Young should follow Gasquet's example... [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Young should follow Gasquet's example...

TheMightyFed
04-19-2005, 02:30 PM
Young already lost 6-1 6-4 against Calatrava in Houston. He hasn't won a match on ATP tour so far. Isn't it time for him to go back to Challengers and build some confidence ŗ la Gasquet. We've seen in Monte-Carlo the pretty amazing results of this strategy: in his first ATP tourney of 2005, he succeeded where guys like Roddick or Hewitt failed since 2003: to beat Federer !
Wild cards are not always an opportunity to promising talents IMO.

Action Jackson
04-19-2005, 02:31 PM
Actually he should be in Futures events and not challengers.

Armada~121
04-19-2005, 02:59 PM
Tell me about it. I just wrote an article on the disadvantages of wildcard, questioning how much experience can Young get when he was there only to be butchered. To me, people try to push him to bloom too early and that may hinder his natural development as a whole.

I also mentioned that it's much more dignified to qualify for an event than getting privilege into it, citing examples of Baghdatis earlier this year at AO. If I had written the article two weeks later, Richard would become my prime example :)

One thing I like about both Richard and Rafa is that tho they both are known as prodigies since they entered the tour. They built themselves up from smaller events, qualifying, and not receiving privilege too often. They earn their place and that's why they deserve success.

Action Jackson
04-19-2005, 03:01 PM
It's better starting out in the Futures and the Challengers, it's not glamorous, but then players learn about life on the tour and what it's about and how hard it is, instead of having everything given to them.

khyber
04-19-2005, 03:24 PM
I don't know if its an issue of his parents and/or IMG being desperate for money and or glory, or if they really think he's ready to play with the big boys (which we can all see he's not). I'd hate for the kid to destroy himself because of the actions of the adults around him.

smucav
04-19-2005, 04:49 PM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A61484-2005Apr17.html
washingtonpost.com
Professional Tennis at Age 15: Too Much to Young?
Many Wondering If Joining the ATP Hurts, Not Helps Teen's Progress
By Douglas Robson
Special to The Washington Post
Monday, April 18, 2005; Page D05

He's 15, black, prodigiously talented and competing with men twice his age -- a boy in a man's world.

He isn't D.C. United's Freddy Adu, though the comparison is apt. He is America's latest tennis sensation, a lanky Chicago native named Donald Young Jr., whose list of age-defying accomplishments is breaking barriers.

"He's insanely talented," said Andy Roddick, the top-ranked U.S. player. "If you've watched him just strike the ball, the way he naturally feels it -- there's definitely something special there."

Forget Young's race, which automatically makes him an anomaly in tennis. Simply put, he may be the best 15-year-old male in the history of U.S. tennis.

Sixteen months ago, the 5-foot-10, 150-pound left-hander won the prestigious 16-and-under Orange Bowl title -- the first African American to do so -- and followed up by winning the Easter Bowl 18 singles crown last year. Not even Pete Sampras, who reached the Easter Bowl semifinal at 15, or John McEnroe, who won at 17, equaled that feat.

In January, Young became the youngest male to win a junior Grand Slam crown, capturing the boys' title at the Australian Open. That win also made him the youngest player to be No. 1 in the junior world rankings, a position he still holds.

Young turned pro last year, at 14, and he already has contracts with Nike, Head and sports management giant IMG.

"If he gets bigger and stronger, I predict him to be the top American and one of the top players in the world," said Nick Bollettieri, whose famed Florida academy (now owned by IMG) has produced Grand Slam champions Jim Courier, Andre Agassi and Monica Seles.

But unlike Adu, Young has been thrust into the upper echelons of the game by agents eager to earn him publicity and valuable tour experience, securing him a number of wild cards at top-tier tournaments this year. It would be like Adu trying to play in a top European league instead of gaining experience in MLS.

The result: A youngster who has rarely lost at any level has been battered like never before. Since his ATP Tour debut in San Jose in February, Young is 0-4 and has won more than five games in a match just once.

"I'm getting more games than I did the last couple times," Young said with a shrug after his 6-4, 7-5 loss to 56th-ranked Frenchman Jean-Rene Lisnard at last month's Nasdaq-100. "I'm getting a little more confident, I guess."

