Are there any vegetarians in here? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Are there any vegetarians in here?

shiaben
11-02-2011, 04:52 PM
If so, what does your typical daily meal plan look like?

And if so, what kind of changes have you witnessed in your lifetime as a result?

buddyholly
11-02-2011, 05:09 PM
I have added more vegetables to my diet as I grow older. That does not mean I should go to an extreme of only eating vegetables.
I think that being a vegetarian is contrary to our nature. A balanced diet includes meat, grains, vegetables and dairy. Vegetarians are no more logical than people who live on snack foods.

A vegetarian diet is probably healthier than an all-meat diet, but I doubt it is healthier than an omnivore diet.

shiaben
11-02-2011, 05:20 PM
I have added more vegetables to my diet as I grow older. That does not mean I should go to an extreme of only eating vegetables.
I think that being a vegetarian is contrary to our nature. A balanced diet includes meat, grains, vegetables and dairy. Vegetarians are no more logical than people who live on snack foods.

A vegetarian diet is probably healthier than an all-meat diet, but I doubt it is healthier than an omnivore diet.

In some sciences (I think psychology and maybe even biology) they use to categorize them as having an "eating disorder". I'm wondering if getting getting zinc, iron, omega3 and other key nutrients found in meat, are satisfactory or not if they are taken in through chocolate (in the case of zinc), iron (say through apples and carrots), and omega3 from walnuts. I'm assuming vegetarians would have to eat tons of these (especially for omega3) in addition to supplements, just to be safe enough to make sure their body absorbed enough nutrients.

Sonja1989
11-02-2011, 05:23 PM
I'm not, my favourite foods are meats, mostly. :lick: :p

Everko
11-02-2011, 05:24 PM
I don't eat a lot of meat because it makes my stomach uncomortable so I end up eating many vegetables.

buddyholly
11-02-2011, 05:28 PM
I don't eat a lot of meat because it makes my stomach uncomortable so I end up eating many vegetables.

That will continue with age. I eat a lot more seafood than red meat. And my red meat intake is mostly in pastas and stews. I still love the flavour of a thick, rare steak, but have to be prepared to undergo a poor night's sleep afterward.

tennizen
11-02-2011, 05:31 PM
I was raised a vegetarian. My parents, grandparents, their parents before that and at least two more generations beyond were all vegetarians.

I couldn't care less if I get enough nutrients or not.

Everko
11-02-2011, 05:35 PM
That will continue with age. I eat a lot more seafood than red meat. And my red meat intake is mostly in pastas and stews. I still love the flavour of a thick, rare steak, but have to be prepared to undergo a poor night's sleep afterward.

I have never loved meat, maybe because my parents used to cook it at it wasn't that good. But I have had some good cooked meats before and it very good. But it wasn't a part of my natural favorite diet.

My favorite vegetable to eat is zucchini. Hard to find because I am the only one who likes it that I know. I eat it raw, in soups, in stews and cooked. I have this one man I always get the best ones from, he is a long walk from my quarters but it is worth the long walk. :)

Ivanatis
11-02-2011, 05:37 PM
yup, but no vegan, also not really into all the meat-copycat-stuff, but I love everything milk-related for example

huge advantage of living in a big city which makes it really easy as you get easily all you could imagine for a proper meal and also you won't find a restaurant without a veggie section on their menu here anymore

solowyn
11-02-2011, 05:38 PM
Iron is really easy to pick up in your diet without meat, I've given blood regularly as a veggie for example. Typical day I'd have some porridge and fruit, scrambled eggs or a sandwich or yoghurt and fruit for lunch, then lots of veg and grains for dinner. I like curries, brocolli & spinach dishes especially, roast vegetables, soups etc. I like snacking on oatcakes with cottage cheese.

I'm not particularly strict about it, I mainly do it because of the environmental implications, I'll have the occasional bit of fish when I want it (and can afford some decent fresh local caught stuff).

Everko
11-02-2011, 05:48 PM
I was raised a vegetarian. My parents, grandparents, their parents before that and at least two more generations beyond were all vegetarians.

