Greatest moments of sportsmanship [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Greatest moments of sportsmanship

TheMightyFed
04-20-2005, 10:18 AM
Here we can discuss about the moments where players demonstrated true great sportsmanship, like Nadal shaking hands of every French player after his victory in DC semifinal 2004... ;)
This gesture from Fed was not bad either after a tough battle:

Action Jackson
04-20-2005, 10:21 AM
Bored again I see? Starting all the threads, but this one is a good one.

There was an instance when Pat Rafter gave away a point which would have gave him the break of serve in a close match against Andrei Cherkasov. The linsepeople got it wrong and Cherkasov won the match.

Jeff Tarango at Wimbledon.

Auscon
04-20-2005, 11:05 AM
Here we can discuss about the moments where players demonstrated true great sportsmanship, like Nadal shaking hands of every French player after his victory in DC semifinal 2004... ;)

Dont all DC round victors do that?....or they should at least

Doesnt seem like a case of great sportsmanship, it's just the right thing to do

Auscon
04-20-2005, 11:54 AM
Bored again I see? Starting all the threads, but this one is a good one.

There was an instance when Pat Rafter gave away a point which would have gave him the break of serve in a close match against Andrei Cherkasov. The linsepeople got it wrong and Cherkasov won the match.



Jimmy Connors did that when playing Newcombe in the AO final...wasnt for a bp though

Newk mentions it in his book...he couldnt believe it

I couldnt imagine Connors having done that many times in his career

fabolous
04-20-2005, 12:10 PM
Indian Wells 1996

Jordi Burillo vs Goran Ivanisevic

Burillo is down 4-6 5-6 but has a breakpoint. The umpire says the 2nd serve of Goran is out which would mean tiebreak. But Burillo says "no it was good", he gives Goran the point. 30 seconds later he lost the match 4-6 5-7. And i ask you would have Coria acted the same way;)

Auscon
04-20-2005, 12:13 PM
Indian Wells 1996

And i ask you would have Coria acted the same way;)

try 99% of players on tour

fabolous
04-20-2005, 12:15 PM
try 99% of players on tour
i know, was just a joke.

Action Jackson
04-20-2005, 12:15 PM
Magnus Norman when he played Grosjean at the Aus Open, there was an ace, but it was called a let.

Norman just shook his head walked up to the net and shook Grosjean's hand as it clearly hadn't touched the net.

Angle Queen
04-20-2005, 12:20 PM
'95 AO QF Sampras v. Courier. Emotional and classy...from both gentlemen. I think Courier would have agreed to stop and play another day (and in retrospect, might have had a different outcome).

And over the years, I've seen players give or try to give points back but I'd be hard pressed to give specific examples. And at least once, when the umpire was being hard-headed, I saw the returner purposefully slap the serve into the net to even things out again. Wish I could remember who that was. Wanna say Borg but that was a long, long time ago.

fabolous
04-20-2005, 12:21 PM
Magnus Norman when he played Grosjean at the Aus Open, there was an ace, but it was called a let.

Norman just shook his head walked up to the net and shook Grosjean's hand as it clearly hadn't touched the net.
yes i remember that very well. great magnus!! :worship:

TheMightyFed
04-20-2005, 12:22 PM
Dont all DC round victors do that?....or they should at least

Doesnt seem like a case of great sportsmanship, it's just the right thing to do
Count how many do that before even congratulating their own team...
In terms sportsmanship, Noah did a great stuff in Malmö in 96 when he took Edberg on his shoulders while France had just defeated Sweden... Noah is a great person and we miss that kind of guy on tour...

Auscon
04-20-2005, 12:27 PM
That was really a communion with the public, with a lot of humour, Noah's song being a funny party-one, that was nice from his behalf to celebrate this way, on a very light mode as it was a very important moment in French tennis history. In terms of pure sportsmanship, Noah did a great stuff in Malmö in 96 when he took Edberg on his shoulders while France had just defeated Sweden... Noah is a great person and we miss that kind of guy on tour...