Young will try to boost his confidence and halt his four-match ATP losing streak today, when he takes on Spain's Alex Calatrava at the U.S. Men's Clay Court Championships in Houston, where he has received yet another wild-card entry into the main draw.

But the string of losses has led to speculation that Young is being pushed too hard too fast, and that it could ultimately damage his confidence.

"In my opinion, he's played too many of the bigger events," said U.S. Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe, who thinks Young would be better served playing smaller and lower-level Challenger and Futures events. "You can't let a kid go out there and lose one-and-one 10 times in a row. That's no fun. It can start to have a detrimental effect on his mental state."

Added 2003 U.S. Open champion Roddick, himself a highly touted prodigy and former No. 1 in the world junior rankings: "Is he ready to play week in and week out on the main tour? I don't think so, but I hope I'm proved wrong."

Those in his inner circle -- his agent, his parents, some USTA officials -- say Young is handling the mounting expectations, travel, attention and losses well.

"I keep things as basic as possible," said his mother, Illona, who home-schools her only child and lets him continue to play his beloved Xbox and engage in other teen activities.

Donald Sr. said his son is able to shake the losses off quickly by "taking it out on me around the court."

His agent, Gary Swain of IMG, whose company is responsible for getting Young the wild cards, dismissed the notion that the teenager is being pulled along too fast.

"We have not put pressure on Donald to win at the professional level but have given him opportunities [that he has earned] to accelerate his learning curve," Swain wrote in an e-mail.

Young has beaten two players ranked in the top 200 and is now ranked in the 600s. But despite his excellent court vision, superior movement and once-in-a-generation hand skills, he lacks the size and strength to compete with many pros.

"He's a boy playing a men's game," said American pro Jeff Morrison, a former NCAA singles champion from the University of Florida.

Off the court, Young seems split between the teen and adult worlds. In news conferences, he can seem distracted and immature; a minute later, he can sound like a jaded veteran: "A lot of people have told me that," he said of the praise heaped upon him, "but I just try to go out there and play my game."

Driven by their son's success, the Youngs relocated to Atlanta last year, where Donald Sr., a one-time player at Alabama State, took over a tennis academy with the help of IMG. Illona, also a former player, shares coaching and child-rearing duties with her husband.

"He's a pretty levelheaded kid," said Paul Roetert, managing director of the USTA's USA Tennis High Performance Program, which has been involved in Young's training. "His parents are doing a fabulous job."

Still, it's hard to know how much pressure Young is putting on himself. His court demeanor is revealing. He often engages in self-critical muttering, slouches his head on missed shots, constantly eyes his parents in the crowd and occasionally slams balls into the backstop.

Illona Young admits that there is no blueprint for an African American boy, or any boy, with Donald's skill. That has made their journey sometimes lonely, and certainly difficult.

It would seem logical that the Youngs might have sought advice from Richard Williams or Oracene Price, the parents of Venus and Serena Williams.

"No, never met them," said Illona. "Never talked with them."

She gets defensive when people criticize the decision to allow her son to turn pro so early -- a decision made because there was no competition left for Young, and the travel and other expenses were becoming prohibitive. There is no cookie-cutter approach to raising a prodigy, she says.

"It's very customized, personalized," she said.

But with such a heavy schedule of pro and junior tournaments -- Young will play top-tier junior events this year, including all the remaining Grand Slams, plus pro tournaments -- some worry he will burn out, or take the mounting losses too hard.

Asked about such concerns, Donald Sr. said: "That's their opinion. No comment."

What everyone is willing to comment on are Young's gifts. He has solid groundstrokes, an improving serve, moves well and isn't afraid to charge the net.

"He's one of the very few kids that actually comes to the net," said Bollettieri.

Much is also made of his size 12 1/2 feet, which suggests he has a lot more growing to do.

"The closest thing to a sure bet," said IMG's Swain.

Of course, tennis is littered with sure bets who failed to make an impact in the pros, such as Billy Martin, Scott Davis and Al Parker Jr., or early flameouts, such as Andrea Jaeger.

