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for all you Marcelo Rios fans (doubt there are many)

Devotee
03-22-2005, 10:42 PM
Marcelo Rios: The Man We Barely Knew
http://www.sportsmediainc.net/tennisweek/RIOS-02-s.mull.jpg
Photo By Susan Mullane By Scoop Malinowski
03/22/2005

"Be not afraid of greatness: some are born great, some achieve greatness and
some have greatness thrust upon them." — Shakespeare.


"There is no great genius without some touch of madness." — Seneca.

No tennis player ever awed us with his beautiful talents quite like Marcelo Rios. Even his name flowed smoothly, like that of some legendary artist from centuries ago.

The great Rios turned pro in 1994 and went on to win 18 career singles titles, including five Masters Series. He produced his finest season in 1998, capturing three consecutive Masters Series titles (Indian Wells, Key Biscayne and Rome) along with four other titles. Rios even became No. 1 — at the age of 22 — for six weeks after conquering Andre Agassi in a captivating performance on Key Biscayne to become the first South American to rise to the top of the ATP rankings.

But for how familiar we were with the Rios style on the court — that leaping two-handed backhand, the graceful and artful movements, those uncanny angles, the Chilean chanting from his flag-waving supporters — there was always an aura of mystery about Rios. Why did he seem so often to be joyless on the court? For what reasons was he so reluctant to do media interviews or engage with the fans or even other players? Was his reputation for being unapproachable an act of self-defense because he was actually very shy?

The enigma of Rios will continue to confound us now that he retired (due to repeated leg and back injuries) last summer from professional tennis at the age of 28. His last ATP matches were in April of 2004, losses in Satellite events in Ecuador and Mexico City to Mariano Delfino and Juan Pablo Guzman. Suddenly the career of Rios was over, without any final applause or a befitting tribute.

Even the idea for this article only came by a chance comment during an unrelated interview with former Australian Open winner Thomas Johansson. The Swede just so happened to share this anecdote of Rios when I asked him for a funny tennis memory, something from tennis that made him laugh:

"All the guys have different humors, outside of the court," Johansson said. "A player that I really liked to watch was Rios. I think he was one of the best players, ever. Because I remember one year when he was gonna play Thomas Muster in Rome. And I saw the press conference before the match. And they asked him, so how are you gonna be able to beat Muster, because he only had lost one or two matches on clay so far. And Rios said, ‘The guy should be happy if he gets like a couple of games.’And Rios went out there the next day and killed him, 1 and 2. And that's for me unbelievable. I really liked to watch him. I didn't like to play him though. But I really liked to watch him."

Asked why he didn’t enjoy the experience of playing Rios, Johansson replied: "He could make you feel like it was the first time you were standing on a tennis court, you know [smiling]? So I hated to play him. You could get killed by him easily, 1 and 1 or something like that, and you could have played a good match."

Johansson's high regard for Rios sparked a curiosity to investigate further insights about Rios from others in the tennis community. If a Grand Slam champion like Thomas Johansson had such respect for Rios, just what else would some of the other ATP insiders have to say?

So here's an interesting and insightful collection of memories and lasting images of one of the great tennis players of this modern era — Marcelo Rios:

Jimmy Arias, former No. 4 in the world: "My one memory of Marcelo Rios is — I was retired for a number of years already — and he was ranked No. 2 in the world in 1998. And he lost first round of Wimbledon. And made some disparaging remarks about Wimbledon. He came to Bollettieri's because he had to practice for the rest of the summer. And I was the only one there. Everyone else that played was still at Wimbledon. So I was a decent enough player for him to practice with. So Nick called, ‘Can you come? Marcelo Rios is here for a couple of weeks?’ So we play the first day, the first set — and he's not trying at all [smiles]. He's just sort of lounging around. And I win the set 6-4. And as is my way, when I play a top guy of today, I find a way to give them a little jab, just to see how they react. So we finish the set and as we're shaking hands after, I said, ‘Marcelo, what would you rank me if I were playing today? Two or three in the world?’ And he said, ‘Man, tomorrow, I'm going to kick your ass!’And I liked his attitude. And actually, some of the top players, when I give them a hard time, they actually didn't want to play with me anymore. When I would say something like that, they would get insulted. They didn't want to play with me. Rios came at me. He said, ‘No, I'm gonna kick your ass tomorrow.’ And sure enough, we came back the next day, and for about three games, he was fired up. And I was playing well and was down 3-love. And he couldn't keep that intensity, because it's practice. He's just so relaxed. Eventually the set was close. But I did see for those three games what talent he had. He would hit a couple of forehands in a rally, and with that same swing — not a bigger backswing, nothing — he'd suddenly hit it 20 miles-per-hour harder. Down the line for a winner. You didn't know how that happened. You couldn't understand how the same swing produced such a different pace on the ball. So that's part of what he had that the other players couldn't figure out."

Hernan Gumy, former top 50 ATP player from Argentina: "I have a personal memory about him because we were kind of close. He didn't get along with many players. But we were kind of friends in a way. And we play against each other many times. The greatness of his game — I didn't see anybody who play like him in the past 10 years. All the most difficult things he made it easy. I mean, it was so nice to watch him play. It would have been great to have him for a couple of more years. He's still young but, every time I spoke with him, he said that he was not made to travel 25 weeks a year. Or play 20 tournaments. He loved to play the big tournaments but he didn't like the whole life of a tennis player. So you have to understand that also. But I think he was a great. He was a nice guy from, I repeat, my side. And he was a helluva tennis player...The fans and the media never got to him — really close. I think you have to check the background. In Chile, when he was a kid, he had some problems with the media when he was 16. When he stepped up to complain about something about the Federation. So maybe after that he took some distance from the media around the world. With the fans also. Like I said, he was gifted to play tennis. But he was maybe not gifted to do whatever is outside to the inside of the tennis court. Because he loved to practice, sacrifice. He loved to compete. But everything else outside of the tennis — you name it, the fans, the kids — he wasn't able to do it. Because of his character, he didn't enjoy to do that. He's a guy who, I believe, he do things that he enjoy...We were close. I mean, he was a sensitive guy. Personally, he was a guy that I really liked. I know that not many players like him, but I like him."

