another doubles option for the Aussies, who launched the Lleyton Hewitt-Todd Woodbridge combination in Adelaide.
Draper said he would be always available to Australia and he thought others should do the same. Mark Philippoussis's exit left a last-minute opening for Draper.

"We all have different beliefs. I have my own. I believe you should play all year round, make yourself available," Draper said. "But not everyone thinks that way and I know Fitzy (captain, John Fitzgerald) is a guy who wants to put his best team on the field each tie and I'm not in a position as a player to make any demands. I love playing Davis Cup – that's important to me. I'll always make myself available but Fitzy's the captain and he can make the decisions."

Draper, 28, said he had no expectations of playing the lead singles role in Adelaide but he was out to press his claims for future Davis Cup engagements. He said he could add versatility to the Aussie doubles line up to compliment either Philippoussis or Pat Rafter if the former world No. 1 returned to world tennis.

"We've got sort of singles players and we've got Todd and trying to mix and match is going to be very difficult," Draper said. "I'm sure it's going to be Todd and Lleyton or Wayne (Arthurs) and Todd. If Flip (Philippoussis) plays, well, that's another (option). It's a tough decision really."

Ranked a modest 147 in singles and 602 in doulbes, Draper was heading for the challenger circuit in the US to wittle away at his ranking.

shakya
09-23-2002, 06:38 PM
dragged all over the ground ?? can someone explain that in dutch
plzzz


tnx

Knockers LaBroad
09-23-2002, 06:43 PM
Over de grond sleuren, ofzo iets denk ik (helemaal niet);)

shakya
09-23-2002, 06:57 PM
ist lik azo van da ze mee aar armen over zijne nek vloog en dat ti door zijn knieen of zo zakte?? kwee ni é tzoe mss kunne


want kzie ze ni direct em over de grond sleuren lik ne dweil

KaseyL
09-24-2002, 11:01 AM
LOL Shakya, your text!

Shakya: ik denk dat het hier eerder figuurlijk te begrijpen is, hoor. Ze hebben hem naar 't schijnt een beetje ontzien, heb ik gelezen. :o Dus hij zal wel niet over het gans speelplein gesleurd zijn, zeker. :D
Denk eerder dat dat meisje hem goed heeft laten rondlopen.

KaseyL
09-24-2002, 11:03 AM
New article from Reuters today:

Tennis-Football fan Hewitt prepares for grand final day

By Greg Buckle, Sep 24, 2002

MELBOURNE (Reuters) - Lleyton Hewitt may be the number one tennis player in the world but when he was a boy he wanted to be an Australian Rules footballer.

The Wimbledon champion proudly wore his Adelaide Crows Football Club jumper during his on-court warm-up as Australia beat India 5-0 in their Davis Cup world group relegation tie in Adelaide last week.

Unfortunately for Hewitt, the Collingwood Magpies defeated the Crows in their Australian Football League (AFL) preliminary final on Saturday.

But the 21-year-old from Adelaide is still looking forward to attending Saturday's grand final between the Magpies and Brisbane, a match that will be watched by a crowd of 90,000 at Melbourne Cricket Ground.

"Growing up, I played as much football as I could and now travelling around the world I am always trying to keep up with what's happening in the AFL and the Adelaide Crows," Hewitt wrote in the "AFL Record" official programme this week.

"I can't wait to be at the grand final again. Last year was the first one I had been to and it was just fantastic."

Hewitt said he started playing the 18-a-side game when he was six and had success at high school level.

GOING AWAY

"Football was my number one sport until I was about 13 or 14 and then tennis took over," he said.

"I was going away overseas with junior (tennis) teams."

Hewitt's father Glynn played for Melbourne AFL club Richmond in the 1970s.

The world number one was given permission to miss Sunday's reverse singles against India, which were dead rubbers, by Davis Cup captain John Fitzgerald so that he could play in a Crows charity football match in Adelaide.

Hewitt kicked three goals in the match, celebrating with a typical double-fisted arm pump, and showed enough dash to avoid any possibility of a heavy tackle interrupting his tennis career.

"I'm definitely not the greatest footballer out there but it's great to be playing with people I idolised as a kid," Hewitt was quoted as saying in the Adelaide newspaper The Advertiser.

Hewitt's passion for Australian Rules football matches that of 1987 Wimbledon champion Pat Cash.

