Dramatic Rise In Chilean Iq Following Death Of Allende [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Dramatic Rise In Chilean Iq Following Death Of Allende

buddyholly
01-08-2012, 04:02 AM
So says infosur.

http://infosurhoy.com/cocoon/saii/xhtml/en_GB/features/saii/features/2009/05/04/feature-02

Stensland
01-08-2012, 04:19 AM
thread of the year.

Har-Tru
01-08-2012, 09:27 AM
hahaha :lol:

abraxas21
01-08-2012, 07:12 PM
i feel honoured.

Jimnik
01-08-2012, 08:41 PM
Vamos Chile!

By far the most well-run Latin American economy.

abraxas21
01-08-2012, 08:50 PM
Vamos Chile!

By far the most well-run Latin American economy.

the richest 1% of this country surely agree with that statement.

buddyholly
01-08-2012, 09:51 PM
And they should know.

star
01-08-2012, 09:54 PM
I can’t believe that article didn’t point out that prenatal health care and nutrition as well as nutrition in early childhood years greatly affects IQ.

finishingmove
01-08-2012, 11:21 PM
Only two points rise in the UK. Not enough sunshine for IQ synthesis.

shiaben
01-09-2012, 12:11 AM
buddyholly and his trolling.

Has Abraxas frustrated you so much, that you're looking to find dirt on Chile?

LOL, get a life holly.

Jimnik
01-09-2012, 12:18 AM
Pinochet was the greatest dictator of the last century.

abraxas21
01-09-2012, 12:54 AM
Pinochet was the greatest dictator of the last century.

you are a bit of an idiot, aren't you?

abraxas21
01-09-2012, 01:01 AM
Vamos Chile!

By far the most well-run Latin American economy.

i wonder how can that be understood with your assessment in the other thread:

The best economic system is the one with highest AVERAGE (both mean and median) living standard.

when argentina is the country with the highest GDP per capita (adjusted for PPP) and has a better distribution of income than chile (which btw is one of the most unequal countries on earth).

i sense that you not only have the wrong principles, you also have no clue what you're talking about

Topspindoctor
01-09-2012, 01:01 AM
I heard that if you lie down to sleep in Chile horizontally, you'd be trespassing on Argentina's territory.

abraxas21
01-09-2012, 01:05 AM
I heard that if you lie down to sleep in Chile horizontally, you'd be trespassing on Argentina's territory.

i guess that by "horizontally" you mean from east to west or viceversa.

i see that geographical education among bogans in oz can find some room for improvement...

Topspindoctor
01-09-2012, 01:22 AM
i guess that by "horizontally" you mean from east to west or viceversa.

i see that geographical education among bogans in oz can find some room for improvement...

Hey, you should be honored that I know which country Chile borders with, it's not like you guys are giants on the world stage, I feel my bogan education is already paying dividents :rocker2:

abraxas21
01-09-2012, 03:04 AM
Hey, you should be honored that I know which country Chile borders with, it's not like you guys are giants on the world stage, I feel my bogan education is already paying dividents :rocker2:

i dont mind the fact that we are a small and thin country ;)

in fact, i think i kind of like the low profile we have

buddyholly
01-09-2012, 03:08 AM
buddyholly and his trolling.

Has Abraxas frustrated you so much, that you're looking to find dirt on Chile?

LOL, get a life holly.

Even abraxas has more of a sense of humour than you. You can't even recognize a joke thread when you post in it.
I wonder what you are like in real life.

Jimnik
01-09-2012, 04:37 AM
you are a bit of an idiot, aren't you?

i wonder how can that be understood with your assessment in the other thread:



when argentina is the country with the highest GDP per capita (adjusted for PPP) and has a better distribution of income than chile (which btw is one of the most unequal countries on earth).

i sense that you not only have the wrong principles, you also have no clue what you're talking about
Oh abraxas. One day you'll be a man, my son, and you must open your eyes.

Jimnik
01-09-2012, 04:39 AM
Btw, check your facts sweetpea. Chile's GDP per capita, $15.400, is higher than Argy-bargy's, $14.700.

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2004rank.html?countryName=Argentina&countryCode=ar&regionCode=soa&rank=77#ar

You should be pleased. You're country is doing well.

fast_clay
01-09-2012, 07:49 AM
I feel my bogan education is already paying dividents :rocker2:

dividents :haha: :spit: you stupid f**king bogan :lol: :silly:

Topspindoctor
01-09-2012, 08:04 AM
dividents :haha: :spit: you stupid f**king bogan :lol: :silly:

You have Kim Jong Il in your avatar. Remind me why you should be taken seriously again?

tripwires
01-09-2012, 11:16 AM
dividents :haha: :spit: you stupid f**king bogan :lol: :silly:

This.

abraxas21
01-09-2012, 12:25 PM
Btw, check your facts sweetpea. Chile's GDP per capita, $15.400, is higher than Argy-bargy's, $14.700.