Luis Lobo, former coach: "I just have good things to talk about Marcelo. I think he was the most professional player that I've ever seen. I know the people think of him another way, but for me he was a very good professional. He was one of the best players in the world, for sure. For sure he's one of the best players in history. For me, yes. Because, about tennis, if he made a Grand Slam or No. 1 for more time, for sure he's one of the best guys I ever see. Very talented. If you play against him on a day when he's focused, very tough to beat him, very tough. He had so many great matches — Monte Carlo against Kuerten, Paris against Albert Costa, indoors when he make Singapore — so many good matches. (What held him back from winning a Slam?) It's a good question, I don't know. I'm not a psychologist [laughs]. He was very close to winning a Grand Slam. He lost the final (in Australian Open to Korda in '98), and then personal problems. I don't know. One part of each player — some players when they're this close to the final, they make it. And others, no, they can't do it. But I think he was injured a long time too. And the moment for him was a stress fracture in the lower back, and problems with legs...He was very nice person. Very nice. When he was in a tournament, he would be alone and no say hello to anybody. Just a few guys. He didn't believe too much in the people. And I think he was right. Because in tennis, the world is very tough to be friends."

Fabrice Santoro: "I played Marcelo three times. You could say, on the court, he was a great, great player. And one of the greats of the game. He was to serve well and he hit the ball really, really well on both sides. He hit the backhand moving well too. I remember when he won Indian Wells and Key Biscayne in a row, he was playing one of the best tennis I've ever seen...We played three times, he beat me twice. It was always a good match. Because I like to use the spins and slice on the court and when I was playing against him, it was a very fun match, but it was a very good competition. His talents — one of the best. A lefty Agassi. (What was he missing?) Sometimes a little bit short physically. Because other guys can serve really well. He can play well forehands, backhands, moves pretty well. But five sets for two weeks — too tough for him."

Wayne Ferreira: "He was really good because he took the ball early and he had a lot of feel on the ball. He moved pretty well and he was a good competitor. But he was so good at finding where the ball was going and taking it so early...I didn't really have a problem with him. I actually did pretty well against him. I beat him most of the times that I played against him. I just felt like I could overpower him a lot. He got a lot of balls back and he took it early but, to me, he was a little bit soft at times. He didn't hit the ball that hard. I felt like he hit the ball, I could still run down everything. I could overpower him. But he was difficult. He could get a lot of balls back, make you play a lot of balls. I had to be in great shape and I had to be really competitive and concentrate a lot to beat him. (Why did he not win a Slam?) Maybe for that reason. I think he was just a little bit soft. Guys like Pete and Andre — on a regular basis — when it got tight, tough like this, they used to overpower him."

Roger Federer: (When asked back in 2000 which was his favorite tennis player to watch): "I like Rios. I like his game. When he's playing well, he's fun to watch. Because he's a different type of guy."

Vera Zvonareva: "I think Rios was a great tennis player. I watched him play maybe a year and a half ago in Washington. And I think he was a great player to watch for me. I think he was like an actor on the court. And I love it because he was doing his show. Everybody knows it's tough to play tennis, especially when it's 100 degree. And he was like performing like an actor. You can always see his emotions. He wasn't just like standing there doing his job, you could see how he feels."

Patrick McEnroe (his ESPN commentary during the first set of the 2002 Nasdaq- 100 semifinals vs. Agassi): "I'm not even sure if he goes out there with a strategy, Cliff. He just goes out there and just swings away, angles the ball, it looks like he just sort of free-wheels it out there and relies on his talent. Agassi used to do that. Agassi would just bomb the ball and just says, I'm just gonna be a shotmaker and I'm gonna rely on that. But why Agassi has won seven Slams now and Rios has won zero is because Agassi has learned to play his opponents, to play within himself, to come out there focused, to be physically fit, to have a strategy, have a gameplan...The players are just too good these days, to think you can go out there and just free-wheel it...That is SCARY right there! That is pure genius right there. What a one-two from Rios. Just launching himself into that backhand, taking it in mid-flight for the clean winner cross court (at 7-7 in the first-set tiebreak - which Rios won 9-7, but he retired after losing the second set 6-4.)."

Guillermo Vilas: "I talked to him a couple of times. He didn't talk too much. He had a strong character. It's like when you are in front of a lion — you are not going give some candy to a lion, right? Everybody knew he was like that. Some people are like that. If you give him enough space, he's okay...He play well, but he could never win something very big. He had the qualities to do that, then his body gave out. But he left his image to the players &38212; a very good way of playing and the attitude was like a rebel. He was very interesting, to add color to the game. If he wouldn't have had all those injuries, he would have been better, much better. The time he was there, he was exciting. But it's sad, because the body gave out. He was a great player, but you have to be champion of the world. He was geared to do that, but the body didn't allow him to do that. Like it happened to Muster. Muster was gearing to be No. 1. Suddenly he had the accident (hit by car in Miami) and three years after, he did it. Rios didn't have that second chance. You can say Rios was one of the most gifted ever. But not one of the best ever. Because you have to win something, you have to do a little bit more. He looked very nice, everything he did. But the body did not allow him to do it."

Ilie Nastase: "He's the worst prick I ever met. The players of today probably have the same opinion of him. Ask all the players what they think of him, you'll get the same thing. When somebody doesn't sign autographs for the kids, that is a prick for me. (What about his game?) I don't give a shit. I don't look at him. For me, he's an idiot. I don't know what else to tell about him. And that's the first time I say something about somebody like that. I think he was the worst thing for tennis. He did not deserve to be No. 1 — one or two days. To live with the other players like he did — terrible. He really was the worst. I never say anything about anybody else like this but about him I have to say this. Sorry."

Pat Cash: "Rios is one of the most talented players I've ever seen. I thought he had a control like a McEnroe. He was definitely a wasted talent but he still got to number one in the world. I loved watching him. He was brilliant. He hit the ball anywhere. Anywhere...I played doubles with him one week, in Scottsdale in '95 or '96. When I was making a comeback. We practiced quite a bit. And when I practiced with him, I never ran so much in my life. I played with a lot of the top guys in practice and he was just able to hit the ball anywhere. He used to run me everywhere. (How did you do in doubles with Rios?) Not very good. It wasn't his fault though [smiles]. I was making a bit of a comeback and I was pretty terrible. But he was a brilliant player and I was disappointed that he never actually fulfilled his potential. (Get along well with him?) I got on all right with him. A lot of other guys didn't like him, that's for sure. Not many guys, I think, got along with him. And he was fine to me. We always had a good time, we practiced hard and I liked his game. And I think he appreciated somebody that was nice to him, I think."

