Players name meanings [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Players name meanings

Maia
03-07-2005, 10:49 AM
I don't know if this kind of thread already existed (if it did sorry... :o ), but I was just wondering if there are any players whose name signify anything in their own language (or in other languages...)
I'm mainly talking about first names, but if there are interesting meanings for last names then it's cool too.


For example, in Hebrew Noam (Okun) is like grace, or something pleasent, doing something in a nice way.
And Yonatan (Jonathan Erlich) is "god gave" like a present from god or something like this...

:)

Bart.
03-07-2005, 10:55 AM
Tommy HAAS (haas = hare in Dutch)

Eruwen
03-07-2005, 10:55 AM
Mmm... I only know that "Rafael" is an arch angel... Like me!

Action Jackson
03-07-2005, 10:56 AM
Nadal means Christmas in Catalan.

Ponytail
03-07-2005, 11:47 AM
Paradorn = brother

Nacho
03-07-2005, 01:09 PM
Mariano Puerta = Mariano Door
Guillermo Cañas = William Rods or William Canes
Albert Montañes = Albert Highlander
Albert Costa = Albert Coast or Albert Shore
Santiago Ventura = Santiago Happiness or Santiago Fortune
Ramon Delgado = Ramon Slim or Ramon Thin

*Ljubica*
03-07-2005, 01:16 PM
A friend of mine once told me that Nalbandian means blacksmith in Armenian - but not speaking Armenian myself I can't vouch for that 100%.

JMG
03-07-2005, 01:43 PM
Kiefer means jaw, pine or jawbone.

NiciSunflower
03-07-2005, 02:22 PM
Speaking of Kiefer.... Nicolas comes from Greek goddess of victory, Nike and "laos" which is the people, Nicolas is the people's winner :D

Ferrero Forever
03-08-2005, 07:49 AM
well juan carlos is the king of spain's name and he was named after him, so hence 'king juan carlos ferrero'.

robinhood
03-08-2005, 10:19 AM
Agassi means "a miss" (an unwed woman) in Korean!
The two words sound similar.

joske
03-08-2005, 11:48 AM
"Ferrero" is also derived from the profession of blacksmith... and you've got similar names in many languages (German: "Schmidt" etc, Dutch: "Smets", "De Smedt" etc, English: "Smith" etc, Spanish and Italian (maybe Portuguese too? not sure) "Ferrero", "Ferrer" etc)

correct me if I'm wrong :)

RogerRocks
03-08-2005, 12:22 PM
Schüttler = shaker :aplot:

~EMiLiTA~
03-08-2005, 01:25 PM
AGASSI = "balcony" in gujerati (Indian language)

(Yves) ALLEGRO..."lively and fast" in Italian (I remember that from music terms...please correct me if I'm wrong!)

obviously (Olivier) PATIENCE doesn't need explanation lol, nor does (Pat) RAFTER or (Mardy) FISH haha

(Michael) KOHLMANN = "cabbage man" ?! haha

(Marcelo) RIOS = "rivers"

(Sébastien) GROSJEAN = "fat John"

~EMiLiTA~
03-08-2005, 01:28 PM
would FEDERER be like "featherer"? cos isn't the German word for feather "Feder"?

RonE
03-08-2005, 02:14 PM
Amazing that "Agassi" has meanings in so many languages.

In Hebrew it would mean "my pear". :lol:

mitalidas
03-08-2005, 02:21 PM
would FEDERER be like "featherer"? cos isn't the German word for feather "Feder"?

I'm more inclined to believe that it is derived from "Federation" (Federer is an old Swiss name, and the country's name is Confederation Helvetique originally)

lunahielo
03-08-2005, 02:54 PM
Roger means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear.

Saumon
03-08-2005, 05:12 PM
I'm not a tennis player but my last name means salmon in french :o

mandoura
03-08-2005, 05:20 PM
Amazing that "Agassi" has meanings in so many languages.

