How Do You Keep Your Momentum? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

How Do You Keep Your Momentum?

mandoura
03-09-2005, 08:24 PM
My son lost a match today in the 3d set after being 1 set and 4-1 up in the second. His opponent faked an injury, asked for the doctor, and was running like a cheetah after his injury time out. My son totally lost his momentum and concentration after this time out. Any tips on how to remain focused? :help:

Fumus
03-09-2005, 08:32 PM
yea, Brad Gilbert talks about this in his book "Winning Ugly", he calls it winning the hidden ad points. Basically throughout the match there a few big points that decide momentum shifts. A common example, 15-30 is a hidden ad point, this is because everyone plays their hardest on bp. You should play your hardest at 15-30 when your opponent is not mentally prepared.

In your son's match when the opponent came out again it injury timeout it was crucial for your son to get that first point. He needs to fight like a mad dog for that point. It sends a message to his opponent "your gamesmenship didn't work on me". Then the next hidden ad point(s) would have been the next service game your son had. It's crucial to have an easy hold there (at love or 15) and keep your foot on your opponents throat. If you concentrate on winning the points that set the tempo you can swing the momentum in your favor.

RonE
03-09-2005, 08:32 PM
Wow, that's a tough one! First of all you need to remain focused even if it means bolstering it in an artificial way. Don't let yourself relax too much. Jog around the court, bounce on your feet, hit practice serves make sure you stay warm physically and mentally.

Players that fake injuries in order to stop the momentum do that in the hope that while you are waiting you start to think ahead to the moment of victory. Remain at the present at all time, do not think about how you will win the match just force yourself not to let your mind drift!

The most important thing- remember what you were doing that got you to the position you were in. Keep your gameplan in mind and continue executing the shots that put you in a winning position and do not start pressing and going too much for your shots!

That's all I can think of, hope it helps :wavey:

Ultraman
03-09-2005, 08:38 PM
Also......just plain experience.

Now that he's experienced such a loss, by the sheer fact of having "been through it," he will be better able to handle such situation in the future.

mandoura
03-09-2005, 08:40 PM
yea, Brad Gilbert talks about this in his book "Winning Ugly", he calls it winning the hidden ad points. Basically throughout the match there a few big points that decide momentum shifts. A common example, 15-30 is a hidden ad point, this is because everyone plays their hardest on bp. You should play your hardest at 15-30 when your opponent is not mentally prepared.

In your son's match when the opponent came out again it injury timeout it was crucial for your son to get that first point. He needs to fight like a mad dog for that point. It sends a message to his opponent "your gamesmenship didn't work on me". Then the next hidden ad point(s) would have been the next service game your son had. It's crucial to have an easy hold there (at love or 15) and keep your foot on your opponents throat. If you concentrate on winning the points that set the tempo you can swing the momentum in your favor.

Thanks for the great tips. He is only 13 and a half but making a lot of progress. He jumped from # 187 last year to # 33 under 14. Still need some mental toughness and match experience though. :)

Would you favor buying the book by Gilbert? :)

Fumus
03-09-2005, 08:45 PM
Thanks for the great tips. He is only 13 and a half but making a lot of progress. He jumped from # 187 last year to # 33 under 14. Still need some mental toughness and match experience though. :)

Would you favor buying the book by Gilbert? :)


Yes!! That's my favorite.

but some other goods ones are

"Maximum Tennis" - Nick Savino

and the orginal book on tennis

"The inner game of tennis" - Timothy Galloway

but I would buy the Brad Gilbert book and see what you think.

mandoura
03-09-2005, 08:46 PM
Wow, that's a tough one! First of all you need to remain focused even if it means bolstering it in an artificial way. Don't let yourself relax too much. Jog around the court, bounce on your feet, hit practice serves make sure you stay warm physically and mentally.

Players that fake injuries in order to stop the momentum do that in the hope that while you are waiting you start to think ahead to the moment of victory. Remain at the present at all time, do not think about how you will win the match just force yourself not to let your mind drift!

The most important thing- remember what you were doing that got you to the position you were in. Keep your gameplan in mind and continue executing the shots that put you in a winning position and do not start pressing and going too much for your shots!

That's all I can think of, hope it helps :wavey:

You are absolutely right, Rone. That is exactly what I told him before the match. You see, we played this guy before in summer. He was seeded 8 and my son's rank was 85 then. My son was up in the first set 4-1 when the guy asked for the doctor. We lost 6-4 6-3 :sad:

So basically, my son knew the guy was faking it. He kept stretching, practicing serves, and jogging around. Instead of keeping his concentration on how to keep playing the way he did, he kept thinking on how to prevent the guy from giving it to him again and ended up totally losing his concentration. :(

Anyway, some lessons are learned the hard way. Thanks for your input. :)

mandoura
03-09-2005, 08:47 PM
Yes!! That's my favorite.

but some other goods ones are

"Maximum Tennis" - Nick Savino

and the orginal book on tennis

"The inner game of tennis" - Timothy Galloway

but I would buy the Brad Gilbert book and see what you think.