Melchior DiGiacomo, noted tennis photographer: "I think he's one of the best players I've ever seen play the game. I've been following tennis since 1971. And I thought Rios was a bit of a throwback in many ways. He reminded me of guys like Ken Rosewall — who had so many great shots. Guys like Tom Okker who was a brilliant player. Rios was that way. But I couldn't figure Rios' head. Because I never knew where he was on the court. Whereas the older players, you always knew where their head was 7#8212; their head was, To win. At all costs. But Rios, I don't know. There's a wonderful line written by Norman Mailer in a book called 'The Bullfighter.' He's talking about how a man cannot be judged by what he is, the man is best judged at his greatest moment. (Melchior sent the exact quote to me the next day: "The one thing that can keep the sweet nerve of life alive is the knowledge that a man cannot be judged by what he is every day, but only at his greatest moment, for that is when he shows what he was intended to be..It is a Latin approach, their allegiance is to the genius of blood. So they judge a man by what he is at his best.") And that's what Rios was to me. There are times when you look at him and you say, Nobody in the world has ever done what he has just done, in terms of the match. And then you may see him the next day or two days later and you go, What happened to that guy that was out here a couple of days ago? Is it the same guy? I don't know how you get to a kid like that. Again, he was brilliant. There were other players who were like that — Mel Purcell never had a killer shot. But you had to hit him over the head with a shovel if you wanted to beat him. But Rios' head was the thing. He had every shot in the game. There was nothing he couldn't do. (How was he as a subject to shoot?) Brilliant. Because of his athleticism. He wasn't like Adriano Panatta, who was like this stand-up, at-attention Italian. He had a beautiful game but there really wasn't anything to shoot, in terms of physical action. Rios is the kind of guy that could stop on a dime and give you five cents change. He was very exciting to shoot. Connors was not very exciting to shoot, in the sense that he played basically a baseline game, rarely came to the net. And the only time Jimmy was exciting was when he pumped up the crowd. Then he was exciting. But photographing Rios during a match was always exciting. And you had to be quick, because he was quick. When guys are running as fast as he is and lunging out making shots, that's exciting for me, because he fills the frame. He's not standing up straight. But Rios was exciting. And he'll be missed. By me. I don't know about everybody else."

Carl Munnerlyn, U.S. Open locker room supervisor: "Rios was very giving. When I knew him, when he was a player, he always, after each practice, he would come in and go up to one of the attendants and always offer a pair of his shoes that he just practiced in. And even after the match. His match shoe, that he wore in the match. He'd always come up to us and give us his shoes. Every time, every day he was here. It was unbelievable how such a giving person he was. Not too many people knew him that way, but we, as locker room attendants, knew him that way — as a very giving, courteous person. And he always joked with us, he liked to joke with us. Because he saw us as people he could relate to. He was relaxed with us. And we brought out his lighter side, his personality, instead of serious all the time, like always getting ready for a match. One time I was standing next to the soda refrigerator and he walked by and gave my head a push. I turned around and Marcelo's walking out the door, smiling. So that's how I know him. He was friendly to me. In that sense, I know him that way. He was never not the slightest bit sarcastic to me. That's what I know of Marcelo Rios. Nice guy."

Petr Korda: "I beat him badly (in 1998 Australian Open final 6-2, 6-2, 6-2). It was very — actually I had the chance to see the match on video for the first time a month and a half ago. And in TV it looked completely different than it did on the court. But I remember I was really dominating and I was ready for that. I knew this was probably my last chance to win a Slam — and if I played the right game, then I could beat him. I think I really shot him down that day. I know we were hitting the balls very hard. On the TV it doesn't look like it. I was hitting balls very hard. (What kind of person was Rios?) I think that not many people knew him. Some people had problems with him, he was like a controversial, not many people did like him. But I know him, we play doubles. I don't know if it was before or after we played in Australian Open. He was a nice guy. Gifted player. And I said in Australia, he can be maybe number one. But it's most important to win the Slam. Unfortunately for him, he never achieved it. Maybe I was that reason, probably."

Jaime Fillol, former Chilean pro tennis player with six career singles titles, quarterfinalist 1975 U.S. Open: "I first met him in New York when he was a junior. And he was already playing well in Futures. We became very close. We run an AP event in Chile. We would have to many times negotiate with him, his participation, especially when he was top 10. I think he was a very good player, he had a lot of talent. Not just with his hands, but with his mind. Very good at feeling no pressure and I think that's what made him so good. There's a lot of people that have talent but when it comes to winning, they have a hard time winning. And he was winning a lot of matches at a young age. Then I think he got hurt too much, too often, he couldn't keep it up. There was criticism over his attitude — that he wouldn't fight hard enough. But I would say that his personality was not a disciplined mentality. He was very erratic in that respect. He was not a Saxon or a Slavic, he's Chilean, he's kind of moody. And if he doesn't feel good, he just doesn't try. Not because he's lazy, because he doesn't feel good. So I think that was the criticism — which was fair — in order to be a champion and stay there as champion — you have to have the discipline too. Have the discipline, as far as to be a champion."

Asked for his lasting image of Rios, Fillol replied: "Playing so well that it was so much fun to watch him play. In fact, he really could make almost anyone look like a beginner. If things were right, he would guess exactly where the ball was coming. He would anticipate. He didn't have to be strong physically to make the ball go and to have the guy run from one side to the other. I think his body didn't hold the pressure of the circuit. He was weak in his preparation, probably coming from Chile, not knowing exactly what was gonna happen if he was that good. I don't think he was prepared physically for the Tour. (Did he ever win the Chile event?) He never won the tournament, that's why I didn't mention it [smiles]. He got to the finals four times. He would make the crowd very upset because everybody was waiting for him to win the first time. He made the finals four times and lost to guys he should have beat — Slava Dosedel, Hernan Gumy and recently he lost in 2002 to David Sanchez. He was winning 6-1 and 40-love to go up 4-1 and lost the game. And then he couldn't play. He became nervous."

"He was very — the word in is Spanish, 'contradictorio' — he would do the unexpected. If you were waiting for him to say hello to you, he's not gonna say hello to you. If you didn't think he'd say hello to you, he'd come up and say hello to you. He treated people like that. Not that he didn't care for people, it was just like a game. He made a lot of enemies because of that, but I don't think he's a bad person. I would say he didn't have the same discipline you need to have off the court. Many times he would do things — I mean the President of Chile was practically disgraced by him. When he became number one and the President invited him to the Palace and he came in a shirt, looking like he was going to the beach. And the President said, ‘Marcelo would you like to say something to the people?’ ‘No, I don't want to say anything.’ So he turned the President of the country off just by being different. He didn't think it was a big occasion, but he's not a bad person.