Australian Cash, whose father Patrick Cash Snr played for Hawthorn in the 1950s, often visited the players in the locker room on grand final day during the club's golden run of five premierships between 1983 and 1991.

shakya
09-24-2002, 06:56 PM
Originally posted by KaseyL
LOL Shakya, your text!

Shakya: ik denk dat het hier eerder figuurlijk te begrijpen is, hoor. Ze hebben hem naar 't schijnt een beetje ontzien, heb ik gelezen. :o Dus hij zal wel niet over het gans speelplein gesleurd zijn, zeker. :D
Denk eerder dat dat meisje hem goed heeft laten rondlopen.


lol why lol??

ja ma tzoe kunne é
da kan to da da maiske in zijne nek is gevlogen kzouder ton wel gèren foto's van zien

;) :D

duck
09-26-2002, 08:57 AM
Herald Sun
Edition 1 - FIRSTSAT 21 SEP 2002, Page 021
PRIZE FIGHTER
By SHAUN PHILLIPS


A multi-million-dollar pay packet is every 21-year-old's dream. But becoming the world's No. 1 tennis player requires an extraordinary determination, as Lleyton Hewitt explains to SHAUN PHILLIPS.

LLEYTON Hewitt stepped on to centre court at Adelaide's Memorial Drive yesterday an Australian sporting hero.
This weekend he leads his country's assault in the Davis Cup, a competition as prestigious and traditional as any on our calendar.
This week he signed a new racquet deal that will lift his annual earnings to more than $20 million.
He's just 21.
A few former classmates from Immanuel College, a Lutheran school in Adelaide's south, were in the stands for yesterday's tie.
Some would have been sitting in university lecture halls, or toiling at $25,000-a-year entry-level jobs.
Others may have been idling in Rundle Mall, waiting for life to take off.
At an age where most people are just starting out, Hewitt has reached the top.
Rewind three days to a grey, wet morning in the South Australian capital.
A green-and-gold tracksuited Hewitt is up early for work, just like the many young office workers who hurry past the swish Hyatt Regency.
Inside, Hewitt is thanking the president of Yonex for his generous new contract. It's worth about
$4 million a year.
Lleyton Hewitt sits back and tells you that the money is nice, but it's not motivation. It's all about fighting. And winning.
``You throw five bucks out there in a tiebreak and I want to win it,'' he said. ``That's me. It's not how much money I'm playing for.
``I'm playing because I love the game. I love competing.''
Rewind further to 1987, the year of Pat Cash's Wimbledon triumph, and Lleyton Hewitt has arrived for his first tennis lesson. He is six, and the coach asks why he is there.
``I said, `I want to be No. 1 in the world and I want to win a (grand) slam','' Hewitt recalled this week.
``That's how I was back then, and then the closer I got to reaching that goal, the more hungry I got.''
You can add single-minded, tenacious, driven, obsessed. They are characteristics that, combined with natural ability, have made the little blond dynamo from Adelaide the best tennis player in the world.
Last November, then just 20, he became the youngest season-ending No. 1.
Two months before that he won his first grand slam event, the US Open. In July, he added to that with the Wimbledon crown.
There may be some 21-year-olds in Australia who are worth more thanks to family wealth, but surely none who have earned more.
Hewitt's visit to Adelaide for the Davis Cup tie against India allowed him to drop by the exclusive suburb of Tennyson, where he has paid about $1.8 million for three adjoining waterfront blocks.
He may build there one day, but at the moment sees no reason to leave the family nest, complete with tennis court, in suburban West Lakes.
Paying $1.8 million to secure land for your first home seems a bit extravagant, but not when Hewitt's estimated annual earnings are taken into account.
Nike hitched its wagon to the Aussie wunderkind early, and tips in about $10 million annually.
The renewed racquet deal with Yonex confirmed this week is put at $4 million a year.
He has already earned close to $4 million in prizemoney this year and November's Masters Cup is still to come. He won the 2001 Masters in Sydney, collecting a handy $3 million.
Lleyton Hewitt, extrovert on court but fiercely private off it, has grown up before our eyes.
AT 15, he became the youngest player ever to qualify for the Australian Open. At 16, he defeated Andre Agassi en route to his breakthrough title, the Australian Hardcourt Championship, in front of an adoring Adelaide crowd.
For five years we've followed his fist-pumping progress from prodigy to paragon.
It's an extraordinarily public life for someone who says he is, by nature, a retiring person.
``I'm a totally different person off the court to what you see on the court,'' he said.
What we see on court is a latter-day McEnroe, a Connors for the 21st century.
It is Hewitt who draws the comparison with the former bad boys. He says the fact that he shows emotion and wears his heart on his sleeve is a plus for the game.
``Back in the time when McEnroe was getting defaulted, everyone was saying how bad it was for the game, and Connors getting fired up; now they're out of it people realise how good McEnroe, Connors and these guys were for tennis.
``Marat Safin is a great player, but he's got personality. Sure he cracks a few racquets here and there, and he throws in the odd average match, but he's a hell of a tennis player, and people want to pay to go and watch him play.
``I think it's a little bit the same with me. I think people enjoy coming to watch me play.
``They feel they can get involved; they can interact with me on the court and I think that's a really good thing for tennis.''
Hewitt lost many people, especially early in his career, because of his on-court demeanour.
