McEnroe broke the ATP record in 1984...then he never won another slam... [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

McEnroe broke the ATP record in 1984...then he never won another slam...

Tennis Fool
04-16-2005, 07:43 PM
And I'm also thinking of Mats Wilander who produced three Slams in 1988 and never won another. This is piggyback to "Is Fed getting worse thread", as I was thinking about the question in relation to the greats?

What happened to these two (for those who followed)? Who were they coached by? Did they dismiss their coaches? Did their strokes get worse the next year? Did the competition get better? Or did they simply lose motivation?

Of course, I don't think Fed is having any of these problems at all. Just a question that popped into my mind...

Sjengster
04-16-2005, 07:54 PM
Johnny Mac had to cope with the arrival of the new, highly fit power generation, led by Lendl but also including people like Curren who served him off the court at Wimbledon when he was defending champion in 1985. This was when the new rackets were really beginning to take effect. There were also, ahem, personal complications off the court that didn't help him much. Wilander I suppose had achieved so much by the age of 24 and lost a little motivation, although I don't know as much about him.

Good job you added that corollary to your post to make sure that hordes of posters won't attack you for starting another panicky thread prophesying doom and gloom for Federer.

MisterQ
04-16-2005, 08:06 PM
Johnny Mac had to cope with the arrival of the new, highly fit power generation, led by Lendl but also including people like Curren who served him off the court at Wimbledon when he was defending champion in 1985. This was when the new rackets were really beginning to take effect. There were also, ahem, personal complications off the court that didn't help him much. Wilander I suppose had achieved so much by the age of 24 and lost a little motivation, although I don't know as much about him.

Good job you added that corollary to your post to make sure that hordes of posters won't attack you for starting another panicky thread prophesying doom and gloom for Federer.

Another factor is that McEnroe was not a particularly hard worker. Rather like Hingis, he was so talented that winning came quite easily to him at first. As the game became more physical and demanding, he seemed to lose focus rather than work harder.

MisterQ
04-16-2005, 08:20 PM
come to think of it, Laver never won another major after his 1969 Grand Slam.

Adam Thirnis
04-16-2005, 08:27 PM
McEnroe became distracted from tennis and took a sabbatical during 1986 - missing Wimbledon. During this time he didn't train or pick up a racquet. When he came back he had lost his edge and couldn't regain it.

Skyward
04-16-2005, 08:29 PM
come to think of it, Laver never won another major after his 1969 Grand Slam.

Amazing that he was able to win the GS at the ancient age of 31.

TennisLurker
04-16-2005, 08:34 PM
rackets changed, tennis changed

tangerine_dream
04-16-2005, 08:54 PM
McEnroe was just flat-out lazy; hated working out, didn't stretch or eat right; also got distracted by a host of personal problems. He was one of those who coasted on his talent but wasn't ambitious enough to get it back when he lost it. Will forever more whine and complain about today's racket technology and constantly cry "bring back the wood!" because he thinks that's the reason why he lost his domination.

Tennis Fool
04-16-2005, 08:55 PM
I'm just looking at Mac's rec in 1985...Really it wasn't a bad year, but maybe for him not great. He won his five out of six of the first tournaments. He lost to Ivan Lendl at Forrest Hills and DC, and then to Mats at the FO. He then beat Ivan twice that summer submitting humbly to him at the US (he had to beat Mats in 5 in the semis). Can you imagine that 1-2 combination :eek: That summer must have been verrrrrry frustrating.

And Wimbledon :tape: Who the hell was Kevin Curren? He beat Edberg, Connors and Mac in straights before falling to Becker in the finals (and making Becker a star). I do recall Chris Evert mentioning how he should have won the tournament, but choked the finals.

Maybe it was Wimby that ultimately did Mac in??? He lost first round of the Masters to Ugh Brad Gilbert. I think this is where he said "I can't believe I lost to someone like you!"

Tennis Fool
04-16-2005, 08:56 PM
He also reportedly took steroids to get back to the top in 1987...

TennisLurker
04-16-2005, 09:05 PM
Kevin Curren was one of the first big serves of the modern rackets age, he also made the Australian Open final (when it was on grass), a career comparable to Todd Martin, he defeated most of the top players of the second half of the 80´s at least once.

Tennis Fool
04-16-2005, 09:09 PM
Is that why JMac is so wound up about bringing back wood rackets? Because he's still hurting from that loss :lol:

TheBoiledEgg
04-16-2005, 09:12 PM
Mac and Wilander did the same thing, both took a bit of time off after their great seasons and were never quite what they once were.

Once you lose the edge, its very hard to get it back.

TennisLurker
04-16-2005, 09:13 PM
Wilandr said something similar when he lost to Pete being defending champion of the Australian Open, Chris said about Steffi, lets see if she can hit that big forehand with a wood racket.