"I saw him about two months ago in Santiago, at the gym where he was training. I was talking to his physical trainer. And Marcelo was there, although he is retired, he still goes to the gym every day and trains, so he's in good shape, other than the pain that he says he feels when he plays tennis."

"A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery." — James Joyce, Ulysses

"We don't see things as they are, we see things as we are." — — Anais Nin

"To be great is to be misunderstood." — Ralph Waldo Emerson

*Viva Chile*
03-22-2005, 10:49 PM
Thank you for the great article, Devotee :yeah:

federer express
03-22-2005, 10:59 PM
u cant like tennis and not like rios (in my humble opinion!)

Skyward
03-22-2005, 11:13 PM
Thanks for the article. I miss his tennis. :sad:

alfonsojose
03-22-2005, 11:17 PM
:tears:

*Viva Chile*
03-22-2005, 11:20 PM
"He was very — the word in is Spanish, 'contradictorio' — he would do the unexpected.

The word "contradictorio" in spanish is a synonymous of "controversial" ;)

Roger-No.1
03-22-2005, 11:27 PM
Thanks! Great article!

Fergie
03-22-2005, 11:28 PM
Thanks Devotee :yeah:

I miss Marcelo :sad: :sad: :sad:

buddyholly
03-22-2005, 11:43 PM
Nastase got it right.

tennischick
03-23-2005, 01:35 AM
Rios :worship:

i miss his game :bigcry:

But for how familiar we were with the Rios style on the court — that leaping two-handed backhand, the graceful and artful movements, those uncanny angles, the Chilean chanting from his flag-waving supporters — there was always an aura of mystery about Rios. Why did he seem so often to be joyless on the court? For what reasons was he so reluctant to do media interviews or engage with the fans or even other players? Was his reputation for being unapproachable an act of self-defense because he was actually very shy?

*Viva Chile*
03-23-2005, 01:58 AM
Nastase got it right.

If you don't understand Marcelo like Nastase doesn't... :rolleyes:

Action Jackson
03-23-2005, 02:29 AM
Thanks for posting this interview.

tennischick
03-23-2005, 02:35 AM
Nastase got it right.
Ilie is in no position to call any other tennis player a prick :o

i like Gumy's comments. you can tell who knew Rios, who tried to get to know him, and who are shooting off crap :mad:

Ponytail
03-23-2005, 05:45 AM
Thanks for the articles, he'll be missed

I think he's not that bad as the press made him out to be. He signed autographs for fans and had a smile on his face when I saw him played an exhibition.

Hendu
03-23-2005, 04:38 PM
good article.

Saumon
03-23-2005, 06:14 PM
Safin always says that his fav player's Marcelo.

Rios, Federer, Safin = the 3 very bad players coached by Lundgren :p

And Guga doesnt sign autographs for the kids: is he a prick too? :rolleyes:

jole
03-23-2005, 08:34 PM
Nice to hear from Hernan. Is interesting since he is the total opposite of Rios. Not much talent, but survived on pure grit and determination.

Grafiati
03-23-2005, 09:10 PM
It's nice for the writer to collect some opinions/thoughts about Rios... I agree with the comment that his body really let him down. He was capable of much more and wouldn't have achieved all of it because of his mentality, but he would have done more if it weren't for his body.

I found Rios fantastic to watch, especially when he was in "I care about this match" mode. After years of the American press harping on his attitude/his pile of Sour Lemon awards (don't remember name exactly), it's like he got lost in the shuffle of other players... but he was one of the best to watch, I think.

Sjengster
03-23-2005, 09:57 PM
I feel so annoyed that I only got into tennis when Rios was near the end of his career, I only got to see a handful of matches in 2002 that showcased what he was capable of. He completely dismantled Corretja in Miami by jumping into his shots and flattening out all the topspin that was coming at him from across the net, beat Kafelnikov for only the second time in eight meetings, and then gave Agassi that gruelling test in the semi-finals that ended in his retirement and the quote from him that he would have won for certain if he had been able to carry on.

Trust PMac to come up with the dumbest quote out of all those selected - Rios may never have had the discipline that Agassi displayed, but I hardly think he went out there without a gameplan and just threw flashy shot after flashy shot against his opponent. I have seen some clips of the Miami final from 98 against Agassi, he was caressing forehands into the corners, hitting backhand returns cross-court at ridiculous angles, and finding the lines with his serve. Nastase's quote is interesting, it's hard to reconcile with all the positive comments from people like Gumy and Lobo but I can certainly imagine that Rios displayed different sides to his personality depending upon whom he was talking to.

Props to him for coming up with the finest minimalist interview technique of any player in the history of the game.

NYCtennisfan
03-24-2005, 12:15 AM
Great article. Rios has had his moments where he is understandably hated, but what great athlete isn't at some time, especially one who doesn't necessarily conform to everyone's ideals about what an athelete SHOULD be like? I can think of many athletes like Barry Bonds, Randy Moss, Rasheed Wallace who are also misunderstood. Rios' ass-kicking of Agassi in that Nasdaq final when he won IW and Miami back-to-back is unforgettable.

G_Hughes
03-24-2005, 01:16 AM
I miss you genius!!!!!!!!!!
Who gives a fuck about Ilie Nastase or Ion Tiriac ? Mind your business,
" bankers " ,
Federer said that several times, GOD CAN΄T BE WRONG !!!

Auscon
03-24-2005, 01:41 AM
dont think I've ever seen Rios play, or if I did, I cant remember it


...another player who's old matches I'm looking forward to getting a hold of

liptea
03-24-2005, 01:47 AM
:woohoo: for Devotee.

I wish I had been able to see more Rios. All I remember was that one match against Agassi and he came off with an injury, still confident that he would've destroyed Andre. He made me laugh. :sad:

+alonso
03-24-2005, 03:05 AM
Yeah
Here in chile i missed so much rios :sobbing:
Good luck !
Bye :)

Jenrios
03-24-2005, 05:01 PM
Thank you so much for posting the article! I'm just rushing to go out, but will print it off and read it later! Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

RonE
03-24-2005, 05:25 PM
Yes- when Rios was it his best he was a genius at work. As was mentioned his thrashing of Agassi in the final of Miami in 1998 was an awesome sight to behold. Also he played a fanatstic match against Guga in Rome that year beat him 7-5,6-0 :eek: against the then defending RG champ!