In Hebrew it would mean "my pear". :lol:

In Arabic too. Well a special type of pear, grown in Lebanon.

robinhood
03-08-2005, 08:03 PM
Dent : A depression in a surface made by pressure or a blow (among many other definitions)

Fish : Any of numerous cold-blooded aquatic vertebrates of the superclass Pisces, characteristically having fins, gills, and a streamlined body

Can't think of anyone else who has an obvious dictionary word as his name....
Who else?

Leena
03-08-2005, 08:07 PM
Elena BOVINA (RUS) = Helen Cow.

Andrew RODDICK (USA) = 2 instances of the slang usage of male genetalia in his last name. Maybe that's why he's so well endowed.

robinhood
03-08-2005, 08:08 PM
AGASSI = "balcony" in gujerati (Indian language)

(Yves) ALLEGRO..."lively and fast" in Italian (I remember that from music terms...please correct me if I'm wrong!)

obviously (Olivier) PATIENCE doesn't need explanation lol, nor does (Pat) RAFTER or (Mardy) FISH haha

(Michael) KOHLMANN = "cabbage man" ?! haha

(Marcelo) RIOS = "rivers"

(Sébastien) GROSJEAN = "fat John"

Right, Rafter! I forgot about that name.
And yes, you are correct. Allegro is a musical term. I was very surprised to find that it was also used as a surname.

Saumon
03-08-2005, 08:38 PM
dent=tooth :wavey:

mitalidas
03-08-2005, 08:47 PM
agassi = one with flatulence issues

RonE
03-08-2005, 10:00 PM
In Arabic too. Well a special type of pear, grown in Lebanon.
Cool :D

adeegee
03-08-2005, 10:04 PM
Dent : A depression in a surface made by pressure or a blow (among many other definitions)

Fish : Any of numerous cold-blooded aquatic vertebrates of the superclass Pisces, characteristically having fins, gills, and a streamlined body

:haha:

marilag
03-09-2005, 12:34 AM
Roger means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear.

Thank you.

I shall make it a point to refrain from referring to Roger as 'Mirka's Roger'. :)

(Actually, I think 'roger' means, well, 'to bonk', in British slang. Someone correct me here.)

robinhood
03-09-2005, 01:10 AM
(Actually, I think 'roger' means, well, 'to bonk', in British slang. Someone correct me here.)

Correct. :D

robinhood
03-09-2005, 01:21 AM
(Karol) Beck : A gesture of beckoning or summons.

(Donald) Young : Being in an early period of life, development, or growth. (how fitting)

Borg : In "Star Trek: The Next Generation" the Borg is a
species of cyborg that ruthlessly seeks to incorporate all sentient
life into itself; their slogan is "Resistence is futile. You will
be assimilated."

tennis4eva
03-09-2005, 03:10 AM
AGASSI = "balcony" in gujerati (Indian language)

(Yves) ALLEGRO..."lively and fast" in Italian (I remember that from music terms...please correct me if I'm wrong!)

obviously (Olivier) PATIENCE doesn't need explanation lol, nor does (Pat) RAFTER or (Mardy) FISH haha

(Michael) KOHLMANN = "cabbage man" ?! haha

(Marcelo) RIOS = "rivers"

(Sébastien) GROSJEAN = "fat John"


Mary Carillo was calling Seb "fat pants" last year....I guess her she was a little off lol. ;)

Action Jackson
03-09-2005, 03:21 AM
Mary Carillo was calling Seb "fat pants" last year....I guess her she was a little off lol. ;)

She is always off.

tennis4eva
03-09-2005, 03:35 AM
She is always off.
:haha:

Pernille
03-09-2005, 08:49 AM
Borg is a danish word for a big, old castle...

Swider
03-09-2005, 11:07 AM
Nadal means still (as before) in Polish.

