Copa Davis 2000 [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Copa Davis 2000

Vera
12-19-2002, 12:37 AM
As mentioned, I've just gotten my Davis Cup 2000 year book. Very exciting. I was gonna post some quote on Hackie's DC 2000 tape thread. But, what the hack, this deserves a new thread :D. I wish I have a scanner to put some pics in but I don't, sorry. This is the next best thing to the DC tape. I don't have the DC tape yet so in the mean time, I'm satisfied with the book. :)

What I want is to do some quotes here to share. I think most of us are very familiar with Spain's road to the Davis Cup 2000. So I'll focus on those parts that I've never read before anywhere else. The book is written by an English journalist, so no bias :). I think some of you have the book too, so feel free to join in and do the same thing.

Chloe le Bopper
12-19-2002, 12:40 AM
Oohhh - I was going to order this book!

Chapters here only has 1998, 1999, and 2001 :rolleyes:

So i would have had to order from Amazon.

I still will when I can afford it. Do share :)

Leo7
12-19-2002, 12:43 AM
awesome Vera. how exciting! and i'd love to read some quotes! :bounce: D

Vera
12-19-2002, 12:43 AM
This is the part I like the most, bcos...well, it's pretty obvious, let's read:

This paragraph is from the chapter on the Final, it's before Rafter and JC's match:

-From an hour into Hewitt's match, Rafter had been trying to get his head around the task ahead of him in what might be the last chance he had to get his name inscribed on the old punch bowl. Every time Hewitt fell behind, his heart deflated. Then came his teammate's ultimate glory and Rafter was elated. It was a lot for body and soul to take.

The same, if not more, had to be true of Ferrero, a twenty-year-old of inordinate skills who had dazzled in reaching the semifinal of Roland Garros in May. But this? This was something else. "I am very calm," he said on the day before the Final. "Do not worry about me, I will be fine." One had to admire his sangfroid.-

Leo7
12-19-2002, 12:49 AM
oh i love it, Vera! this book sounds terrific. you say there are pictures also? then i need to get myself a copy i think.. and of course the tape also :D

Vera
12-19-2002, 12:50 AM
Hi you guys :wavey:

Lots of typing coming but I'm glad you guys are excited about it too. This book is really about character of the players involved in the Davis Cup, I think. This is what I like about it. It's not just a description of the event.

Becca, I ordered from Amazon.ca, the price is a lot lower than in Amazon.com, at least right now. But while you can't buy it now, I'll try to post as much as possible. And even if you know all the stories, it's worth keeping.

Vera
12-19-2002, 12:57 AM
Also like this one very much. This is JC at his debut in the QF, after his first match against Kafel.

-"Juan Carlos was just unbelievable, "Corretja said. "He is going to be the new star in our country and across the world. It is not just because he is a great player but he is also such a nice guy." Ferrero might have been daunted by the prospect of facing the former world number 1, Yevgeny Kafelnikov, but if he was, he didn't show it. "I slept very well the night before," he said. "I rememberd what Alex had said to me, that I didn't have to prove anything to anybody, just to go out there and play my game."

Such wise words from Alex, and Juanqui listened well too.

RogiFan
12-19-2002, 01:03 AM
:) Hi Vera!

Just posted on the other thread about this book, which I have. But it's great that you're quoting from it! The book is very good and worth it for the articles and the pix!

For you Juanqui fans, there is an article all about him and it's really neat! As I posted before, he said [before the DC00 final rubber] "Sunday will come quietly..."! ;)

I think I mentioned this before but Juanqui was the "image" of the Valencia tourism in Spain last year! Pretty cool, eh?? :D :cool:

TennisHack
12-19-2002, 01:20 AM
Oooh, this book sounds wonderful!! I never knew there was such a thing :eek: so I'll have to check it out.

Keep the quotes coming, Vera! :bounce:

Vera
12-19-2002, 01:32 AM
This piece, we've probably read it somewhere before. But since it appears in the INTRODUCTION of this book, besides, I really like how the paragraph ends :D :

-The Spanish captain Javier Duarte, having made history, was equally impassioned. After the Australians left, the Spanish danced. And danced. And danced some more.