?? where did Noah come from?....I quoted what you said about Nadal

TheMightyFed
04-20-2005, 12:28 PM
?? where did Noah come from?....I quoted what you said about Nadal
sorry I edited it just when you wrote this post, I mixed the two threads, :o ...

TheMightyFed
04-20-2005, 12:33 PM
Bored again I see? Starting all the threads, but this one is a good one.

Not bored, but I was wondering reading the posts about several excuses and gamesmanship moments of Coria, "let's talk about positive stuff for a while"
What about this match point replayed by Wilander in Roland Garros ? Was it in semi or final ? A great stuff when you see what a Slam means to these guys...

Action Jackson
04-20-2005, 12:35 PM
In 1982, Mats Wilander when he played Clerc in his first Roland Garros in the semi-finals when Clerc had a shot that was ruled out, which gave Wilander the match.

He went up to the umpire and conceded the point, and then he eventually won the title.

Auscon
04-20-2005, 12:35 PM
i know, was just a joke.

lol, didnt notice your sig when I replied :)

fabolous
04-20-2005, 12:36 PM
another example: benedicte tarango slapping bruno rebeuh's face.

Action Jackson
04-20-2005, 12:37 PM
another example: benedicte tarango slapping bruno rebeuh's face.

Jeff is great and the wife that was a brilliant moment.

fabolous
04-20-2005, 12:43 PM
being serious again:

rainer schüttler vs wayne ferreira at RG two or three years ago.
ferreira injured himself when he fell down and rainer took care of him, he ran over the net, asked the umpire for ice and medical support and walked off the court together with poor wayne. it was great to see that rainer really was worried about ferreira's health:yeah:

http://www.sportunterricht.de/fairplay/french2.jpg

Socket
04-20-2005, 01:35 PM
Jimmy Connors did that when playing Newcombe in the AO final...wasnt for a bp though

Newk mentions it in his book...he couldnt believe it

I couldnt imagine Connors having done that many times in his career
He must have been ill! :eek:

mishar
04-20-2005, 01:47 PM
Guga going across the net to Pioline at the USopen and helping him up from a fall after a spectacular point -- the apotheosis of sport: competition so intense it creates a bond.

Armada~121
04-20-2005, 04:34 PM
This has been post in Marat's forum but it's a good article that I think it's worth reading.

(the picture the author is referring to)

A Picture of Grace by Rohit Brijnath
TODAY newspaper, 3 Feb 2004
[shorter version of article]

Amidst the rapidly blurring memories of a riveting Australian Open, this one moment stands sharp. It haunts me like lines from an old love letter. Yesterday I had to print a copy of a photograph of it to look again. As I type, it sits beside me.

There is seemingly nothing to the picture, yet it holds me in its thrall. It tells of an act of utter simplicity yet one that is clearly uncommon. It is a moment, frozen on film, that tells us more about a man than an entire match.

There is something about Marat Safin, you know, that makes things personal. On Sunday night, he breaks a nation’s heart and then they clasp him to it. Of how many men can we say that?

The photograph is of a moment after the Safin-Federer semi-final, a match replete with stroke-making of startling effrontery and despairing struggles for momentum. The Russian has a way of turning matches into operas, and the Swiss for a while has been in fine song.

When victory is sealed, Safin does not leap for the moon, or gesticulate wildly, or snarl like a scalp-taker in Federer’s direction. In times of exaggerated reactions to victory, like an American football player who mimicked mooning the audience, this is tasteful. More pointedly, from an instinctively theatrical man, given to communicating emotion, this is interesting.

Safin has, by winning the Open, wiped off cobwebs of self-doubt that have accumulated in his mind. It is five years, more or less, since his last Grand Slam title and they have been hard years of insecurity, of an injured back, hurt wrist and wounded psyche.