I couldn't care less if I get enough nutrients or not.

Is it religious? Or Culture?

shiaben
11-02-2011, 05:49 PM
Can you guys live without soy? Or is soy a crucial part of a vegetarian's diet?

Time Violation
11-02-2011, 05:52 PM
I still love the flavour of a thick, rare steak, but have to be prepared to undergo a poor night's sleep afterward.

Make it less thick, and send it back to the kitchen and have it properly baked/fried, you'll sleep much better. :rolls:

shiaben
11-02-2011, 05:54 PM
Iron is really easy to pick up in your diet without meat, I've given blood regularly as a veggie for example. Typical day I'd have some porridge and fruit, scrambled eggs or a sandwich or yoghurt and fruit for lunch, then lots of veg and grains for dinner. I like curries, brocolli & spinach dishes especially, roast vegetables, soups etc. I like snacking on oatcakes with cottage cheese.

I'm not particularly strict about it, I mainly do it because of the environmental implications, I'll have the occasional bit of fish when I want it (and can afford some decent fresh local caught stuff).

Interesting meal routine. Yeah, I was thinking if I were to go about it, I would definitely have it organized in a way where porridge/oatmeal would ideally be set for breakfast, than fruits, eggs, sandwiches, soups, probably for early and midtime lunch, then in the evening probably lots of tea, greens, grains, anything else that's light enough to help you rest.

Filo V.
11-02-2011, 08:41 PM
I'm more of a semi-vegetarian than a full-blown one. But I virtually never eat red meat, never never, not once-in-a-while never. I eat tuna and chicken a fair bit, but that's about the extent of the meat I have.

To me, things like meat loaf, hot dogs, BBQ ribs, cheeseburgers, they are disgusting and unhealthy. Then you add on the dead animal aspect, and it makes it an easy decision not to eat these foods. The last time I had anything like that was in 2009 when I had a McDonald's cheeseburger, and it made me sick to my stomach, it was so disgusting, so soggy, so fattening. That day I totally changed my diet, and I'm way hotter now than I was then because I got tighter, and I lost face weight really quick. And I feel much cleaner internally than I did when I ate a lot of meat. So I think the advantages are plentiful.

Gagsquet
11-02-2011, 08:44 PM
I'm way hotter now

Pics needed

Filo V.
11-02-2011, 08:50 PM
As for my diet now, I eat TONS of oatmeal. That's pretty much my #1 dish these days. I eat at least one bowl of vegetables daily and I have a fruit every morning, bananas, blueberries, apples. I eat a lot of salads. I don't eat a lot of eggs, although I know several vegetarians who do. Egg yolks aren't that healthy and I limit egg consumption to around 2 times a week. As for chicken, some weeks I have it a lot, and some weeks I don't. I guess my average is 2-3 times a week because some weeks I'll have it like 4 times. I try to limit eating tuna a lot because of the mayonnaise factor, although I buy light, no-fat mayo.

So yeah, that's it for me for the most part. My diet is more about looking good than anything else. Everything I eat has a plan behind it, and that plan is to keep in shape, stay lean in the torso and face, and being sexy.

buddyholly
11-02-2011, 09:00 PM
Make it less thick, and send it back to the kitchen and have it properly baked/fried, you'll sleep much better. :rolls:

That is because I would not have eaten it. Baked/fried steak? Not possible.

buddyholly
11-02-2011, 09:02 PM
I'm more of a semi-vegetarian than a full-blown one. But I virtually never eat red meat, never never, not once-in-a-while never. I eat tuna and chicken a fair bit, but that's about the extent of the meat I have.

To me, things like meat loaf, hot dogs, BBQ ribs, cheeseburgers, they are disgusting and unhealthy. Then you add on the dead animal aspect,

So chicken and tuna are fine? Not being dead animals, like!

Filo V.
11-02-2011, 09:02 PM
The thought of baked steak honestly makes me nauseous.

Filo V.
11-02-2011, 09:05 PM
So chicken and tuna are fine? Not being dead animals, like!