They went on to a disco called Gaslight, where the players ended up onstage, and Ferrero, the lad with the face of a choirboy, performed what a local paper called "un simpatico y discreto striptease." There were shades of Australia's 1999 hero, Mark Philippoussis, in Nice, but without the accompanying female distractions.

By the time the kid presented himself just before noon the next day for a marathon session of interviews, the Davis Cup had done this for him: Sergio Tacchini signed him up for a four-year shirt contract; the tourist office of his home province, Valencia, tabled a bid to become his leading sponsor; Spain's top communications company, Telefonica, offered what it called a "supercontracto"; and the citizens in his hometown of Onterniente circulated a petition to raise a monument in his honor. Ferrero had dinner that night at McDonald's. -

Dissident
12-19-2002, 01:33 AM
Thanks Vera! :wavey:
Great stuff! :D
Keep it coming, please...

Dissident
12-19-2002, 01:39 AM
lol @ McDonald´s.
He was THE KING for a day, and could order Lunatic Shrimp and they would give ´em to him. And he chose a Big Mac?? hehe, how cool! :)

RogiFan
12-19-2002, 01:43 AM
Originally posted by Dissident
lol @ McDonald´s.
He was THE KING for a day, and could order Lunatic Shrimp and they would give ´em to him. And he chose a Big Mac?? hehe, how cool! :)

LUNATIC SHRIMP??! for lunatics?

You know Juanqui's fave food is MEAT, esp. McDo!!! :p He's a cutie!! Que mono es, nuestro Juanqui!! Viva el rey! ;)

Dissident
12-19-2002, 01:46 AM
Lunatic shrimps, like shrimps who live in the moon.... :p
hehehe... I thought it was cool he wanted to have something as simple as McD :D

Vera
12-19-2002, 01:57 AM
Okay, this is the chapter of the Final Round. It's really long so I'll just picked those interesting part. This is how the chapter begins:

HISTORY IN THE MAKING

Juan Carlos Ferrero was wrong. "Sunday will come quietly," he said in the characteristically understated way he has with a foreign tongue. Instead, Sunday, December 10, was to be the day this pencil-slim son of Onteniente surrendered his boyhood. It was the day, too, that Spain shed its status as the nearly country of the Davis Cup.

As an intoxicating combination, these two images, of fearless youth and deep-seated desire, proved too potent for the defending champions Australia, the nation that had done more than any other to illuminate the event's first century and be everything that Spain itself wanted to be.

That you reached page 18 of Monday's edition of the Barcelona newspaper Sport before there was mention of the city's illustrious football team was a compelling measure of the magnitude of Spain's tennis success. "La conquistaros" screamed the headline on the front. The Conquerors. And so it felt for the country that had dispensed with the old, failed formula and came up with a prototype it believed could usher it to glory. And glorious it was.

Ferrero, named Juan Carlos after the King of Spain, was lifted off his feet and greeted with a warm clasp of hands from the man himself - singularly the most captivating moment of his adolescence. The King strode onto the court at a rapturous Palau Sant Jordi to hug each and every one of his victorious Spanish team. He then walked across to pat the cheek of Australian Lleyton Hewitt as a kind-hearted father would a son.

In that moment, maybe, he hoped to cement a reconciliation between winners and losers - a defining moment in sport that sends a flutter through the hearts of those who have never experienced anything like this before, and that grips at the guts of those who have come so close but not quite made it.-

TennisHack
12-19-2002, 02:01 AM
Originally posted by Vera
That you reached page 18 of Monday's edition of the Barcelona newspaper Sport before there was mention of the city's illustrious football team was a compelling measure of the magnitude of Spain's tennis success.

:eek::eek::eek:

LOL, anybody else feeling the excitment of two years passed?

Ferrero, named Juan Carlos after the King of Spain, was lifted off his feet and greeted with a warm clasp of hands from the man himself - singularly the most captivating moment of his adolescence. The King strode onto the court at a rapturous Palau Sant Jordi to hug each and every one of his victorious Spanish team. He then walked across to pat the cheek of Australian Lleyton Hewitt as a kind-hearted father would a son.