The biggest outbursts are well documented. They include labelling an umpire a ``spastic'' at the French Open last year and allegations, denied by Hewitt, that he implied a black US Open linesman was favouring a black opponent.
The Hewitt camp blames sections of the media for perpetuating the brat tag.
HEWITT says the support for him in the community is overwhelming.
``The public's been incredible,'' he said.
``I don't think anyone would have any idea how many letters that I get week in and week out -- buckets full -- and from all ages.
``You'd be surprised how many of the elderly who write and say, `Stick to it . . . just go out there and be yourself'.
``To me, that hits home the most. That's what I enjoy hearing.''
Hewitt rejects any suggestion he has set out to deliberately tone down his behaviour in response to public criticism.
``I think everyone makes little mistakes and you learn from it along the way, especially as a teenager thrown in the spotlight,'' he said.
``You learn from that, you bounce back and you become a better person on and off the court because of it.
``I don't think I've really consciously changed who I am just because I'm in the spotlight more and I want to come across as a better person.''
When Hewitt attended a media conference on Wednesday to announce the Yonex deal, his two biggest supporters -- parents Glynn and Cherilyn -- were on hand. They continue to be a welcome force in their son's life, with Glynn taking responsibility for Lleyton's investments.
These days, the Hewitt support network is expansive.
Coach Jason Stoltenberg and childhood mate Hayden Eckermann are with him for the 20-plus tournaments and Davis Cup engagements on the Hewitt schedule.
His parents join him for a number of ``swings'' on the tour, particularly around grand slam time, but are not full-time companions.
Continued Page 22
Executives from the Octagon group, Hewitt's management company, will also usually be on hand.
Melbourne chiropractor Andrea Bisaz is summoned for the big dates.
Belgian girlfriend Kim Clijsters and sister Jaslyn, who continues to pursue a tennis career, are other regular faces in the players' box for the grand slams.
Eckermann has travelled with Hewitt for the past 18 months. He will reduce that schedule next year, with other mates taking his place.
Hewitt loves Davis Cup partly because of the team atmosphere and comradeship. It's something he misses from his junior football days.
He says having friends and family on tour is important when engaged in such an individual pursuit.
Close friends are rarely made on the circuit.
``The countries really stay together,'' he said. ``I go out to dinner with all the Australian guys, I play golf (handicap of eight) with the Australian guys. We watch movies and stuff.
``It's a very individual sport. There's some nice guys on tour. Tim Henman is one of the nicest guys around. I play some doubles with him now and then, and we get on really well.
``There's a lot of young guys at the court -- (Juan Carlos) Ferrero, Roger Federer. They're good mates on the tour, but you don't go to dinner with them. It's a different atmosphere on the circuit.''
Most men Hewitt's age, and of his disposition, would be horrified to think large sections of the population were monitoring his romantic interests, but that's how it is.
It's a very public life but, at the same time, insular.
Simple things like going shopping during his few weeks at home each year become a potential ordeal to be avoided.
Much of his break is spent resting at home.
``It's hard to really go anywhere,'' he said.
``There's a lot of times when you think twice about where you're going to go.
``Not so much movies or dinner, but shopping and stuff like that down Rundle Mall. Little things like that that when I was a young teenager I'd do every second day.
``It's not that I don't enjoy being out there, it's just the fact that I sort of put up with it for 11 months of the year, and when I'm home just those few weeks I like just chilling out and sort of forgetting I'm Lleyton Hewitt the tennis player.''
Hewitt says he's not complaining, it's just the way it is. And he acknowledges the rewards for his sacrifices are rich.
``Obviously there's little things you miss out on -- socials and stuff like that.
``I've sacrificed a lot more than a normal teenager, but then again I've had a lot more to gain than a normal teenager.
``I knew at a young age that I had the chance to become a top tennis player. Mate, that was my dream.''
He says he doesn't resent the obvious restrictions on his high-profile relationship with fellow tennis star Clijsters.
Hewitt and Clijsters are often apart as they follow their respective tours. They meet regularly in Belgium between tournaments.
``I don't really think, `If we both weren't tennis players, what would we be doing?' '' he said.
``We wouldn't have met (if not for tennis). It doesn't really worry me.
``Obviously if we stay together, we'll both retire and there'll be plenty of time for relaxing and socialising then.''
For now, there are more fights to be won, including one with the governing body of men's tennis, the ATP, over a fine of almost $200,000 for failing to do an interview. Hewitt says he has done nothing wrong.
There are more Davis Cups to be won and more grand slam trophies to hold aloft.
Those goals will be the focus next year, not so much protecting his No. 1 ranking.
Hewitt says he will continue to give as much to the public as he can, but that will not be as much as some will want.
``I want to try and be in control of what I do,'' he said.
``I don't want to lose focus on why I got to No. 1 in the world, why I won Wimbledon, why I won the US Open, the Masters . . .
``I want to stay there. I know how hard I had to work to get there, and I'll work as hard as that, if not harder, to stay there.''