Yet he remains all respectful restraint. His behaviour after the semi-final suggests he has not conquered Federer but merely beaten him this one time; similarly, in the Final, he has shattered Hewitt and his nation’s dream, and as the pieces lie at his feet, he feels no need to step on them.

On court, he dares to express himself, his agony, his frustration when others do not let a single emotion register. He hurls his racket but it is done without malice; he berates himself yet rarely linesmen like Hewitt does. Always there is a humanness to Safin, and mostly it is fetching.

But it’s also why so many thought he wouldn’t win the Final, because his mind and talent appeared beyond harnessing, because he had forgotten how to win Slams, because this was Australia with 15,000 Australians in the audience cheering on Hewitt. But he did win, and he still did not gloat.

But of all these glimpses into Safin, the photograph tells the most. The match with Federer is over, and the Swiss, for all his heartbreak, embraces Safin at the net, they exchange words and go to their separate seats.

What happens next, usually, is that the loser will exit swiftly for sorrow is best not left on show while the winner will linger and soak in triumph he has bravely constructed. Except this ritual of ages has an abrupt interruption, for the briefest of moments, so brief that people may not really sense its significance, custom is abandoned.

Federer, head bowed, racket bags on both shoulders, is walking out, and as he passes Safin, it is expected they will politely ignore each other, the victor allowing the defeated his ego, the defeated not wishing to look his champion in the face.

But incredibly, by instinct not premeditation, Safin puts out his hand and rests it on Federer’s shoulders.

*click*

It is nothing but everything. I am staggered for I have not seen this before, astonished because grace has become an aberration; this gesture does not fit the modern urge for one-upmanship, it does not sit with the silly vanity of the times.

We cannot say exactly what message Safin’s act is sending. Perhaps it is one simply of solidarity, that he knows, too, how losing hurts; perhaps it is merely an acknowledgement of the sustained battle they have just fought and that so little separated them.

Perhaps it is an act of humility, as if he knew one defeat does not truly end a reign; perhaps it is recognition of each other as human beings, an understanding that while they may play our their hearts in public arenas they know there is life beyond this court.

It is beautiful, it is a gesture of spontaneous decency in a time when we find ways to excuse Hewitt’s petulance, it is a natural moment in a sporting world of artificiality, it is an instinctive sign of respect in an era of stage-managed show biz.

Federer does not shrug him off, or freeze, but puts out his left hand to touch Safin. And for this fleeting of instants, it is a better sporting world.

TheMightyFed
04-20-2005, 05:15 PM
This has been post in Marat's forum but it's a good article that I think it's worth reading.
that was a great moment, although I think the article is a bit exagerated compared to other fairplay gestures.
Fed always smiles when he loses, I like that ;)

Chloe le Bopper
04-20-2005, 08:21 PM
Well, I didn't see it, but Nadal conceded one of his match points to Calleri in one of the SA tournaments this year. It was in the second set and Calleri was serving. Nadal corrected the call that the linesperson made, even though Calleri was already walking to the net to shake hands. Calleri then won the set, but Nadal did win eventually.

I'm not sure I would call this a "great moment", since I neither saw it nor was it at a big tournament... but it goes to show you that sometimes you can be too nice ;) (although he had no regrets after the match)

TheMightyFed
04-20-2005, 08:40 PM
Well, I didn't see it, but Nadal conceded one of his match points to Calleri in one of the SA tournaments this year. It was in the second set and Calleri was serving. Nadal corrected the call that the linesperson made, even though Calleri was already walking to the net to shake hands. Calleri then won the set, but Nadal did win eventually.