Wait -- is this saying the King of Spain walked on court and hugged everyone and patted Hewitt on the cheek? Because I know for a fact that Juanqui didn't stride anywhere after his win -- he was carried on the shoulders of Alex Corretja :D

The King, like I said, was so cute during the match. I could totally see him doing something like that :D

Vera
12-19-2002, 02:02 AM
This is the last part of that chapter, there's a lot in between but I'm not doing it right now, but I thought you should at least get the closure of the chapter:

- Ferrero was asked if the win would change his life. "It's definitely a great, great experience for the future and other tournaments," he replied. "I need to take the profit from this and I am only twenty. The future is everything now."

No Juan Carlos, this was no quiet Sunday. It was the loudest you might ever have in your life. -

TennisHack
12-19-2002, 02:06 AM
Originally posted by Vera
No Juan Carlos, this was no quiet Sunday. It was the loudest you might ever have in your life. -

Well, it may be the loudest, but I hope he has a few more competing moments there -- like a Roland Garros crown or two? ;)

Thanks, for that, Vera :) I'll have to bump up my match thread so these can be right together. I still have yet to see the match all the way through :eek: though this makes me want to go put in the tape RIGHT NOW! ;)

RogiFan
12-19-2002, 02:11 AM
Originally posted by TennisHack


Well, it may be the loudest, but I hope he has a few more competing moments there -- like a Roland Garros crown or two? ;)

Thanks, for that, Vera :) I'll have to bump up my match thread so these can be right together. I still have yet to see the match all the way through :eek: though this makes me want to go put in the tape RIGHT NOW! ;)

Ooh! I want that tape!!! that match!!! :p

Vera
12-19-2002, 02:14 AM
Oh, maybe I should include this part too. After he won the Hewitt match...

- He sank to his knees, fell onto his back, and the next few minutes were lost as Duarte leapt on top of him - not something to be recommended :D (LMAO) - and the rest of the Spanish contingent followed en masse. Hewitt shook the empire's hand, took Newcombe's, and was in the dressing room before Ferrero had staggered back to his feet.

And so the blond boy king of Spanish tennis was swept off his feet to meet the King himself, and in celebration of the moment he delivered the bauble they had waited sixty-five years to raise. Ferrero was carried on the shoulders of Alex Corretja to his blue-blooded namesake who leaned down from the front row of the VIP box to shake the hands that had finally grasped the coveted Davis Cup.

He had the expression of a kid not exactly sure of what he had done. Being acclaimed a conquering hero was a bit too much for him, but he rose to the occasion and carried the Palau Sant Jordi around like a matador at a kill. It probably felt like he had tweaked a bull by the tail, for his 6-2, 7-6,6-4, 6-4 victory over Hewitt spanned three hours and forty-seven minutes of emotion-charged tennis, most of the time spent trading brilliance and brawn from the baseline. -

Vera
12-19-2002, 02:20 AM
Originally posted by TennisHack


Well, it may be the loudest, but I hope he has a few more competing moments there -- like a Roland Garros crown or two? ;)

Thanks, for that, Vera :) I'll have to bump up my match thread so these can be right together. I still have yet to see the match all the way through :eek: though this makes me want to go put in the tape RIGHT NOW! ;)

Hey, TMC final was pretty loud, and they chanted Ferrero in Chinese :D. I love to watch that DC match too. I must order it soon, well, I wish I win a lottery or 2 in the near future to have the money to, cos I'm dying to watch that match, 3 hours and 47 minutes of pure joy and excitement :D .

Okay, enough typing for today. I hope you guys enjoy these as much as I do. You know, those things he did, like saying those really calm words, eating at McDonald after the biggest triumph of his life, dancing without the female distraction:o :D and his understated way of a personality...that's what I like about him.

Vera
12-19-2002, 02:21 AM
Can someone tell me what is Palau Sant Jordi ?

RogiFan
12-19-2002, 02:22 AM
:) for those lucky enough to have seen both that DC00 match AND the entire TMC Shanghai final, how w/you rate those matches [apart fr the fact that Juanqui lost in Shanghai, of course]? Which was more exciting, nailbiting, dramatic, tense, intense, rousing, up and down, etc.