Saumon
03-09-2005, 11:20 AM
In french Sa_fin means his/her end ;)

syd
03-09-2005, 12:43 PM
in arabic "Myskina" means "poor"
and in french "Beck" means nozzle (of bird)

mandoura
03-09-2005, 02:00 PM
Thomas Zib = Dick in Arabic :o

mandoura
03-09-2005, 02:02 PM
Borg = Tower in Arabic

~EMiLiTA~
03-09-2005, 02:36 PM
Thomas Zib = Dick in Arabic :o

:lol:

Suzi
03-09-2005, 03:15 PM
Gael Monfils - The Mon - Fils bit means my son in French

mitalidas
03-09-2005, 04:50 PM
coria = an asian country ;)

MaRat = mother of rat ;)

johansson = son of johan (Real)

Mount Goddess
03-09-2005, 09:49 PM
"Ferrero" is also derived from the profession of blacksmith... and you've got similar names in many languages (German: "Schmidt" etc, Dutch: "Smets", "De Smedt" etc, English: "Smith" etc, Spanish and Italian (maybe Portuguese too? not sure) "Ferrero", "Ferrer" etc)

correct me if I'm wrong :)

So if Juan is Spanish for John and Ferrero is Spanish for Smith, his name is John Smith!!lol lol lol He would be sooooooooo common over here!!

David Kenzie
03-09-2005, 11:39 PM
In french Sa_fin means his/her end ;)
Yes but Safin is pronounced "Safine" (read that in french) so that wouldn't work ;)

RonE
03-09-2005, 11:50 PM
Sampras- "he put a prize" in Hebrew (sam=put [masc. sing.]; pras=prize)

naiwen
03-10-2005, 12:04 AM
Thank you.

I shall make it a point to refrain from referring to Roger as 'Mirka's Roger'. :)

(Actually, I think 'roger' means, well, 'to bonk', in British slang. Someone correct me here.)

I thought Roger = Hodge = farmer(or rustic)?
:confused:

SuperFurryAnimal
03-10-2005, 11:54 AM
'Rainer' means 'a wise warrior' in old-German.
'Schüttler' means 'shaker'.

kandykane
03-11-2005, 03:02 PM
Moya divided into "mo-ya" is exactly the same prononciation as "touch (me)" or "feel (me)" in Chinese, which fits the sexy moya so damn perfectly ;)

alfonsojose
03-11-2005, 05:42 PM
Coria means Cheats all the time.

SixPack
05-24-2007, 12:37 PM
Just found out that Nadal means Christmas in Catalan. Imagine if Nadal went by Rafael Christmas. He would become more popular.

RonE
05-24-2007, 01:40 PM
You would be even more amused if you knew the meaning of the name "Rafael" :)

tufani
05-24-2007, 01:42 PM
Imagine if Nadal went by Rafael Christmas

LOL:haha:

Louche
05-24-2007, 01:48 PM
His 1st name comes from Hebrew. God has healed? Googled it.

RonE
05-24-2007, 06:59 PM
His 1st name comes from Hebrew. God has healed? Googled it.

Thats right ;)

God has healed Christmas. Hmmmm, so much for eggnog and mistletoe :tape:

MisterQ
05-25-2007, 12:19 AM
It's a less scandalous name than Roger. :o

;)

Sunset of Age
05-25-2007, 01:10 AM
His 1st name comes from Hebrew. God has healed? Googled it.

Aren't all so-called Christian names derived from the Bible in fact Hebrew?
I thought so. Enlighten me, if I'm wrong, here? :confused:

Johnny Groove
05-25-2007, 01:28 AM
Aren't all so-called Christian names derived from the Bible in fact Hebrew?
I thought so. Enlighten me, if I'm wrong, here? :confused:

Most of them, yeah. If I recall correctly, Jonathan means something like "Gift from God" or "Gift of God" or something like that. Hebrew, I believe.

Sunset of Age
05-25-2007, 01:32 AM
Most of them, yeah. If I recall correctly, Jonathan means something like "Gift from God" or "Gift of God" or something like that. Hebrew, I believe.

Thought so, too. And in your particular case, I guess your name is pretty appropriate... :kiss:

l_mac
05-25-2007, 01:46 AM
Most of them, yeah. If I recall correctly, Jonathan means something like "Gift from God" or "Gift of God" or something like that. Hebrew, I believe.

"God has given", I think. Matthew is ""Gift of God", although both names are essentially the same.