I'm not sure I would call this a "great moment", since I neither saw it nor was it at a big tournament... but it goes to show you that sometimes you can be too nice ;) (although he had no regrets after the match)
I've heard about it as well, Nadal really is a good guy, in addition he was badly cheated in Miami final, and just repeated "unbelievable" after the bad call of the chair umpire :worship:

Chloe le Bopper
04-20-2005, 08:47 PM
I've heard about it as well, Nadal really is a good guy, in addition he was badly cheated in Miami final, and just repeated "unbelievable" after the bad call of the chair umpire :worship:
I like to think that Moya has been a good influence ;)

Action Jackson
04-21-2005, 02:03 AM
I'm not sure I would call this a "great moment", since I neither saw it nor was it at a big tournament... but it goes to show you that sometimes you can be too nice ;) (although he had no regrets after the match)

It doesn't matter it was a good moment irrespective of whether it's a big tournment or not.

Mimi
04-21-2005, 02:42 AM
sorry, i am not against nadal or roger's sportstmanship, but the matches you referred, they won, its easy to be gracious after you won, but if you still show sportsporthsip when you lost, then it can really be called sportsmanhip :angel:
Here we can discuss about the moments where players demonstrated true great sportsmanship, like Nadal shaking hands of every French player after his victory in DC semifinal 2004... ;)
This gesture from Fed was not bad either after a tough battle:

Hendu
04-21-2005, 03:28 AM
I like to think that Moya has been a good influence ;)

:rolleyes:

Moya never called anyone "sudaca gil", like Nadal did to Gaudio in Monte Carlo :o

I guess Moya should be more influential...

:wavey:

Caitlin
04-21-2005, 03:55 AM
:rolleyes:

Moya never called anyone "sudaca gil", like Nadal did to Gaudio in Monte Carlo :o

I guess Moya should be more influential...

:wavey:

what does that mean?

Hendu
04-21-2005, 04:05 AM
what does that mean?

its a contemptuous way of calling South Americans...

WyveN
04-21-2005, 04:08 AM
Everyone knows this one but it must be mentioned.
Federer v Safin in Houston TMC last year.
Roger got a match point denied deep in the second set tb when a Safin out ball was called good by the lines person. Roger was right on top of it and knew the ball was out yet didnt even question it.

Hendu
04-21-2005, 04:14 AM
Everyone knows this one but it must be mentioned.
Federer v Safin in Houston TMC last year.
Roger got a match point denied deep in the second set tb when a Safin out ball was called good by the lines person. Roger was right on top of it and knew the ball was out yet didnt even question it.

thats not sportsmanship but being smart... it was not played on clay, the call couldn't be changed. He just tryed not to lose concentration by arguing.

croat123
04-21-2005, 04:18 AM
i don't know if anyone has noticed, but ivan always seems to give a few close calls to his opponents.

WyveN
04-21-2005, 04:28 AM
thats not sportsmanship but being smart... it was not played on clay, the call couldn't be changed. He just tryed not to lose concentration by arguing.

So 95% of players are stupid? that is the amount that would blow up over a call like that.

Its easy being rational about it (call couldnt be changed etc) here but not questioning wrong calls on key points in the middle of a match is certainly good sportsmanship.

Hendu
04-21-2005, 04:35 AM
So 95% of players are stupid? that is the amount that would blow up over a call like that.

I think 95% is too high... but yes, the players that blow up in a moment like that are stupid... maybe stupid is too much, I should say mentally weak...

Its easy being rational about it (call couldnt be changed etc) here but not questioning wrong calls on key points in the middle of a match is certainly good sportsmanship.

I don't agree... Federer just did what was more convenient for him in that particular moment... I don't call that sportsmanship. Thats just being smart.

WyveN
04-21-2005, 04:47 AM
I think 95% is too high... but yes, the players that blow up in a moment like that are stupid... maybe stupid is too much, I should say mentally weak...


Questioning calls is not a sign of being mentally weak. Hewitt questions calls occasionally yet is fully concentrated once the next point begins.

Sampras was not very emotional on court yet questioned important calls and was certainly not mentally weak.



I don't agree... Federer just did what was more convenient for him in that particular moment... I don't call that sportsmanship. Thats just being smart.

