Why is it only Great Britain hosts grass court tournaments? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Why is it only Great Britain hosts grass court tournaments?

tommyg6
06-09-2012, 06:38 PM
Aside from the 250 events in Germany and Netherlands, Great Britain seems to be the only country hosting grass court events? Why is that?

Why can't Ireland host an atp 250 grass court event? or Canada? To me, I get the impression this grass court tennis is a commonwealth thing and was historically a court of prestige and only countries like Great Britain, a former Empire, can host it?

rob_z
06-09-2012, 06:41 PM
Part of teh reason is that Britain has a conservative/traditional culture. In the past 3 of the 4 slam tournaments were played on grass. But later Austalian Open and Us Open changed to hard court. The conservative Britons continued to play on grass (what's good in my opinion, but that's another debate).
That conservative culture is probably not the only reason. But it is one of the reasons.

Wing Man Frank
06-09-2012, 06:43 PM
Nobody wants to go to Ireland. It's full of potato-munching gingers. The US hosts Newport.

Think you have to remember that for a lot of countries like Spain, Italy etc where the climate is better, there's no desire for grass courts due to the cost to maintain them.

Given that, they're not going to make more grass court tournaments as the demand simply isn't there.

tommyg6
06-09-2012, 06:46 PM
My wishlist,

Dublin, Ireland hosts one, call it Irish Open
Canada should host one, we are linked to the British.
New Zealand should change its single atp 250 event's surface from hard to grass, they are linked to British
Australia should change their surfaces to grass, link to British.
India should change their surfaces to grass as well, link to British.
South Africa should chnage their surfaces to grass, link to British.


Latin countries or countries with clay court event history should just stick with claycourts. Leave the grass courts to the commonwealth.

Make it consistnent that all commonwealth countries host only grass events.

Looner
06-09-2012, 06:47 PM
Who would fly to Australia to play a grass prep event for Wimbledon :facepalm:. It does not make any sense. Same with Canada. Proximity and climate is why there are so many grass courts in the UK.

tommyg6
06-09-2012, 06:49 PM
Who would fly to Australia to play a grass prep event for Wimbledon :facepalm:. It does not make any sense. Same with Canada. Proximity and climate is why there are so many grass courts in the UK.

But there needs to be more, How come Scotland doesn't get a grass court event? Novak Djokovic gets the Djokovic Open in Belgrade, Rafa used to have the Rafa Open in Mallorca, Feds gets the Fed Open in Basel but Andy Murray can't get his own open in Scotland? Cmon!

Looner
06-09-2012, 06:51 PM
Fed gets the Fed open... Dude, Basel is one of the oldest events on the tour. He was a ball boy there. What are you talking about. Murray deserves a futures event at best.

Wing Man Frank
06-09-2012, 06:53 PM
But there needs to be more, How come Scotland doesn't get a grass court event? Novak Djokovic gets the Djokovic Open in Belgrade, Rafa used to have the Rafa Open in Mallorca, Feds gets the Fed Open in Basel but Andy Murray can't get his own open in Scotland? Cmon!

There's enough rain in London without going even further north. You'd be playing the final on the second Thursday for a regulation 250 event!

In all seriousness though, you have to remember that there simply isn't the facilities for an event like Queen's in Scotland. By the time they start the planning, building and opening of the event Murray would have retired anyway!

tommyg6
06-09-2012, 06:55 PM
There's enough rain in London without going even further north. You'd be playing the final on the second Thursday for a regulation 250 event!

In all seriousness though, you have to remember that there simply isn't the facilities for an event like Queen's in Scotland. By the time they start the planning, building and opening of the event Murray would have retired anyway!

If not Scotland, how about Ireland? I would love to see them host an Irish Open, atp 250 grass event.

cocrcici
06-09-2012, 07:01 PM
Because I Said So.

Wing Man Frank
06-09-2012, 07:01 PM
If not Scotland, how about Ireland? I would love to see them host an Irish Open, atp 250 grass event.

Are there the facilities for it? Wouldn't have thought so. Where do you fit it into the schedule? Etc etc.

I agree that there should be more grass court tournaments, but there's neither the demand nor willingness to see it happen, so it won't.

Allez
06-09-2012, 07:02 PM
Judy Murray is working on opening up the Dunblane Open which is due to be a mixed Masters 1000 event...

cocrcici
06-09-2012, 07:03 PM
But there needs to be more, How come Scotland doesn't get a grass court event? Novak Djokovic gets the Djokovic Open in Belgrade, Rafa used to have the Rafa Open in Mallorca, Feds gets the Fed Open in Basel but Andy Murray can't get his own open in Scotland? Cmon!