Caption: Above left: Lleyton Hewitt, pictured as a baby, was only six years old when he told his coach he wanted to be the No.1 tennis player in the world. Left: parents Glynn and Cherilyn Hewitt support Lleyton on the gruelling professional circuit.Right: Hewitt fulfills his childhood dream, lifting the Wimbledon trophy above his head after defeating Argentina's David Nalbandian.
Above: Lleyton Hewitt kisses girlfriend, Belgian tennis star Kim Clijsters, after his Wimbledon win this year.Left: Hewitt marches to victory in the first rubber of Australia's Davis Cup clash with India yesterday.
Illus: Photo
IllusBy: RAY TITUS
Section: SATURDAY

KaseyL
09-26-2002, 10:41 AM
thanks for the article! :kiss:

KaseyL
09-26-2002, 09:01 PM
Hewitt's appeal held up
September 27, 2002

THE withdrawal of John Fitzgerald and Patrick McEnroe from the panel to hear Lleyton Hewitt's appeal against a heavy fine for not doing a television interview is believed to be delaying a resolution of the issue.

Nearly two months have passed since Hewitt was fined almost $200,000 for not doing the interview before the Cincinnati Masters tournament on August 5-11.

His case will go to the ATP appeals committee once replacements can be found for Fitzgerald and McEnroe, who pulled out because of conflicts of interest.

Fitzgerald cited his role as Hewitt's Australian Davis Cup captain while McEnroe withdrew because he works for ESPN, the network with which Hewitt was supposed to do the interview.

The ATP has been unable to confirm replacements to join Frenchman Guy Forget on the committee.

"Some players have been approached but no players have been confirmed as yet," an ATP spokesman said.

Hewitt's manager Rob Aivatoglou's only comment on the appeal delay was that it was up to the ATP to set the date.

In late August, ATP chief executive Mark Miles said he hoped the appeal would be heard soon after the US Open, which ended on September 8.

Hewitt has been enjoying a week of relaxation after Australia's 5-0 win over India in last weekend's Davis Cup qualifying tie.

"He's downed tools and he's just enjoying it," Aivatoglou said.

Hewitt's next assignment is the Japan Open, starting in Tokyo on Monday, when the world No.1 and top seed will also be the defending champion.

He then moves on to Madrid (October 14) and Paris (October 28) before the Tennis Masters Cup end-of-season tournament in Shanghai, worth $US3.7million.

Despite six weeks still to run on the men's tour, Andre Agassi yesterday joined Hewitt as the only two who are guaranteed to play in the Masters.

In the tightest battle to date, just 55 points separate the third and ninth-placed players and just 91 points separate third and 12th.

duck
09-26-2002, 09:44 PM
I've had this for ages and didn't think it was that interesting but you might like it if you're into the little details.