Just really curious! I love those kinds of matches -- they are very rare!! [my MOM loved the Shanghai final exc. for Juanqui's loss -- she's going to be cheering for him in 2003, along w the rest of this forum!!! -- well I'm rooting for Rogi too of course!!] ;)

RogiFan
12-19-2002, 02:25 AM
Originally posted by Vera
Can someone tell me what is Palau Sant Jordi ?

Vera, the Palau Sant Jordi [palau is Catalan language for palace] is the venue or hall where the DC00 was played -- it's quite modern, was designed by the Japanese architect Isozaki and is neat-looking. It's in the area Montjuic in Barcelona, which is a "mountain" and overlooks the city and the port. I passed by the Palau S Jordi on a bus tour when I was there in October. I w/have given anything to be there at that final though!!! Imagine the atmosphere! ;) :D

Vera
12-19-2002, 02:27 AM
Oh, sounds like a magnificant looking place. I was guessing that Palau means Palace but then the translation service couldn't give me a translation since I thought it's Spanish. But being in Barcelona, it's of course in Catalan. Thanks RF.

Chloe le Bopper
12-19-2002, 02:48 AM
I just saw some of the Masters Cup final.

But I would pick Davis Cup, because there is a lot more than individual performance on the line,... both had the pressure of their team and nations on their backs.

Of course, since he won, I might be biased.


They went on to a disco called Gaslight, where the players ended up onstage, and Ferrero, the lad with the face of a choirboy, performed what a local paper called "un simpatico y discreto striptease." There were shades of Australia's 1999 hero, Mark Philippoussis, in Nice, but without the accompanying female distractions.

By the time the kid presented himself just before noon the next day for a marathon session of interviews, the Davis Cup had done this for him: Sergio Tacchini signed him up for a four-year shirt contract; the tourist office of his home province, Valencia, tabled a bid to become his leading sponsor; Spain's top communications company, Telefonica, offered what it called a "supercontracto"; and the citizens in his hometown of Onterniente circulated a petition to raise a monument in his honor. Ferrero had dinner that night at McDonald's. -

THis passage was in some article I posted along time ago, that is why you had seen it before. I wondered where it had come ffrom ;)

RogiFan
12-19-2002, 03:51 AM
Originally posted by Vera
Oh, sounds like a magnificant looking place. I was guessing that Palau means Palace but then the translation service couldn't give me a translation since I thought it's Spanish. But being in Barcelona, it's of course in Catalan. Thanks RF.

Take a look at it [it was built for the 92 Olympics and also is a venue for concerts]:

http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/spain/barcelona/isozaki/isozaki.html

BTW, PJ performed there too in 25/5/00: Palau Sant Jordi: Barcelona, Spain! Check out the CD!

http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?PID=1140876&frm=sh_google

Read this:

Davis Cup Committee Announces Barcelona
as the Site for the 2000 Final

The ITF's Davis Cup Committee announced today that the Spanish Tennis Federation has selected Barcelona as the site for the 2000 Davis Cup Final between Spain and Australia. The Final will be played at the Palau Sant Jordi, a multifunctional indoor venue which can hold from 13,000 to 17,000 spectators. The Palau Sant Jordi is a part of the complex built for the 1992 Olympic Games. This is the third Davis Cup Final for Spain but the first time that they have been the host. In 1965 and 1967, Spain also reached the Davis Cup Final, losing on both occasions to Australia in Sydney and Brisbane, respectively. The defending champions Australia have won the Davis Cup title 27 times, second only to the United States with 31 titles. Australia entered the Davis Cup competition in 1905 as Australasia and won their first title in 1907 while Spain entered the competition in 1921. The Davis Cup Committee is chaired by Juan Margets (ESP). The other members of the Committee are Ismail El Shafei (EGY), Neale Fraser (AUS); Jean-Paul Loth (FRA), Harry Marmion (USA) and Nelson Nastas (BRA).