John McEnroe said it pays to be cautious when kids turn pro before they can even obtain a driver's permit.

"He's not fully developed, and I don't think he should be professional now, personally," said the three-time Wimbledon champion, who first met and hit with Young when Young was 10 and who spoke about him at the All England club last year. "But on the other side of the coin, I don't know his parents' financial situation. If someone is going to pay him, a Nike, a million dollars -- I'm just throwing out a number -- to use rackets or clothes or sneakers, who am I to say not to do it?"

Agassi, 34, who turned pro at 16, said that tasting top competition at a young age isn't always a bad idea.

"I wouldn't say it's necessarily a mistake to be out here taking your lumps, because it's what you have to face ultimately."

© 2005 The Washington Post Company

onewoman74
04-19-2005, 06:13 PM
I think that is a very revealing article...i wish him the best, but it seems too much too soon. Maybe he will get through it and come out on top like Venus and Serena did a few years back...only time will tell.

Alvarillo
04-19-2005, 06:14 PM
Gasquet example????
Gasquet should have played Challngers before, cos he has lost 1 or 2 years because of he played a lot of ATP events since he won a match in Montecarlo some years ago, the example to follow is Nadal who before playing MS or ATP played a lot of Futures and Challengers and then ATP events, Gasquet began with WC to ATP, then when he saw he couldn't do it began to play smaller tournaments
but Nadal is the best example, he is the best of his generation right now! :)

onewoman74
04-19-2005, 06:19 PM
Gasquet example????
Gasquet should have played Challngers before, cos he has lost 1 or 2 years because of he played a lot of ATP events since he won a match in Montecarlo some years ago, the example to follow is Nadal who before playing MS or ATP played a lot of Futures and Challengers and then ATP events, Gasquet began with WC to ATP, then when he saw he couldn't do it began to play smaller tournaments
but Nadal is the best example, he is the best of his generation right now! :)

I agree w/ your post...u have to work your way to the top. It's hard when you have people throwing money at you every which way...I say work hard now and make your money later. ;)

TheMightyFed
04-19-2005, 07:13 PM
Gasquet example????
Gasquet should have played Challngers before, cos he has lost 1 or 2 years because of he played a lot of ATP events since he won a match in Montecarlo some years ago, the example to follow is Nadal who before playing MS or ATP played a lot of Futures and Challengers and then ATP events, Gasquet began with WC to ATP, then when he saw he couldn't do it began to play smaller tournaments
but Nadal is the best example, he is the best of his generation right now! :)
This is bullshit, you can check on ATP website, he played mostly Futures and Challengers apart from a few tournies in France, which is understandable, and clay South American season in 04.
In addition, this WC in Monte-Carlo made him the youngest player to win a TMS match, which will remain in his record as a milestone. ;)

federer express
04-19-2005, 07:18 PM
one good week and everyone should follow gasquet's example.
one more slam at the AO and safin was ready to take over as world no 1
one tms win and nadal is now ready to dominate on clay and win the french
one win in davis cup doubles and andy murray is the next best thing in britain

one more post and i'm at 985 :p

Marine
04-19-2005, 07:18 PM
but Nadal is the best example, he is the best of his generation right now! :)

But Richard proved the last week he has no cause to be jealous of him, at least in the game. Physically he can improve ;)

TheMightyFed
04-19-2005, 07:25 PM
one good week and everyone should follow gasquet's example.
one more slam at the AO and safin was ready to take over as world no 1
one tms win and nadal is now ready to dominate on clay and win the french
one win in davis cup doubles and andy murray is the next best thing in britain

On Gasquet I'm sorry but it's pretty rare to see a young guy coming off of a Challenger, qualies, and beating the Unbeatable, the guy who lost once in 8 months... he didn't play an ATP match before MC ! Interesting to compare his run to Young losing streak at ATP level...

federer express
04-19-2005, 07:26 PM
On Gasquet I'm sorry but it's pretty rare to see a young guy coming off of a Challenger, qualies, and beating the Unbeatable, the guy who lost once in 8 months... he didn't play an ATP match before MC ! Interesting to compare his run to Young losing streak at ATP level...