Tennis Fool
04-16-2005, 09:21 PM
Mac and Wilander did the same thing, both took a bit of time off after their great seasons and were never quite what they once were.

Once you lose the edge, its very hard to get it back.
Reminds me of these episode of Nature on PBS. A baby wolf injured itself and couldn't run. The mama wolf waited a couple of days for baby to get better. Baby didn't. So, as the narrator said, "The pack had to move on."

Such as in tennis. The pack waits for no one.

Sjengster
04-16-2005, 09:24 PM
Seriously, I wouldn't be surprised if McEnroe's call to bring back wooden racquets is based on that loss - in his autobiography he calls Curren "the Mark Philippoussis of the 80s", so that says a lot about his game. At least he has a case for wanting the wooden models back given that he played with them in his prime, unlike Becker who is an absolute raging hypocrite for agreeing with Mac when he was one of the first major practitioners of the power game.

Tennis Fool
04-16-2005, 09:32 PM
Sjengster: Maybe you should start a thread, "Players who lost their minds after retirement" :lol:

Whistleway
04-17-2005, 02:16 AM
[deleted out]

federer express
04-17-2005, 02:21 AM
Seriously, I wouldn't be surprised if McEnroe's call to bring back wooden racquets is based on that loss - in his autobiography he calls Curren "the Mark Philippoussis of the 80s", so that says a lot about his game. At least he has a case for wanting the wooden models back given that he played with them in his prime, unlike Becker who is an absolute raging hypocrite for agreeing with Mac when he was one of the first major practitioners of the power game.

am not sure if it makes becker a hypocrite. as a player you do what you can to win. becker took the game to a new level in terms of power yes. at the time he didn't have to woory about tennis as a spectacle, he was a player just trying to win. now however, like the rest of us, he wants to watch the most entertaining tennis possible.

that said, i think bringing back wooden rackets (which thankfully will never happen) is a ridiculously bad idea!!

TennisLurker
04-17-2005, 02:41 AM
Imagine trying to hit winners on clay against Coria, playing with wood rackets!!

I think modern rackets were very good for men tennis on clay, and the women, no one wants moonballing girls or those sukova shriver serve volleyers.

tennischick
04-17-2005, 04:17 AM
He also reportedly took steroids to get back to the top in 1987...
is this fact or Tatum-speak :eek:

WyveN
04-17-2005, 07:25 AM
Rumour is Mac became a fan of cocaine, not steroids shortly after 1984.

Action Jackson
04-17-2005, 07:27 AM
Rumour is Mac became a fan of cocaine, not steroids shortly after 1984.

He was friends with Vitas Cokealitis so there would be a good chance that he might have had some of the snow.

Action Jackson
04-17-2005, 07:30 AM
Wilander reached the top in 1988 and once he did that it was over for him. He wasn't prepared to do the work to stay there and once he reached his end goal, his motivation for the game dropped off and hence that's why his game fell away. It would have eventually just like all champions, but it hit him after he reached # 1.

WyveN
04-17-2005, 07:32 AM
Vitas Cokealitis

:lol:

Action Jackson
04-18-2005, 09:12 PM
I always thought that Vitas had sinusitis all this time.

Pea
04-18-2005, 09:26 PM
I believe Tatum did speak about his cocaine addiction in her book.

alfonsojose
04-19-2005, 01:25 AM
I always thought that Vitas had sinusitis all this time.
Whos' that sexy guy on your avatar? :drool:

Auscon
04-19-2005, 06:51 AM
one question for those who recall the media back in the day;....when Wilander won his 3/4, was there anything like the talk there is of Federer at the end of 04, possibly being one of the greatest of all time etc?

Action Jackson
04-19-2005, 08:09 AM
one question for those who recall the media back in the day;....when Wilander won his 3/4, was there anything like the talk there is of Federer at the end of 04, possibly being one of the greatest of all time etc?

Not at all. His name was Mats Wilander and that was the reason, always was and always will be underrated, just like Lendl but for different reasons.

YoursTruly
04-20-2005, 12:28 AM
Wilander reached the top in 1988 and once he did that it was over for him. He wasn't prepared to do the work to stay there and once he reached his end goal, his motivation for the game dropped off and hence that's why his game fell away. It would have eventually just like all champions, but it hit him after he reached # 1.


Yes, there are some players like this, even people in everyday life. And they're content with what they've achieved. They're not materialistic or not greedy, but humble in their abilities.
Mats is a good example of this, another is Kimiko Date. She was nowhere in Mats' kind of level, but she reached no.4 in the world, won titles and beat top players and was making consistent successful results, she made the 1996 Wimbledon semis while giving Graf a match, and then by the end of that year while still in her mid-20s, she called it quits because she stated that she had reached her maximum possible potential and she was happy.