Rafa = God has healed Christmas - :lol:

Johnny Groove
05-25-2007, 01:46 AM
Thought so, too. And in your particular case, I guess your name is pretty appropriate... :kiss:

awww :smooch:

Sunset of Age
05-25-2007, 02:08 AM
awww :smooch:

Not ALL on this board indulge in 'mutual hatred', me dear.
:kiss: :hug: ;)

GlennMirnyi
05-25-2007, 05:14 AM
Just found out that Nadal means Christmas in Catalan. Imagine if Nadal went by Rafael Christmas. He would become more popular.

Who cares, really?

Stensland
05-25-2007, 05:43 AM
haas pretty much means "rabbit" in german.

kiefer's a kind of tree.

schüttler means "shaker".

rochus is a christian saint btw (the wtc is played at the rochus club düsseldorf)

del potro means something like "from the little horse".

monfils means literally "my son".

VolandriFan
05-25-2007, 08:39 AM
Doesn't Berlocq mean something too? ;)

Saumon
05-25-2007, 08:45 AM
Most of them, yeah. If I recall correctly, Jonathan means something like "Gift from God" or "Gift of God" or something like that. Hebrew, I believe.
my name is Hebrew too :rocker2:
haas pretty much means "rabbit" in german.

kiefer's a kind of tree.

schüttler means "shaker".

rochus is a christian saint btw (the wtc is played at the rochus club düsseldorf)

del potro means something like "from the little horse".

monfils means literally "my son".

there was a GM thread about the meanings of players name :scratch:

EDIT: there was not one, there are at least 2:

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=30641

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=95571

Action Jackson
05-25-2007, 09:14 AM
Coria means Cheats all the time.

Nasty, but funny.

Puerta = door, though the door has been closed on his career.

mallorn
05-25-2007, 09:32 AM
Rafa's full name is Rafael Nadal Parera - that would be "God Has Healed Christmas Peartree". Lovely. :lol:

Sean.J.S.
05-25-2007, 10:02 AM
Monfils - My son (in french)

Pixie
05-25-2007, 10:02 AM
As for Grosjean, in the medieval times, gros Jean used to be a simpleton character whom you could make a fool of. Someone being taken in is "Gros Jean comme devant" (which means "Gros Jean as before")as the saying goes.

Luckily, adages are dying out.

Kolya
05-25-2007, 10:04 AM
Carlsson - Son of Karl.
Svensson - Son of Sven.

alansk
05-25-2007, 10:11 AM
Kohlschreiber - "cabbage writer"
Boluda is only a junior but his name is rude I think.

my0118
05-25-2007, 10:35 AM
Agassi means "a miss" (an unwed woman) in Korean!
The two words sound similar.

yes :D

and Carlos "Moya" in korean, also means and has a nuance like "what?" "what the heck?"

delsa
05-25-2007, 11:13 AM
Nadal means Christmas in Catalan.

And in Occitan (the mother language from which Catalan originated, spoken in Occitania, South of France) too. In most dialects it's Nadau, but in some it's Nadal as well.

delsa
05-25-2007, 11:15 AM
"Ferrero" is also derived from the profession of blacksmith... and you've got similar names in many languages (German: "Schmidt" etc, Dutch: "Smets", "De Smedt" etc, English: "Smith" etc, Spanish and Italian (maybe Portuguese too? not sure) "Ferrero", "Ferrer" etc)

correct me if I'm wrong :)

In French : Lefèvre, Favre, Lefébure, Lefebvre, Fèvre, Févret, Favret, Férrère etc... ;)

delsa
05-25-2007, 11:18 AM
Gasquet means "Little Gascon" (from Gascony, Occitania, France). And the name Gascon has the same roots than the name Basque, in the "frontalière" part of Gascony/Iparralde Basque country, the Basque and the Occitan dialects spoken mix and exchange words...

You've got lots of people named Gasc (even one of my ex-classmates Maëlle Gasc, if you happen to post here lol) but fewer named Gasquet...

laure xxx
05-25-2007, 11:19 AM
Andrew = manly.
(Murray, Roddick).

Neely
05-25-2007, 12:02 PM
Clément means "gracious" or something close to that, not sure if I use the right word in English

Novacek (Novak) means "newbie" in Czech.