dont apologise. gasquet's performances were just unbelievable. but let him back that week up with some other good results before hailing him as richie le roi! :)

TheMightyFed
04-19-2005, 07:28 PM
dont apologise. gasquet's performances were just unbelievable. but let him back that week up with some other good results before hailing him as richie le roi! :)
Maybe a bit of pressure of not having a Frenchie in the Top 25 ! :mad:

federer express
04-19-2005, 07:32 PM
Maybe a bit of pressure of not having a Frenchie in the Top 25 ! :mad:

you guys have always had great players. the ones i remember:
noah, leconte, forget, pioline, boetsch

now you have grosjean, santoro,llodra (lol), lisnard (lol), clement, mathieu, monfils and of course gasquet.
monfils and gasquet...wont be long before you are celebrating again!

TheMightyFed
04-19-2005, 07:45 PM
you guys have always had great players. the ones i remember:
noah, leconte, forget, pioline, boetsch

now you have grosjean, santoro,llodra (lol), lisnard (lol), clement, mathieu, monfils and of course gasquet.
monfils and gasquet...wont be long before you are celebrating again!
May Benedict XVI hear you and tell God to make it happen !
Last Slam winner was Noah ! 22 years ago :mad:

federer express
04-19-2005, 07:47 PM
May Benedict XVI hear you and tell God to make it happen !
Last Slam winner was Noah ! 22 years ago :mad:

yes but you guys beat the states in the davis cup final. the states who had agssi and sampras as their singles players at the time!
just enjoy your flamboyant players...am sure the slams will come again one day!

onewoman74
04-19-2005, 07:47 PM
Can we get back to talking about Donald Young? Gasquet has made his way back to the ATP tour, but what about Donald Young? What is he doing right or wrong? Discuss!!

federer express
04-19-2005, 07:49 PM
Can we get back to talking about Donald Young? Gasquet has made his way back to the ATP tour, but what about Donald Young? What is he doing right or wrong? Discuss!!

its mdhubert's thread. i think he can chat about what he wants in it ;)

Marine
04-19-2005, 07:50 PM
May Benedict XVI hear you and tell God to make it happen !
Last Slam winner was Noah ! 22 years ago :mad:


:lol:

I wonder if I have to laugh or cry

Cervantes
04-19-2005, 07:54 PM
Can we get back to talking about Donald Young? Gasquet has made his way back to the ATP tour, but what about Donald Young? What is he doing right or wrong? Discuss!!

He's only 15 so it's no surprise he's losing ATP matches. he should probably accept some WCs into smaller tournaments on his favorite surface (which I presume is hardcourt), so I think it was a mistake to play Houston. Next to those couple WCs in ATP tournaments he should play a lot of Challengers to get used to the pro life and get some results. After all losing first round week in week out can't be good for your confidence.

onewoman74
04-19-2005, 07:57 PM
its mdhubert's thread. i think he can chat about what he wants in it ;)

So you mean have nothing of value to add to the discussion of donald young?

No worries mate! ;)

TheMightyFed
04-19-2005, 07:57 PM
its mdhubert's thread. i think he can chat about what he wants in it ;)
Honestly I didn't have a chance to see him play, but it's pretty sad not to see him make some progress in 5 tournies. And it's pretty scary to see him go to the slaughter in TMS like Miami and IW... Who the hell is managing his career ? Is American tennis in such a bad shape to push in a hurry some talented guys in the water ? USTA or whoever should do exactly the contrary in order to help him to breakthrough at the right time, because the Fish-Roddick generation is not exactly the Sampras-Agassi one, so they should prepare the future instead of trying making business with it ASAP. What do you guys think ?

federer express
04-19-2005, 08:01 PM
Honestly I didn't have a chance to see him play, but it's pretty sad not to see him make some progress in 5 tournies. And it's pretty scary to see him go to the slaughter in TMS like Miami and IW... Who the hell is managing his career ? Is American tennis in such a bad shape to push in a hurry some talented guys in the water ? USTA or whoever should do exacrly the contrary in order to halp him to breakthrough at the right time, because the Fish-Roddick generation is not exactly the Sampras-Agassi one, so they should prepare the future instead of trying making business with it ASAP. What do you gus think ?