Interview with the Spanish Armada
Q. For Spanish tennis, what will it mean really to reach the final of Davis Cup
for Spanish tennis?
-JUAN CARLOS FERRERO: This is difficult.
Q. What does that mean? Now this has been history today. What will this mean for Spanish tennis?
-JUAN BALCELLS: It's a difficult question.
- ALBERT COSTA: What does that mean for Spanish tennis?
- ALEX CORRETJA: Well, a bit of surprise.
- JUAN BALCELLS: It means the dream which becomes reality and that's it. (Laughter.) What else can I tell you really?
-ALBERT COSTA: Yes, we are here just to win and that's it.
-ALEX CORRETJA: It means that the work means something and the technical committee and the colleagues and the players, I mean to work very hard just means the result.
And if all the physical work, et cetera, and training and sacrifices, that without all this, we wouldn't be here. This is the only way. Juan Carlos has been working very hard; otherwise, at 20 years old he wouldn't be here. I've been working three years. Albert, all the others, all the technical team, everybody, our doctor, all the coaches, etcetera, everybody has been working very hard indeed to arrive here today.
-JUAN CARLOS FERRERO: This is what I wanted to say. (Laughter.) (Applause.)

Dissident
12-19-2002, 03:41 PM
Arata Isozaki is a great achitect. He worked with Santiago Calatrava during the Olympics time, designing buildings for the event. Santiago has some of the most beautiful buildings in thw whole world.
Arata is japanese, and Santiago is spanish. :)

Palau Sant Jordi is one of the best things they made for the 92 Olympics. Theres the Swimming Complex that I remember is awesome too. ;)

RogiFan
12-19-2002, 04:23 PM
:) Ola, Diss!

Didn't Calatrava design those sleek, slender bridges too? I saw a book on him in an art book shop in town -- he has lovely designs! Isozaki -- what else did he design? I know there's sth but I can't remember.

I see Mrs. B. took exception to being cast as a Black man w an afro!!

Hope she can view the other movies!! ;)

Tell me, Diss, have you ever seen Guga live at a tournament (in Brasil or elsewhere)? He was in TO but I didn't see him at all either on court or anywhere else! He didn't do well though w his injury (Pavel beat him :mad: ).

Vera
12-20-2002, 06:36 AM
Originally posted by RogiFan
Take a look at it [it was built for the 92 Olympics and also is a venue for concerts]:

BTW, PJ performed there too in 25/5/00: Palau Sant Jordi: Barcelona, Spain! Check out the CD!


Thx for the links, RF. The place looks great, I like the spacious surrounding, that it's surrounded by blue sky. Can't try the PJ link though, soundless computer:( :o. I can imagine the atmosphere of the Davis Cup final there. Too bad we never have anything happening in where I am. Well, maybe we'll get the winter olympics here in the near future.

Vera
12-20-2002, 06:44 AM
So in the book, in the President's message, they talked about this:

- Record audiences watched the Final around the world and, in Spain, over twenty-two million people followed their country's fortunes with a market share of over 55 percent watching the presentation of the coveted trophy on sunday. -

Sounds impressive. They also said 95% of the top players make time in their schedules to participate in Davis Cup. That's about right. I mean, this is an individual sports and Davis Cup is the only time that they are actually playing in a team environment for their country. So there's those world team champ or Hopman Cup or sth, but I don't really care of those cos I actually have no idea of any of those other format. Davis Cup is what matters, I think.

Vera
12-20-2002, 06:51 AM
There's 7 pics of JC in the book, 3 of them are full page. Even you might have seen those pics somewhere in the internet or not. I think it's worth it, I love to have a hard copy of the pics.

Since some of you are going to get this book in the future, I don't know if I will ruin your exciting if I post everything here. So I want to ask, should I continue? I was gonna type up Juanqui's profile but I want to ask first before I do that. Let me know.

Dissident
12-20-2002, 12:37 PM
Originally posted by RogiFan
:) Ola, Diss!

Didn't Calatrava design those sleek, slender bridges too? I saw a book on him in an art book shop in town -- he has lovely designs! Isozaki -- what else did he design? I know there's sth but I can't remember.

I see Mrs. B. took exception to being cast as a Black man w an afro!!