Accepting the umpires decision is good sportsmanship (particularly at important moments) no matter what sport is being played. Its a spur of the moment thing, I hardly think they have enough time to work out what is convenient.
I have seen top players pressure umpires into giving them a few calls after consistently questioning calls, that is not good sportsmanship.

NYCtennisfan
04-21-2005, 05:15 AM
So 95% of players are stupid? that is the amount that would blow up over a call like that.

Its easy being rational about it (call couldnt be changed etc) here but not questioning wrong calls on key points in the middle of a match is certainly good sportsmanship.

Exactly. Sportsmanship is much more than the giving and conceding of points. True sportsmanship is when things aren't going your way and you don't act like a big baby doofus clown out there. I know it is hard because I have done the doofus clown thing many times. Most players would have started yelling and screaming on instinct but Federer respected the umpire, the fans, Marat, and the game of tennis.

TheMightyFed
04-21-2005, 07:34 AM
Exactly. Sportsmanship is much more than the giving and conceding of points. True sportsmanship is when things aren't going your way and you don't act like a big baby doofus clown out there. I know it is hard because I have done the doofus clown thing many times. Most players would have started yelling and screaming on instinct but Federer respected the umpire, the fans, Marat, and the game of tennis.
THAT WAS SPORTSMANSHIP, 100% sure !
However in Miami final on the very bad call Nadal had at a critical moment, Rogi didn't say anything, but he was really in deep shit !!

Hendu
04-21-2005, 12:31 PM
Questioning calls is not a sign of being mentally weak. Hewitt questions calls occasionally yet is fully concentrated once the next point begins.

true

Sampras was not very emotional on court yet questioned important calls and was certainly not mentally weak.

but Im not talking about every important point in the game... I am talking about a match point... argue in a mp to put preassure on the umpire, is not a situation you take advantage off... doing it in the middle of the match, probably yes...




Accepting the umpires decision is good sportsmanship (particularly at important moments) no matter what sport is being played. Its a spur of the moment thing

again, I think we weren't talking about all important moments... (arguing the calls in every important moment is gamesmanship), but in match point situations (when you are up in the score) is just plain stupid, unless you are extremelly tough mentally and you don't lose concentration.

I hardly think they have enough time to work out what is convenient. .

those who are mentally strong and smart (as Federer), know what is convenient for them in that kind of moments.

I have seen top players pressure umpires into giving them a few calls after consistently questioning calls, that is not good sportsmanship.

no, thats gamesmanship. But arguing in a match point situation, when you are up in the score (and the call can't be changed), is not gamesmanship, because probably that guy is not trying to take advantage of that situation... and not arguing is not sportsmanship. Its just the right thing to do for your convenience...

WyveN
04-21-2005, 01:05 PM
but Im not talking about every important point in the game... I am talking about a match point... argue in a mp to put preassure on the umpire, is not a situation you take advantage off... doing it in the middle of the match, probably yes...


Of course oyu put pressure on a mp. The match could have easily went to a 3rd set and if the umpire felt someone got robbed on match point it is likely they would be more lenient to them on the calls for the rest of the match.


again, I think we weren't talking about all important moments... (arguing the calls in every important moment is gamesmanship), but in match point situations (when you are up in the score) is just plain stupid, unless you are extremelly tough mentally and you don't lose concentration.


Can you come up with examples when players didnt question wrong line calls when up set points/match points? I can think of 3 or 4 situations where players (even mentally tough calm players) lost it during those moments.



those who are mentally strong and smart (as Federer), know what is convenient for them in that kind of moments.


Then why doesn't someone like Federer argue about line calls when its convenient for him? You yourself said it can be advantagious at times.


But arguing in a match point situation, when you are up in the score (and the call can't be changed), is not gamesmanship, because probably that guy is not trying to take advantage of that situation... and not arguing is not sportsmanship. Its just the right thing to do for your convenience...

fine its your opinion but I am almost certain you (along with vast majority of people people) wouldnt be so calm & rational if it happened to you in professional sport.