+ https://encrypted-tbn1.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ5xwe0C-mdrrupFwBrH28YSDCO_ulB-TkoAv4rfyCl7V8DDGSvOw

motorhead
06-09-2012, 07:12 PM
High costs

misty1
06-09-2012, 07:23 PM
i feel like alot of it has to do with timing. There's only 2 weeks between wimbledon and the french and no one wants to fly far out of the way to play a tournament the week before a slam. If there was a great period of time than perhaps they might consider giving grass tournaments to other countries that could support them..perhaps the czech republic or switzerland for example

Henry Chinaski
06-09-2012, 07:27 PM
If not Scotland, how about Ireland? I would love to see them host an Irish Open, atp 250 grass event.

our tennis authorities can't even get their shit together enough to attract the sponsorship needed to fund a challenger event in dublin, never mind an ATP 250.

we don't have the facilities capable of hosting an atp event.

The Irish Open futures here (which is the oldest event on the professional calendar) is played on artificial grass, not the real stuff.

mooncreek
06-09-2012, 07:27 PM
If there's going to be a tour event in Scotland, it's going to be an indoor hard court. The weather just doesn't allow for anything else.

United States does have Newport. Due to the Olympics, what's usually a Mickey Mouse tournament actually has a decent field.

TigerTim
06-09-2012, 08:25 PM
If you had a grass 250 in September it would get a good crowd IMO.

Johnny Groove
06-09-2012, 08:32 PM
They ought to bring back the Philadelphia Grass Court Event, at the Cricket Club. They play the juniors there. Also Newport 250 to before Wimbledon, right after RG. Come on, East Coast USA to London isn't so long of a flight.

Former great tournament. Also the Irish Open in the 1880's and 1890's was basically a slam.

Also Roehampton should have a 250.

TigerTim
06-09-2012, 08:36 PM
They ought to bring back the Philadelphia Grass Court Event, at the Cricket Club. They play the juniors there. Also Newport 250 to before Wimbledon, right after RG. Come on, East Coast USA to London isn't so long of a flight.

Former great tournament. Also the Irish Open in the 1880's and 1890's was basically a slam.

Also Roehampton should have a 250.

I've played at Roehampton (the one in London right?!)

The only problem is there is only 2 weeks to put all these tourneys in.

Johnny Groove
06-09-2012, 08:39 PM
our tennis authorities can't even get their shit together enough to attract the sponsorship needed to fund a challenger event in dublin, never mind an ATP 250.

we don't have the facilities capable of hosting an atp event.

The Irish Open futures here (which is the oldest event on the professional calendar) is played on artificial grass, not the real stuff.

Irish Open, a former Grand Slam in the 1880's and 1890's reduced to a futures, sad.

It is actually Japan that has a lot of futures events on grass :eek:

I've played at Roehampton (the one in London right?!)

The only problem is there is only 2 weeks to put all these tourneys in.

Well that is a whole other issue that involves either moving RG up a week or Wimbledon back a week in the calendar to get a proper grass season to put events like Philly and Roehampton, Newport, etc.

fran70
06-10-2012, 12:03 AM
Nobody wants to go to Ireland. It's full of potato-munching gingers. The US hosts Newport.

Think you have to remember that for a lot of countries like Spain, Italy etc where the climate is better, there's no desire for grass courts due to the cost to maintain them.

Given that, they're not going to make more grass court tournaments as the demand simply isn't there.

There's nice weather in Australia aswell and you can find plenty of them everywhere. Its more about tradition than anything else.

Fortunately UK still (and will) keeps the tradition that the business of sport has rotten it.

156mphserve
06-10-2012, 12:07 AM
they have the best fertiziler

Black Adam
06-10-2012, 04:03 AM
Prestige.

BroTree123
06-10-2012, 04:06 AM
But there needs to be more, How come Scotland doesn't get a grass court event? Novak Djokovic gets the Djokovic Open in Belgrade, Rafa used to have the Rafa Open in Mallorca, Feds gets the Fed Open in Basel but Andy Murray can't get his own open in Scotland? Cmon!

Let me remind you that Mugray has 0 grand slams.

156mphserve
06-10-2012, 04:17 AM
Wu Di(or Di Wu, the chinese are confusing with their first name last, last name first crap) hasn't even appeared in a grand slam yet he has a 1000 event in his hometown. Based on that Murray definately deserves something

BroTree123
06-10-2012, 04:23 AM
Wu Di(or Di Wu, the chinese are confusing with their first name last, last name first crap) hasn't even appeared in a grand slam yet he has a 1000 event in his hometown. Based on that Murray definately deserves something

You sure the Shanghai tournaments are actually opened on his behalf?