It was a pity his career was plagued by so many injuries he could have done so much more.

*Ljubica*
03-24-2005, 06:09 PM
Thanks for the article Devotee - I was always a great Marcelo fan and I miss him a lot :sad:

CooCooCachoo
03-24-2005, 06:15 PM
u cant like tennis and not like rios (in my humble opinion!)

I don't like tennis then :sad:

When Rios retired, all I could think of was Good riddance :o Sorry, the bloke ('s game) annoyed me.

Tricky_Forehand
03-25-2005, 02:23 AM
I saw this article on Tennis Week. I like the respect given for his game. Of course, now they show him respect now that he has retired. I loved Marcelo's game and it makes things all the better that he's a leftie.

I've been missing watching Marcelo's game for the past few years. He and Pat Rafter top my list of "most missed."

In_Disguise
03-31-2005, 07:45 PM
Wayne Ferreira: "I didn't really have a problem with him. I actually did pretty well against him. I beat him most of the times that I played against him. I just felt like I could overpower him a lot. He got a lot of balls back and he took it early but, to me, he was a little bit soft at times. He didn't hit the ball that hard. I felt like he hit the ball, I could still run down everything. I could overpower him. But he was difficult. He could get a lot of balls back, make you play a lot of balls. I had to be in great shape and I had to be really competitive and concentrate a lot to beat him. (Why did he not win a Slam?) Maybe for that reason. I think he was just a little bit soft. Guys like Pete and Andre — on a regular basis — when it got tight, tough like this, they used to overpower him

What is Ferreira talking about! Rios leads their encounters by 5-3 including victories in the last 3 matches. Tennis is much more than just raw power, and Rios was at least twice the player Ferreira ever was!

http://www.atptennis.com/en/players/headtohead/head2head.asp?player1=Rios%2C+Marcelo&player2=Ferreira%2C+Wayne&playernum2=F196

Dirk
03-31-2005, 07:48 PM
Ferreria can I have some of your brownies too? :smoke:

TheBoiledEgg
03-31-2005, 07:59 PM
Marcelo, loved watching him at his best, such wonderful shots

such a pity what happened to him, never the same after the groin injuries/surgeries.

In_Disguise
03-31-2005, 08:05 PM
wonder what would happen if the '98 World no. 1 Rios played Fed today...now that would have been a rivalry for the tennis faithfuls!

Action Jackson
12-23-2005, 01:29 PM
Bump.

Rios show these guys the true respect.

1999 U.S. OPEN CHAMPIONSHIP
Flushing Meadows, New York

M. RIOS/M. Damm

6-4, 7-6, 3-6, 5-7, 6-1

An interview with:MARCELO RIOS

USTA: Questions.

Q. It was a tough match. What happened?

MARCELO RIOS: He played pretty good. I slowed down my game a little bit, but like I say, I'm not hitting very good the ball. He's played really nice to win like that.

Q. Who were your childhood heroes?

MARCELO RIOS: What is that?

Q. Who were your childhood heroes?

MARCELO RIOS: I don't understand what you say.

Q. People you admired when you were growing up?

MARCELO RIOS: Nobody.

Q. What are your hobbies and interests?

MARCELO RIOS: Nothing.

Q. What is your greatest sports moment?

MARCELO RIOS: I don't remember, man.

Q. Come on.

MARCELO RIOS: What do you want me to tell you?

Q. Just answer the questions.

MARCELO RIOS: Don't ask me questions like that.

Q. What's your favorite movies?

MARCELO RIOS: (No response.)

Nathaliia
12-23-2005, 01:36 PM
haha i was sure that a thread with the article i posted must have existed but i was too lazy to use search option :angel:

that interview about childhood heroes - maestry. :worship: at Mister Rios, the person who made me love tennis forever :hearts:

NicoFan
12-23-2005, 02:04 PM
I never know how to take Marcelo.

But as a person who hopes to be a freelance journalist at some point, I know that I would want to interivew either a player like Marat who gives great quotes (and Andy too at times) or someone like Marcelo who with his non-responses gives an amusing interview. 99% of the guys on the tour give pat bland answers. Fans blame the journalists (and yes they do ask stupid questions sometimes), but they don't have much to work with - these guys are taught early how to reveal nothing. As one of our guest lecturers said in my sports reporting class - tennis players more than any other professional athlete live in a sheltered bubble.

Action Jackson
12-23-2005, 02:10 PM
I never know how to take Marcelo.

But as a person who hopes to be a freelance journalist at some point, I know that I would want to interivew either a player like Marat who gives great quotes (and Andy too at times) or someone like Marcelo who with his non-responses gives an amusing interview. 99% of the guys on the tour give pat bland answers. Fans blame the journalists (and yes they do ask stupid questions sometimes), but they don't have much to work with - these guys are taught early how to reveal nothing. As one of our guest lecturers said in my sports reporting class - tennis players more than any other professional athlete live in a sheltered bubble.

Research isn't that hard, learn about the subject, try asking intelligent questions and let someone else ask the mundane ones.

Devotee
12-23-2005, 02:38 PM
If you think that interview was rude & awkward, you should have been in the official ATP online real-time chat with Rios several years ago!

It's like he did the chat with the purpose of insulting & ignoring fans.

He hardly answered any fan questions. He told fans to shut up and worse. :tape:

Many fans got riled up & expressed their disgusted feelings toward Rios. :shout:
One fan was kicked off the chat. That chatroom was a madhouse by the
time the whole event was mercifully over!

Action Jackson
12-23-2005, 02:46 PM
If you think that interview was rude & awkward, you should have been in the official ATP online real-time chat with Rios several years ago!

It's like he did the chat with the purpose of insulting & ignoring fans.

He hardly answered any fan questions. He told fans to shut up and worse. :tape:

Many fans got riled up & expressed their disgusted feelings toward Rios. :shout:
One fan was kicked off the chat. That chatroom was a madhouse by the
time the whole event was mercifully over!

Did they ask him stupid questions? Rios was a people person, just misunderstood.

Devotee
12-23-2005, 02:49 PM
Did they ask him stupid questions? Rios was a people person, just misunderstood.

No, not stupid questions; and the fans did not try to goad him.

They asked questions like what his favorite type of car was and what his favorite tournament was.

Action Jackson
12-23-2005, 02:52 PM
No, not stupid questions; and the fans did not try to goad him.