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2004rank.html?countryName=Argentina&countryCode=ar&regionCode=soa&rank=77#ar

You should be pleased. You're country is doing well.

when adjusted for Power Purchasing Parity (PPP, which is a better indicator of quality of living than just nominal GDP per capita), the IMF and the World Bank list argentina higher than chile

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(PPP)_per_capita

but that's not the only factor to consider. in relative terms, i'd say uruguay is also better off than we are. they have a lower GDP per capita (even when it is adjusted for PPP) but still there's a higher proportion of uruguayans with a higher income than in chile. the problem here is that the income is so badly distributted that the differences between the richest 10% and the poorest 10% would make your country look like some sort of socialist paradise. someone here recently said that chile is the tea partier's earthly heaven and he couldn't have been more right.

Action Jackson
01-09-2012, 12:41 PM
Legend on the right.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3278/2998570491_47913fb74e.jpg

abraxas21
01-09-2012, 12:44 PM
Oh abraxas. One day you'll be a man, my son, and you must open your eyes.

in a way i do feel sorry because you're the one poster in a long time who managed to upset me. your trolling intentions are more than clear but deep down you do have pretty wrong ideas.

believe it or not, some years ago i used to sympathize quite a bit with libertarianism. then fortunately i grew out of it

Action Jackson
01-09-2012, 01:07 PM
Leo Farkas the man is class.

buddyholly
01-09-2012, 02:08 PM
OK, who is he?

Jimnik
01-09-2012, 04:41 PM
in a way i do feel sorry because you're the one poster in a long time who managed to upset me.
Seriously? I'm an online stranger to you on a tennis forum. Why the hell should you care what I think or post? If my libertarian views offend you, there's always the ignore list. Put me on it and my posts will never bother you again.

Mate, I don't know about you but I didn't join this forum to upset people. I know a lot of people get kicks out of making others miserable but I swear I'm not the type. Have I insulted you? If so let me know where and I'll delete it.

abraxas21
01-10-2012, 12:04 AM
Seriously? I'm an online stranger to you on a tennis forum. Why the hell should you care what I think or post? If my libertarian views offend you, there's always the ignore list. Put me on it and my posts will never bother you again.

Mate, I don't know about you but I didn't join this forum to upset people. I know a lot of people get kicks out of making others miserable but I swear I'm not the type. Have I insulted you? If so let me know where and I'll delete it.

it's no biggie. i've never felt offended here

abraxas21
01-10-2012, 12:05 AM
since we're on the topic...


January 8, 2012 8:29 pm

No play on words

In its inception, the word change in the history curriculum for Chilean schools – from military “dictatorship” to “régime” for the period of general Augusto Pinochet’s violent rule – was part provocation, part slip-up. In its effect, it reflects that while Chile is an economic athlete, it remains a political cripple. So does its government.
Whoever in the education ministry had the bright idea of sanitising language to describe one of the more murderous governments of an era stiff with competition in political violence, it did not come sanctioned from the highest echelons of governments. The hapless minister for education, the technocrat Harald Beyer, is only a week into his job. And Sebastián Piñera, the businessman-turned-president, is an economic liberal who is unexcited by ideology. That is why his election two years ago brought an opportunity to mend the rift that still splits Chile after nearly 25 years of democracy and why his failure to do so is so disappointing.
More

Polarisation into left and right has persisted through truth commissions and high and steady economic growth; indeed it has grown more acute under Mr Piñera. Student protests recur annually in Chile, but last year’s were bigger in scale and harsher in tone than anything seen in a long time. The immediate cause is legitimate frustration with a heavily private education system that costs much and yields too little quality. But having a right-wing government in power has also whetted protesters’ appetite for confrontation, while that government’s tin-eared response to demands backed by a large majority has hardened fronts further.
In such an environment, a word change that can only be seen as an attempt to rehabilitate Pinochet throws fuel on the fire. It also exposes Mr Piñera. Not only has he let his lack of ideology become a political blind spot instead of turning it into a political resource. Even on plain managerial grounds, the president looks ever less in control of his own government.
To be fair, Mr Piñera was always hostage to the Independent Democrat Union, the irreconcilably conservative party that is the biggest in his coalition and muscles its way to more influence the lower the president’s approval rate falls.
But the greatest obstacle to political renewal in Chile are the institutions beaqueathed by the dictatorship, which congeal any serious reform effort in permanent deadlock. Mr Piñera has two years left of his non-renewable mandate: he should devote it to electoral reform. His country needs a statesman, not a lame duck manager.

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/9ee4a9ec-3875-11e1-9f07-00144feabdc0.html#axzz1izZBl4Pn

piñera has been called a lot of things but a lame duck manager sounds kind of cool