i dont really have a view on young yet. in my opinion it is generally better when developing your game to play people better than yourself. the flip side of that is that if he is not controlling the points enough, he will not be learning how to construct them possibly. its a balancing act. he needs some wins for his confidence and for the development of his game, whilst continuing to expose himself to better players. its not easy...

jole
04-19-2005, 08:07 PM
I understand why Young and his posse are taking the glamourous route, but at the end of the day it is kind of silly. If he was playing futures he would easily make quarters, semis, finals, and perhaps win one or two. This would increase his ranking very solidly the old fashioned way, and he can then move up slowly but surely.

It's not like they need the money (right now at least).

onewoman74
04-19-2005, 08:11 PM
Honestly I didn't have a chance to see him play, but it's pretty sad not to see him make some progress in 5 tournies. And it's pretty scary to see him go to the slaughter in TMS like Miami and IW... Who the hell is managing his career ? Is American tennis in such a bad shape to push in a hurry some talented guys in the water ? USTA or whoever should do exactly the contrary in order to help him to breakthrough at the right time, because the Fish-Roddick generation is not exactly the Sampras-Agassi one, so they should prepare the future instead of trying making business with it ASAP. What do you guys think ?

yes, I think the USTA and his people are pushing for the next US champion...they want a US Champion that can dominate mens tennis like ala Sampras and Agassi. I think the people surrounding Young are seeing $ signs and not trying to nuture his talent...only time will tell.

TheMightyFed
04-19-2005, 08:15 PM
yes, I think the USTA and his people are pushing for the next US champion...they want a US Champion that can dominate mens tennis like ala Sampras and Agassi. I think the people surrounding Young are seeing $ signs and not trying to nuture his talent...only time will tell.
Hope they won't screw up such a precoce talent, it's quite a reponsibility, but at the end I think even himself will know what is good for him. For the dominating American player, maybe we wait for the end of the clay season before talking about that, otherwise the laughs will interfere too much in the debate... ;)

Horatio Caine
04-19-2005, 08:55 PM
He is clearly not good enough for the top levels of the game and should start at futures and satellites. He is not a Nadal - he was able to win week in week out on the futures tour and then work his way up within a year.

Stop giving the guy wildcards - it is a waste. Why is he being pushed this early anyway? There are ,any players that have shown huge potential at juniors and not fulfilled that potential at senior level. Leave him alone and let him grow. Besides it isn't as if the US haven't got other promising players who are OLDER as well. :rolleyes:

Robxon
04-19-2005, 10:05 PM
Young has reached 600's in the Entry Rankings having only won 1 match and 3 sets in the whole of his senior career? Would he have risen this quickly, if as many people have suggested by playing Futures/Challengeres?

In any case, the USA Futures tournaments are highly competetive and one thing he has now avoided is playing through Futures qualy rounds.

His case could only happen to an American as no other country has as many ATP tournaments.

Whatever you think of Andy Murray, he is the reigning US open Junior champion and only received his first ATP wildcard at Barcelona this week. So far this year he has been through the mill of Challenger qualifying and mostly been found wanting.

It will be interesting to watch if they meet in the remaining Junior Slams (Murray is still eligible).

My worry is not necessarily about the effects of his mental state but the pressure he is putting on his body while it is still growing. Again Murray is comparable, having spent months out with a knee injury caused by growing pains.

YoursTruly
04-19-2005, 11:08 PM
The Americans and that sponsor just wants to hurry up and develop a new American "star" to keep them coming.

smucav
06-02-2005, 02:07 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/01/sports/tennis/01rhoden.htmlJune 1, 2005
Being a Prodigy Has Its Faults
By WILLIAM C. RHODEN
Paris

AFTER John McEnroe finished warming up for a doubles match yesterday afternoon, he climbed on top of a green Perrier ice chest. He peeked over into the adjoining court, where Donald Young, a 15-year-old tennis phenom, was battling Alexandr Dolgopolov, a 17-year-old Ukrainian. This was one of the more crowded smaller courts.

Young, a Chicago native, went to Roland Garros as one of the favorites to win the French Open junior tournament.