Will do and will write down the others. Thanks. :)

RonE
03-09-2005, 09:04 PM
You are absolutely right, Rone. That is exactly what I told him before the match. You see, we played this guy before in summer. He was seeded 8 and my son's rank was 85 then. My son was up in the first set 4-1 when the guy asked for the doctor. We lost 6-4 6-3 :sad:

So basically, my son knew the guy was faking it. He kept stretching, practicing serves, and jogging around. Instead of keeping his concentration on how to keep playing the way he did, he kept thinking on how to prevent the guy from giving it to him again and ended up totally losing his concentration. :(

Anyway, some lessons are learned the hard way. Thanks for your input. :)

Your advice was very good- but his mistake like you said was concentrating too much on not letting the guy into the match. That usually leads to overpressing and errors. From a mental standpoint you almost need to tell yourself "ok, I am starting the match all over again now from zero". Brush the injury timeout off, as hard as it is when you get back on to the court erase that gap in time from your mind and try to convince yourself you are playing continuously as if the time-out didn't happen.

As was said before, it is also a matter of experience. The more your son plays and learns to deal with such situations in the future, the less it will affect his play and concentration.

federer express
03-09-2005, 09:17 PM
My son lost a match today in the 3d set after being 1 set and 4-1 up in the second. His opponent faked an injury, asked for the doctor, and was running like a cheetah after his injury time out. My son totally lost his momentum and concentration after this time out. Any tips on how to remain focused? :help:

dont hear of many injury time-outs in junior tournaments. how u know he was faking?

mandoura
03-09-2005, 09:41 PM
dont hear of many injury time-outs in junior tournaments. how u know he was faking?

He does it all the time when he is down. He is known for it. We played him in summer and he did the same thing. Instead of concentrating on his game, my son focused on how not to take it from him again, thus completely losing his focus.

jole
03-09-2005, 09:50 PM
I guess it might be easier said than done, especially at a young age, but if my opponent was doing this I would realize that he is in dire straits. At this point you really just need to clamp down and when the guy comes back just make him play, make him work very hard each point. It is no doubt very frustrating to have your opponent do this when you know they are faking it, but if it happened to me I would just go to the bench and not even pay too much attention to the opponent. I'd just focus on continuining my game plan of what got me up in the first place, and realize that he is desperate for trying this.

Angle Queen
03-09-2005, 10:22 PM
You've gotten some good advice here. Not sure how much I can add. But one thing I try after a long "break"...is to mentally squeeze the court a little bit...not go for so much. Keep the ball in play...and get my stroke back. And while I'm normally a fast server (in the sense that I don't bounce the ball much or dilly dally)...I try to force myself to take just a bit more time and not let my opponent control the tempo of the match.

Tough loss for him today...but like Ultraman said, it's all about live and learn.

adeegee
03-09-2005, 10:26 PM
I guess it might be easier said than done, especially at a young age, but if my opponent was doing this I would realize that he is in dire straits. At this point you really just need to clamp down and when the guy comes back just make him play, make him work very hard each point. It is no doubt very frustrating to have your opponent do this when you know they are faking it, but if it happened to me I would just go to the bench and not even pay too much attention to the opponent. I'd just focus on continuining my game plan of what got me up in the first place, and realize that he is desperate for trying this.

100% agree. Your son should take the injury time out as a compliment, if he's only doing it coz he's getting his ass kicked. instead of getting pissed off by it, your son should just have a laugh to himself about how desperate this guy is. i always play better when i'm relaxed, and not in a mood about something. this guy (is his name guillermo coria :p ) realises that his time outs obviously affect your son, he'll do them every time they meet. its bad sportsmanship but it can't really be stopped, maybe he isn't even feigning i don't know. but my main advice is for him not to get annoyed by it, and just carry on playing as he was.

Leena
03-09-2005, 10:30 PM
Your son needs a killer mentality.

Having a conscience is a bad thing in competition.

I've dealt with this a couple times, also...

1) If there's any sign of real injury, you play to win obviously, and make the injury worse if you can.

2) If he's faking it... take it as a compliment. He has to cheat to win. So, then you reply back. Purposely do things to annoy him. If he starts coming back in the 3rd, you take an injury timeout yourself. If he comes to net, aim at his head a few times.

tennis4you
03-09-2005, 10:33 PM
Focus on one point at a time. That is what I do.

mandoura
03-09-2005, 10:36 PM
You've gotten some good advice here. Not sure how much I can add. But one thing I try after a long "break"...is to mentally squeeze the court a little bit...not go for so much. Keep the ball in play...and get my stroke back. And while I'm normally a fast server (in the sense that I don't bounce the ball much or dilly dally)...I try to force myself to take just a bit more time and not let my opponent control the tempo of the match.

Tough loss for him today...but like Ultraman said, it's all about live and learn.