The asked questions like what his favorite type of car was and what his favorite tournament was.

At least it was memorable.

Devotee
12-23-2005, 03:44 PM
At least it was memorable.


Yeah, see, I even remember it after all these years!

RogiFan88
12-23-2005, 04:48 PM
Of course Marcelo was misunderstood -- most geniuses are! ;) I miss you Marcelo Rios! Now HE was an exciting, unpredictable player!

Jenrios
12-23-2005, 06:26 PM
A classic Marcelo interview! Love it! Marcelo doesn't suffer fools. And let's face it - what have his hobbies got to do with a match against Damm?

Jenrios
12-23-2005, 06:29 PM
If you think that interview was rude & awkward, you should have been in the official ATP online real-time chat with Rios several years ago!

It's like he did the chat with the purpose of insulting & ignoring fans.

He hardly answered any fan questions. He told fans to shut up and worse. :tape:

Many fans got riled up & expressed their disgusted feelings toward Rios. :shout:
One fan was kicked off the chat. That chatroom was a madhouse by the
time the whole event was mercifully over!


I do believe that was the chat where he was asked if he prefered tennis or sex and replied 'depends on what type of sex it is'. What a gem of a question, eh? :rolleyes:

Devotee
12-23-2005, 10:47 PM
I do believe that was the chat where he was asked if he prefered tennis or sex and replied 'depends on what type of sex it is'. What a gem of a question, eh? :rolleyes:


No, that question & answer did not occur in the chat I participated in.
I remember years ago some fan mentioning the sex question occurred in an earlier chat.

mandoura
12-24-2005, 12:29 AM
u cant like tennis and not like rios (in my humble opinion!)

Where are you?

buddyholly
12-24-2005, 01:25 AM
In the final analysis, a social misfit is just that. I don't want to understand him. He showed his real personality when he visited Costa Rica.

Jenrios
12-24-2005, 04:02 PM
No-one knows his 'real personality' anyway. But no-one is 100% 'nice'/'bad'. We're all a combination.

Sugar Kane
12-24-2005, 04:29 PM
Nastase got it right.
Rios was not in his league IMO, he had the talent, but too little charisma to go with it...

amierin
12-24-2005, 04:59 PM
Four pages so I guess there are people who remember and either love or hate Marcelo. What did he do in Costa Rica buddyholly?

enqvistfan
12-24-2005, 05:18 PM
I didn't like the man but the most important is that he was interesting to watch. I haven't watched all his matches, unless when he faced my faves. Rios didn't let you totally indifferent, you liked him or not. Rios was not one of my fave, but he got (still has I think) very beautiful eyes :lol: But I think he was maybe misunderstood, maybe he was shy and didn't know how to deal with the popularity. Sorry if I'm saying stupid things. But, I can't believe that someone who is capricorn like me was a bad guy :lol: :lol: It will be his birthday on monday. Feliz cumpleaρos, in advance :)

Rex
12-24-2005, 06:00 PM
a good read-- cheers mate

Action Jackson
12-25-2005, 05:37 AM
Where are you?

He got banned.

Action Jackson
12-25-2005, 05:43 AM
Four pages so I guess there are people who remember and either love or hate Marcelo. What did he do in Costa Rica buddyholly?

The guy was a very gifted player and had an impact for sure, some people love him like Jenrios and others love to dislike him like buddyholly.

He married a Costa Rican model and they had a kid and they are divorced.

almouchie
12-25-2005, 12:55 PM
great quotes
definitely a gifted player, wasted talent maybe
social misfit, very likely
he was great to watch play tennis
i suppose that he didnt/couldnt win a GS says a lot, that u need a combination of hard work, talent, discipline & a bit of luck as well, being likable help too

Action Jackson
12-25-2005, 01:01 PM
i suppose that he didnt/couldnt win a GS says a lot, that u need a combination of hard work, talent, discipline & a bit of luck as well, being likable help too

Being likeable really doesn't help I mean Connors, McEnroe, Sampras and Lendl weren't exactly likeable each for different reasons, but they were among the most successful ever to play the game.

Jenrios
12-26-2005, 01:45 PM
hey George - she's not a model - she's a billionaire's daughter and has had more careers in 4 years than most people do in a lifetime, and she never sticks at anything - including marriage ;) he has since re-married, and is now separated again! There was an incident in Costa Rica - a minor car accident when he and his new wife were picking up his daughter from his ex's. His new wife then had a hissy fit because he paid more attention to his daughter back at the hotel - despite the fact he and his ex wife had offered to take her to hospital and she assured them she was ok. Well, you know what they say - marry in haste, repent at leisure.....

Jenrios
12-26-2005, 01:56 PM
As for his personality - well, if you read the bio of marcelo, that gives an insight. Unlike a lot of players, he didn't pick up a racket until he was 10, and his parents never dreamed he could make a career out of it. He had no interest in watching tennis as a child, and his parents didn't realise how good he was. In fact, they tried to curb his tennis playing. He had difficulties in school - was even put on ritalin for ADHD at one point (not really a surprise, eh?) and his mother stopped him taking it because it altered his personality.

He was allowed top play tennis as a reat because that was his only interest - but his parents took steps to try and stop him playing - not theusual tennis parents story, eh? He only took up tennis partly as a way of getting out of school when he was 14. His family were amazed he could make a living out of it - so naive that they got badly ripped off by the Chilean tennis fed - the famliy took their case to court and won. One of the guys from the fed had a brother who was on a national Chilean newspaper and made sure Rios got plenty of bad press.

IMO, not having pushy parents who were naive, and being the first big Chilean player for a long time, made Marcelo unprepared for life on the tour. He likes to keep himself to himself - if he could play tennis as he wished and not participate in off-court activities, he would have been much happier.

A pyschology report states that Marcelo's attitude was similar to an artist - if he didn't like what he was doing, ie, when playing a match, he'd lose and just think he could beging again - an artist spoils a painting he's not happy with and just starts again. Of course, this attitude wasn't going to get him anywhere on the tour.

Action Jackson
12-26-2005, 01:57 PM
I mean with Rios it's not like he ever lacked female company and thanks for that Jen and I wasn't sure what she did, but I knew she had plenty of cash, but had some feeling she was a model, but this is not the case.

Stay single and don't marry that's the key for Rios.