But this match was a struggle. Young won the first set, 6-4, displaying a wide array of shots and the uncanny anticipation that compelled Nike to offer him a lucrative promotional contract. But yesterday was not Young's day. He dropped the second set, 6-2, then lost his composure. McEnroe left after Young won a game to close the gap, but Young went on to lose the third set, 6-2, and the match.

"It looks like he feels that weight of expectations," McEnroe said.

McEnroe met Young five years ago during a senior tournament in Chicago. Young was a ball boy, and McEnroe's hitting partner was late. Young approached McEnroe's agent and volunteered to hit with McEnroe. Young, who was 10 at the time, told the agent, "I'm No. 1 in the U.S. 12 and under."

McEnroe hit balls with Young the next day, and he said he told his agent: "The sky is the limit. He's the first person I ever saw that has hands like me."

Young, like McEnroe, is left-handed, and his touch and feel are already being compared with McEnroe's.

Five years later, Young is the No. 1 junior in the world, but he lost a sobering match yesterday. In addition, Young has not won any matches on the ATP Tour. "I think what's going to happen," McEnroe said, "it's all going to be a little bit too much for him. And if he truly is going to be a great player, he'll regroup. He'll struggle for a while and he'll find himself if he's going to be at that level of a great player."

Fifteen years old is awfully young to become a professional athlete and fully comprehend what that means. Tennis is your job.

Young is being touted by the United States Tennis Association as one of the bright lights of the game. He is African-American, so, predictably, he is asked about Arthur Ashe, the first African-American man to win a Grand Slam event. But Young's young career is not about race or Arthur Ashe: it is the story of a family learning to contend with the unpredictable monster called professional sports.

On Monday in a small conference room, Young conceded that he was beginning to feel the pressure of being No. 1. "It's a little more difficult because everybody wants to beat the top person," he said. "They play better than they do against other people because they know they have to bring their best game, and they bring it."

Young is coached by his parents, Donald and Illona. After yesterday's loss, his father openly wondered if his son knew what it took to be a professional tennis player. His father said Young should play more matches, professional and junior.

"He's got the best of both worlds right now," Donald Young Sr. said. "He can play junior and pro right now - that's the only way he's going to get as many matches, because he has to get wild cards, but is he ready to play a lot? That's the question."

Talented junior players can live schizophrenic tennis lives; if they decide to turn pro, they can continue to play the junior circuit. The arrangement helps the ATP attract the best players for its international junior tournaments and encourages players to turn pro, because they can have their cake and eat it, too.

If I were the Youngs, I would take their son's loss at the French Open in stride. Roger Federer watched part of Young's match yesterday and wondered afterward about the best way for him to make the transition from the junior to the pro level.

"It must be awful hard for him; he's getting wild cards all over the place, he's playing for a lot of prize money, and many people in the stadium," Federer said. "Then he comes here, O.K., it's the French Open, but he's playing on the small court, playing a junior who nobody knows, the expectations are so high. Maybe he collapsed under that. I don't think that's going to ruin his career, losing at the French Open."

Federer's junior career, like Young's, had its stumbles. Young won the Australian Open juniors in January. In 1998, Federer, who will turn 24 in August, lost in the semifinals of the Australian juniors, lost in the first round of the French Open juniors, won the Wimbledon juniors, lost in the final of the United States Open juniors and won the world junior championship in Florida.

"It's important that you bounce back; your reaction has to be a good one," Federer said. "You analyze it, but it's over, you move on, say 'O.K., I'll practice harder,' and the results will come back. When you're young, you'll always go through much more ups and downs. I went through them as well."

For 15-year-old Donald Young, a week in Paris was a wake-up call: he's a professional tennis player now - and there is a price to be paid.

E-mail: wcr@nytimes.com

Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company

NATAS81
06-02-2005, 05:55 AM
What does that have to do with Gasquet's example?