156mphserve
06-10-2012, 04:35 AM
Nope, but I thought that there could be no other logical reason for it :shrug:

Well, they could put a tournament in Murray's hometown and say it's not there because of Murray.

They could even put it on clay, that way we know he wouldn't even win it

dencod16
06-10-2012, 05:15 AM
Because the others dont want to spend money to maintain the grass.

J99
06-10-2012, 05:33 AM
Newport.

isner-fan
06-10-2012, 03:21 PM
If Great Britain stops to host grass court tournaments, they will disappear probably. And only clay and hard is boring, grass is fresh and nice looking at least...

Thunderfish8
06-10-2012, 03:24 PM
I think if anybody else were to start hosting grass tournaments, it would be somewhere in East Asia/Oceana region. They seem to always raise good grass court players for some reason.

Can somebody verify this, but I believe that Auckland used to be grass tournament... maybe they should change back

abollo
06-10-2012, 03:26 PM
There was a WTA tournament going to be played in Cairo on grass this year but was cancelled later

isner-fan
06-10-2012, 04:12 PM
I think if anybody else were to start hosting grass tournaments, it would be somewhere in East Asia/Oceana region. They seem to always raise good grass court players for some reason.

Can somebody verify this, but I believe that Auckland used to be grass tournament... maybe they should change back

Yes, good choice. Another thing that New Zealand is too far, so only Jan is good to play there (together with Aus). And this is not a time for grass tennis season.

Hensafmurrafter
06-10-2012, 06:27 PM
I would be satisfied with the current short grass season, if Wimbledon actually played like grass.

August
06-16-2012, 10:12 AM
I assume many people think grass tournaments after Wimby wouldn't make sense but how come there are clay tournaments after RG. So, unless grass would be so costly surface, I think there could be grass tournaments also after Wimby just like there are clay events.

Dougie
06-16-2012, 10:16 AM
I would imagine grass is financially a horrible surface for the organisers. Also, while grass tennis can be beautiful to watch, and it has a lot of tradition, it´s not the kind of tennis the ATP probably wants too much of. Clay courts and slow hard courts creat the kind of game that appeals to the large audience.

TigerTim
06-16-2012, 10:40 AM
I would imagine grass is financially a horrible surface for the organisers. Also, while grass tennis can be beautiful to watch, and it has a lot of tradition, it´s not the kind of tennis the ATP probably wants too much of. Clay courts and slow hard courts creat the kind of game that appeals to the large audience.

The ATP are getting it wrong. My dad never watches hard tourneys, saying their dull or clay, saying they last too long - grass on the other hand he loves, it provides a refreshing antidote to the grind fests we see throughout the tour.

Oh and as well as grass bring back carpet :worship:

Caesar1844
06-16-2012, 10:51 AM
With the exception of the US Spring Hardcourts and the European indoor season, tournament surfaces are mostly dictated by the surface of the Grand Slam event they lead into. So you are unlikely to see any more grass tournaments unless one of the other Slams switches to the surface.

The USO and the AO both switched away from grass when they moved from private tennis clubs to big purpose-built facilities. It was just easier and cheaper to pick a synthetic surface and make it play the way the organisers wanted than to build and maintain acres of grass courts.

There are still a lot of grass courts in Australia (most cities have a few complexes open to the public and in Perth, they are the most common type of court). They have experienced a bit of a decline because you can't play on them in winter, even though the weather is still quite nice for outdoor tennis. People want a court they can play on all year round.

Most new tennis courts that are built are carpet (sanded synthetic grass). Concrete hardcourts are quite popular as a public court surface, and in the southern states there is a form of clay called entoutcas that is used on a lot of older courts. Clay is falling out of popularity though, and this is cited as a problem by a lot of elite tennis coaches (given how much of the pro tour is played on that surface).

Ironically, even though the Australian Open is played on a synthetic hardcourt, the surface is practically unheard of. The tennis centres that host pro events are probably the only ones in the country that have it installed.

There is practically no indoor tennis in Australia. We don't have a climate that requires it.

TigerTim
06-16-2012, 03:32 PM
possible new grass event?
http://www.pitchcare.com/magazine/grounds-for-improvement.html

jacoblewis2008
08-30-2012, 06:31 AM
First off, GB has always been about the traditional aesthetic. This is seen in other sports as well, where traditional stadiums are still intact and used (with exceptions of course). The US has definitely played around with tennis surfaces (http://www.decoturf.com) and seems to change every once in awhile. In general I feel like there is more of a demand for tennis in GB and Europe, which could explain the traditional tennis surface structure.