Jenrios
12-26-2005, 01:58 PM
And of course, with tennis coming so easy to him, when he started to get injured and had to struggle to come back, I don't think he had the heart to fight for it. Especially after that groin op when he realised he'd lost his speed.

amierin
12-26-2005, 01:58 PM
As for his personality - well, if you read the bio of marcelo, that gives an insight. Unlike a lot of players, he didn't pick up a racket until he was 10, and his parents never dreamed he could make a career out of it. He had no interest in watching tennis as a child, and his parents didn't realise how good he was. In fact, they tried to curb his tennis playing. He had difficulties in school - was even put on ritalin for ADHD at one point (not really a surprise, eh?) and his mother stopped him taking it because it altered his personality.

He was allowed top play tennis as a reat because that was his only interest - but his parents took steps to try and stop him playing - not theusual tennis parents story, eh? He only took up tennis partly as a way of getting out of school when he was 14. His family were amazed he could make a living out of it - so naive that they got badly ripped off by the Chilean tennis fed - the famliy took their case to court and won. One of the guys from the fed had a brother who was on a national Chilean newspaper and made sure Rios got plenty of bad press.

IMO, not having pushy parents who were naive, and being the first big Chilean player for a long time, made Marcelo unprepared for life on the tour. He likes to keep himself to himself - if he could play tennis as he wished and not participate in off-court activities, he would have been much happier.

A pyschology report states that Marcelo's attitude was similar to an artist - if he didn't like what he was doing, ie, when playing a match, he'd lose and just think he could beging again - an artist spoils a painting he's not happy with and just starts again. Of course, this attitude wasn't going to get him anywhere on the tour.

Thanks for the insight. I still wish he'd been able to stay on the tour longer.

Jenrios
12-26-2005, 02:02 PM
great quotes
definitely a gifted player, wasted talent maybe
social misfit, very likely
he was great to watch play tennis
i suppose that he didnt/couldnt win a GS says a lot, that u need a combination of hard work, talent, discipline & a bit of luck as well, being likable help too

don't see how being likeable can help you - Lendl said he'd rather be hated and win than vice versa - in fact, he said a hostile crowd helped him because he drove him on to want to win just so the crowd would be even more upset:)

Jenrios
12-26-2005, 02:04 PM
you're welcome amierin - he'll be 30 today - still of an age to play on the tour. Really sad he's not.

Jenrios
12-26-2005, 02:06 PM
He got banned.


is FedererExpress really banned? why? what did I miss?

Action Jackson
12-26-2005, 02:14 PM
is FedererExpress really banned? why? what did I miss?

Yes, it seems that way. I think he called KarolBeckFan "a cocksucking princess" at one point, he had a time out before and maybe that's what got him banned.

Jenrios
12-26-2005, 02:47 PM
wow - I didn't think posters got banned for that - will he be allowed back? Thanks for the info, btw.

prima donna
12-26-2005, 06:02 PM
Marcelo Rios is the type of sportsman that is easily admirable, he does the minimum of what is required of him when it comes to matters concerning his career, I say this as if it is the present as opposed to past, because I hear he is trying to make a comeback ? Possible that this is only speculation or hearsay, but who knows.

I love the fact that he was never seeking acceptance from the media or fans, it doesn't really matter what they think. Is it going to help him win anymore matches than he actually did if the media thinks he's this great guy or other players like him ? Actually, his mentality worked to his advantage because he "psyched out" other players, his erratic behavior, accompanied by his erratic play (one match he paints a masterpiece and the next match he's urinating on the canvas) -- does this remind you of anyone ? Perhaps Marat ? :lol:

Fact of the matter is, great guy, great mentality and most of all straight-forward & to the point. Don't waste your time, also for being vertically challenged, this guy proved that size really doesn't matter. Sad to see him come up short, he is truly one of the only players I've come to appreciate of South American descent, aside from Gustavo Kuerten whom played a beautiful game when at his peak.

Grinder
12-26-2005, 06:34 PM
I seriously think that Marcelo Rios and Hicham Arazi are two of the most unrealized potentials of all time. Arazi was a top 5 talent in my opinion, his eye hand coordination was insane.

amierin
12-26-2005, 10:22 PM
I know Marcelo retired due to injury. What happened to Arazi? Is he still playing?

Nathaliia
12-26-2005, 11:52 PM
Arazi received WC to Doha challenger this week (50.000$) and lost 1-6 1-6 to Lamine Ouahab from Algeria :rolleyes:
He was one of my top faves as well... :rolleyes:

PS. He plays today with Gael Monfils the doubles game :yeah:

Dirk
12-27-2005, 04:21 AM
hey George - she's not a model - she's a billionaire's daughter and has had more careers in 4 years than most people do in a lifetime, and she never sticks at anything - including marriage ;) he has since re-married, and is now separated again! There was an incident in Costa Rica - a minor car accident when he and his new wife were picking up his daughter from his ex's. His new wife then had a hissy fit because he paid more attention to his daughter back at the hotel - despite the fact he and his ex wife had offered to take her to hospital and she assured them she was ok. Well, you know what they say - marry in haste, repent at leisure.....

His 2nd marriage is now in trouble? :( :sad:

Jenrios
12-27-2005, 02:18 PM
Rios is not attempting a comeback on the main tour - he may play the seniors in the future.

And yes, his 2nd marriage is in big trouble......divorce looms.

Jenrios
12-27-2005, 02:23 PM
not surprisingly, I like to watch Arazi as well:)

cobalt60
12-27-2005, 03:57 PM
I wasn't into tennis when he was active but a couple of months ago watched a Tennis Channel special on him. When he was on; he made it look so easy. And he seems to make poor choices in his personal life. Read a while back that his dad is somewhat of a difficult character but when really should one believe anything the media in Chile put out there. ;)

Devotee
12-27-2005, 05:50 PM
And yes, his 2nd marriage is in big trouble......divorce looms.

I wonder if his 2 failed marriages have to do with his personality.

Maybe for the near future, he should just live with his partner.
Is that now socially acceptable in Chile?

prima donna
12-27-2005, 05:58 PM
I wonder if his 2 failed marriages have to do with his personality.

Maybe for the near future, he should just live with his partner.

I find this highly unlikely, a man with such a unique personality is born that way, besides you make it seem as if he had a defective or unhealthy mindset.

This is the Dr. Phil show or MTF Therapy ? I'm sure that Marcelo would gladly accept an invitation. ;)

Jenrios
12-28-2005, 05:00 PM
I find this highly unlikely, a man with such a unique personality is born that way, besides you make it seem as if he had a defective or unhealthy mindset.