Hope she can view the other movies!! ;)

Tell me, Diss, have you ever seen Guga live at a tournament (in Brasil or elsewhere)? He was in TO but I didn't see him at all either on court or anywhere else! He didn't do well though w his injury (Pavel beat him :mad: ).

http://www.skewarch.com/architects/calatrava/alam1.jpg One of Calatrava´s Masters Pieces. Alamillo Bridge, in Sevilla, Spain.
He has some other works that are wonderful. :D
I will check Isozaki later, since I have to go to a doctor now.

And I´ve seen Guga live twice on Davis Cup. Against Spain in 1998, when they lost to Corretja, Moya and Javier Sanchez, and last year against Australia, when they lost to Rafter, Hewitt etc.. Didn´t have luck untill now. :(

Chloe le Bopper
12-20-2002, 10:14 PM
Vera - it would not ruin it for me at all. If you'd like to share, I would love to read it.

I won't be able to afford this book for at least another 6 months.

If other people really don't want to see it, then I"m sure they will say as much.

REgardless- it is appreciated how much time you are putting in to type this stuff out :)

Dissident
12-21-2002, 02:38 AM
I guess we could say like this:

Vera should write if she feels like. If someone is planning on buying the book and dont want the surprise spoiled, they simply dont read further than this message. ;)

Vera
12-21-2002, 04:07 AM
The whole point of doing this thread is to share the excitement. So I just want to make sure :). And Becca and everyone, you are welcomed, the pleasure is mine, really.

So here comes the Profile :D :

"I think it's going to be fun to be famous."

He is known as the Mosquito. Try swatting him away and he becomes even more aggressive. With his blond hair, all-black outfit, and purple-stringed racquet, Ferrero is making the vivid splashes of color across men's tennis that compatriot Sergio Garcia made in golf and goalkeeper Iker Casillas:hearts: made in the Real Madrid club's return to European prominence.

These trendy ninos are at the forefront of a Spanish sporting renaissance. But while the footballers and golfers of that passionate country have enjoyed a garlanded place in the hearts and minds of the public, the reaction to their tennis players has, for the most part, been strictly small print.

Manuel Santana's Wimbledon victory the same summer England won the World Cup inspired a generation of Brits to change their holiday destinations and seek out the beaches of the Costa Brava. Since Santana's graceful game earned him three Grand Slam championships in the mid-sixies, Manuel Orantes and Andres Gimeno flirted with fame until Sergei Bruguera burst to prominence at Roland Garros in 1993.

The mantle was passed to Carlos Moya, the 1998 French Open champion and briefly world number 1 last year, and Alex Corretja, who came back from two sets to love down to beat Moya and win the ATP Tour World championship in 1998, rising to number 3 in the world the same year.

Now Ferrero is the lauded one. At a glitzy celebration at the Monte Carlo Sporting Club in April, the twenty-year-old was acclaimed as the ATP Tour Newcomer of the Year, joining a distinguished cast that includes the late Vitas Gerulaitus, John McEnroe, Patrick Rafter, and Mark Philippouissis.

Vera
12-21-2002, 04:22 AM
Con't

Bad days have been few and far between for Chavalito (the "little kid") since he broke into the world's top 100 in 1999 and won his first tour title in a converted bull-ring in Mallorca. It was only a matter of time before he was elected to his country's Davis Cup team, walloping Yevgeny Kafelnikov, the Russian former world number 1, in straight sets to cement Spain's place in the 2000 semifinals.

"Last year, I was the promise. Now I am the reality," said Ferrero. "I would like everyone in Spain and the world to know that I am a strong competitor."

There is nothing of Santana's grace in Ferrero's game; indeed, he is very much in the Spanish vogue, pounding the ball with virulent topspin on the forehand and playing double-fisted on the background. "I play very fast, very physical. The Davis Cup was a fantastic experience for me. I expected to be nervous, but I slept very well the night before. Six thousand people in the stadium were supporting me and it felt so good, so different. I think it's going to be fun to be famous."

Ferrero uses his successes to pay tribute to his mother, Rosario, who died from breast cancer four years ago. "When I won my first tournament in Majorca I sent a kiss in the sky to my mother," he said. "It was the same after I won in Davis Cup, one kiss for her. I play for her all the time."