NYCtennisfan
06-02-2005, 06:54 AM
I think this kid has been given a raw deal by everyone around him but perhaps it could not be avoided. He is dripping with talent but sometimes that talent needs to develop bit by bit, playing against people that you can beat and compete with with a few excursions into big events i.e. a wildcard at the USO or at Wimbledon. Everyone around him has told him how great he is going to be but it takes time. People want to market him and he is extremely marketable--a young African-American tennis player. Not too many around. His body is going to be quite different by the time he is 18 or 19 I believe and his game will also change along with it. His parents need to take control, and let the kid play some lower level matches before his confidence is shot completely.

TheMightyFed
06-02-2005, 09:46 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/01/sports/tennis/01rhoden.html
Interesting article, I think he needs to go step by step and realise what it means to be a professionel athlete. That's what did Gasquet, he struggled a lot to find his way. It's hard to make your own territory, because your parents, the tennis federation, the medias and the tournies organisers are too present and it's difficult to handle all these guys' expectations when you're jsut 15 or 16 years old. Look at Nadal: Ok he has a rarely seen maturity, but his entourage is quite healthy: 2 uncles, not the parents, who brought him early in Futures and Satellites, without mixing with juniors, to ensure a smooth transition.

mishar
06-03-2005, 12:15 PM
I attended a little of Young's first-round match in Paris. He left me with a very unpleasant impression. He acted obnoxiously, as if he should be winning every game easily. After the kid from Kuwait held serve for 2-1 in the second set, Young threw his raquet and screamed out "I'm playing like a fucking faggot."

He did not win a fan that day

vincayou
06-03-2005, 12:25 PM
I attended a little of Young's first-round match in Paris. He left me with a very unpleasant impression. He acted obnoxiously, as if he should be winning every game easily. After the kid from Kuwait held serve for 2-1 in the second set, Young threw his raquet and screamed out "I'm playing like a fucking faggot."

He did not win a fan that day

As long as he keeps working on his tennis, he'll be fine if he is that talented. The funny thing with being that famous at 15 is that you can be a has been at 17.

But if he starts thinking that he's too talented to continue working physically and technically, then he'll go nowhere. But that works for everybody.

Horatio Caine
06-03-2005, 12:26 PM
Young needs to continue playing on the junior circuit for another 2 years and finish growing both physically and mentally. If Mishar's post is accurate, it seems that Young still has the mind of a boy anyway.

All this playing at the top level this early is becoming more detrimental by the month, week, day etc. He is playing too much = deterioration of his body by late teens / early twenties. He is peaking too early at the top and lsoing easily all the time = loss of confidence / motivation.

He should do what Nadal did - play week in week out on the futures circuit. Nadal won something like 6 Spain Futures in a row at one point...that shows he had the talent and more importantly the stamina to win. Young can't even win back to back matches on the US Futures circuit. He has done pretty much nothing. To me that is a sign of a player that just isn't ready at the moment....or more importantly, a sign that he just isn't as good as he is portrayed to be.

Horatio Caine
06-03-2005, 12:26 PM
It actually wouldn't surprise me if people are saying in 2010 "Who is Donald Young?"

smucav
06-26-2005, 09:35 PM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8365776/Great promise for Donald Young: Rising American star would be wise not to rush his development
COMMENTARY
By Bud Collins
NBC Sports
Updated: 3:09 p.m. ET June 26, 2005

WIMBLEDON - With Andy Roddick the only top U.S. contender at Wimbledon, the question becomes who is the next American male player with the potential to be one of the sport's best?

No less a tennis expert than John McEnroe says Donald Young is the one to watch. But I think that itís too early to tell whether the 15-year-old Young has the goods to someday be a top-five player in the world.

Wrong to rush Young
Even though Young has already turned pro, people need to allow him to grow up more slowly and not put pressure on him to produce significant results at the highest levels of the game.

Interestingly, back in his day, Hall of Famer Bill Tilden used to predict great things to come for numerous up-and-comers and was wrong every time out.

Letís hope that Tilden hasnít cursed Johnny Mac, and Mac hasnít put a hex on Young.

Young has been called the next great one by numerous renowned coaches since he won the 2003 Orange Bowl 16-and-unders as a 14-year-old.

In December 2004, Young lost in the final of the Orange Bowl 18s to another promising African American male, Timothy Neilly.

Next he impressed the world by winning his first junior Grand Slam title at the Australian Open in January, and American tournament promoters were quick to jump on his bandwagon.