Melzer derives from a profession that had to do with beer brewery in the past

Kucera means "curl(y)"

Escudé is an over-the-time altered form of the noun "écuyer" which describes a squirt serving for his master until his bestowal of knighthood

Seppi: simply a short name of Guiseppe

Saulnier: somebody who in the past worked in a salt mine, lived in a region with salt or dealt with salt

Koe(ö)llerer: centuries ago used for somebody who made the leather harness for animals, especially horses

Heuberger: a person living in or near the town called "Heuberg"

Mayer: landowner, big farmer

Eschauer: somebody who lives in a furtile land where corn/grain was grown

Eitzinger: this name was given to the children of the person who founded the town "Eycing" in middle age in Upper Bavaria. The descendants of this founder later left the town and founded new ones and gave them their name, some of them were in Austria. Eycing(er) developed into Eitzing(er) with time and different spelling (story is here explained in German: http://club.schrattenthal.at/swclub-sz11-eitzing.htm )


not sure about:

Devilder: dutch connection, I believe it is somebody who as a profession is picking up dead animals to dispose them (what does "De (Vilder)" mean in Dutch exactly?)

Volandri: any connection in Italian with the French adjective "volant/volante" (flying, agile)???

Bracciali: I see a connection between "braccio" = arm. Braccia could have been used for a female in the past, and Bracciali could be a diminutive then

Saumon
05-25-2007, 01:30 PM
Gasquet means "Little Gascon" (from Gascony, Occitania, France). And the name Gascon has the same roots than the name Basque, in the "frontalière" part of Gascony/Iparralde Basque country, the Basque and the Occitan dialects spoken mix and exchange words...

You've got lots of people named Gasc (even one of my ex-classmates Maëlle Gasc, if you happen to post here lol) but fewer named Gasquet...
My sisters had teachers (wife and husband) named Gasc :p

jitterbug
05-25-2007, 01:32 PM
Bracciali: I see a connection between "braccio" = arm. Braccia could have been used for a female in the past, and Bracciali could be a diminutive then

Google always translates Bracciali into Bracelets ;)

delsa
05-25-2007, 02:01 PM
Ok. I'll cover most of the Frenchies. My biggest internet source :http://jeantosti.com/noms/r2.htm. ;)

Mat(t)hieu : Very common first/last name in francophone countries. French equivalent of the Italian Mat(t)eo, the English Mathew, the German Mathias, the Polish Mateusz etc...

Simon : Far too well-known and common internationnaly to need any translation.

Monfils : « Mon fils » indeed means exactly « my son » in current French.

Clément : Very common in francophone countries both as a last name and as a first name (Clémence for girls, meaning clemency, mercy). It is a word also, an adjective still very much used in common French, meaning, well just what the loanword from French to English that it is means : clement. So... merciful, gracious...

Montcourt : It means litteraly « Short/Small Mountain/Hill » in French.

Recouderc and above all Couderc (and its numerous variants : Coudeyre, Couder, Coudert, Couder(c)q...) is a very frequent Occitan name in France. There is a famous movie with Alain Delon and Simone Signoret called « La veuve Couderc » (« the Couderc Widow »), the most famous French tv sport commentator was the beloved Roger Couderc and his «Allez les petits!», Raymond Couderc and Anne-Marie Couderc were too famous French politicians etc...etc....
The word couderc (in Occitan : "còderc" ) is used to describe an uncultivable/uncultivated space/area located near a farm or a communal pasture. It's most worn in Ariège.

Dupuis/Dupuy/Dupuit and all its numerous Occitan & Arpitan variants : Delpeuch, Delpech, Delpuech, Dupeuch, and diminutive Dupuisset, Dupuiset, and others adding an « s » or a « t » here and there... is one of the most common francophone last names. It means litteraly « from the water well/hole ».
In current French (meaning in modern Langue d'Oïl/dialect of Picard that became the vehicular language in France and most francophone countries) Du = « from the »/ »of the » before a masculine noun, and puit means « well »/ « hole ».