Ferrero was within one step of the Roland Garros final before defeat in the semis to Gustavo Kuerten. On the way, he had shaken several leading stars to their roots, notably Philippoussis and, in the quarters, his compatriot and surrogate brother, Corretja.

Corretja is full of admiration: "The good thing is, he is an even better guy than he is a player, and that is really important. He has many things to learn, but he is going to be good on every surface, believe me. I can see that Juan Carlos and Lleyton Hewitt are going to be the best guys on the tour. They are both great talents. It is only a matter of time before Juan Carlos wins something really big."

Little did Corretja know that his words in the spring would come true on a never-to-be-forgotten Sunday afternoon in Barcelona in December, when the kid took flight on the wings of greatness.
______________________

:angel:

TennisHack
12-21-2002, 08:44 PM
I can't get the look-inside work :rolleyes: But I think this is the book, no? :drool:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0789305208/ref=lib_rd_btb/102-2830631-4349746?v=glance&s=books

RogiFan
12-21-2002, 08:54 PM
Originally posted by TennisHack
I can't get the look-inside work :rolleyes: But I think this is the book, no? :drool:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0789305208/ref=lib_rd_btb/102-2830631-4349746?v=glance&s=books
Hi Hackie!

Wow, thanks for those Juanqui matches! You do have a lot of time! It takes forever to transcribe commentary!

Yep, that's the book alright! I was hoping to one day have Alex sign my copy of the book.

RogiFan
12-21-2002, 08:57 PM
Originally posted by Dissident


http://www.skewarch.com/architects/calatrava/alam1.jpg One of Calatrava´s Masters Pieces. Alamillo Bridge, in Sevilla, Spain.
He has some other works that are wonderful. :D
I will check Isozaki later, since I have to go to a doctor now.

And I´ve seen Guga live twice on Davis Cup. Against Spain in 1998, when they lost to Corretja, Moya and Javier Sanchez, and last year against Australia, when they lost to Rafter, Hewitt etc.. Didn´t have luck untill now. :(

Diss!

I love that bridge! It's so graceful-looking and light! It was the first thing I noticed as I was entering Sevilla a couple of years ago -- it was around 9pm and I had just arrived from London, UK and I was amazed at the heat of the night -- in October!

Was listening to some old Brazilian jazz again... love that stuff! Aguas de marco and all that! I really need to see the lyrics and listen to the singing at the same time to learn Brazilian Portuguese!!

RogiFan
12-24-2002, 03:06 AM
Originally posted by Vera


Thx for the links, RF. The place looks great, I like the spacious surrounding, that it's surrounded by blue sky. Can't try the PJ link though, soundless computer:( :o. I can imagine the atmosphere of the Davis Cup final there. Too bad we never have anything happening in where I am. Well, maybe we'll get the winter olympics here in the near future.

Hi Vera:

I just remembered that the European Music Awards were held in the Palau Sant Jordi a couple of weeks ago -- it was on TV. So it's quite a popular venue for a variety of events -- and it's big! Lots of atmosphere there! Can you imagine the DC00?! ;)

Vera
12-27-2002, 06:37 AM
Originally posted by RogiFan

Yep, that's the book alright! I was hoping to one day have Alex sign my copy of the book.

Hey RF, I checked the calendar for next year and TMS TO is a week later than last year. So now there's a week in between Kitzbuhel and Toronto. Maybe Alex won't be too tired to play Toronto in 2003 and you can finally get a autograph. In fact, I want very much to go to Montreal too. Hopefully I can make it too so I can also have my copy signed :). I think it's great that they make the change of schedule. For the spaniards, they will now have more time to adjust the time difference before they have to play a TMS in the States.

Vera
12-27-2002, 06:40 AM
Originally posted by RogiFan


Hi Vera:

I just remembered that the European Music Awards were held in the Palau Sant Jordi a couple of weeks ago -- it was on TV. So it's quite a popular venue for a variety of events -- and it's big! Lots of atmosphere there! Can you imagine the DC00?! ;)

Oh, I missed that. I can imagine the DC final there. The noise must be deafening. Hopefully, Spain will play another DC final in the near future and we will get a chance to watch it live, well, that's me dreaming out loud about the watching part:( .