This is the Dr. Phil show or MTF Therapy ? I'm sure that Marcelo would gladly accept an invitation. ;)

ROTFL! :haha:

NicoFan
12-28-2005, 05:39 PM
I find this highly unlikely, a man with such a unique personality is born that way, besides you make it seem as if he had a defective or unhealthy mindset.

This is the Dr. Phil show or MTF Therapy ? I'm sure that Marcelo would gladly accept an invitation. ;)

Can you imagine Marcelo's reaction to fans giving their views and playing amateur psychologists on his personal life?

Stand back as the proverbial shit hits the fan. ;) :lol:

Jenrios
12-29-2005, 02:42 PM
I expect he'd say 2 words, the second one being 'off':) But then, as he doesn't bother reading stuff about himself, he won't know. And to be honest, I don't really think he'd care. But he certainly is fascinating at times.

Riosreigned
12-08-2010, 04:18 AM
Working on a book about Rios titled, Marcelo Rios: The Mysterious Champion, which is being expanded from this original article which I wrote for Tennis Week.com several years back. If anyone has any comments or opinions or memories of Rios to share, please send message. Or email me at thereisnojoybutcalm@yahoo.com Thanks, MSM

Sham Kay
12-08-2010, 05:19 PM
Interesting opinions. 5 years on he's beginning to get forgotten, but Rios was a legend nevertheless.

Oh and this quote- "We don't see things as they are, we see things as we are."

.. It's as if it was made for tennis fans.

BlueSoul Formula
12-08-2010, 11:34 PM
I am glad the Marcelo Rios types are few and far between. He was not a good representation of the sport. His game may have been aesthetic but his attitude was not of a champion. It is justice that he never took home the hardware of a grand slam victory.

fast_clay
12-09-2010, 12:27 AM
nice read...love it when a thread like this pops up from the depths... so many great quotes/stories/opinions in the OP...

i think that getting angry at rios for performing super poorly merely hours after playing unthinkable tennis is really missing the point of the man...

tennis players like that dont come around everyday... so rare... and when they produce you must simply enjoy it, because with most genius there must be a flaw... a flipside... the counterbalance... and that you must accept too... which, if you think about it, is easy with rios because according to him he never asked you to buy the ticket, nor is he telling you to watch your tv...

a talent that defied method...

Topspindoctor
12-09-2010, 12:39 AM
Have zero respect for the guy after he insulted Monica Seles. Should have shown more class, especially since his own achievements were mediocre despite his supposed "talent".

Sham Kay
12-09-2010, 01:02 AM
Have zero respect for the guy after he insulted Monica Seles. Should have shown more class, especially since his own achievements were mediocre despite his supposed "talent".
Ah but good sir. You are the living definition of a glory hunter. As such you shall never stand to understand a player like Rios.

Now run along back to the loving security of Nadals G-String.

BlueSoul Formula
12-09-2010, 01:06 AM
Have zero respect for the guy after he insulted Monica Seles. Should have shown more class, especially since his own achievements were mediocre despite his supposed "talent".


Everyone has a moment of weakness and lets the toungue slip and may say disrespectful things. Rios's damage to the sport is deeper than that. He was a bad sportsman at every level and he did not play the game with the integrity that the great champions did. This is why his failure to win a grand slam was justice. He remains at a crest below the games greats, where he does belong.

Topspindoctor
12-09-2010, 01:07 AM
Ah but good sir. You are the living definition of a glory hunter. As such you shall never stand to understand a player like Rios.

Now run along back to the loving security of Nadals G-String.

What is there to understand? The guy was an obnoxious jerk, it was no secret. :shrug:

For all of his supposed talent he didn't even win a slam. All he did was taint world #1 ranking by having no major title to his name. I will never undertstand the praise overrated players like him get just because his highlight reel looked impressive :zzz:

fast_clay
12-09-2010, 01:13 AM
yep... he acheived exactly what he put in - which was very little... pretty remarkable talent then...

Henry Chinaski
12-09-2010, 01:30 AM
Very interesting article. Especially because I'm reading Agassi's autobiography atm. P-Mac's comments seem appropriate. I guess Rios in many ways was like Agassi before Agassi hooked up with Gilbert.

paseo
12-09-2010, 02:23 AM
I was a brief fan of Rios back then. I even switched to the 2 Handed BH just so I can try those jumping ones. Glad I switched back to the one hand, though :D Rios was just very entertaining to watch when he's on.

Action Jackson
12-09-2010, 02:42 AM
Bump.

Rios show these guys the true respect.

1999 U.S. OPEN CHAMPIONSHIP
Flushing Meadows, New York

M. RIOS/M. Damm

6-4, 7-6, 3-6, 5-7, 6-1

An interview with:MARCELO RIOS

USTA: Questions.

Q. It was a tough match. What happened?

MARCELO RIOS: He played pretty good. I slowed down my game a little bit, but like I say, I'm not hitting very good the ball. He's played really nice to win like that.

Q. Who were your childhood heroes?

MARCELO RIOS: What is that?

Q. Who were your childhood heroes?

MARCELO RIOS: I don't understand what you say.

Q. People you admired when you were growing up?

MARCELO RIOS: Nobody.

Q. What are your hobbies and interests?

MARCELO RIOS: Nothing.

Q. What is your greatest sports moment?

MARCELO RIOS: I don't remember, man.

Q. Come on.

MARCELO RIOS: What do you want me to tell you?

Q. Just answer the questions.

MARCELO RIOS: Don't ask me questions like that.

Q. What's your favorite movies?

MARCELO RIOS: (No response.)

Still the best press conference.

Rios danced to his own tune and that's admirable. Some people liked it and others hated it.

Forehander
12-09-2010, 06:47 AM
lol Nastase... :lol:

But Rios's game was very fun indeed.

Nathaliia
12-09-2010, 06:57 AM
Great press conference, one of all time classics. We need more players like this one. PC and being cute just plainly suck.

Start da Game
12-09-2010, 07:12 AM
"There is no great genius without some touch of madness." — Seneca.

that is so very right i must say.......even i have this notion........who is seneca?

Pirao666
12-09-2010, 08:38 AM
Lovefest article, but Rios is no great.

Start da Game
12-09-2010, 08:42 AM
rios was not great achievements wise but he was definitely talented........one just has to laugh at the gasquet fans for calling him talented, he's not 10% of what rios was.......the words talent and great are heavily overused these days.......