The Advertiser
Edition 1 - STATESAT 13 JUL 2002, Page W08
LLEYTON HEWITT
With a little help from my friends
By STORY / LEO SCHLINK


Lleyton Hewitt's dream of winning Wimbledon began as a child in Adelaide.
But it took a unique collaboration of talent and tactics to ensure victory.
UP by 8.30am, in bed by 10.30pm, no alcohol, junk food or smoking - expect the occasional cigar. It's a routine most teenagers would rebel at, let alone a 21-year-old with a full-time job.
Lleyton Hewitt's job, however, is not your average nine-to-five slog. And the small sacrifices he makes each day have proved, by anyone's estimates, to be well worth it.
But sacrifice alone is not enough to make a Wimbledon champion. Hewitt's remarkable triumph was an amalgam of talent, tactics, strategy and even the unconventional.
Take physical trainer Mark ``Muddy'' Waters. Watching impassively from the terraced pews of the All-England Club as Hewitt conjured the most pivotal of Wimbledon victories, Waters' reputation was firmly on the line.
Tim Henman had just stormed into a semi-final clash with a now fatigued Hewitt, triggering a tidal wave of British expectation. Henman appeared physically fresher, while Hewitt looked out on his feet after a traumatic, draining quarter-final slog against Sjeng Schalken.
But Waters, a sports science consultant with decades of experience with elite athletes, knew exactly what to do, and calmly launched Operation Recovery.
By the time Hewitt had returned to the main locker-room under centre court, Waters, coach Jason Stoltenberg and chiropractor Andrea Bisaz had put in place the plan which effectively secured the Wimbledon championship. Apart from the customary warm-down in a quiet corner of the gymnasium, Waters ordered Hewitt to have an alternating warm and cold shower - ignoring the chilly swirl of rain outside - since time was of the essence.
``Lleyton had to play Henman the next day and the warm and cold showers or baths are designed to help recovery by shifting the body's waste products,'' Waters says.
``The cold water flushes the waste products into the centre of the body and the warm water flushes it out. It takes about five minutes, but it's something I've found that's worked in the past with Pat Rafter.''
It worked again. Hewitt destroyed Henman in straight sets before lashing David Nalbandian in the most lopsided final since John McEnroe obliterated Jimmy Connors in 1984.
It was only after a long - as opposed to heavy - night of celebrations that Hewitt admitted to understandable exhaustion. He had been perfectly honed to push for victory achieved for the loss of only two sets in seven matches over two weeks. The timing was executed with instructional precision.
As Hewitt was deservedly feted for the courage, extraordinary skill, desire and ruthlessness he plies, his support staff were equally elated.
The routine they had developed for Hewitt was the key to his success.
His father Glynn describes Hewitt's daily program as ``pretty uncomplicated''.
``On match days, Andrea will come over and give a rub, he'll go to the courts early, do some stretching, have a hit and get ready to go out and play,'' Glynn says. ``Once he's played, he'll do his stretches, have something to eat, do the media stuff and come home.'' That is precisely what Hewitt did on Sunday - albeit with a few more distractions - as he reflected on a month in London where his daily regimen was strictly observed.
Rarely to bed any later than 10.30pm, Hewitt generally rose by 8.30am to breakfast with Glynn, mother Cherilyn, girlfriend Kim Clijsters and best friend Hayden Eckermann at their rented house not more than a five-minute walk from the courts.
Then, depending on whether he was playing that day or not, Hewitt would either hit for 45 minutes (off-day) or 20-25 minutes on match days. Completing his duties at Wimbledon, Hewitt would return to his secluded base and make probably the toughest decision of the day - whether to eat at home, at the nearby mansion hired by his management company Octagon or venture into the bubbling Wimbledon village.
Relaxation took the form of just one video - the 2001 Wimbledon highlights tape given to all competing players - ploughing through the Internet in search of news on his beloved Adelaide Crows and, when his competitive instinct resurfaced, games of table tennis with Clijsters after sharing meals prepared by a chef at Octagon House. ``He likes Chinese, chicken, Indian or Italian,'' Glynn says of his son's culinary persuasion. ``Some nights he'd have pasta, whatever he felt like.''
Eckermann, Hewitt's best mate for nine years, says: ``He's very quiet and enjoys his Adelaide Crows and catches up with all the AFL news on the Internet. He's a Crows fan, I'm Port Power and at the moment I'm winning the war.''
As Stoltenberg, himself a Wimbledon semi-finalist, sagely says: ``Lleyton was in a pretty good routine.
``On court he is feisty and intense, but off court he's quiet, relaxed and low key and really keeps to himself.