I know, AQ, but I was really pissed off today, even more than him and tried not to show it. I just fear he will mentally fall for this guy, you know, like when a player keeps losing to the same guy? This is the 2nd time with the same guy and the same antics. :fiery:

Anyway, as I said earlier, some lessons are learned the hard way. And the same old line he is certainly fed up from hearing : What doesn't kill you makes you stronger. I know it is true but he still has to believe it. :shrug:

mandoura
03-09-2005, 11:15 PM
Thanks you all guys. You've really been a great help. :)

I feel better already.

alfonsojose
03-09-2005, 11:56 PM
Was the other kid's last name Coria? :angel:

adeegee
03-10-2005, 09:11 PM
Was the other kid's last name Coria? :angel:

hey you stole my joke! see 2nd last post of page 1! i want my joke back! :mad:

tennischick
03-10-2005, 09:20 PM
My son lost a match today in the 3d set after being 1 set and 4-1 up in the second. His opponent faked an injury, asked for the doctor, and was running like a cheetah after his injury time out. My son totally lost his momentum and concentration after this time out. Any tips on how to remain focused? :help:
was your son playing against the Duck? :p

it's tough but he's gotta realise that tennis is as much a MENTAL sport as it is physical. perhaps even more so. he's gotta learn to be mentally tougher. there are some psychological tecniques that he can practice. if u check the www.tennisone.com site, there are a number of good articles on getting the mental edge in tennis. also Tennis magazine usually has a section each month dedicated to that. and i agree about reading "Winning Ugly". it's my tennis bible.

mandoura
03-10-2005, 10:41 PM
hey you stole my joke! see 2nd last post of page 1! i want my joke back! :mad:

Don't worry, ageegee, I read your post first so I know you own the copyrights of this one. :haha:

mandoura
03-10-2005, 10:44 PM
was your son playing against the Duck? :p

it's tough but he's gotta realise that tennis is as much a MENTAL sport as it is physical. perhaps even more so. he's gotta learn to be mentally tougher. there are some psychological tecniques that he can practice. if u check the www.tennisone.com site, there are a number of good articles on getting the mental edge in tennis. also Tennis magazine usually has a section each month dedicated to that. and i agree about reading "Winning Ugly". it's my tennis bible.

I didn't know A-Rod faked injury often. I thought it was just Coria. :)

Thanks for the link. It is great. I bookmarked it and will let him read some articles. :D

adeegee
03-10-2005, 10:47 PM
I didn't know A-Rod faked injury often. I thought it was just Coria. :)

Thanks for the link. It is great. I bookmarked it and will let him read some articles. :D

Roddick doesn't fake injuries! Coria's the main culprit. Plus Alberto Martin after what he did against Hewitt at the Aussie Open a couple of years back. Tell your son to listen to music while the guy takes an injury time out to relax him.....almost worked for the mighty barry cowan against sampras at wimbledon :D

mandoura
03-10-2005, 11:19 PM
Roddick doesn't fake injuries! Coria's the main culprit. Plus Alberto Martin after what he did against Hewitt at the Aussie Open a couple of years back. Tell your son to listen to music while the guy takes an injury time out to relax him.....almost worked for the mighty barry cowan against sampras at wimbledon :D

That's what I thought, about Roddick I mean. :)

I will tell my son to put his MP3 player in his tennis bag starting tomorrow. :D

tennischick
03-11-2005, 12:00 AM
i guess you guys missed the Tariq era. :p

mandoura
03-11-2005, 12:24 AM
i guess you guys missed the Tariq era. :p

Did Tariq teach him to do that? :awww: Didn't know.

tennischick
03-11-2005, 12:36 AM
Did Tariq teach him to do that? :awww: Didn't know.
lol! no i didn't mean that. :lol: i meant that he faked a lot of injuries durung that period and pissed off a lot of people. Brad cut out that, the visor, and the general showiness and tried to turn him into a serious player.

MisterQ
03-11-2005, 05:09 AM
yea, Brad Gilbert talks about this in his book "Winning Ugly", he calls it winning the hidden ad points. Basically throughout the match there a few big points that decide momentum shifts. A common example, 15-30 is a hidden ad point, this is because everyone plays their hardest on bp. You should play your hardest at 15-30 when your opponent is not mentally prepared.

In your son's match when the opponent came out again it injury timeout it was crucial for your son to get that first point. He needs to fight like a mad dog for that point. It sends a message to his opponent "your gamesmenship didn't work on me". Then the next hidden ad point(s) would have been the next service game your son had. It's crucial to have an easy hold there (at love or 15) and keep your foot on your opponents throat. If you concentrate on winning the points that set the tempo you can swing the momentum in your favor.

wow, Fumus, all this insight. I'm getting worried about our match at the Albany Open. :scared: ;)

nice tips :yeah:

Ferrero Forever
03-11-2005, 05:34 AM
some really good advice in this thread, i ain't got nothing to add though

Fumus
03-11-2005, 03:36 PM
wow, Fumus, all this insight. I'm getting worried about our match at the Albany Open. :scared: ;)

nice tips :yeah:


haha...what do I know, I am just a stupid meathead like Andy. :devil: