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SAMPRAS FANZONE!!!!!!!!!

angiel
01-20-2005, 12:55 AM
Proof, if More Proof Were Needed,
That Pete Sampras is the Greatest Tennis Player of Them All
by: Cynthia Smith (UK)

Those who love and admire Pete Sampras had been through a painful and difficult period after his historic victory at Wimbledon 2000, with his failure to add to his 63 titles for more than two years. Of course it must have been even harder for Pete, but as the months went by I found myself torn between the old excited anticipation when he was going to play and the increasing dread that he might lose again. I kept telling myself that people endowed with genius don't suddenly lose it - Pete couldn't have forgotten how to play great tennis. But what had become of this formerly peerless champion? Where was the supremely beautiful game that tennis aficionados had known and loved so well? Where was the fire, the confidence, the will to win? I felt disloyal for thinking it, but the Pete Sampras of 2001 and so far in 2002 seemed an inferior replica of the superbly efficient tennis machine who had powered his way to a record 13 Grand Slams.

“ I kept telling myself that people endowed with genius don't suddenly lose it — Pete couldn't have forgotten how to play great tennis."

As tournament followed Slam followed tournament, it was no longer a question of would Pete win the title - but would he even make it past the first round? So many painful times during this drought I watched him play with increasing disbelief and dismay. I did not want him to retire from tennis, but I could not bear the pain of his losing to player after player who was hardly fit to tie his shoe laces. It became a vicious circle: the more he lost, the less confidence he had, so he lost again. There were the odd glimmers of hope, but one or two good matches were then followed by another miserable exit.

When it came to Wimbledon 2002, I convinced myself that this was where Pete was going to re-ignite his winning fire-power and regain the title. We all know how that turned out. I was there, courtside, when Pete sat motionless on his stool after that dreadful defeat by another unknown. He stared blankly into space, as if seeking answers there as to how he had been brought so low. It could not have hurt more if Pete had been my own son and I longed to run and comfort him. But even his wife couldn't do that until the shattered legend had trudged off court to the comparative shelter of the locker room.

As the US Open came round again, so did the all-too-familiar wrestling match between my optimism and anxiety. Thankfully, however, the first match against Albert Portas was just the kind of start Pete needed. How long had it been since I had been able to watch him play a whole set without any need for nerves? Pete took it 6-1! True, his game was far from perfect yet, but I felt he had built something solid enough on which to base a credible US Open campaign. His serve had started to click and he attacked Portas aggressively at the net, taking both the 2nd and third sets at 6-4. In his second round match, I had to stop myself veering towards over-optimism, thinking that Kristian Pless wouldn't give Pete too much trouble. But he didn't! It was straights again: 6-3, 7-5, 6-4.

Pete's third round opponent, however, Greg Rusedski, presented a different proposition. When he gets his big serve going well, Rusedski can be a threat to any player. Just to make things more nail-biting, because the match was halted by rain in the first set with Rusedski leading 5-4, when play resumed next day Pete had to come out cold and hold serve. This he did easily enough, but with no break of serve the set had to be decided by the lottery of a tie-breaker. Suddenly Pete thrilled us with one of his special 'Air Sampras' overhead smashes, then went on to take the set with two aces. P-h-e-w, I breathed easily again. But not for long! The Sampras roller coaster swung us up, down and around - then into a fifth set. When it counted most though, Pete made no mistake. Breaking Rusedski again, he closed out the match 7-6 (4), 4-6, 7-6 (3), 3-6, 6-4.

So, that wasn't bad: two fairly easy matches, and a long, testing one. Now Pete needed to see off Tommy Haas in similar fashion - or preferably better. That wasn't likely to be an easy task, but I felt Pete was gaining not only match fitness with each round but the confidence which was equally needed. Here we were in the second week, round of 16, and not only was Pete still there but looking good. ("Be calm my thumping heart - long way to go yet!") Against Haas, Pete looked very purposeful, like a workman back at the job he loves and does so well. Crafting out a gutsy 4-setter for a 7-5, 6-4, 6-7, 7-5 victory, he notched up 27 aces, as well as 80 winners to the German's 36.

My hope could not be dimmed even by the fact that Pete's Quarter Final opponent was to be Andy Roddick, who had beaten him on both previous occasions they had met. But that was then - this was now! I prayed that Pete would put those losses out of his mind, come out fast and shoot Roddick down before he knew what had hit him. I saw Pete as a born-again believer in himself, who could surely beat the youngster this time. In fact he did just that, but the ease and style with which he accomplished it exceeded even my expectations. He was all over Andy from the first point, giving him no chance to settle or assert himself. The straight sets score-line was a deeply satisfying 6-3, 6-2, 6-4.

My faith in Pete had increased during the tournament in line with his renewed self-assurance. The Haas match seemed to be the real turning point. There were more flashes of the old dominant Pete, but against a top ten player rather than lower lights such as Portas and Pless. Next, taking his game so brilliantly to Roddick, a player who had held a 2-0 advantage over him, surely indicated that Pete was on a roll. I began to feel that he was unstoppable now!

"This is what I play for", said an elated Sampras after beating his younger compatriot so decisively. "I mean, these are big moments, playing Andy in a night match here. You know, he's a young up-and-comer that has a great future. I'm pumped up." Yes, Pete, so was I!

Pete's Semi-Final was to be against Sjen Shalken, who I thought was likely to be considerably less dangerous than some other players it might have been. And I wasn't exactly disappointed that Andre Agassi had a date with Leyton Hewitt in his Semi.

“ By now I was convinced that the tennis gods had finally relented and that destiny was beckoning Pete again."

.The Sampras serve had been going from strength to strength. His stats against Roddick were stunning: 87% of points played off his first serve, 46 net points to Andy's pitiful 4, and only one break point against him, which Pete didn't allow Roddick to convert. As long as Pete's stamina and fitness held out (the rain delays being responsible for his having to play 5 matches in 7 days) I felt sure that Shalken would soon be on his way home. So it proved, with the Dutchman finding few answers to the problems Pete posed him, going down in three sets for 6-7, 6-7, 2-6. To complete my joy, Agassi had disposed of Hewitt, so there was the prospect of another classic Final between the greatest server and the best returner in the game.

Sunday, 8th September dawned brightly in the UK. As soon as I woke, my thoughts flew across the ocean to New York, where I hoped Pete was enjoying a deep, rejuvenating sleep. I had been so anxious at the beginning of the Open, but by now I was convinced that the tennis gods had finally relented and that destiny was beckoning Pete again. Fortune had smiled so favourably on him at Wimbledon 2000, when he achieved the amazing feat of winning there for the seventh time, despite suffering from tendonitis and being unable to practise. I don't believe he deserved to pay for this by being condemned to wander in tennis wilderness for two years, but who can fathom the workings of fate?

The day couldn't pass quickly enough for me. I spent it feverishly fussing around, repeatedly checking the weather forecast for the States and the start time of the match. I even dusted the furniture and arranged fresh flowers, although no visitors were expected. (Let unexpected ones dare, on a day like this!) But I wanted everything to look nice in honour of Pete - as if he could see into the room from the television set!

Eventually it was time to don the 'lucky' clothes I had worn to watch all of Pete's matches, including the special King of Swing T-shirt. One of my prize possessions, the candle holder I had made from a water bottle Pete had drunk from, with a blue candle in it (his favourite colour) was ready to be lit as soon as His Gorgeousness appeared on court, and I had a stash of nibbles and cold drinks on hand to keep my strength up. Perhaps I did feel a tiny bit nervous, but most of all I was s-o-o-o excited. I was almost certain that Pete would win and put an end to our mutual misery!

You don't need me to take you through that historic match in detail, as it has already been eulogised by innumerable sports writers. But I should like to share with you the unforgettable feelings that it left with me.

I sat spellbound during the first set and a half, savouring every minute of Pete's scintillating performance. As he was to say afterwards, he was 'in the zone', that special corner of tennis heaven, from where Pete had been absent far too long. No human being could keep up that level of perfection indefinitely, and as Pete started to tire, fear struck my heart like violent indigestion. ("Oh Pete, how shall we bear it if you're denied for the third year running!) But, being the great champion he is, the mighty Sampras dug deep, found that extra ounce of resolve, and suddenly, from being a break down he was serving for the match. And winning it - his first slam - first title - for 26 months! Pete, you deserved it so much!

At last our warrior was restored to us! All the hard times were forgotten as we happy voyeurs shared in the joy and pride that radiated from Bridgette Sampras, while her beaming husband sought her out in the crowd to hold her close and whisper in her ear. Was ever a sporting victory more poignant - a drama fit even for Shakespeare's interpretation. With apologies to the latter, I can imagine it now: A valiant king, tested by cruel adversity, fights and loses numerous hard battles in his own and foreign lands. Yet he refuses to yield his sovereignty. Despite years of suffering, he returns at last with his faithful queen to his own land, winning his most glorious victory and restoring his fortunes.

Pete Sampras is not a man to stoop to trading insults with lesser mortals. He speaks most eloquently with his racket, with the athletic poetry of his movement, and above all, with the fighting heart that all conquerors must possess. How proud and joyful I am to have followed his unique career, through tears and triumphs, and now to delight in his greatest reward so far. As Pete said, with characteristic under-statement, "I guess I'm back." And thousands of tennis fans world-wide are so very glad he is.

-end-

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angiel
01-20-2005, 01:00 AM
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The Superhero
by: Dalia King - Trinidad & Tobago

Disclaimer: I'm not going to lie to all you readers out there - don't expect the following article to be impartial. I'm probably going to be as biased as they come - and as unrepentant as all get out...which shouldn't be much of a change from all those reporters who get paid to tout their favourites right? Another warning: it's an article about a tennis player, the tennis player, but largely, it's not about tennis. Don't look for analysis of his serve motion.

Pete Sampras spun a magical web for his fans during Wimbledon 2000. He overcame adversity throughout the fortnight, culminating in a glorious win over an in form and always pumped Patrick Rafter. As fans, we were beside ourselves with joy - could it possibly get any better? Our minds were in hyper-drive - of course it could get better! The man had won Wimbledon with a gimpy leg!! The French Open was small fry compared to this! Bring on Flushing Meadows!

This Superhero of ours didn't climb walls wearing tights or fly wearing tights or drive a hot car...wearing tights. No, he won matches…in unfortunately baggy shorts. We weren't that disappointed - at least he was winning.

It's 2002 and we're desperate. He isn't winning and he's still wearing baggy shorts. What's a fan to do??

You've probably had it up to the eyelids with this phrase and its many sickening derivatives:

"It's been X number of tournaments since Pete Sampras has won a title."

No doubt we've all come close to murder a couple of times while reading disparaging articles about the state of our beloved's game - especially as there is almost always that annoying little nugget of truth. This is not Pete Sampras. He isn't closing out as he used to. What good are all those finalist plates? Pete Sampras isn't a finalist - he's a champion!

Everybody knows exactly why Pete is no longer the dominant force - even on grass as some over-zealous reporters had the audacity to claim. It was his aura - it was gone. It was his second serve - where was it? His feet - they were slower. Look at his hair - he's just older.

Through it all, as a Pete fan, you plug on, accustomed to negative comments though not quite like this. We're used to holding our own by shouting rejoinders such as: "He's not boring!"

"He does NOT look like a monkey!!"

"He is sick, he wasn't faking it!"

Nothing we couldn't handle.

Now we have to deal with serious arguments that cannot be ignored, no matter how hard we may wish for it to go away. So far we have yet to see if the real Pete Sampras shows up for this Wimbledon 2002, but it would be foolish to argue that for the majority of the past two years the Pete Sampras of old has not been in hibernation. We can only hope he's well rested when he returns. We can only hope he wins. This is no longer a given - has not been for a while - now not even at Wimbledon. I still get chest pains when I recall that match against Roger Federer in 2001 and I'm a young and reasonably healthy woman.

It's not easy being a Pete fan. I don't expect you to believe me however. Many fans of other tennis players say we've had it too easy - wins have always been the order of the day; they were expected and we wondered how much he would thrash his victim by, not whether he'd win. Please - that went without saying.

These days his pampered fans are all nervous wrecks. We look at draws where he's paired with an unknown player in the first round and take some pills in preparation.

Another dreaded quote always looms:

"He was just too good."

I would hope Pete says this in order to get pesky reporters off his back and tiresome post match conferences out of the way. Just tell them what they want to hear and head home. However, if this is his honest opinion, Pete's problem is mental. Unless Jose Higueras dabbles in sports psychology Pete may be looking in the wrong direction for answers. Nobody is too good for Pete Sampras and from any other mouth that quotation would be secular blasphemy. We only just tolerate it from the man himself.

I feel sorry for Pete - such weak words, but true. For so many years he's been all tennis, driven by the sport. He found his lady love in Bridgette Wilson and if only all aspects of his life could have then been a Happily Ever After. Instead his tennis career took a harsh fall - the only way to fall when you're at the top. I don't think his marriage to Bridgette is a reason why he's not the same Pete we've grown to see kiss those trophies. Getting married and playing tennis isn't exactly the toughest multi-tasking job there is. I always found it quite an insult to both bride and groom to suggest falling in love and making it legal played an essential part in the problems he's now facing. Bridgette is not his kryptonite (I had to stick to the theme) and the faster we all realise that, the easier it's going to be to get to the root of the problem - or problems.

Other general tennis fans wonder why we seem to throw so many drama sessions, railing at myriad uncaring gods. Isn't this the guy who got to the finals of two US Opens in a row beating Rafter, Safin and Agassi in 2001?

Well yes...but wouldn't it sound better if we could say he won the thing twice in a row? Never content those Sampras fans. We're also well aware time isn't exactly standing still. For the optimistic amongst us, Pete's got three of four more Slams left but the man is in his thirties and his back gets thrown out at all the crucial moments. You'd think it was working with the enemy.

It's been a harsh two years, especially this 2002 where he dedicated his time once again to tennis, made some eyebrow raising changes - and still lost. Roland Garros 2002, like Wimbledon 2001 was "devastating".

Pete never gives up though - but should he? A bone of contention even amongst steadfast fans. Nobody disputes that Pete should retire only when he feels to (Yevgeny Kafelnikov notwithstanding and who cares about him anyway?) but how sad it would be to see only the shadow of Mr Sampras still on court five years or even two years down the road. This is not how champions should go out.

When Pete Sampras, Grasscourt King, loses to Alex Corretja who is allergic to chlorophyll in a Davis Cup match on home soil, the word retirement is bandied about and rightly so. Reporters, however annoying they may be...and they are annoying... would not be doing their job if they didn't tell it like it is. This is not Pete Sampras.

"I was in the zone."

It seems as if the last time I heard him say that I was in diapers. I want to hear it again - and soon. It's always been a bit corny to me; he sounds like a jock in those teen movies:

"I was in the zone man!"

But I grin whenever I hear it. It reminds me of who he is. So he's not perfect, he's not invincible, he doesn't have abs of steel - but he's the best superhero the tennis world has today (bias alert, bias alert!). Too often these stars give up when they realise there's no chance of a win and behave badly when they are losing or have lost. Pete's no angel, but anyone would be hard pressed to think of instances when he was less than the gentleman. It makes him so much easier to follow during the hard times.

You'll never be embarrassed to say you're a Pete Sampras fan whether he's losing in the first round or closing out the set for the title.

It's time to make those reporters eat every one of their words and this summer at that croquet club would be the perfect time to do it. Spin another magical web for us Pete baby.

"If I didn't believe it, I wouldn't be here."

He believes and I believe. We'll see you at Wimbledon.

June 24, 2002

- end -

angiel
01-20-2005, 01:11 AM
Age Ain't Nothing but a Number
by: Georgia Christoforou (UK)

When Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi contested the 2002 US Open Final their combined ages amounted to 63!


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Long before the tournament began, the critics and journalists had been writing about the possible impending retirement of two of the greats in the game.

Some of the headlines regarding record breaking Pete Sampras were nothing short of soul breaking. For example one US Newspaper ran an article with the headline "For Pete's Sake Stop" but had any of them bothered to listen to the great champion Pete Sampras then they would have heard the words and heeded them "I still believe I have one or maybe two great moments, otherwise I wouldn't be playing" "I want to go out on my terms, I think I've earned the right to do that!"

If it had been written about a player who was more openly sensitive to what was spoken about them then perhaps they would have agreed and retired, but not Pete Sampras a player and a living legend who has built his successful career on a foundation of mental toughness and an unwavering belief in himself and his ability to rise above and allow his natural talent and skill to carry him through to success.

Of course he had earned the right to retire on his terms, and perhaps this is being presumptuous but he most definitely deserved to be shown a little more respect by the people in the media and by his fellow players.

Many players may have felt or thought that Pete was slowing down, but many respected and admired Pete Sampras and his achievements too much to voice them openly. One player however dared to voice his opinions in a press conference following his defeat at the hands of Pete Sampras in a five set battle! That player was Greg Rusedski. Upon entering the pressroom where he proceeded to arrogantly state, "I lost that match, he didn't win it!" He then followed that statement with "He's a step and a half slower coming into the net… I can't see him winning another match, in fact I'll be very surprised if he wins against Haas in the next round!"

As usual Pete Sampras chose to ignore the bait to get involved in a media fight and let his trusty racket do the talking. Not only did he beat Tommy Haas in the following round, he did it in the style that many had forgotten Pete Sampras to play. He served well, his returns impeccably accurate. Perhaps Greg's comments re-awakened Pete's awesome talent and brought it out again to shine in the Stadium that he began his amazing Grand Slam haul at the tender age of 19 way back in 1990. Whatever the reason for Pete turning on the genius play that has earned him countless trophies and accolades in a career spanning more than a decade, he has proven why he is and should always be known as the great champion that he is.

His next round opponent was in the form of up-and-coming, future of American tennis star, Andy Roddick, it was billed as the match between the changing of guard.

What in fact the match was, was a master-class in tennis, Pete Sampras destroyed Andy Roddick in straight sets, breaking the youngster in his opening service game, perhaps even breaking the youngster's spirit, which set the tone of the match and firmly stamped Pete Sampras' authority on the match.

In the press conference after his win against Roddick, the press decided to question Pete Sampras again about Greg Rusedski's comments. Pete in his usual understated yet charming manner replied with "I don't really take much notice of what he has to say, I have better things to use my energy and time on. Besides against him I don't need to be a step and a half quicker do I?" Despite Pete's calm response, his eyes did show a burning anger, that he obviously wanted to harness and use in helping himself to win his matches and prove the doubters wrong the best way - by WINNING!

What was emerging over the course of the championships was that you should never underestimate the capabilities of a player despite the fact that he had not won a tournament since breaking the Grand Slam record with his 13th Grand Slam win at Wimbledon 2000. Had people forgotten that he had been the finalist the past 2 years at Flushing Meadows? Who could honestly predict him not making it 3 finals in a row, but coming out victorious the 3rd time around?

Sampras's semi-final match was to be against Schalken, a fast improving player. Sampras took advantage of being the first semi-final match to be played and beat Schalken convincingly in straight sets, 7-6, 7-6, 6-2. The look of satisfaction and elation on making the final was priceless; Sampras was through to the final of the US Open. Now he had to wait and see who his opponent would be. Would it be the defending champion, Leyton Hewitt or would it be his oldest rival Andre Agassi?

Agassi fought hard and beat Australia's Leyton Hewitt in four tough sets. So, the two players that the media had so quickly dismissed and written their epitaph's were to contest the 2002 US Open Final - a dream final in many a tennis fans eyes!

So what if Pete Sampras is 31, Agassi 32…. Age is nothing but number, and it is not right to disregard these two players who have achieved so much and without a doubt have had the longest standing rivalry in tennis. A rivalry that both players have admitted has brought out the best in their games.

For the first 2 sets of their final contest, Pete Sampras could have walked on water… he played near flawless tennis, his serve as accurate as ever. His returns blistering! Pete Sampras somehow managed to turn back the clock and despite his hair thinning looked like the player that won at the age of 19 by dismissing his opponents as though he was swatting flies in his back yard!

In the third set Agassi found his form and briefly looked as though he would push his rival to five sets. Despite Agassi winning the 3rd set 7 games to 5, Sampras hung in despite feeling and showing obvious fatigue in the fourth set to clinch the match and his 14th Grand Slam title 6-3, 6-4, 5-7, 6-4.

“ He speaks most eloquently with his racket, with the athletic poetry of his movement, and above all, with the fighting heart that all conquerors must possess."

It was an emotional and most sweetest of wins for Pete Sampras. He ran into the crowd to celebrate and thank his biggest supporter, his beautiful wife Bridgette, who is expecting their first child at the end of the year. He later went on to say that if had not been for his wife he may have given up, but she kept his spirits up and kept on reminding him of who he is and what he has achieved. "Just shows I chose the right woman to be my wife!" Sampras proudly said.

Despite this win, people still insist on bringing up the retirement question, Pete and Andre both refuse to give a set date. As long as they feel as passionately as they do about competing then who can realistically put a time limit on them playing?

In my honest opinion, Pete Sampras can still play and compete with the best for at least 3 or perhaps 4 years. Perhaps this 14th Grand Slam win will be the start of Pete Sampras on another winning streak…. Who can say that he won't win numbers 15,16 or even 17 next years at the Grand Slams to come? No one can predict anything in sport, but one thing is for sure, no one can ever take away the fact that Pete Sampras is the Greatest Ever to Play the beautiful game of TENNIS.





-end-

angiel
01-20-2005, 09:10 PM
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The Sampras Song
by: Perizad Dalal (Mumbai, India)


They said you should retire
You should call it a day
Proved so much already
What else was there to say
Thirteen titles in the bag
A place in history
What's left to play for
Just bow out gracefully

But you knew yourself better
You know you are The Best
You've got your 14th title
You've passed your toughest test

Well done, Pete
Champion of Champions
Bravo Pete
You're a real Superstar
That's why you're ahead
And others are where they are
Oh-oh-oh

You showed them Pete
Showed you could do it
Talent and grit
Took you right through it
When you're on a roll
You just rock,
Pete, you rule!
When you're on a roll
You just rock,
Pete you rule

angiel
01-21-2005, 09:59 PM
Pete Sampras' Current Situation
by: Jane Nixon, UK


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I don't believe Pete looks at his position as a slump because Pete Sampras has always believed that more great successes are just around the corner. Yes, he's slipped a fraction in the rankings, but Pete Sampras does not play for ranking points anymore, he plays for History. What else has he to prove? Nothing to anyone except to himself which is why he's still playing. Pete is a very fit athlete and I don't see any reason why he shouldn't continue to play for as long as he is still enjoying competing because the longer he plays the more he will imprint his name in the record books.

Hope is all I have left, and the many posts from the members of the Samprasfanz group which continually lift me during this very sad time. I find the Samprasfanz group a wonderful tonic because it's a place where I can go to vent my feelings whether angry, sad or happy about our GREAT CHAMPION THE GREAT PETE SAMPRAS. After having said this I find the hardest thing to cope with is the tennis writers opinions about what they think is the case everytime Pete loses a match, and what they believe Pete Sampras should do about it. However, since I've stopped reading the negative articles, I am beginning to cope better with Pete's current situation.

Pete Sampras' current situation of not winning a title since Wimbledon 2000 seems to be never ending. However, I have to keep reminding myself that Pete is playing for the Grand Slams and for history and then I immediately feel better. Pete helps me feel better too when he says that he's an optimist and he isn't getting too down on himself. Like Pete, I'm an optimist too and this certainly helps me to keep a positive outlook for his heroic comeback. One phenomenon that helps me to keep a positive outlook for Pete's return to winning ways is the aura which enveloped him whilst winning his first Grand Slam the US Open aged only 19 years. Pete is now the grand slam king, a legend and I believe all great players find a way to return. Many argue that Pete has lost his aura but perhaps they never saw it in the first place. I don't believe this just because he isn't winning at the moment because an aura and I quote: is a distinctive character or quality around a person that is a visible faint light, and a visible faint light never goes out (Chambers Dictionary). Pete has always had this light ever since he was a child and one lovely quote from player Justin Gimelstob who summed it up beautifully after he played Pete Wimbledon 2000. "Whilst in his mother's womb, God spent a little extra time on his right shoulder and touched it". This quote says so much and really sums up that aura's are everlasting.

"It is true that although Pete hasn't won a title since Wimbledon 2000, he is still as talented a player as ever and has the game to win more tournaments. For some time since that great and historic record-breaking win, it was possible (and certainly argued amongst the tennis elite) that he had lost the hunger and motivation to win tournaments, however I believe that this was only temporary otherwise he would have no real reason to keep on playing. Keep on playing he has, appearing to be as determined and committed as ever, and certainly fitter than he's been for many months. As he himself said "Before I needed to win (tournaments), now I want to". I am sure that elusive win will come sometime this year, and this so-called twilight period of his career where he seems to play himself into a tournament winning frame of mind and gradually gather momentum; whereas when he was younger, he was winning tournaments more frequently and earlier on in the year. He is certainly confident that he has another Grand Slam or two left in him" Sue Dodds, Australia

This he nearly did at last year's US Open after beating three former US Open champions on his way to the final. When you have been a champion like Pete Sampras has, the champion of all champions, I cannot begin to understand why so many are writing him off for more Grand Slam glories. He would not be treated like this in any other sport and I believe the constant hounding he is having to endure by the tennis media is absolutely unforgivable because they are certainly not helping him to make a revival by continually referring to the retirement question. Luckily for them Pete doesn't read half of what's written about him, but at the same time I believe a certain amount must filter back to the Sampras camp and to Pete himself which obviously isn't helping.

I found the US Open quarter-final match between Sampras and Agassi lasting three and a half hours one of the most nerve wracking matches I have ever seen and what made it worse was that the tennis experts were predicting that Agassi would win as he was the player in form. However, I felt as Sampras had beaten Rafter in such great style that perhaps he would be alright. I stayed with the match from the first point to the last and by the end I was over-tired but at the same time so elated that Pete came out the winner. Both players were playing at the highest level perhaps ever seen in the sport which made it according to many experts one of the best handful of matches ever played. I agree with these experts which leads me on to why I don't believe Pete Sampras should retire.

Pete's terrific display at last years US Open showed me that Pete can hold his own in very tough matches which proves he's not over the hill by any means. Pete shouldn't retire just to please those in the tennis media whose theory is that he's over the hill because he hasn't won a tournament since Wimbledon 2000. Perhaps Pete not winning a tournament since his historic Wimbledon 2000 victory might be due to how much it mentally it took out of him when he was only about 80% physically fit due to suffering with tendonitis in his ankle. Pete has said that winning Wimbledon 2000 did take a lot out of him mentally. So why is it then that some want him to retire?

Is it because Pete Sampras is 30 years old that he's supposed to be over the hill, washed up and finished by so many, or is it because some in the tennis media want to see him go to stand aside for the next generation? Whatever the reason, the tennis media should just leave him alone to enjoy the rest of his tennis career. When Pete is ready to go he will announce his retirement to the world and in the meantime he doesn't need this continual harassment from the tennis media. Pete has said on many occasions that he will stop playing when he doesn't want to go to the practice courts anymore because this will tell him that he isn't enjoying playing tennis anymore.

At first the talk about Pete's retirement really upset me because the media were relating to his age as the most important factor he should be considering to continue on in the sport he has always loved. But I am learning from those in the know that you shouldn't be listening to the media talk, because these sports writers are more interested in the style than the content. So I now ignore the writers whose articles are just painting doom and gloom, that is writing negatively.

"Ah, the dreaded 'R' word. For those who love Pete, whenever he retires will always be too soon. I still firmly believe that he will beat the demons which are hounding him, but it seems increasingly possible that he may need some extra outside help to do so. However, I am still hopeful that his mighty champions heart will finally break the mental chains which are fettering him" Cynthia Smith UK

"I think the retirement issue is something that shouldn't really be discussed, especially as Pete Sampras himself has made it clear that he has no intention of retiring anytime soon. As long as he has the desire to play, physical health and has the belief that he can still compete with the rest of the guys on the tour then I don't see what right anyone has to comment on this matter" Georgia Christoforou, UK

"Pete will retire when he believes he's no longer in contention for winning Grand Slams. It is his inherent belief that he still may have another Grand Slam (or two) and this is the fuel which drives him to keep striving for that goal. As he has said in the past "winning the majors is what it's all about for me" Sue Dodds, Australia

I believe Pete Sampras will win another Grand Slam or two as do all those in his camp/entourage, Jose Higueras, Patrick McEnroe, Bridgette his beautiful and very supportive wife, Tom Gullikson, and Paul Annacone when he is able to support Pete on court. Also the very supportive Samprasfans who help me everyday to see that there will be a light at the end of this dark tunnel. If the people Pete has most contact with believe that he can, then why should anyone else question his ability to do so? I suppose they question because he hasn't won a tournament since Wimbledon 2000 but quite honestly Pete judges his years by what he does in the slams and not a first round exit somewhere in some 3rd league tournament. I know winning breeds winning but in Pete's case this isn't how he should be being judged. As a fan, desperation has begun to set in as to when the number fourteen will happen but my faith in Pete succeeding remains high because whenever I see him play either on court or on the television I still see that wonderful aura that has enveloped him from the very first time I saw him win his first slam at the US Open 1990.

"I have no doubt and every belief that Pete can and will win another Grand Slam title…. He came very close at last year's US Open…and had his draw been a little less mentally and physically exhausting then he would have won the title. I believe that with all my heart! His new coach will help him to do this and I cannot wait to see him claim a fourteenth Grand Slam. J Also it will satisfy me greatly to see all the people that have doubted this will happen being made to eat their words and perhaps be brought to their knees begging for forgiveness or even mercy from Pete Sampras" Georgia Christoforou, UK

"As a fan of his for many years I still believe he has the talent to win at least one more slam, if not two. The fact that he has made the final of the past two US Opens is indicative enough for me that he can still do it, and crack that magic number fourteen. This is something that I don't expect to see any other player do for many years, maybe not even in my lifetime" Sue Dodds, Australia

Conclusion: Pete's current situation hopefully won't continue for much longer and as I said at the beginning I have to keep optimistic, holding the belief that the best player ever will find a way back to within the top five. I say the top five because Pete isn't interested anymore in the number one ranking as he has been there and held that position for six consecutive years 1993-1998. To be fair to Pete he has told the world this in many an interview, so for those who don't know, now you do. Another belief is that in other sports, the great sportsmen do have a habit of coming back and doing great things. This I believe will be the case for THE GREAT PETE SAMPRAS, THE GREATEST TENNIS PLAYER IN THE HISTORY OF THE SPORT OF TENNIS.

June 8, 2002

- end -

Ultraman
01-21-2005, 10:10 PM
Great articles.........perfect for my train ride home.

Mimi
01-22-2005, 02:44 AM
wow, so many long article, i need long time to read, but thanks a lot angiel for posting :worship: :wavey:

Lalitha
01-22-2005, 03:50 AM
Angiel, how come you are able to gather so much info?? :rolleyes:

angiel
01-22-2005, 06:29 PM
Great articles.........perfect for my train ride home.


Hello there Ultraman - how are you doing - hope you enjoy reading the articles and have a great weekend at home. :D :) see ya.

angiel
01-22-2005, 06:31 PM
Angiel, how come you are able to gather so much info?? :rolleyes:


Hi there Lalitha,how are you my dear and how is the job doing, I browse all over the internet and found these super articles from his fans - so I post them for you guys to read - enjoy. :wavey: :angel:

angiel
01-22-2005, 06:32 PM
wow, so many long article, i need long time to read, but thanks a lot angiel for posting :worship: :wavey:


You are welcome Mimi, and take your time my dear, to read them, no rush. :wavey: :D

angiel
01-22-2005, 08:22 PM
A TRIBUTE TO OUR CHAMPION
By: Sandie Anthony

http://www.samprasfanz.com/gallery/2002us4/r404.jpg


Written with heart-felt thanks for the years of nail biting, breathtaking, floor pacing, cover my eyes because I can’t bear to watch, jubilant, tearful, beaming with pride memories to the greatest tennis player of all time……….Pete Sampras. Thanks for the memories Pete!


Isn’t it funny how things happen, isn’t it funny how things go,
Isn’t it funny they never appreciated you until you no longer showed?
Isn’t it funny they didn’t acknowledge your serve and volley game,
Isn’t it funny now they’re saying without you the sport is not the same?


Isn’t it funny how they’re lining up to shout your accolades and praise,
Where were they for the past 12 years during your glory days?
Isn’t it funny they labeled you boring, and refused to acknowledge your feats,
Isn’t it funny how they almost wallowed in your occasional defeats?


Isn’t it funny how the talent and grace you brought into the game
Were labeled very boring, dull, and even lame?
You didn’t have a personality; you certainly had no flair,
And watching you win Slam after Slam was just more than they could bear.


It was nearly torture, so they said, to have to watch you play,
Same old boring Sampras blowing all the opposition away.
Same face showing no emotion, same shoulders hanging low,
Pete Sampras, a great champion……no, they didn’t think so.


But to those of us who knew better, watching you was such a gift,
And it wasn’t just your high jumps that gave us such a lift.
Watching as you painted the lines, time and time again,
Rendering your opponents helpless, just mere mortal men.


I laughed so many times as I saw them try desperately to guess,
Just which damn line that serve of yours was to powerfully caress.
And just when they thought they had you running desperately side to side,
You’d nail that running forehand as they stood helplessly watching it fly by.


You brought a certain style and grace that was certainly your own,
You refused to ever allow yourself to become the media’s clone.
You always remained true to yourself, no matter what they clamored for,
You learned to laugh and ignore it when they continued to call you a bore.


I am who I am, I’m not going to change, and I do my talking out on the courts,
I’m chasing some records, I have my goals and I’ll do it quietly without your support.
If you can’t learn to like me for who I am and what I can bring to this game,
I suggest you go chasing the others out there that are in it for glory and fame.


Isn’t it funny they just didn’t get it, isn’t it funny they just couldn’t see,
That being the best to ever play the game was just your destiny.
Seems they have all gotten glasses, as they now see things quite clearly,
Isn’t it funny how they miss you now and actually find you endearing.

Isn’t it funny now how many seem to realize just what they had?
Realizing it so late in the game isn’t funny though, it’s sad!
Why weren’t the so-called experts supporting you just like all your fans?
Why weren’t they holding up banners and shouting your praises from the stands?


Where were all the headlines in the local papers and magazines?
Stating for a fact that Sampras is the best they’ve ever seen!
They were too busy looking elsewhere for someone with perhaps a little more flair,
Someone to sign the endorsements, to help them sell their wares.


Too bad they missed the party; too bad they missed the show,
Too bad the so-called experts were the ones who didn’t know.
Didn’t know the best to grace the courts and ever play the game,
Had been there right before their eyes for more than the past decade.


Is it possible a decade has passed by as quickly as a wink?
Is it possible you were here and gone before we could even think?
Gone is that beautiful serve that no one ever learned to read,
Gone is the Sampras high jump that left us all unable to breathe.
Gone is the greatest second serve to ever grace the game,
Gone is the running forehand that left opponents shaking their heads in vain.
Gone is that beautiful net game that showed off your gentle touch,
Gone are so many other things we miss so very much.


Although our main wish for you is happiness and we’re glad you have your family,
Please know just how much you’ll be missed by many more than me.
They say the sign of a true champion is one who truly changes the game,
If that is true then the champion can only go by one familiar name.
That name is Pistol Pete Sampras and if you missed him it’s your loss,
For on the courts of tennis he was king, he ruled, he was boss!


Although we miss you terribly and the selfish side of us wants you back,
Cause without you there’s so many things the game just sadly lacks!
What we truly want is your happiness and if you choose to no longer play,
Then we’re grateful for the time we had and we’d just like to take the time to say:
You’ll always be our champion, and we’ll never really part,
For we’ll carry you and all our memories forever in our hearts.
The one thing we still ask for, the one thing we still need,
Is to send our very best wishes and say, Thanks Pete for the Memories!

angiel
01-24-2005, 08:50 PM
LONG LIVE THE KING OF THE COURTS!

Sampras Completes the Circle
by: Cynthia Smith (UK)


http://www.samprasfanz.com/gallery/2003usopen/pete01.jpg


Arthur Ashe Court at Flushing Meadows, New York on Monday evening, 25th August, 2003 was packed with more than twenty thousand expectant tennis lovers. Pete Sampras, five-time winner of the US Open, was due on court shortly, as he had been almost every August for the past fifteen years. But this year was different. This year Pete was not competing. The greatest competitor of them all had decided he must make the difficult decision to end his illustrious career, in the place where he had won the first and the last of his history-making 14 Grand Slam titles.

So often during that career Pete seemed not to have received due recognition for his supreme talents and achievements. On this special night, however, the United States Tennis Association had persuaded the shy and self-effacing Sampras to attend a ceremony honouring his career. How I wished I could have been there at such a momentous occasion in Pete’s life.

Waiting for the ceremony to begin, I reflected on how I had been similarly disappointed not to be present on that euphoric evening almost a year ago, when Pete had confounded his critics by triumphing for a fifth time at the Open and breaking his own Grand Slam title record. That had held for twenty-six months, since Wimbledon 2000. But from that date until 8th September 2002 Pete had not won a single title. So all that mattered was that he had restored his fortunes; of course the fact that I was not there was unimportant. Instead, I had shared the building tension with members of Samprasfanz in the Chatroom and then watched the match on television. No drama conceived by any playwright could have surpassed the one unfolding then!

Americans like to do things in style and the crowd and television audience were treated to a lengthy build-up, from a rock band, an excerpt from a Broadway musical, and a spectacular procession of flag waving and trumpet blowing. Well, Pete Sampras would never blow his own trumpet so he needed someone to do it for him. Fans were waving banners for him too, including a distinctive yellow one with blue lettering, held proudly aloft by a group of his loyal Samprasfanz.

Camera views from the top of the stadium were awe-inspiring, with the sheer size of the spectacle laid out in miniature so far below. There were off-court shots of Pete with wife Bridgette, smiling happily as they watched what was taking place. How different their thoughts must have been from those they normally shared before Pete went on court, especially during the long win-less months prior to last September.

At last, the phenomenon himself appears in the stadium. Pete walks towards the line-up of VIPs assembled to pay court to the king of tennis, accompanied by enthusiastic cheers and a standing ovation. His well-cut black suit accentuates his dark good looks, but the grey-blue shirt is casually open at the neck. He always hated those formal occasions, such as the Wimbledon Ball, when he was required to wear an awkward bow tie. He pauses for a moment to look around, as if he can hardly believe that all the fuss is for him.

David Enberg of CBS Sports gives Pete an appreciative welcome and then introduces those who are there to give their accolades. First up is Pete’s long-time friend and coach Paul Annacone. Pete is fairly comfortable with what Paul has to say, although he glances down at his shoes much of the time, smiling shyly. Some of the more extravagant compliments from John McEnroe, Boris Becker, Jim Courier and Andre Agassi cause Pete to look slightly embarrassed and he seems glad to laugh at their jokes to ease his self-consciousness.

The Chairman of USTA, Alan Schwartz, then steps forward. He shows to Pete, the crowd and watching millions on television a magnificent, free-standing, commemorative plaque. Surmounted with an engraving depicting Pete in slam-dunk mode, there is a red super-hero cape attached to his shoulders. Mr Shwartz reads out the inscription, as follows:

“In a career that spanned three decades, Pete Sampras re-wrote the record books for the men’s game and re-defined the word ‘champion’. His quiet confidence, unfailing courage and unparalleled commitment to excellence defined him as a player and a person. Sampras’ 14 Grand Slam titles are a record which is likely to stand for all time, as will the legacy of a man who graced the great sport of tennis with his singular brilliance and class. He finished at number one in the rankings a record six years (1993 – 1998) and held the top spot a total of 286 weeks, another record. Sampras also tops the career earnings list with $43 million.”

I smiled inwardly at how ‘American’ the red cape and mention of his earnings seemed. And why not? Pete may be of Greek descent but he’s an all-American boy too, and one at last taken to the hearts of his compatriots.

The crowd and VIPs roar their approval as Sampras the Supreme is presented with the plaque. An expectant hush falls for a second and then it’s Pete’s turn to respond to all the lavish but well-deserved praise. The man who so often has been unfairly described as ‘boring’, ‘robotic’ and lacking in emotion now proves his detractors wrong again. Several times his deep, soft voice falters as tears threaten to get out of control. He wipes his eyes, puts a hand over his face and tries again, several times. Camera shots of the crowd show how enthralled they are by this unique piece of tennis theatre. As if remembering who he is and why he is there, Pete recovers his dignity and finally gets through his speech. Bridgette and baby Christian Charles come to join him and loud applause erupts again. Sampras junior sits quiet and solemn in his mother’s arms, a cherub at the Olympian court of King Pete. Requested to do a novel lap of honour so that all sections of the crowd can take their photos, Pete carries little Christian with him instead of his customary trophy.

The baby gazes wide-eyed and wondering at all the people and the noise. Clutching a tennis ball and looking gravely about him, the flashes from so many cameras prompt the little boy to drop the ball and reach for the security of Daddy’s broad chest. Pete kicks the ball into the crowd, to be retrieved by a jubilant young fan.

Watching Pete walking round the court with his greatest prize tenderly cradled in his arms and the exuberant response of the crowd, I am transported back to when I had first become aware of what a remarkable tennis player, what a special human being Pete Sampras is.

It was the summer of 1995 and I had been in hospital for several weeks. The days were long and boring, which I found depressing. My husband had to be abroad on business and I was missing him badly. I was only half-watching the television; they were showing tennis. Of course, it was late June – this was Wimbledon. I had only ever seen the highlights before, which we used to watch in the evenings after work.

I suddenly became aware of a dark, good-looking young man who attracted me with his brooding intensity. Oh I’d seen him briefly before, flashing dark and white across the court, and holding up the trophy in 1993 and 1994. Now I witnessed him on the way to his third title; so quiet, so graceful, so swift and deadly in execution of his shots and pursuit of the ball. I was held spell-bound. Between sets, after he had towelled down his Greek god-like face and broad chest, he stared pensively into the camera lens – straight at me it seemed. The significance of that moment was as powerful as a religious conversion. I know it was no the medication which induced what I felt then, and ever since when I’ve been in the presence of Pete. I swear he ‘came to me’ through the television screen and inspired me, with the burning self-belief of his gaze, to get well. Shortly after the Final and watching Pete hold up his third Wimbledon trophy, I was told I could go home.

Since then I have followed Pete’s career avidly. Each time I watched him hold up yet another trophy I could not have been more proud than if he were my own son. I was house-bound for some time, waiting for operations to restore my mobility, and Pete was a great source of solace. In fact he opened a new window in my life when I found Samprasfanz in 2002 and was able to share my feelings about him with so many like-minded people. Pete has engendered so many emotions in me for the past eight years: euphoria, pride, delight, encouragement, worry, stress, tears, joy. It’s been an exhilarating roller-coaster ride.

Back at Flushing Meadows, Pete gives the crowd a final solar smile and waves them farewell. As he walks off court for the last time, I feel sure that whoever comes after his blazing presence has departed will be an anti-climax.

I will miss Pete not only as the greatest tennis player ever but as a source of joy and inspiration in my life. I may never have the chance to thank him in person for all he has given me, but mere words could not convey what I owe him. Instead, I will continue to enjoy the many friendships which have grown from a shared admiration and love of the greatest tennis player of all time – hundreds of people of different ages, colours, creeds and backgrounds, brought together by what I call The Power of Pete.

These words from the greatest writer ever, William Shakespeare, seem apt for the greatest tennis player ever:

“Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.” (Henry V)

“Good night, sweet prince,
May flights of angels sing thee
To thy rest.” (Hamlet)

And also from Voltaire:

“Appreciation is a wonderful thing; it makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well.”

Pete, I like to think that a tiny little bit of yourself will always belong to your numerous fans. How you deserve your new contented life, with your dear wife and son, after all the hard lonely years on the tennis circuit, chasing your dreams. These dreams you made reality and they are enshrined forever in tennis history. There are so many who will miss you so much, but we will always be grateful for the time you spent with us and what you gave each one.

The King has abdicated.

LONG LIVE THE KING OF THE COURTS

in our hearts.


http://www.samprasfanz.com/gallery/2003usopen/pc01.jpg


-end-

Mimi
01-25-2005, 02:29 AM
thanks angiel for posting, but sorry, i am afraid that i cannot read them all, its too long, i don't have enough time to read the old and you already post the new but don't worry, there are lots of pete fans, and many of them are going to read them all :angel:

angiel
01-25-2005, 10:19 PM
thanks angiel for posting, but sorry, i am afraid that i cannot read them all, its too long, i don't have enough time to read the old and you already post the new but don't worry, there are lots of pete fans, and many of them are going to read them all :angel:


:worship: that's the idea Mimi - do you look at the view column and see how much people visit here - a lot, and most of them has never seen these articles about him, :angel: :angel:

When they visit here they can do so. :wavey: :D

angiel
01-26-2005, 01:07 AM
We'll Miss Ya Pete

Pete Sampras fans across the world share their thoughts about Pete.

http://eur.news1.yimg.com/eur.yimg.com/xp/onlsport/20010514/933894.jpg



"I will always remember your reaction to a terrible line call on a critical point in the 2002 US Open finals. There was hardly a reaction. You just kept playing, and, of course, won. You were always a gentlemen on and off the court and you will be remembered as much for that as all the Slam victories."
Bob Greenman Scottsdale, Arizona

"Although it's always hard to compare tennis players of the past with the current generation, I think we can all agree that your presence in tennis has been an example of pure brilliance combined with the incredible mental power which is needed to become one of the greatest champions that has ever been. All the best with your familiy and your life aftre tennis."
Michiel Coppens, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

"Pete, Thanks for being born when you did, otherwise I would have only heard about you as a past classic player, the way we hear about Rod Laver, without the opportunity to see your matches live. You knew what you had to do on court, and you came out and did exactly that. Thanks for showing us tennis fans the engineering precision and the dedication of a professional who knew why he was on court and never lost sight of it. I hope your retired life is as satisfying as you playing career has been. It's been a hell of a ride."
Zahid

"I just want to tell you that we will miss you man. You've been such a inspiration for the next generation. I don't think there is anyone in the tour yet who is such a great player like you... Goodbye Pistol, the world will be never been the same. We love you.
Jethro from Holland

"Pete, Congrats on the best career anyone could have. I grew up watching you since I was in 8th grade when you played Agassi in the 90 Open. I'm now 27. Watching you compete over the years has been my pleasure, especially the rivalry with Andre. If I knew you twowere playing, I'd put everything else on hold and my eyes would be GLUED to the TV. You're a great person, sportsman, and the more important years of your life are just ahead."
Ryan McClure

"I'm a little older than you (34), and I've followed your career since the beginning from several miles away (yes, I'm Brazilian). Your attitude, your technique and your strength has been an inspiration for those who love sports. Be happy, and talke a time to come down here and spend some time on the beach! :-)
Andre Guimaraes - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil

"Pete Sampras is a legend, an athlete of rare gifts, an ambassador of tennis and a wonderful human being. He gave so many memorable moments in great matches to people who love tennis. He has set standards at a very high level and will remain an inspiration to young people for many years. His most memorable moment for me was when he greeted his parents after winning Wimbledon. Most of us who followed his matches on TV never saw his family, but after his win at Wimbledon, we finally saw his mother and father, and the love between their family and how proud they were of their son was terribly moving. Pete Sampras will be missed but never forgotten."
Chris Murray

"I wonder how long we have to wait to get another Pete. I think it is not possible. It is only Pete who will be remembered in all future Grand Slams as the best player all time."
Kamal Ahmed & Mohammed Ahmed Bahrain

"Thank you for the all memories. You're a class act. I wish and hope you the best. This also extend to your wife and kid. I hope to see another Sampras take tennis by the storm in the future. Once again, THANK YOU."
Jun Binas - Edmonton

"I will never forget Pete crying in Melbourne during his match against Jim Courier. I will never forget him getting sick on court during the quarterfinals of the US Open, and after that, serving an ace. His tennis was just poetry. He is the best-ever tennis player. Thank you for over 10 years of unbelievable tennis and a lot of emotions during your battles. I became a real tennis fan because of you, and I thank you for that!!!
Marek (Poland)

"I first watched you play in Wimbledon 10 years ago, when I was 8 years old, and I had never seen someone who played consistently at the top of his game. My dad and I would sit in front of the TV on Saturdays and Sundays and cheer for Pete! Nine years later, my dad and I watched you defeat Andre in the last US Open. What a way to end a career, on top, as usual."
Tiffany Sy, 18, Silver Spring Maryland

"Congrats Pete on an awesome career. Can I borrow your serve now that you've retired??? !!! You were blessed with a lot of talent and worked hard to make the most of it."
Bill Kennedy

"Pete was my mentor since I was in high school. I look at him as my hero. He always gave me hope to compete when I was in my senior year and I was the captain of our tennis team. I imagined myself as Pete competing."

"Every time I watched you play, I got chills. You possesed a serve that will never be duplicated and the grace for which you displayed is unmatched. Your matches against Agassi were a true gift to tennis. I am happy that I can tell my kids I got to watch the great "Pistol Pete Sampras" play tennis"
John M Hutter Long Island, NY

"I have watched and followed Pete's illustrious career through all the years. I have at least 20 videotapes of his matches. He is my ideal because he always showed grace, athletism, finesse and complete class. He is definitely the best player in history for his dedication, longevity, style, person and unmatched results. I wish him and his family the best and I hope we will continue to hear about him and may be see him in the other circuit. Good show Pete."
Sam Abdou

"Tennis will never be the same without you Pete. No words can describe your true value to our sport and what you have achieved for it. I wish you the best of luck for the future, you deserve every last ounce of it. "
Matt O`Donnell

"You've brought so much to the game of tennis during your reign on the men's tour, you deserve the greatest of congratulations. You always seemed to be a man unconcerned with being the most outspoken (even though you undoubtedly had the most to talk about) and made the grandest statements with your abilities on the court. For you, actions truly speak louder than words. It is a shame to see you go, the passing of an era with so much accomplished by one man. I wish you the very best for the future with your wife and family. Your impression on the game is undeniable and immense. You are now one of the greats and will now and forever remain: 'Pistol Pete'.
With deepest respects"
Dan Mumford, Wellington, New Zealand.

"Pete Sampras may be regarded as cool and aloof but only if you are blind. This champion has real heart and desire. He puts his everything into his game, his words and his actions. He's is driven by sheer will and has never overreacted. Sampras's control is impeccable. His movements are fluid and graceful. He has a blend of everything that makes him like no other.
Volleys, forehands, overhead dunks, and most of all, the booming serve has become 'his'. We will truly miss this hero who has given his all and will always be the one, and only 'silent' champion whose actions speak louderthan words.
Unconsciously, he has given many of us the will to win and succeed to our full potential.
Thank you, Pete Sampras for everything!"
Charmaine Ooi

"I'm a braziliam fan of yours who has just read the announcement of your retiring. Believe me I' m very sad, but I hope you are very conscious, proud and happy of what you've done to tennis in the whole world.
I remember I was in New Haven, CT in 1998 at the Pilot Pen Tournament and I saw you pass me by. I was with my camera in my hands but my reaction was very strange at that moment. I was feeling ashamed to stop you and ask for a quick shot and that was the only thing I regret on that tour.
Hope you be very happy, proud of your parents who brought you up so well being a wonderful human being, humble and a model for other tennis players who intend to become champions in their careers. Have all the good time and spend it with your wife and your lucky son. Give him the education your parents gave you and another champion is born.
Goodbye hero...hope meet you one day again to get that picture I missed." Marcio Luiz Fonseca

"I am a 71 yr old grandma and a tennis fan through the Rod Laver era and on to the Pete Sampras era. Pete is indeed the very best ever and should inspire new young players to emulate him, both as a player and a person.
Have already missed him a lot and want to wish him and his family all the best!"
Mary Cesark

"It's a huge loss for the tennisgame to lose the best player ever so far. I really enjoyed your play and your behaviour on the court. You're a great example to all of us.
Good luck with everything you'll do in the future, may you be as succesfull as you were in the tennisgame,"
Monique van de Klundert, The Netherlands

"I just watched your match against Corretja in the US Open 1996 on video. NOTHING in tennis can ever top that. I´ve admired you for so long and every time you played a Swede I always hoped you would win. My friends here didn´t understand that at all...
Good luck with your new life as a father and a husband. Of every athlete in every sport, you will forever be my number one!"
Stefan Alhag, Eskilstuna, Sweden

"You have been the best player the sport has had to offer. Watching you play as I grew up gave me more memories then I can count. Your rivalries with Andre are by the far the best matches you have ever played. Your last match with Andre is the one I will remeber the most. Two Americans slugging it out in the US Open final is the best possible ending we could have hoped for. I'm saddened by the fact that you are retiring from the sport, but happy that you have something to focus on..your family. You will be missed as you probably already know, but it had to be said. I wish you the best in all that you pursue, and hope you enjoy your life away from tennis."
Mike Gagnebin

It's pretty difficult to say what my favorite Pete Sampras experience was. There were so many great matches like the 1996 US Open QF against Alex Corretja or in the same year the final of the Masters in Hannover against Boris Becker. Or what about his "walk on water" in the Wimbledon final in 1999. Who could forget his "lucky 13" at Wimbledon 2000 and the scenes after the final when Pete went straight to his parents. But he was right when he said last year after winning his 14th Grand Slam title "This one might take the cake." I really thank him so much for the poetry tennis on the court, I'm just happy that I was able to follow Pete's outstanding career."
THANK YOU PETE SAMPRAS..."
André Fischer, Berlin, Germany

angiel
01-27-2005, 12:04 AM
Re: (Sampras)

kalforpete Posted: Jan 08, 2005 Quote
Posts: 7

Actually, I'm surprised that a Sampras fan would think that way...

1. I didn't think Sampras was "too lazy" (to compete at his best)... the last 2 years of his career. It was a mixture of his decreasing motivation (that's different from lazy), increasing physical and mental toll due to the years and level of competition on the circuit etc etc.

mc, I think you're accurate in your remarks as you usually are. Being one of the biggest Pete fans around, I know how difficult it was for any fan of Pete's to understand why he was losing when we knew he was capable of still winning. But I never once thought it was because he was "too lazy".

2. Sampras didn't just called every nobody who beat him "the future of tennis".

Again, you're right. Matter of fact, throughout his career, he took a lot of flack from people saying he didn't give his opponents enough credit when he lost. The last couple of years he did start giving opponents more credit, but he didn't call everyone who beat him the "future of tennis".

I only recall him saying something like that when he lost to Hewitt and Safin respectively at the USO 2000 and 2001. He also briefly remarked that Federer (paraphrasing) "have a great future" when he lost to him in their only meeting at Wimby 2001.

The likes of Fed, Hewitt, Safin, as it turns out, are INDEED among the most talented of the "new balls" (as shown in the last few years).

He was right. Hewitt went on to be #1 for two years in a row. As for Safin, anyone who saw Safin's display during that USO final would have said the same thing. I also recall other remarks Pete made after that loss to Safin. He said Safin had the potential to win more but that it took a lot of focus and desire. He remarked how hard it was, once the target was on one's back, to remain #1.

He did remark about Federer havign a great future. He also remarked during the last couple of years that he thought Federer was the best player he had seen play. That he was the "complete" player.

He also remarked that Roddick was the best of our "future" American players. So far, he's been right in all of his "predictions".

... on the other hand, I did NOT recall him calling eg. George Bastl "the future of tennis" when Sampras lost to him at Wimby 2002.

Nope, don't recall that either. I do remember him giving him credit for playing a good game that day. That was about it. Pete knew that was one loss that he would never live down. Too bad that was the last match he played at Wimbledon. That one will forever be etched in our memory.

Please remind me of any REAL "nobody" that Sampras lost to in the last 2 years or so of his career whom he wrongfully labelled as "the future of tennis".


Among some of those he lost to in 2001-2002, there were Todd Martin, Haas, Ferreira, Gonzalez, Alberto Martin and Max Mirnyi. Don't recall him ever calling any of them the "future of tennis". And most of them aren't "REAL noobody". A. Martin is probably the least known on that list.

I think if he felt he was outplayed, he gave credit for that particular game. If he felt he contributed to the loss, he said that, too.

angiel
01-27-2005, 09:26 PM
Letters to the Editors
Sampras: role model for fans and Roddick

© St. Petersburg Times
published September 8, 2002


I do not diminish or dispute the tennis prowess of Andy Roddick. As a matter of fact, I see him as the next great American star. But (Thursday) night his idol became his teacher. Pete Sampras, a class act, was cool, calm, purposeful and masterful in his triumph over his young opponent. In his overpowering demonstration he not only proved that he still can compete, but that his sportsmanlike demeanor, throughout the match, was that of a professional without the element of braggadocio too often seen in other players. I salute him, and congratulate him, and offer him to those looking for a role model for their own rising hopeful stars of the future.
-- Orfeo Trombetta, Seminole

angiel
01-28-2005, 09:34 PM
Close Encounters with Pete

By: Supriya Bhat - USA

Location: UCLA (California, USA)
Date: February 29, 2000

I have finally accomplished something at UCLA...

It has been the most incredible day. I saw Pete practicing at the UCLA tennis courts with Paul Annacone, which apparently was his first time practicing there.

That day I took a different route back to my apartment. I was complaining about having to walk uphill to the housing office to sign some form about my housing termination. It just goes to show like Pete said that everything happens for a reason...I noticed some people standing by the bleachers when I was about to walk by. I walked closer and stood amongst the people at the top and I peered down and thought I saw Pete. Then I figured I must be hallucinating. So I was going to make sure and ask the girl next to me. But nope, I didn't need to! As the player flicked his hand over his upper lip to wipe off sweat - that was all the confirmation I needed. He was practicing with Paul and his sister Stella was sitting on the bench.

I walked all the way down and sat in the very front with my heart racing so fast that I thought it was going to jump out of my chest. The stupid kids sitting across from me were wondering who Paul was, and thought he was just some ball guy! Pete was wearing dark green shorts and a white Nike T-shirt. I couldn't believe I was even there. Then they walked over to the bench, I thought maybe Pete was going to leave, but then Paul changed his shirt. And I was desperately hoping Pete was going to follow suit. But he didn't. Then they resumed while I sat there in disbelief, in sheer joy, in amazement. I also bonded with two other students who were just as enthralled as I was. One girl, Pam had been watching him since the 4th grade. The other, Jason, a tennis player himself had been watching Pete play for eight years.

I didn't even have anything memorable to give him to autograph. I was ready to get my shirt or jeans signed so I got out my UCLA notebook with all my lecture notes and a pen ready to go. Then at the end, someone shouted out if he could get an autograph and Pete said, "Yeah". Jason and I had already made a plan that no matter which exit Pete took we would run after him. It turned out that all ten of us went running after him on the tennis court. I was the second person to get his autograph. While I just took in being right next to him, I kept walking and bumped into him. I could barely breathe. I had just gotten Pete's autograph, and for some reason I still kept running with everyone else as he kept signing on his way to the men's gym. Anyway, I feel that I have finally accomplished something being here at UCLA and I don't care if I never see any "celebrities" during the rest of my time here...It was such a wonderful experience and I still can't believe it.

angiel
01-31-2005, 09:28 PM
Sampras fans.


Don Vito
Sampras a living legend in tennis. he has done what many has dreamed of doing all their life. he has got style, class and the grandslams to prove it. he has inspired millions especially me. so you guys have your say.

angiel
02-01-2005, 11:41 PM
Amir
I have only one thing to say, even if I was not the best Sampras fan, I have to admit that:

Pete Sampras is the best tennis player ever


real player
I really hope he can get one French Open :(...

Yep, he's the greatest!:proud:
And I am sure he will be back once he can cope with his injuries...


tigerTUFF
Hes been my favourite from day1!!!

the guy is just so naturally gifted more so than anyone since perhaps crazy mac. and Laver before that who pete based his game on............. He can take anyone from the baseline and can serve volley as well as anybody too. But all great things come to a close, hes lost the desire and he'll retire at years end unless he has an incredible american season.......

I dont care that he hasnt won a french open b/c in the old days all the slams were in fact grass, so lay to rest the argument he couldnt do it on all surfaces, hes the best of alltime and his record proves it. None of the new breed are even close to this guy, only agassi of all the present day players can be mentioned in close to the same breath as the great Pete Sampras.
Your already a champ and theres nothing to be ashamed abt if you bomb at the us open too..methinks he'll give it a good shake b/c that was his first slam

angiel
02-05-2005, 07:43 PM
Nikolas Greece 1/22/2005
Hello
Please visit my homepage at http://www.easyhostingplans.com

Nicholas Cyprus (Greece now) 1/22/2005
YOU ARE THE BEST
PETE I LOVE YOU , S"AGAPAME RE MALAKA, we miss your aces!! YOU ARE THE BEST!!!

sheeraz pakistan karachi 12/31/2004
salam
as salam o alaikum how ru im ur reatives beacause ur papa my granfather my contact # 00922535895

peter irono United Kingdom 12/30/2004
Commenting at Grand Slams
Pete, You are undoubtly one of the greatest players. You made history at Wimbledon 7 times. Will you be considering commenting at Grand slams. I would still like to be seeing you, I am one of your greatest fans. I still relish your final with Agassi particularly the US 2002.

angiel
02-05-2005, 07:51 PM
LYDIA BANGALORE(INDIA) 11/19/2004
I LOVE U PETE
HI PETE HOW U DOIN?MISSIN U NOT BEING ARUOND.WANTED U TO PLAY AND BE AROUND SO TAT V CUD STILL SUPPORT U.PLZ COME TO BANGALORE.MY MOM DAD N MYSELF ARE CRAZY BOUT U.I REALY DON WAT TO TELL U .UR THE GREATET AND THR NO ONE LIKE U ... LOVE U ALWAYS PLZ SEND ME U PICTURE WTH UR AUTOGRAPH LOVE LYDIA

joshua RI 9/7/2004
BIG FAN
How do i know if this is rely u. can i have ur atograph. i read ur ato biography loved it

katelynn 8/3/2004

dear pete i am not very good at tennis espcially with my serve. do you have any tips? please email me.

Andre 7/7/2004

RadioTennis.com

Daniel Brisk england 7/4/2004
tennis
Hi pete please would you send me a signed picture not only are you my idol but you are the greatest player the tennis world has ever seen Thank you very mutch pete Daniel Brisk

angiel
02-07-2005, 07:54 PM
JUSTIN BERGMAN 6/29/2004
GREAT!!
PETE, YOUR AWSOME!! I LOVE YOU! JSUTIN BERGMAN


Elyse Biebesheimer Nova Scotia 6/26/2004
Hi
You are the most amazing tennis player ever! You have been my favourite since.......I don't know when. When I saw you retiring from tennis, I didn't know what to think. I teach kids ages 5-12 how to play tennis in my town. One of my examples of why they need to stay in shape and play tennis is so they can be as good as you. You and other tennis players have inspired me to teach them as best as I can. You are awesome!

angiel
02-10-2005, 12:35 AM
Rodrigo Brasil 3/18/2004
e aee
e ae Sampras!!!p/ mim voce foi o melhor jogador de todos os tempos(melhor que o Agassi)...pena q voce paro de jogar jogar né...mas td bem,ah1 e quem sabe um dia desses voce pode vir aqui em casa e ai agente vai joga umas partidinhas nas quadras aqui do meu condo. abraço do teu amigao Testa

Frank Toronto, Canada 1/28/2004
Plans
What are your plan's that your retired, do you plan on playing the senior's tour in a couple of years

Adam Wise 1/22/2004
Hello I was wondering as you look back on your incredible career. What you believed the one thing that contributed more then anything to your sucsess. I was also wondering did you really feel that calm and collect when you won all your titles the most emotion or expression I have ever seen you show was that one wimbledon that you won and you ran up to your parents. Thanks I was curious what the secret was behind the incredible persion and heart that you showed on the court was

angiel
02-11-2005, 10:18 PM
http://www.samprasfanz.com/projects/banner1.jpg




http://www.samprasfanz.com/projects/banner5.jpg

angiel
02-12-2005, 09:38 PM
http://www.samprasfanz.com/projects/banner4.jpg




http://www.samprasfanz.com/projects/banner2.jpg

Mimi
02-14-2005, 08:42 AM
thanks angiel for thephotos and articles, seems these fans are asians , just like me :wavey:

angiel
02-14-2005, 02:54 PM
thanks angiel for thephotos and articles, seems these fans are asians , just like me :wavey:

Yes these are some of his Asians fans, and how are you my dear. :D :angel:

angiel
02-15-2005, 11:57 PM
belen bariloche argentina 2/10/2005
thank you
pete I regret every day of my life for not going to see you on live when you where still playing. The thing is you never played in my country and I didn't have the money then. The thing is i admire you in very diferent ways. First of all, for your game but also the excellent competitor you are. I wanna thank you the best for you, your wife and chris

angiel
02-17-2005, 09:45 PM
Frank Toronto, Canada 1/28/2004
Plans
What are your plan's that your retired, do you plan on playing the senior's tour in a couple of years

Adam Wise 1/22/2004
Hello I was wondering as you look back on your incredible career. What you believed the one thing that contributed more then anything to your sucsess. I was also wondering did you really feel that calm and collect when you won all your titles the most emotion or expression I have ever seen you show was that one wimbledon that you won and you ran up to your parents. Thanks I was curious what the secret was behind the incredible persion and heart that you showed on the court was.

Cheryl Linda Jefferson-Davis Chicago, Illinois 1/12/2004
Hall of Fame Induction
Pete: I have followed your career since you began on the men's tour, & saw your potential when you won the U. S. Open in 1990. Unfortunately, I only managed to see you play in person ONCE & that was when you played at the Rosemont Horizon just outside Chicago, Illinois, I believe in 1995 or '96. You were on Billie Jean King's team while Andre Agassi was on Elton John's team. I watched your phenomenal athleticism when you beat him in the one set you played, then you walked off the court in yo

Kaz Coatbridge, Scotland 11/18/2003
Hey Pete!!!
Hey Pete!!! jst wana say im sad tht uve retired now n tht i want u 2 cum bk 2 the tennis wrld!!

angiel
02-19-2005, 09:34 PM
alonso 11/6/2003
Hi Master
I guess, Sampras it´s the best of all the time, because he got all the shots, he is very profesional, and i love the traditional he is wearing ever in white clothes

Bernard Moremi 10/20/2003
Inspiration
Hey Pete. You are the best tennis player ever and I want to folow in your footsteps. Please tell me your recipe for success.

rosie 10/7/2003

This may be short but i mean every word. Pete you are the best!!!

Wilbert Garzon 9/11/2003
Information for school project
Hi, I am doing a school project on what I want to be when I grow up. I want to be a tennis player and since you are one of my favorites tennis players, I wanted to ask you a few questions: 1) On average, how much money do you make? 2) How many hours a day do you practice? 3) What does it take to be a good tennis player? I would really apreciate it if you answered as soon as possible. Thank you for your time.

angiel
02-21-2005, 03:20 PM
Sweet Doane Naquita Philippines 2/21/2005
I wish to see you
Hi! I'm one of those million die hard fans who look up to you that's why I was inspired to play your game too... But I was sad when you stopped already and I was wishing that someday I can see you in personal... but I think I can't and by this e-mail I hope I could chat with you and ask some advice about Tennis.... I love to play tennis....

angiel
02-21-2005, 10:06 PM
Phyllis Dunn Norwalk, CT 9/2/2003
a goodbye
Hi Pete, You've been my idol for years. Love your style, personality, and play. Thanks for the memories. Hope we see you sometime in the near future. Meanwhile enjoy married life.

DELLA MOSES WAYCROSS GA 9/1/2003
RETIREMENT
PETE I HATED TO SEE YOU GO IT WANT BE THE SAME I WISH YOU AND YOUR WIFE AND SON THE BEST OF LUCK LOVE YOU GUYS DELLA

Mohammed Salem Melbourne, Australia 8/28/2003
Wishing you the best
Growing up you have been my inspiration and idol. It's sad to see you go, because I believe you had another 4 or 5 grand slams in you. Nevertheless I wish you and your family the best and hope to see your son Christian Sampras break your 14 grand slam record in the future. Love always,

angiel
02-22-2005, 11:23 PM
sweetdoane philipines 8/28/2003
see you soon in the court!
i lke your styles....see you soon int he court...

david chale r. santo domingo 8/26/2003
Gracias por todo.
tu has sido la inspiración de de cada uno de los animos que he sentido en el tenis, fuiste y siempre serás la lumbrera en conocimientos, animo, espiritu deportivo y tecnica del tenis. Gracias por estar ahí, por ser nuestro ejemplo, y para que te podamos mostrar a las generaciones venideras como el padre de no solo el buen juego, sino del buen comportamiento, de la humildad y de la fortaleza emosional. Gracias y hasta siempre.

Lillian Crudo California 8/25/2003

Dear Pete, Congrats on your retirement. You will be missed by everyone. You are one of the greatest tennis players I've ever seen. Just a classy player! We will miss you. Wishing you a wonderful life with your family. Enjoy......they grow up so fast! Maybe we'll see a Sampras, Jr??? someday!

angiel
02-25-2005, 10:36 PM
Niel Gillman 7/31/2003
Legends never die!
Jis my ou. Slaan nog 'n paar balle man. Hoe's jou hart dan? Maar as ek so mooi vrou gehad het sou ek al lankal 'n Davis Cup team vol gehad het.

Sweet Doane Naquita Philippines 7/26/2003
Hey Dude!
Hello Pete, A fan from a weirdest world wants to say keep it up...I'll be a geatest fan of your life and play!

Thanh Phan San Jose, California 7/25/2003
Good-bye to the King of Court
Dear Pete, The ATP tour is not the same without you. No one serves, volleys, and plays like you, and especially one one will ever come close to your accomplishments that have made you as the King of the court. It'll be sad for your fans when you offically announce your retirement. You'll be missed dearly!

angiel
02-26-2005, 08:44 PM
kholoud almohairbi uae 7/20/2003
i luv u soo much
hi pete how r u hope ur fine i am a uae girl im 15 i am tennis player i love tennis and i hope to see u in dubai tennis open 2004

Niel Gillman 7/17/2003
King of the court!
Hi Pete! It is so inspiring to even watch you play on the TV! No man will ever achieve what you have achieved in tennis, NEVER!!! You made tennis the best sport to watch. You don't have to impress anyone any more. Your Biggest fan!!!

TONY HARY AUMSVILLE, OR 7/16/2003
KEEP UP THE SPIRIT
PETE, I HOPE YOU COME BACK TO TENNIS. IF ANDRE CAN DO IT, YOU CAN DO IT. YOUR THE GREATEST ATHLETE MALE OF ALL TIME. I JUST HOPE YOU PLAY THE US OPEN 2003 AND SHOW TO THE FANS ONE MORE TIME THAT PETE HAS THE STRENGHT,STYLE,GRIT, AND POWER. GOD IS ALWAYS HELPFUL TO PEOPLE LIKE YOU WHO IS COOL,RESPECTFUL,AND KIND TO PEOPLE. PETE JUST THINK TO PLAY THE US OPEN AND HOPE THAT IT WILL BE AN INTERESTING US OPEN. IT BRINGS THE CROWDS MOMENTUM,SUPPORT, AND RESPECT. I THINK IT WILL BE EXCITING TO SEE YOU

Niel Gillman 7/16/2003 4:
US Open 2003
Hi Sampras! You inspire me so much. It would be great to see you at the US Open. You are the man!

angiel
03-01-2005, 10:11 PM
Close Encounters with Pete
By: Janet McEwan
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana, USA



Hi, my name is Janet McEwan and I have a Pete story I'd like to share. I have only seen him in person two times. Both times were in Indianapolis, Indiana. The first time was on August 13th, 1997. I didn't meet him at that time. The second time was on August 19, 1999. Let me start by saying that I had already gotten his attention earlier that night when there was a bad line call, and I yelled, "What are you blind?" Well Pete turned around and looked right at me, I was three rows off the court, and said, "Yeah, I agree with her." Luckily I didn't get kicked out for causing a disruption.

After the match, I waited around so I could give him a belated birthday gift, and two cards. The security guys said, "I'm sure he's already gone." Just when I was about to leave, they said, "There he is!" I saw him walking through the courtyard, so I ran over and was right behind him on the stairs. I walked behind him calling, "Pete, Pete, I have a present for you." He lifted his arm up for the gift because he couldn't turn to see me, then suddenly stopped and I nearly knocked him over. My hand touched his back and then he was off walking again signing autographs.

Once he walked into the secure area, I followed him and called out, "Pete, Pete." He turned around not 10 feet from me and waited for me to walk over. Well, I froze, couldn't speak or move. He stood there five minutes and then as he got ready to walk away, he smiled this beautiful friendly smile and winked and then he was gone.

Wow, I'll never forget that smile. I still have his teddy bear. I hope to give it to him someday. That's my tale, pretty silly huh? I thought other fans might enjoy reading it.

angiel
03-03-2005, 01:26 AM
Atif 7/4/2003

HE is not retired yet Mr.Rodriguez.Are you a Sampras fan I am big fan of him I have got his poster in my room.I read your mail and I relly liked it.I hope that you please write back to me.Give my regards to your family.I wish if I could meet you. Bye Bye and do take care.

J. Rodriguez Quito-Ecuador 7/4/2003
You´re the greatest
Pete: I write to you on behalf of my mother in law who is 92 years and still loves watchin tennis. She always bothers me about writing u to tell you how good you are, Unfortunately I did´nt have your e-mail address until now (Are you retired or still playing?) Please answer this !She will loved!! Best regards, Jesus Rodriguez

Atif Shah 7/4/2003
Play US OPEN 2003
Hi Pete i know you are thinking about playing or not my suggestion is that you please play 1 more year.You are only 31 and plus you are a great player of all times.Today I saw your interview and i started crying because i was missing you with my full heart.You can do it once more so please play US OPEN.Thanks

angiel
03-07-2005, 10:29 PM
Atif Ali Shah vIRGINIA 6/24/2003
HIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
PETE I wanted to say that please play US OPEN 2003.I am going to buy tickets for your match.Best of luck for US OPEN

Cathy Brittingham San Diego, CA 6/21/2003

Hello Pete, How on earth do you serve like that? I'm am learning now how to serve somewhat like you, and it is killing me...well, i'll miss you in Wimbledon.

Chris Corpus Christi 6/18/2003

Hey Pete! I just wanted to congradulate you and your wife on your child. How is it being a father? How is married life? Well if you got a chance please drop a line to me, thanks

angiel
03-09-2005, 09:51 PM
Santhosh India 6/15/2003
best of luck
hi pistol pete best of luck for the up coming wimbledon am sure u can do it once again.. I really miss u this year n I wanna see a strong come back from u.........

ruby London, England 6/13/2003
You are the man!!
Hi pete..I'm not sure whether you ever read the messages but i have to tell you, you are the the man..Critics can critisize you and so may the players but the truth is they want to be you.. Please play more tournaments the games dull without your greatness, i think even Agassi seems lonely without you..Congratulations on shutting everyone up , you are the king of the court , you were the best yesterday, you are the best today and you sahll remain the best in the years to come.. Noone will ever

Greg 6/11/2003
Why dont you just freakin admit that your RETIRED!

Thanh Phan San Jose, California 6/10/2003
Boring ATP Tour
Dear Pete, The ATP tour has been not the same without you. There're dominance of baseliners, which is very boring. I really miss you, your beautiful serve, and your excellent serve-volley game.

angiel
03-10-2005, 09:21 PM
Carlos Bracamontes Mexico 3/1/2003
You´ll be the best forever
Hi, my name is Carlos, I want you to say you´re my favorite tennis player, I like your style,thanks for showing me a good tennis, I don´t mind if you don´t win any tournament more, I am a grate fan. Bye

santhosh balsubramanian India 2/19/2003
cammmon yaar
HI pete, Hey king of tennis am sure u have gr8 future more U can win the comming French,Wimbeldon n US this year dont never think of retaid ...ok

angiel
03-12-2005, 09:22 PM
Pat Champlin 2/5/2003
Retirement
Don't quit. We're looking forward to your next tournament!

Thanh Phan San Jose 2/4/2003
Disapointment !!!
Dear Pete, I just want to let you know that my friends and I are very disapointed in your late withdrawal from the Siebel open. It's o.k to play if you are not fully prepared because if you don't get started, you'll never be ready. You'll lose at Scottdale again if you don't start at San Jose. Now we can't return the tickets.

Thanh Phan 1/30/2003

Dear Pete, Since A.A. just won another Aussie title, you'd probably hungier than ever. I think there'd be at least two more grandslams in you. Remember you told Rafter that the difference between you and him was 11 grandslams, so the difference between you and A.A. should double what he has. I'll see you at the Siebel Open in San Jose on 02/11.

George Rode Indiana 1/24/2003
the best
Just wouldn't to e-mail the greatest of all time. It has been a joy watching you over the past years. One more Wimbledon???

angiel
03-14-2005, 08:20 PM
Vanessa Michalopoulos 1/15/2003

your really really really hot!!!!!i loooooooove you! marry me!

dodi fodi Hamburg Germany 1/7/2003
hey ho
hey pete!your are the best player for me.i like it how you play.but its very stupid that every time you are in hamburg you are going to lose in the first round.then the Rothenbaum cup isnt interesting any more.please, when you will come this year to hamburg,win for all your fans!!!!!!!bye

Wasif Cheema Pakistan 1/3/2003
pictures
hello Pete, i hope u r fine, i wanna get new pics of yours, and i wanna see u in all of the tournaments of 2003, please Pete write e an email, wasifc@hotmail.com, i realy really love your game. please!!

lydia east 1/3/2003

You are a legend! I really don't think you should retire. I love your playing style. You'll always be my favorite tennis player.

VERNIE DUNCAN 12/19/2002

Hey Pete! Now for the joy of the competition and love of the game. Isn't it just great? and possibly a win or two. Sheer Icing on a Slamcake

angiel
03-16-2005, 01:16 AM
cassie 3/14/2005

Pete, I am a huge fan! I've loved you since I was old enough to watch the matches...and understand the game. I will always think of you as #1. Congratulations on your second baby...good luck!!

angiel
03-17-2005, 12:25 AM
Passion for Pete
by: Dave Wilson
St. Louis, Missouri, USA


Introduction: I joined SamprasFanz before the turn of the century, which sounds pretty impressive if you forget that it was 1999. Anyway, here’s an edit of my first post. Basically, it’s my memory of the first time I saw Pete on TV, which may not be entirely accurate. It also covers my first ‘in person’ match, why I joined the Fanz, what I dig about the group, and why Pete’s the greatest.

I’ve been reading all of your posts for a while, and I thought I'd share with the group the first time I watched Pete play on TV. The details may be a little off, but the impression is still very much with me.

It seems like it was the early rounds of 89 US Open and here was this skinny kid running down and getting to every single ball with all kinds of speed and agility. I have this image in my head: I'm laying down sleepily watching a tennis match, and all of a sudden I have to sit up and pay close attention to the grace and tenacity before me. Seems like this teenager had some pop in his serve, too. Next thing I know it's a year later and Pistol Pete wins the 90 US Open. Since then, I've only seen Pete play once in person. I spent a year in Lyon, France and picked up some tickets to Le Grand Prix de Tennis de Lyon in 1993. I was pumped: Pete was playing Pioline, a Frenchman ranked 9 or 11 in the world at the time, in the final. What was extra cool was that Pete had won the tournament the prior two years and the sponsors had set up the prize such that if you won three years in a row, you got to keep the trophy 'd'une valeur inestimable,' the priceless trophy!

Pete won, and the crowd cheered for him. All through the match more people were shouting more forcefully Allez Pete! (Go Pete!) than were shouting Allez Pioline! I was already a fan before I got to France, but one of the things I loved there was that you could watch even the minor tournaments on Eurosport basically whenever they were on. Back then I pretty much just followed the Grand Slams, and that was it. Now, I follow whatever I can, and SamprasFanz is a great source for finding absolutely everything. You don't have to scour the web for stories, just open your email. If there's an article to be read, just read it.

I'm a fan and that's why I joined the group. But I work hard to keep my analysis of his game as objective as possible:

Not the fastest first serve, but the most solid and deceptive. Most dependable second serve. Unbelievable touch on the volleys. And what's his signature anyway, the running forehand crosscourt just-try-to-run-it-down winner or that mercury rising overhead smash?

Despite John McEnroe's continual 'surprise' when Pete meets Andre in a final and starts blistering laser-like groundstrokes, I really don't see much lacking in that department, either. In fact he probably owes some felt to a few fuzzless balls, and some white paint to a few faded courts after most of his tournaments (the French notwithstanding, though just wait till he cinches that one up in his sack and carries it 'cross the Channel to the All England Club.) And let's not overlook the the other two essentials: heart and mental toughness, guts and steel. (I'd say mental fortitude, but it's just not tough enough.) His heart's in it, converting to the one-handed backhand at 12 years old, 6 years at the top, that goofy grin he had during the entire Dennis Miller Live show.

As for mind over matter, consider an article from an English paper about Pete mentally imposing his will on a match, figuratively playing on both sides of the net. I still can't shoo that frightening prospect out of my head. Can you imagine ? You're trying to stare your opponent down and he pops up next to you and says I'm number one and you can bite me. The next thing you know your name is Tim Henman and despite your game, and all of the All England Club, nay the whole of England cheering you on, you've just dropped another match to your best friend on the tour.

And through it all, Pete's just as modest as can be: "One day Tim will win this tournament and I just got the breaks today. Yeah, there's an advantage to being number one, but it takes a lot of good fortune to winning a major." That's what Pete's saying, but it's as if all the other players are hearing, "Go home. You can't have what's mine. Not any. No. Go back to Vegas and make some TV commercials. Maybe you'll win in one of those, but not here, not against me, not on my watch, nor in my prime."

What I love the most about SamprasFanz is that everyone already knows how great Pete is. You all help me to feel like the world can be a rational place that appreciates greatness. It's a comfortable feeling, like being home.

It's cool, too, the diversity of his appeal, that 'home' can be Down Unda, on the Continent, across the Continental Divide and all of the Americas and more. Actually, it's something that speaks to Pete's mastery of the game. His popularity crosses borders so easily, as evidenced by the membership of this group.

While I was in Lyon watching some tourney that took place between the Australian Open and Roland Garros, I had the good fortune to have a wonderful conversation with a retired teacher who, without any leading questions whatsoever, described for me the beauty of Pete's game. I was surprised. We were in France after all, where it's all together too easy to blame every American you meet for what McDonald's does to your bowels, not to mention your culture or your national identity. And yet he appreciated Pete’s artistry at least as much I did. And let’s not forget all of the fans rooting for Pete against Pioline. What wigs me out, though, is that Pete's popularity crosses borders but somehow slips through the cracks in America; the casual tennis observer in the US at least as often as not still thinks Andre Agassi is the man. But that's all right because Pete's starting to get his due, and we're all at the forefront.

You realize that when Pete takes his well earned retirement we'll all take a cue from a similarly named movie and begin Searching for Pete Sampras. Who will follow in his footsteps, who will better him, who will make us the old fogies who argue that Ted Williams was a better hitter than Tony Gwynn, That Pele was better than two Maradonas and a Ronaldo rolled into one, that Ali was a better boxer than Tyson, that Mickey was a better mouse than Scratchy. I for one started taping his matches sometime after the 95 Open, figuring to show them to my children just in case the 'next Pete Sampras' doesn't show for a while. Heck, I watch them now. Because Pete's so great. He's so great.

Go Pete!!!

angiel
03-17-2005, 09:26 PM
James Blake



Last year I learned a lot from Pete Sampras here in Düsseldorf mentally. We practiced together and he taught me how to quickly put a loss behind me and to go positively into the next match."

angiel
03-18-2005, 10:17 PM
Close Encounters with Pete
By: Claude-Etienne Borduas
Canada
Location: Canadian Open
Date: Summer, 1995

I went to the outside courts between the midday and night sessions as I was told that the players would hit out there. I was surprised to find Sweet Pete with Paul Annacone with - would you believe it, NOBODY watching! I watched most of his practice session all by myself! About midway through the session, I told to myself that I must figure a way to get his autograph, so I went to buy this white Nike cap and borrow a felt pen from the boutique's manager. I still don't know how I managed to run all across the site and back that quickly. Adrenaline, I guess! When I came back, he was almost finished. I caught him walking casually toward the exit and asked him for his autograph. I was so nervous. I forgot to hand him the pen! I remember, 'cause he asked me, seemingly amused: "Where's your pen?" Instead of handing him the pen immediately, I nervously answered that it was right here, in my right hand! What did I expect? Did I think he was about to take it if I did not hand it to him? I don't know! I finally gave him the pen, he did the little writing on the cap thing, and I managed to gather my senses back in order to ask him a few questions (How are you feeling? Your thoughts on tonight's match... ) and wish him best of luck for the US Open, (which he won in the most extraordinary fashion one could imagine!) A great moment I will never forget. The most impressive thing is how REAL he looks in person. He seems much smaller than on TV, but he seems authentic, relaxed, kind and easy to approach. Quite unlike AA, who was practicing on a screened court...

I never thought I would get so nervous when meeting him in person. I was not even that young (18...) I still have the cap. I am not that sure, but I think it somewhat glows in the dark...

angiel
03-19-2005, 08:11 PM
buffy - 12/19/00
My Email:I search


Comments:
well,I'm a french girl of paris and I guess PETE is the best player ever and ever I'm her more big fan for say the truth continue to supporte him to the way of victory!!! COM ON PISTOL PETE

Liz - 12/15/00
My Email:TennisQueen_Liz@tennis.com


Comments:
PETE IS A SUPER HOTTIE!!!!

Elizabeth - 12/15/00
My Email:Just Surfin!


Comments:
Pete Sampras is a kick-butt tennis player and a super cutie!!

glorie - 12/04/00
My URL:http://gloria@bigbluespot.com


Comments:
PETE, I WANT YOU TO KNOW THAT YOU MADE ME TO BE INTERESTED IN TENNIS. PEOPLE SOMETIMES ACCUSE YOU OF BEING BORING OR NOT AS LIVELY AS OTHER MALE PLAYERS; BUT I THINK YOU ARE COOOOOOL. YOU CAN ONLY BE YOUR BEST BY BEING WHO YOU ARE, SO I SAY IGNORE PEOPL AND MOVE ON.

angiel
03-21-2005, 03:25 PM
Close Encounter with Pete
By: Lorianne Feltz-Upperman
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
Location: Great American Insurance Tournament (Cincinnati, Ohio)
Date: August 1998 & 1999


What's the wish of every Sampras fan fortunate enough to have a real life encounter with the greatest tennis player who's ever stepped on to the tennis court? In short, it's to remain calm, behave in a dignified manner, and to not embarrass oneself.

Athough I've been lucky to be able to attend the ATP tournament in Cincinnati, Ohio since moving to the area, I haven't been lucky enough to live up to the hope of not embarrassing myself. Each year, I've taken the opportunity to do just that in front of Pete Sampras.

EMBARRASSING ENCOUNTER #1.
This was in 1998 after the infamous Rafter "disaster". By the way, I was there, I saw it clearly, and it was NOT an ace.

After the tournament, all of the beautiful plants around the stadium are sold at rock bottom prices. The sale is at the area just outside of where the players enter and exit. I bought a huge potted palm (which we've named "Pete"). Because of its size, they allowed my husband, Mat, to get our car and bring it around into the reserved parking lot to pick it and me up. As he was pulling the car around, he had to pass the players' entrance / exit.

And that's when it happened! I saw Pete walking out! I dashed over, abandoning my prized purchase, and arrived just as Mat was stopping the car. I ended up nearly running Pete over and stood about two inches from him with a completely dopey look on my face. Mat rolled down the window and leaned out, completely cool, calm and collected. He said to Pete, "Hey, man, what's up. We were rooting for you today." Pete leaned on my car, peered in the window, and said something like "Thanks, I wish it had been a different result." Mat said, "Yeah, that call sucked." Pete agreed, Mat told him we'd see him next year, he'll win the tournament, and, by the way, good luck at the US Open. Pete agreed again, said thanks, and was off into a waiting Mercedes with Kim. It was that fast and he was gone. Mat leaned out, looked at me laughing, and said, "What the hell is wrong with you? You were close enough to touch him and you didn't even talk to him!!" It happened so fast I couldn't even believe it.

EMBARRASSING ENCOUNTER #2,
a.k.a. THE WAYYYY MORE EMBARRASSING ENCOUNTER!
At an unannounced practice at the start of the 1999 event in Cincinnnati, I was with a friend watching Pete. I did actually speak to Pete very briefly to wish him luck as he wandered over to pick some balls up out of the corner of the court where we were standing. He was quite relaxed as he knew he still had a couple of days before his first match. He took the ball on the face of his racket and gently flipped it over to me. Now, I've since blamed this entire debacle on the camera in my hands, but really I'm stretching the truth because the camera was on a strap around my neck and I could easily have dropped it. Truthfully I just froze, a la 1998. Basically, my hands stayed glued to the railing in front of me. Yes, the ball hit me smack in the forehead and bounced right back out into the court. Paul Annacone's kid ran over, picked it up, and actually had to walk over and hand it to me. I still cringe when I think about it.

Have I learned my lesson? NO WAY! The Masters Series Event in Cincinnati is quickly approaching and I keep telling myself, "This is my year. This year, I will be cool. This year, I will not embarrass myself. Whatever I do, I will not let a ball smack me in the forehead in front of the greatest tennis player ever."

angiel
03-22-2005, 11:37 PM
greatest ever


OK...im going to break this down once and for all. the best player ever to lace em up is PETE SAMPRAS. i know everybody is sayin federer , federer right now...but just like any sport its out of sight out of mind kind of deal. nobody has seen pete at the top of his game since well....about 1996 or so. federer is a great talent....but do you think hes beatin agassi 6-3 6-1 when agassi was in his mid 20's? of corse not. i have thought about this many times and im as big a tennis fan as anyone.....heres my top 10 of all time

1.- PETE SAMPRAS
2-ROGER FEDERER
3-BJORN BORG
4-ANDRE AGASSI
5-ROD LAVER
6-IVAN LENDL
7-JIMMY CONNORS
8-JOHN MACENROE
9-MATTS WILANDER
10-BORIS BECKER

in there prime ...in a 7 match series....i dont think theres any question pete sampras would win it all. he had the single most devestating weapon ever in the history of mens tennis....the serve. when he was on...there was no doubt ..you didnt have a chance. you could put agassi...federer...laver and bjorg together and made one man...and they still would have had one problem...getting the ball back in play. beacuase you cant wn unless you hit the ball.

Posted : 28 February 2005
by: Triston4

angiel
03-23-2005, 10:36 PM
Eric0815

The greek god "Pistol" Pete Sampras-------->poetry in motion.


Paprika

1. Sampras
2. Edberg
3. Becker

angiel
03-25-2005, 09:52 PM
2.Pete Sampras

He WAS a role model. Tennis’ golden boy spent his career doing the only thing that is universally respected: winning. He never spilled over onto the blotter page, he never had any drunken fights. His rivalry with Andre Agasi was a distinctly American experience for all involved. For the time he was around, Pete Sampras quietly represented everything we hold dear to Sports in this country.

angiel
03-26-2005, 09:36 PM
When acknowledging the coaches who helped him during his career, Pete Sampras, at his U.S. Open farewell party, did not mention Dr. Pete Fischer. I understand that Fischer was a major influence in Pete's development almost right up to Pete's first U.S. Open title. When Fischer was found guilty of child molestation, my recollection is that Sampras said that while he was unaware of any of Fischer's activities, he still had to give a lot of credit to this man for developing his game. Wouldn't The Life of Dr. Pete Fischer make a great read?
--Rob, Mount Vernon, N.Y.

Not sure I'd use the term "great," but, indeed, The Life of Dr. Pete Fischer would make for a compelling read. Sampras is understandably reluctant to speak much about the eccentric doctor, but for the record, his name was at least broached at the retirement festivities. To wit:

Q: Four men, if I'm right, were very important in your game: your dad took you out to the courts, Pete gave you your early strokes, Gully and Paul guided you. Of those four, which do you think was most key? Secondly, what was it like going through the Wimbledon fortnight and not being there? Did you watch? Was that tough?

SAMPRAS: I watched a little bit, but it wasn't tough. You know, the first day I saw Wimbledon, I missed it, I missed the court, I missed the stadium. It's another tournament. It's a grind. It's a lot of pressure. In a lot of ways, I was glad I was home. The answer to your first question, obviously, is my dad, he gave me the chance to play, which I'll always be thankful. And Tim, he took me from No. 6 in the world all the way to No. 1. ... Paul really, for the past seven years, has been huge for my career. I mean, he has never got the credit that he deserves, and has been instrumental in everything I've done in my career as far as staying No. 1. It worked out well.

Q: Would you be where you are without Pete Fisher?

SAMPRAS: You could say that. But, you know, I don't --

angiel
03-28-2005, 09:55 PM
Subject: PETE - REDEFINING PERFECTION

AN era comes to an end... what a champion, what a legacy...
thank you Pete for the joys that u have given , the triumphs , the memories that all we viewers and admirers of the sport have shared and enjoyed.
i consider myself fortunate to have grown watching you win out there, in these days where there is a dearth of role models, pete , you have definitely been an exception. thank you so much for giving us the happiness.
best wishes for the future.
God bless you, your little son and your entire
family. thakyou for those glorious years of pure tennis and excellent sportsmanship.
Long live the glory of Pete, the epitome of Perfection - a true blue gentleman

Posted by AN INDIAN FAN on 27-AUG-03

angiel
04-02-2005, 07:45 PM
Michelle Michigan 4/2/2005

I am a tennis fan !
Mr.Sampras what made you want to be a tennis player?I love tennis and you are an excellent player!I would love to have an autographed picture if possible but keep up the good work and have a super day I admire you because you put your heart and soul into tennis.

angiel
04-05-2005, 10:31 PM
Posted - 03/13/2005 : 18:55:17


wow -- they've changed the format - and it seems nice. been reading
this website for a while now though i seldom post here, if ever.

i'm a sampras fan , longtime - so that should give some fed fans a starting reference and take whatever i say as "bias". so long as it's clear that the same can be seen from a sampras fan's standpoint about other players.

moving on the discussion which i suspected would always be around until Federer surpasses sampras (and in more ways than just "better player") , i think some fed fans need to seriously review just what sampras had to contend against and how he performed under conditions federer has barely seen, before they even get into the discussion of saying federer is "better".
shot for shot -- federer is no better than sampras when pete played well - which was a phenomenally consistent length of years.

serves -- sampras - who did not have to rely on the federer/current player way of using much more advanced and bigger racquets for pete's intensity and precision, especially under pressure.

returns? -- federer may capitalize on his - but that does not mean sampras' return which faced formidable serves of all kinds (very high percentage against big serving lefties for one) - is less. in fact - it was underrated ONLY because pete's serves were so overwhelmingly masterful. AND the REST of sampras' opponents had to rely on their ground games and returns - such as agassi - to EVEN BE in the game. BUT sampras' return game was extremely effective - or ELSE sampras would NEVER have won wimbledon seven times against the best servers = and in the years when the grass was FASTER than by the time federer won HIS first wimbledon.

1999 wimbledon against agassi alone was a demonstration of sampras mastering the "return game" - better in fact than agassi himself who was number ONE - as a way for pete to show what he mentioned that most people do NOT realize - "in coming to wimbledon -- i always think : return of serve, return of serve".

forehands? sampras - the best running forehand - a lot of it consistently FLAT and more risky than federer's topspin loopy ones- typical of his being a baseliner basically.

backhand? sampras was weaker on that in relation to HIS forehand - federer's is the same against HIS own forehand - and is certainly attackable - as safin and others have shown, although THEIR problem is being unable to consistently string points elsewhere in their games against roger.

rallies? Sampras at his best and when not yet having lost a step or two -which was obvious to any sampras fan by 1998 - woudn't blink against roger - believe me . NOT someone that had faced the Lendl's, Couriers, Beckers, Brugueras, Musters during their physically strongest times.

touch? forgive me -- but federer can't even do real half-volleys , and mainly looks impressive in center of court because his opponents are all too similar to one another - copies of andre , really. and what did sampras do to andre EACH TIME andre was at the top of the world? -

volleys?

forget it .

sampras had it all - federer has a long way to go .

lastly , one would wonder how good THESE guys would be - including in fact, andre against sampras --

IF THEY WERE ALL required to use Sampras' small-frame raquet?

WOULD they hit as precisely with pace , intensity and do it again and again against a far more varied group of opponents than today -- as sampras did?

doubt it.

on the serve speeds -- there was Stan Smith - during the times of borg - known to have reached 150 in serves -- with a wooden raquet.


tedi

angiel
04-09-2005, 08:30 PM
BJ HUNTER Dallas,TX 10/9/2002

Alright, Pete
I was very happy when you won the US OPEN. I knew you had it in you. I was prayiug for you. You pulled it off! Thank you, Jesus! Go get'um! You are still the greatest!

jonas lindberg sweden 10/7/2002

THE ONE
if anyone knows pete, i do!!

angiel
04-12-2005, 10:38 PM
lydia east 1/3/2003

You are a legend! I really don't think you should retire. I love your playing style. You'll always be my favorite tennis player.

VERNIE DUNCAN 12/19/2002

Hey Pete! Now for the joy of the competition and love of the game. Isn't it just great? and possibly a win or two. Sheer Icing on a Slamcake

Leonid Sheptooha Australia 12/9/2002

Pete, I've watched you play for years now but have been unable to ever see you live. I have been granted this opportunity as I was given tickets to the Australian Open in Melbourne. Give it one more year-give it everything you've got and then retire. It has always been my dream to see you play, so please come to the Aussie Open-don't retire yet!! Congratulations on becoming a father. Play intense lead-up competitions before Wimbledon and win it for the 8th time-then retire-Wimbledon K

Thanh Phan San Jose, California 12/6/2002

Dear Pete, First, I'd like to congratulate you on becoming a father. I also want to let you know that the local newspaper, the San Jose Mercury News posted an ad saying that you will play in the Siebel Open on February. So My friend and I expect to watch you play. We miss you very much!

Armir Mehmeti 11/28/2002

Can you write a book on your net game.

VERNIE DUNCAN 11/26/2002

Congratulations Pete and Bridget! on the birth of your son..But what were you thinking. JG will always beat up on CC(relegated to Sissy)that kid is going to have a rough time with those initials might be the key.

Merrill Bergstedt CHARLESTON, WV 11/17/2002
CONGRATULATIONS
CONGRATULATIONS, PETE, ON WINNING YOUR 14TH GRAND SLAM AT THE US OPEN. I HOPE YOU WILL CONTINUE TO PLAY NEXT YEAR. WE NEED YOUR STYLE OF GAME ON THE TOUR. THERE ARE SO FEW SERVE AND VOLLEY PLAYERS LEFT. MAY GOD BLESS YOU AND YOUR WIFE AND BABY. I PRAY THAT YOU WILL STAY HEALTHY IN 2003. I WOULD LIKE TO SHARE WITH YOU A POEM THAT GOD GAVE ME. THE GOSPEL The Gospel message is simple - on Christ the Lord believe. A child of God you will become, the moment you Jesus receive.

luke gardner Wales 11/16/2002
can I get your autograph
Dear Pete, Could you please send me your autograph over the net

angiel
04-14-2005, 10:35 PM
Expert:Dathaeus
Date:9/5/2002
Subject:A Fan's Opinion

Question
I wasn't around enough tennis courts growing up to be a competent participant but I was sold on the game as a fan when I watched John MacEnroe play Bjorn Borg in a classic. It has been very interesting to follow the progress of both the men's and the women's game since then with also the parade of personalities - fleeting and lingering contenders and champions who've enjoyed prominence over the years. This brings me to my question, which is directed to the educated and hopefully opinionated fan in you. How would the head-to-head career series standing be between two great champions "Pistol" Pete Sampras and the "Iceman" Bjorn Borg if their respective eras were perfectly aligned. I think the Swede would've tought Pete a few lessons on grass and therefore log most of his wins there but move from blackboard to notebook on clay. Speculate on this for me if you will, and thanks in advance.

Answer
Hello. I am not sure what you mean if their eras are perfectly aligned, it is still like asking is the X-1 (flown by Yaeger to break sound barrier for first time) better than the space shuttle.

Borg used a wooden racket, used heavy topspin, but did not hit hard at all. He was smart, court savvy, and knew the game while having shots to back it up. His weapons were consistency and court presence, with good passing shots off the ground and competant volleys.

Sampras, my favorite player ever, has one of the best serves, first and second, ever to play the game. He has, or had, one of the best forehands in the game. He has one of the best backhand volleys ever and good forehand volley as well as good touch on both sides. He has one of the best overheads ever. His intellegence on the court is hardly even necesary with his game, but he is not a mindless brute either. Usually attacking players and serve an volleyers do not need to "think" as much as baseliners.

Now, if we had both players play their best with wooden rackets, I would so it would be a close match because Sampras would hold his serve still most of the time (since I would say he still has a better overall serve than McEnroe did) and Borg would have the advantage from the baseline. However, Sampras would still have the ability to chip and charge almost at will off Borg's serves, so I have to give a slight advantage to Sampras.

If they both used graphite rackets, Borg would improve in his server return and can hit heavier groundstrokes, although neither of those ever deterred Pete from playing his game. Borg's serve may improve nominally since he did not consider his serve his major weapon. We all know how Pete plays with the current racket, so I give a major advantage to Pete here.

When you average those two, Pete still comnes out on top. At the top of their games, Pete is still stronger physically and quicker, although fitness was not viewed then as it is now, but Pete should not be handicapped because of that because maybe that was Borg's max potential as far as physical ability, ie, maybe even if he trained harder, he might not have improved much within his game. Pete at his prime is one of the quickest players and has some of the most powerful weapons ever in the game.

Think of the players like Borg currently who have played Pete. None really come to mind. The only players Pete ever had troubles with were other big hitters like Krajicek and Phillipoussis, and he has been able to stay on top of them as well. Agassi is special and in no way hits the ball like Borg ever did. Borg could never dream of hitting the ball like Andre no matter what rackets he uses.

So I do not say this out of being a Sampras fan, I say this realistically, that Pete has the WEAPONS that would work in any era, ie, his only weakness was the backhand and maybe serve return, but then again, you do not win 7 Wimbledons with no return game. What did Borg have? Good ground strokes, still inferior to come players today, a great head and court presence. However you have to realize that court presence and smarts takes you only so far in todays game. Even in women's tennis, Hingis is the best analogy to Borg, and now even at her best, she cannot retain a top 3 ranking when she is so obviously the most skilled and smart player on the court. This concept is true 100 times over in the men's game. You dont have GAME, you dont win, bottom line.

Hope this helps.

angiel
04-19-2005, 10:46 PM
Vanessa Michalopoulos 1/15/2003

your really really really hot!!!!!i loooooooove you! marry me!

dodi fodi Hamburg Germany 1/7/2003
hey ho
hey pete!your are the best player for me.i like it how you play.but its very stupid that every time you are in hamburg you are going to lose in the first round.then the Rothenbaum cup isnt interesting any more.please, when you will come this year to hamburg,win for all your fans!!!!!!!bye

Wasif Cheema Pakistan 1/3/2003
pictures
hello Pete, i hope u r fine, i wanna get new pics of yours, and i wanna see u in all of the tournaments of 2003, please Pete write e an email, wasifc@hotmail.com, i realy really love your game. please!!

angiel
04-23-2005, 07:46 PM
Talha Aug 21st, 2003


A legend will call it day off :( - He will be missed.

sampras.JPG


Sampras to Officially Retire at U.S. Open

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=521&ncid=755&e=1&u=/ap/20030821/ap_on_sp_te_ne/ten_us_open_sampras

Pete Sampras is making his retirement official and he will be honored with a ceremony at the U.S. Open.


Sampras hasn't played a match since winning his record 14th major title at the 2002 U.S. Open, although he never came out and formally said he was retiring.


That will change Monday at a news conference he will hold before a tribute at Arthur Ashe Stadium on the first night of this year's Open, Sampras' representatives said in an e-mailed release.


Sampras has withdrawn from every event this season but remains ranked — currently 35th — because he never officially quit.

His last match was a 6-3, 6-4, 5-7, 6-4 victory over old foe Andre Agassi in the U.S. Open final on Sept. 8. It gave Sampras his fifth Open title and, at 31, made him the tournament's oldest winner since 1970.

At the postmatch news conference, Sampras alternated between sounding as though he were ready to hang up his racket and ready to get back to work.


"I'm going to have to weigh it up in the next couple months to see where I'm at. To beat a rival like Andre, in a storybook ending, it might be nice to stop," Sampras said at the time.


"But," he added, "I still want to compete, you know? I still love to play."


Part of what made that victory so special to Sampras was that he hadn't won a tournament of any sort in more than two years. He entered that U.S. Open seeded 17th and with a 20-17 match record for the year.


"I wanted to stop on my terms," Sampras said after beating Agassi. "That was one thing I promised myself, even though I was struggling this year and hearing this and that. I deserved to stop on my own terms."

Sampras and his wife, actress Bridgette Wilson, had their first child in November.




Diablo Kazama
Aug 21st, 2003

A great player indeed. pity to see him leave without ever winning the French open.

angiel
04-28-2005, 11:17 PM
Passion for Pete
by: Pauline Webster
Queens, New York, USA


I first became interested in Pete during the 1990 US Open. I have to say that tennis for me at that time was not very interesting. I used to be a Borg fan. When he left the game my interest in tennis was just completely passe. But seeing how Pete demolished the top players in the draw, I said this guy looks reallllly good. His serve was the best I've ever seen. His volleys were almost as good as McEnroe's. And he was so cool and controlled. But what got me was his speech, and then I was his fan for life.

I remember looking at this very skinny little kid and then hearing this deep voice.. I couldn't believe that voice was coming out of that skinny body. I think Pete was so shy during that speech and I don't think he even knew what he was saying. I wanted to hug him and tell him it was okay, I knew how he felt

Over the next ten years, I saw and taped as many matches as I could. In all of Pete's interviews I always felt he was an honest and upfront young man. Whenever he won his matches he always complimented the competitor. That's why I don't understand Rafter's complaining about Pete. One of Pete's best matches to me was the final in 1994 Wimbeldon. when he beat Goran Ivanisevic. At that time, Goran was the best server, well, at least second best, next to Pete. And Pete stayed with him and beat him in three straight sets. I don't think Pete was given enough credit from the press for that win. I remember going to the library and getting printouts from different newspapers from all over the world. The British were the worst, And the U.S. was second, in their dismissal of serve volley tennis.

I can go on, but my daughter just told me I'm writing a diary, so I'll end by saying that to me Sampras is the best tennis player in the world, and a gentleman. His demeanor on and off the court is second to none. .

angiel
05-03-2005, 11:54 PM
Alfredo Perez venezuela 11/5/2002
latinos fanz

escribo en nomnbre de todos los latinos que somos fanz de el gran pete sampras, soy de barinas, venezuela y quiero decir que pete eres el mejor de todos los tiempos, empese a jugar tennis por ti, copiando tu juego y tu eres mi ejemplo a seguir oesa mi idolo... si responden mi mail, seria la persona mas feliz de este mundo. TE QUIERO PETE, I LOVE PETE!!!

angiel
05-12-2005, 09:18 PM
"I will always remember your reaction to a terrible line call on a critical point in the 2002 US Open finals. There was hardly a reaction. You just kept playing, and, of course, won. You were always a gentlemen on and off the court and you will be remembered as much for that as all the Slam victories."
Bob Greenman Scottsdale, Arizona



"Although it's always hard to compare tennis players of the past with the current generation, I think we can all agree that your presence in tennis has been an example of pure brilliance combined with the incredible mental power which is needed to become one of the greatest champions that has ever been. All the best with your familiy and your life aftre tennis."
Michiel Coppens, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

angiel
05-18-2005, 12:13 AM
August-26th-2003

steve(thelil)
Sphincterene Spokesperson



To me, when Sampras was on top of his game and he could take chances on every return of service because he'd never lose his serve, his game was an awesome and exciting display of skill and power.


Last edited by steve(thelil) : August-26th-2003 at 08:04 PM.

angiel
06-01-2005, 09:39 PM
Topic: Tennis


Expert:Dathaeus
Date:9/5/2002
Subject:A Fan's Opinion


Question
I wasn't around enough tennis courts growing up to be a competent participant but I was sold on the game as a fan when I watched John MacEnroe play Bjorn Borg in a classic. It has been very interesting to follow the progress of both the men's and the women's game since then with also the parade of personalities - fleeting and lingering contenders and champions who've enjoyed prominence over the years. This brings me to my question, which is directed to the educated and hopefully opinionated fan in you. How would the head-to-head career series standing be between two great champions "Pistol" Pete Sampras and the "Iceman" Bjorn Borg if their respective eras were perfectly aligned. I think the Swede would've tought Pete a few lessons on grass and therefore log most of his wins there but move from blackboard to notebook on clay. Speculate on this for me if you will, and thanks in advance.

Answer
Hello. I am not sure what you mean if their eras are perfectly aligned, it is still like asking is the X-1 (flown by Yaeger to break sound barrier for first time) better than the space shuttle.

Borg used a wooden racket, used heavy topspin, but did not hit hard at all. He was smart, court savvy, and knew the game while having shots to back it up. His weapons were consistency and court presence, with good passing shots off the ground and competant volleys.

Sampras, my favorite player ever, has one of the best serves, first and second, ever to play the game. He has, or had, one of the best forehands in the game. He has one of the best backhand volleys ever and good forehand volley as well as good touch on both sides. He has one of the best overheads ever. His intellegence on the court is hardly even necesary with his game, but he is not a mindless brute either. Usually attacking players and serve an volleyers do not need to "think" as much as baseliners.

Now, if we had both players play their best with wooden rackets, I would so it would be a close match because Sampras would hold his serve still most of the time (since I would say he still has a better overall serve than McEnroe did) and Borg would have the advantage from the baseline. However, Sampras would still have the ability to chip and charge almost at will off Borg's serves, so I have to give a slight advantage to Sampras.

If they both used graphite rackets, Borg would improve in his server return and can hit heavier groundstrokes, although neither of those ever deterred Pete from playing his game. Borg's serve may improve nominally since he did not consider his serve his major weapon. We all know how Pete plays with the current racket, so I give a major advantage to Pete here.

When you average those two, Pete still comnes out on top. At the top of their games, Pete is still stronger physically and quicker, although fitness was not viewed then as it is now, but Pete should not be handicapped because of that because maybe that was Borg's max potential as far as physical ability, ie, maybe even if he trained harder, he might not have improved much within his game. Pete at his prime is one of the quickest players and has some of the most powerful weapons ever in the game.

Think of the players like Borg currently who have played Pete. None really come to mind. The only players Pete ever had troubles with were other big hitters like Krajicek and Phillipoussis, and he has been able to stay on top of them as well. Agassi is special and in no way hits the ball like Borg ever did. Borg could never dream of hitting the ball like Andre no matter what rackets he uses.

So I do not say this out of being a Sampras fan, I say this realistically, that Pete has the WEAPONS that would work in any era, ie, his only weakness was the backhand and maybe serve return, but then again, you do not win 7 Wimbledons with no return game. What did Borg have? Good ground strokes, still inferior to come players today, a great head and court presence. However you have to realize that court presence and smarts takes you only so far in todays game. Even in women's tennis, Hingis is the best analogy to Borg, and now even at her best, she cannot retain a top 3 ranking when she is so obviously the most skilled and smart player on the court. This concept is true 100 times over in the men's game. You dont have GAME, you dont win, bottom line.

Hope this helps.

angiel
06-04-2005, 08:23 PM
tedi


Posted - 03/15/2005 : 22:37:12

quote:
Originally posted by victorgospo

I'm a huge Sampras fan

I still think that Federer will surpass him



no one is saying Federer WON"T. but saying Federer WILL has nothing to do with the question under discussion -- which was suggested by the original author of the thread: that Federer against Sampras at their best would thrash sampras.

those are two differernt, distinct subjects and one ("federer can surpass sampras") can't be SUBSTITUTED as an argument as to which one "would have won at their peaks" or "which is the better player".

as a sampras fan myself -- i will say that i think i know enough from years of watching these players (with Edberg, McEnroe, Stich and Becker preceding sampras as my favorites) and that if there is one thing that is true:

TALK is only talk -- about "who's better" or "will surpass" until it's WALKING the TALK.

they;ve all come and gone - against sampras -- from his RISE against the top and very much commanding players with plenty of grand slams, titles , experience , variety and power among them , to his dominance to his decline and his end -- and Federer is merely a facsimile of PARTS of sampras -- made out to be "surprassing" by those that think tennis has not seen that kind of player.

Until Federer becomes a number one for several years continuously, keeps winnning at least one slam for many years, keeps reaching slam finals again and again, keeps retaining a prolonged pre-eminence -- in order to reach 14 slams at least --

he is not "better" or even nearly as great- to answer these two distinct subject, which satisfy federer fans or those that imagine they are seeing a "better player" who's actually not.

who did Federer beat today? who is Muller? and yet Muller - definitely a no name compared to Roger, even if in a few points ACTUALLY BLEW federer far behind the baseline -- and some people HERE are talking about Federer blowing away sampras?!

don't make me laugh!

apart from Safin - or hewitt with his experience or the devlined 34 yr old andre -- just exactly WHO is there that has been at the top of their games against Roger's "dominance"?

in the rise of Sampras in comparison - the OLDEST of his competitors that reached the last eight of most slams was John McEnroe - at 30 . under that the next oldest was 27!!

against federer -- his rise and "top ten opponents" of 2004 till today --

the age ranges up to 34 - almost 35 - plenty are in their late twenties and HARDLY consistent -- such as Moya, Kuerten, Henman (31). Costa (31)

and who, among them hold a VERY FEW Grand Slams between them!

the age contemporaries of Roger have been either too burned out EARLY or have mental problems , or can't put their acts together!

no wonder Roger LOOKS "so much better and more dominant than Pete ever was".

his field AIN"T ALL THAT TOUGH after all!

so - really -- people should relax about this "roger is the best of all time" nonsnes.

angiel
06-09-2005, 11:45 PM
Subject: A great Career

Being an ardent fan of agassi i just wasn't able to accept pete's greatness.But his victory in last years US open was undoubtedly a terrific champion stuff.He raises the bar when it matters the most.Still his pathetic performances in French should prevent him from being called the greatest.

Bye the bye Andre agassi is competing for his ninth and not eighth grand slam as mentioned.

Posted by gowri shenbaga raman


Subject: Sad day for tennis

Its a sad day for all tennis fans. The greatest tennis player of all times has announced his retirement from tennis. The pistol that fired so many aces will never fire again....hard to believe, but we've just seen 13 amazing years of Pete Sampras, and didnt relaize that it was all coming to an end so soon. The Sampras serve has spawned so many clones...pundits fall short of adjectives to describe the amazingly graceful, yet destructively powerful Sampras serve.
Anyways, i will always remain a Sampras fan, and wish to thank Pete for all those fantastic and inspiring memories.

Posted by Kiran Keshav




Subject: Pete, The Great

He is the greatest tennis player ever to have graced the game. He is the best player I have ever seen playing.No doubt about that! Hats off to you Pete!

Posted by Sravan Abbaraju





Subject: Pete Sampras - a legend

What a champ!!! Sampras is truly a legend!!!

Posted by SP


Subject: PETE - REDEFINING PERFECTION

AN era comes to an end... what a champion, what a legacy...
thank you Pete for the joys that u have given , the triumphs , the memories that all we viewers and admirers of the sport have shared and enjoyed.
i consider myself fortunate to have grown watching you win out there, in these days where there is a dearth of role models, pete , you have definitely been an exception. thank you so much for giving us the happiness.
best wishes for the future.
God bless you, your little son and your entire
family. thakyou for those glorious years of pure tennis and excellent sportsmanship.
Long live the glory of Pete, the epitome of Perfection - a true blue gentleman

Posted by AN INDIAN FAN on

angiel
06-13-2005, 11:40 PM
Author: ti-online
Score: 0 0 1 (total score: 2)
Date: 09 June 2005:
Title: ...

Comment: I am a big fan of Pete Sampras, his victory at the Australian Open after his coach was seriously ill was a true display of human strength and courage and is surely the greatest male player of all time. I found your essay very provoking and thoughtful and Pete is truly an American hero

angiel
06-18-2005, 07:16 PM
And in an effort to end the era of the mid-90s bloc of players, Michael Chang enters his final U.S. Open today.

Congrats to Pete on a great career. He may have had the personality of a mushroom, but he was never boring to watch play.

posted by Ufez Jones

I think it's unfortunate that the modern sprots fan needs so much media involvement and hype to help dictate their degree of fandom. Sampras is neither as boring as most media wags say he is, nor is he a boring tennis player.

He is perhaps the best that ever competed and it passed most people by. Tennis fans were priviledged to watch him play. He should be put in the same pantheon of American sports greats as Thorpe, Michael Johnson, Carl (you took sterioids you fucker!) Lewis, Ali and the rest of those greats who competed on a truly world stage.

posted by WeedyMcSmokey

Of course he won $62 million in prize money (not including appearance fees and endorsements), married a hot actress and retired at 30-something, so I can't quite bring myself to pity him for some reason.

Those lousy modern 'sprots' fans...

posted by WeedyMcSmokey

angiel
06-24-2005, 12:03 AM
Tatiana 6/23/2005

Hey pete!! u are the best tennis player eva!!! miss ya loads! When u go out there u go to win, and i really admire that!!! Tennis just isnt the same anymore...


http://www.gladys.org/piccies/gladwds2.gif

angiel
06-29-2005, 11:17 PM
World wide athletes who are undying fans of Pete Sampras


Basketball
Michelle Greco, USA


Cricket
Cameron Cuffy, West Indies

Aravinda de Silva, arguably, Sri Lanka's greatest batsman ever
"The most complete sportsman and personality of the best individual sport."
(Named his son Sampras !!!)

Rahul Dravid, India

Sourav Ganguly, India
"The cool way he approaches the tennis court, the race up to winning and the example he sets."

Sachin Tendulkar, one of India's greatest batsmen ever


Golf
Ratief Goosen, South Africa


Hockey
Petr Sykora, Czech Republic


Tennis
Eleni Danilidou, Greece
Richard Gasquet, France
Anne Kremer, Luxembourg
Gustavo Kuerten, Brazil
Manuela Maleeva, Bulgaria
Olivier Rochus, Belgia
Paola Suarez, Argentina
Serena Williams, USA
Venus Williams, USA

(tennis players who's role model was Pete, like Roger Federer or Marat Safin are not included - only undying fans)

angiel
07-07-2005, 08:14 PM
akhil nath india 7/5/2005
wishes
hai pete whether you are in or out you are the best

angiel
10-05-2005, 12:19 AM
chwengetai chikara zimbabwe 9/12/2005
your game
hie the best racquet swinger ever on earth .can you tell me what ios the trick behind serve and volleu-y game coz i understand that it is the none that made u top[s .is it serve placement or speed what is it.and what are you doing now having retired

wilfredo galindo (nono) venezuela 8/8/2005

hi pete , im a kid of 13 years qand i want to tell you that you change mi forma de jugar el tenis , (sorry i dont speak english very good) your the best ! thank you, because your mi idol and i think you are a good person , well bye i hope you read this

Iram usa 8/4/2005
congrats
congrats on ur second child. god bless u.