Eysseric : Most worn in Drôme, Hautes-Alpes and Vaucluse (just where the guy and his parents are from by the way...), is a common Occitan last name in France. It's the Occitan version of what used to be a first name of Germanic origin : Égiseric. Egiso = fear, -ric = powerful. It could also mean « powerful axe/chop » since the prefix Eysse- in Occitan French last names is coming from the word « aissa » = chop, adze; just like in the last name Eyssette (just after Eysseric in the link i posted above) which means "small axe". It's very distingably Occitan since Occitan French last names often countains ay/ey in them, just like Bayle, Peyre, Lapeyre (equivalent of the more modern French version Laporte) : name of a famous firm of doors-windows-furniture makers incidentally lol, Labeyrie (name of a famous house of foie gras makers...), Bayrou (French politician), Cayrol, Clavayrolles, Reynié (all famous people locally...) etc...

Capdeville : Occitan French last name meaning « Head of the city/town ». Most common variant : Capdevielle. Paul shares it with Nicolas Capdeville, most titled French bodyboarder, Claudine Capdeville, founder of the publishing house Guère épais, Jean IV de Capdeville, bishop of Lescar, Pierre Triep-Capdeville, famous French rugby union player, Robert Capdeville, French politician etc...etc...
Cap in Occitan = Head. De (French/Occitan)= of, Ville(most dialects of Occitan/French) = town/city.

Roger-Vasselin : Roger is far too well-known and common internationnaly to deserve any translation. Now Vasselin : It's either the diminutive of a first name of Germanic origins or the diminutive of an old French noun. First option, it would be the Frenchified version of Wazzelin (diminutive of Wazzo, from the Germanic wad- = « gage » in French, guarentee in English??!). Then it would be from the same family than the Picard last names that can be found in the North of France and Belgium Wasselin/Wasselyn. Or it is the diminutive of the old French word « vassel » (current French & as a loanword from French to English : vassal).

Lugassy : Quite frequent Sepharadic Jew last name in France. It is supposed to be of Moroccan origins and built from the first name Luc (Luke) / Lucas (meaning « resurrection » in Hebrew) and the Berbère (Berberian?!) suffix -ssi/-ssy. Another common Jewish name(of Tunisian origins this time) in France is Fitoussi (a famous actor is named Grégory Fitoussi btw...) and is built the same way. Fitou being an Occitan locality. Sepharadic Jewish names in France have been created more recently than other French names it is said, far after these families had settled.

Tourte = pie (salty) in current French (as opposed to « tarte » = tart, which is necesseraly sugary). For the very anonymous player Nicolas Tourte...

Gicquel is a very typical Breton last name (same for its numerous variants Giquel, Gicquiau, Gicquiaux, Gicquaud, Gicqueau, Gicqueaux , Gicquiaud, Gicquaire, Gicquère...). It is very common in Brittany/Bretagne/Breizh. It is a contracted version of Jézéquel (in old Breton Judicaël). Judicaël meaning « son of Iudhaël ». Iud = Lord, Haël = Noble/Generous with the usual Breton suffix -ic in the middle. Judicaël was a saint, an ancient Breton king who retired in the village of Gaël where he died in the VIIth century. Despite being born in Tunis, Marc Gicquel was raised in Brittany, from where his family comes and is very much a Breton...

Haehnel : Very frequent in Alsace (oh surprise, surprise just where Jérôme is from...lol) with its numerous variants Haen(n)el, Hänel etc... It comes from the Germanic first name Haen(n), equivalent of John/Jean/Juan/Gian/Sean etc...in other languages.

Devilder : Flemish name (from the extreme north of France & Belgium). Vilder means flayer, squarer apparently. Variants : De Vylder, De Vilder, Dewilder. De is a very common article, suffix shared by French, Spanish, Portuguese languages, sometimes found in old Anglo-French/Norman names or Dutch/Flemish ones naturally (not coming from immigrants of francophone countries)...

Santoro : Italian/Corsican last name. Formerly a first name, the equivalent of the French Toussaint (Toussaint Louverture anyone?...A movie on this Créole Haitian hero is on the works in Hollywood... Bruce Toussaint is also a famous tv presenter on French tv, La Matinale every morning on Canal +). The famous All Saints' day that became a first name in countries of Catholic tradition. Diminutives : Santorelli, Santarelli (they can also come from Santi). Logicvally, there is a huge community of Corsicans in the South-East of France and espespecially in Toulon, where Fabrice is from (despite being born in Tahiti, French Polynesia).