I didn't say they were fine or not fine from a principled POV. I said that that's the only type of meat I have. Also, I'm not a pure vegetarian. I'm not someone who is going to be fake and go to vegetarian rallies when I eat chicken and tuna, but at the same time I totally support the principle behind being vegetarian for moral reasons.

buddyholly
11-02-2011, 09:06 PM
OK, you're just not a moral person then?

Vilnietė
11-02-2011, 09:12 PM
So chicken and tuna are fine? Not being dead animals, like!

personally, I don't care that much about dead animals... I simply don't like meat, it just doesn't taste good for me. But I like tuna/fish :)

I also count myself semi-vegetarian because I eat all dairy products, eggs, tuna, seafood, etc.

emotion
11-02-2011, 09:18 PM
I am a vegetarian :)
Breakfast: Cereal
Lunch: Clif Bar
Dinner: Plain pasta

JolánGagó
11-02-2011, 09:24 PM
what's the relation between tuna and mayonaise? :scratch:

Cloudygirl
11-02-2011, 09:31 PM
me

Today
Brekkie Yogurt and fruit
Lunch - cheese salad baguette - I often have soups and things like cous cous with veggies for lunch though I don't eat that much bread
Dinner - veggie chilli (made with quorn mince), jacket potato, salad

I eat soya or quorn for about 3 main meals a week and the other meals I will have meals with different varieties of veggies.

Last night I had for dinner pasta with aubergine, plum tomato, spinach and onions

Seingeist
11-02-2011, 09:52 PM
I love vegetables.

They make a wonderful side to a steak dinner.

Then again, so does more steak.

Time Violation
11-02-2011, 09:56 PM
That is because I would not have eaten it. Baked/fried steak? Not possible.

Well, I'm a huge fan of eating meat, but a thick and half-alive steak is simply gross, wouldn't touch it with a ten foot fork. :lol: De gustibus non est disputandum :)

Mjau!
11-02-2011, 11:24 PM
Don't you people at least eat eggs and soy beans and stuff??? Surely it cannot be healthy to not eat anything rich in protein?

shiaben
11-02-2011, 11:26 PM
As for my diet now, I eat TONS of oatmeal. That's pretty much my #1 dish these days. I eat at least one bowl of vegetables daily and I have a fruit every morning, bananas, blueberries, apples. I eat a lot of salads. I don't eat a lot of eggs, although I know several vegetarians who do. Egg yolks aren't that healthy and I limit egg consumption to around 2 times a week. As for chicken, some weeks I have it a lot, and some weeks I don't. I guess my average is 2-3 times a week because some weeks I'll have it like 4 times. I try to limit eating tuna a lot because of the mayonnaise factor, although I buy light, no-fat mayo.

So yeah, that's it for me for the most part. My diet is more about looking good than anything else. Everything I eat has a plan behind it, and that plan is to keep in shape, stay lean in the torso and face, and being sexy.

Agree, oatmeal/porridge are known very well for having tons of iron in them. They are a great way to start off breakfast for vegetarians and those that want healthier diets. I'm sure they are loaded with other key nutrients. But I do know iron is the main one when it comes to mind.

I usually eat bananas in the morning as well, best time as it gives you energy.

lol people get confused about mayo and tuna fish but to those that are unfamiliar, it's another common do it yourself lunch, pretty popular in U.S. I often consider it an alternative to the classic PBJ sandwiches since both are popular there.

shiaben
11-02-2011, 11:29 PM
Don't you people at least eat eggs and soy beans and stuff??? Surely it cannot be healthy to not eat anything rich in protein?

There is a group called vegans which are pretty extreme about their beliefs.

They don't eat anything that involves destruction of animals and even insects.

So they don't eat dairy products, eggs, nor honey.

Those 3 are the main ones that come to mind, I'm sure there is more.

Their beliefs are more intertwined with animal rights than health, while vegetarians on the other hand choose to be vegetarians either for health purposes or animal rights, or both depending on the person.

nadejda
11-03-2011, 08:08 AM
Can you guys live without soy? Or is soy a crucial part of a vegetarian's diet?