``My main job is to keep him fresh. That's the most important thing. I keep on using the word fresh, but it really is the key.''
Queensland-born Waters, a former AFL rover, and Swiss-reared Bisaz, who uses kinesiology and acupuncture, were integral to Hewitt's routine.
Working in concert with Stoltenberg they took the art of Grand Slam victory planning to a new plane.
``We've probably hassled Lleyton a bit,'' Waters says. ``But once you've explained something to him and he understands the value, he accepts what has to happen.''
Waters first teamed up with Hewitt and Clijsters in Hamburg 11 weeks ago. It was there on clay in northern Germany that the party planted the acorn which grew into a Wimbledon oak.
``The main thing to understand is that you're dealing with the world No. 1 player and you've got to be careful with what you do,'' Waters says.
``There's only so much you can do because once he's in a match situation that big heart takes over. But we needed to vary his training and do interval training, so I brought the football out and threw it around. He'd chase that like a sheep dog all day.''
Following every match at Wimbledon, Waters would take over. The pair would start with a brief warm down. The process would take only a few minutes and involved light walking, jogging or cycling.
Hewitt would then shower before one of his group - sometimes Eckermann - would make the short walk to the competitors' restaurant to buy an egg, lettuce and mayonnaise roll or sandwich.
``I think Lleyton had that just about every day,'' Waters says. ``It was good for a couple of reasons. It tasted good for him and it contained the necessary protein and carbohydrates we had to get into his body.
``It was three times more value for him to eat then rather than later on in terms of getting the fuel back into his system.''
After eating, Hewitt would then stretch on the gym mats for 20-30 minutes before doing interviews for up to 45 minutes. On his return to the locker-room, Waters would weigh the slight baseliner - he clocks in at 68kg - and decide whether ``his fluids needed a top-up or not''.
``His routine is very good,'' Waters says, returning to a familiar theme.
``He has a routine for everything - between points before he gets ready to play again, whether he's serving or returning, on the change of ends. In fact, he's so good at it, he could probably call `time' for the umpire.''
On the morning of the final, the support staff took over. Hewitt had his usual breakfast of cereal and toast - Waters is keen for him to have cooked oats, fruit and yoghurt - before arriving at the courts for a 20-minute hit with Stoltenberg.
He then had about 90 minutes to wait before being summoned to centre court for the final. Before the match, there were the usual conversations. John Newcombe, a former world No. 1 and multiple Grand Slam finalist, counselled Hewitt on what to expect.
And, apart from two rain delays and the intervention of a streaker, it panned out superbly.
So much so that amiable Stoltenberg felt almost superfluous.
``People come up and kind of say: `Well done, mate', and I think: `What for?','' he says. ``It's a group thing and we're there to take the pressure off him, but at the end of the day it's him out there against Sjeng Schalken and being twice down a break of serve in the fifth set.
``He's good to coach because he is that good. It doesn't matter what position the match is in - he keeps fighting.
``I just sit there and watch and he does it all.
``You just point him in the right direction and he does all the work and makes me look good.
``It's him out there in the final in front of all those people. All we can do is prepare and support him. He's been terrific. As soon as he stepped on the grass, he didn't look like losing.''
Stoltenberg spoke with Hewitt during the two rain intervals and, during the second break, noticed an ominous mood swing. The aggression was now surging through Hewitt's vein after a subtle mid-match change.
``You could sense the match had changed a bit,'' Stoltenberg says. ``The conditions were heavier and Nalbandian was starting to hit his match peak, but the second rain delay gave Lleyton the chance to come out and be aggressive.
``He was definitely ready to go.''
Within an hour, the Wimbledon trophy was back in Australian hands for the first time since 1987. The tournament of shocks had ended with the best player in the world imperiously dismissing an outclassed challenger.
The Schalken match was now a distant memory and, late into the night, a band of ecstatic Australians toasted a triumph sealed by seamless team work, immaculate planning - and the technical excellence of a terrier baseliner.
After the remarkable result a euphoric Hewitt gushed: ``I don't care if I never win another tournament.''
A week later he and his team are probably back to their routine - already plotting victory at next month's US Open.

Jackie
09-28-2002, 03:32 PM
So many articles...go to these links
http://www.theadvertiser.news.com.au/sport/0,5971,sport%255E%255ETEXT,00.html
http://foxsports.com.au/common/story_page/0,5000,5141621%255E9754%255E%255Enbv,00.html