Llodra : Catalan last name (Llodrà) that, to patronymists, seems to be a version of a name of Germanic origin, maybe Leodhramn (leod =people, hramn = hawk) that could be found under the forms Liutram and Luodorane in the XIth century.

Mahut : Common in the Marne (Champagne-Ardenne), a local version of Mathieu.

Very interesting thread subject. :wavey:

delsa
05-25-2007, 02:11 PM
My sisters had teachers (wife and husband) named Gasc :p

You see? :p I've encountered many people named Gasc myself too. But Gascquet/Gasquet, just one so far. ;)

RonE
05-25-2007, 03:20 PM
Rafa's full name is Rafael Nadal Parera - that would be "God Has Healed Christmas Peartree". Lovely. :lol:

So how exactly does a Christmas Peartree get sick anyway? :scratch: ;)

Puschkin
05-25-2007, 03:27 PM
Ok. I'll cover most of the Frenchies.....
Very interesting thread subject. :wavey:

You must spread some reputation around before giving it to delsa again. :wavey:

mallorn
05-25-2007, 03:50 PM
So how exactly does a Christmas Peartree get sick anyway? :scratch: ;)
It depends where it lives. If in Europe, it could get frostbitten, for example. :awww: Not to mention some other, nasty stuff. :tape:

RonE
05-25-2007, 04:00 PM
It depends where it lives. If in Europe, it could get frostbitten, for example. :awww: Not to mention some other, nasty stuff. :tape:

Mutant camouflaged Banana Termites? :angel:

mallorn
05-25-2007, 04:23 PM
Mutant camouflaged Banana Termites? :angel:
Yes, them too. :o

Then there is a very dangerous, if extremely rare and poorly known, species - the February Indoor Bee, which also makes Christmas Peartrees very sick.

peacechick
05-25-2007, 06:55 PM
Blake = Means either "black" or "pale" in Old English. In Dutch the word "bleek", pronounced the same way, means "pale" too.

Murray = Derived from the region in Scotland, called Moray. Moray means "seaboard settlement".

Hewitt = Derived from a diminutive of the given name Hugh. Hugh:From Germanic hug, meaning "heart, mind, or spirit".

Monaco = Country in Europe, within France at the Mediterranian Sea

Dmitry (Tursunov) = Derived from Greek Goddes Demeter. Demeter means "earth mother".

Marat (Safin) = Probably derived from the name Murat, meaning "wish, desire" in Turkish.

R.Federer
05-25-2007, 06:59 PM
When there's a partridge singing in it. :angel:
And two turtle doves nearby, three french hens, four ... ?... :confused:, five rings, .... eleven pipers piping ...

delsa
05-25-2007, 07:05 PM
Monaco = Country in Europe, within France at the Mediterranian Sea

It means "monk" in Italian (and Spanish but i'm not sure about this one...). Monegasques originally comme from Genoa, Italy, and Monegasque (as a language) is a dilect of Ligure (Ligurian?!). Monaco is a niche within an Occitan area. It's the equivalent of the French last name Lemoine. Monaco is called like that because the first Grimaldi entered the city disguised as a Franciscan monk...It's even kind of "explained" in the drawings on the coat of arms of Monaco.

The monks supporting the shield in the coat of arms allude to the conquest of Monaco in 1297, when a Grimaldi entered the city with soldiers dressed as monks, with swords hidden under their cassocks (therefore the monks bear swords on the arms). The collar surrounding the shield represents the St. Charles' Order. The Grimaldi motto (Deo Juvante) reads "With God's help" (also related to the 1297 capture).

Sources: W. Smith, op. cit.; Dorling-Kindersely Pocket Flag Book, op. cit.

R.Federer
05-25-2007, 08:19 PM
Amazing that "Agassi" has meanings in so many languages.

In Hebrew it would mean "my pear". :lol:

I wonder if the original name Agassian has any specific meaning in Armenia, or elsewhere.