He received five wild cards to play pro tournaments at San Jose, Scottsdale, Indian Wells, Miami and Houston and didnít manage to win a match, much less a set.

Growing into his game
At 5-foot-9, 145 pounds dripping wet, Young's simply too small right now to play with the big boys.

He has remarkable touch, terrific speed and a heck of a forehand, but his serve, return and backhand are not ready for primetime.

Young needs to be spending more time playing junior Grand Slams and minor league pro tournaments.

He is one of the top seeds at the Wimbledon junior championships and it will be interesting to see whether he can pull a Lleyton Hewitt and confound the taller kids on the grass.

If he manages to do that at the top junior level again, it will give him a necessary boost of confidence.

The fast-handed kid from Chicago needs that because at the Roland Garros junior tournament earlier this month, he only managed to win a match.

Although that tournament is played on clay, his loss showed that he still needs to add more firepower to his all-around game.

Iím very concerned that Young is being pushed too fast and is receiving too much attention for his age.

The reason for that is because Andre Agassi is injured and close to retirement and only Roddick has proven himself to be a big-time player amongst the early-twentysomething Americans.

Roddick realizes that and would like some more U.S. company in the top echelons of the game, but even he thinks Young has been shoved into a position he shouldnít be put in.

"I think (Young) is getting pushed a little fast," Roddick said. "I'd love to see him take the time and really work on his game. I say that with the best possible intentions for him. I think he's insanely talented if you've seen him strike the ball and the way he naturally feels it.

"There's definitely something special there. But is he ready to play week in, week out on the main tour? I don't think so. I hope I'm proved wrong."

Roddick had it somewhat different
Roddick is more than willingly to talk about Young.

"Maybe he starts in qualifying or in Challengers or maybe even Futures first. I'd love nothing more than for him to come in and just start ripping people apart, but I don't know if that's the case," said Roddick.

"I hope he knows that he should be enjoying the experience and if that's the way they're looking at it, go and try to build and see what you're up against so you know what you have to work on then that's kind of a great attitude to take into it. But I'm not really sure how they are going about it."

Roddick knows all about pressure because after he won the U.S. Open junior tournament at 17, the analystís eyes turned toward him.

But back in 2000 when Roddick pulled off that feat, Pete Sampras, Agassi and Michael Chang were still around holding up the American flag in the pros.

Young doesnít have that convenience as fans and analysts know that 2005 is likely Agassiís last year and that none of Roddickís peers like Taylor Dent, Mardy Fish, Robby Ginepri or James Blake have proved themselves to be topĖ10 players.

Other young Americans seeking to rise
Everyone is looking for the next U.S. guy who can consistently join Roddick in the second week of the Grand Slams.

Young may or may not be that player. Dent compares him to former No. 1 Marcelo Rios of Chile with the way he can speed around the court and flip magical balls off his racket.

Dent also likes the prospects of American teen Alex Kuzentsov, and Iíve heard great things about 17-year-old Sam Querrey from Southern California, a tall serve-and-volleyer who ranked No. 11 in the world in the juniors and who reached the quarterfinals of the Roland Garros junior tournament.

Maybe Kuznetsov, Neilly, or Querrey will develop more slowly and enter the top 10 in their mid-20s, like former U.S. Open finalist Todd Martin did.

Or maybe Young -Ė who turns 16 in July -Ė will come on strong next year.

But it's clear that Young doesnít yet possess the physique of French Open champion Rafael Nadal, who was already making waves in the pros when he was 15. But even as good as the Spaniard was then, it took him four more years to win his first major.

If everyone is more patient with Young, itís possible we could see him holding up the Wimbledon crown in 2009. But can America wait that long?

RickDaStick
06-26-2005, 09:55 PM
Its all about the Benjamins.

JustmeUK
06-26-2005, 10:51 PM
who knows what is right or wrong for prodigies like Young. when all is said and done it comes down to Young himself. does he have the desire, the will to push on despite everything? if he does have that inner fire then a few losses on the ATP tour at his age won't harm him. it's not as if he is only playing ATP tour.. he's still playing the juniors n at some point he may well play futures and challengers too.