TheMightyFed
04-21-2005, 01:16 PM
fine its your opinion but I am almost certain you (along with vast majority of people people) wouldnt be so calm & rational if it happened to you in professional sport.
Agree, Fed really behaved well while many of us would have done a "special Malisse" in a Masters Cup semi on such a call ;)

Hendu
04-21-2005, 01:35 PM
Of course oyu put pressure on a mp. The match could have easily went to a 3rd set and if the umpire felt someone got robbed on match point it is likely they would be more lenient to them on the calls for the rest of the match.

I don't think players are thinking in the third set in that situation...
If for example Gaudio complains in that situation, is not because he wants to put preassure in the umpire for the next set... its just because he is not smart, he can't control his feelings...

This happened to him in the Davis Cup against Kafelnikov... and he lost the match.


Can you come up with examples when players didnt question wrong line calls when up set points/match points? I can think of 3 or 4 situations where players (even mentally tough calm players) lost it during those moments.

no, sorry... but I have bad memory...

but anyway, I don't see how the number of players that keep concentrated or lose their heads changes the situation.


Then why doesn't someone like Federer argue about line calls when its convenient for him? You yourself said it can be advantagious at times.

because he has a good behaviour... thats sportsmanship... not taking advantage with that kind of things... But I am talking about that particular situation, match point, you are up in the scores, the call cannot be changed... you cant take advantage of that situation by arguing.
Arguing in that moment goes against your chances of winning. Doing what is better for you to win is not sportsmanship... is just being cool headed and smart.


fine its your opinion but I am almost certain you (along with vast majority of people people) wouldnt be so calm & rational if it happened to you in professional sport.

I would probably lose my head... but I am not mentally strong or smart in the court. Federer is calm and rational, he is an extremelly smart player... thats why he is #1.

he took advantage in that situation by keeping his concentration... I just don't see how that is sportsmanship. but thats just my opinion.

Action Jackson
04-21-2005, 01:41 PM
Of course oyu put pressure on a mp. The match could have easily went to a 3rd set and if the umpire felt someone got robbed on match point it is likely they would be more lenient to them on the calls for the rest of the match.

Too bad Gaudio never got that when Jorge "I am blinder than Stevie Wonder" made a hideous overrule on his match point against Kafelnikov. :)

Hendu
04-21-2005, 01:53 PM
Too bad Gaudio never got that when Jorge "I am blinder than Stevie Wonder" made a hideous overrule on his match point against Kafelnikov. :)

:lol:

yeah, too bad Guadio's strategy of making the umpire feel the preassure didn't work...

:haha:

every time I remember that match, I die a little bit inside... :hysteric:

Action Jackson
04-21-2005, 01:55 PM
:lol:

yeah, too bad Guadio's strategy of making the umpire feel the preassure didn't work...

:haha:

every time I remember that match, I die a little bit inside... :hysteric:

I've seen a bit of tennis in my time, but has to be in the top 10 of worst calls I have ever seen.

Dias made many of those types of callshttp://apolyton.net/forums/images/smilies/nono.gif

Hendu
04-21-2005, 02:01 PM
I've seen a bit of tennis in my time, but has to be in the top 10 of worst calls I have ever seen.

Dias made many of those types of calls
http://apolyton.net/forums/images/smilies/nono.gif

that was Gaudio's first loss in the Davis Cup... :sad:

his record was something like 10-0 until that match...

joske
04-21-2005, 02:29 PM
don't know if this was one of the GREATEST moments in sportsmanship but I think it's nice when players act like this:

it was a match between Juanqui and I don't even remember who.. Escude maybe? at Wimbledon last year or the year before that and Escude hit the ball on the line - the line judge AND the umpire called it out, and JC went to the umpire and told him that ball was DEFINITELY in (it was in too) and that was that Escude got the point

I think that's when I thought more highly of JC (I was already a BIT fan before but I thought that was so cool of him to admit it (it was well into the match so points were still very important) :yeah: )