I am vegetarian from 11 years already and vegan since July 2010.
I don't eat soy at all, you don't need that!
If you are really interested into vegan/vegetarian diet there are plenty of books about.

Just FYI: WHO officially declaried that vegan diet is safe for all periods of life including pregnancy.
All that staff for incificient proteins and calcium are solved long time ago.
the only disccusion now about vegan/non vegan is concerning vitamin B12. Lots of teories here also, if you are intrested I can give you some links.

my iron levels for example signiccally increased when I become vegetarian and 10 years later I continue to maintain levels near the upper limits. :) and I haven't done anything specifically for that, just continie to eat what I eat.

Nikki♥
11-03-2011, 08:17 AM
I don't eat any meat apart from seafood (once a week).

the biscuit
11-03-2011, 08:27 AM
My sister and her bf are both vegetarians. Her blood was low in iron and she was advised to eat meat again bc she doesn't eat enough substitutes and imo, her bf always looks pale as fuck (not in a natural way). I think the vegetarian lifestyle is a really demanding one.

nadejda
11-03-2011, 11:15 AM
My sister and her bf are both vegetarians. Her blood was low in iron and she was advised to eat meat again bc she doesn't eat enough substitutes and imo, her bf always looks pale as fuck (not in a natural way). I think the vegetarian lifestyle is a really demanding one.

I don't think iron deficiency anemia is atributed to vegetarianism. I know some heavy meat eaters who suffer this also. Every person who is not into takeing care of what they eat may come to this. You can be a vegetarian eating anly junk food, chips and so on and having iron deficiancy. Also you can eat meat but also lots of vegetables and fruits, nut and still be more healthy than this vegetarian.

Speaking about that I read somewhere that huge consumption of dairy products, cheese, milk and staff may interfere with the iron absorbion in your body. Then if you for example switch from meat eating to vegetarianism, but increase significaly the amount of dairy products may very well have low levels of irons.

tennizen
11-03-2011, 02:56 PM
Is it religious? Or Culture?

It's hard to separate the two.

the biscuit
11-03-2011, 05:16 PM
I don't think iron deficiency anemia is atributed to vegetarianism. I know some heavy meat eaters who suffer this also. Every person who is not into takeing care of what they eat may come to this. You can be a vegetarian eating anly junk food, chips and so on and having iron deficiancy. Also you can eat meat but also lots of vegetables and fruits, nut and still be more healthy than this vegetarian.

Speaking about that I read somewhere that huge consumption of dairy products, cheese, milk and staff may interfere with the iron absorbion in your body. Then if you for example switch from meat eating to vegetarianism, but increase significaly the amount of dairy products may very well have low levels of irons.

That's why I say it's demanding and that she didn't eat enough substitutes. :p It seems like a hassle. Just have a piece of fish or (red) meat and voilà, iron.

nadejda
11-03-2011, 08:57 PM
That's why I say it's demanding and that she didn't eat enough substitutes. :p It seems like a hassle. Just have a piece of fish or (red) meat and voilà, iron.

substitues?
what substitues? you mean vegetables? :confused:
so eating fruits and vegies is demanding? more that eating meat?

JolánGagó
11-03-2011, 09:02 PM
Red meat is pretty poisonous for human body. Livers cry in despair after a steak, that's a fact.

shiaben
11-03-2011, 09:05 PM
Thanks for the input Ndejda and Verd.

Yes you are right. The key is to just make sure to eat enough in order to maintain that iron level. Some people just eat based on the required amount on paper, but doctors and nutritionists usually say to usually eat above the required amount for the key nutrients like iron, B12, Omega3, etc. Since body to body, some people's digestive systems end up absorbing short.

shiaben
11-03-2011, 09:07 PM
I think when there's hummus, peanut butter, sesame butter, meat tasting tofu, I think it can really cut down hunger since vegetarians don't strictly eat JUST fruits and vegetables, they need nuts, oils, dairy (if they are not vegan), grains, fat, etc.

Everko
11-03-2011, 09:12 PM
Anyone love peppers? That comes close to zucchini for my favorite vegetable

shiaben
11-03-2011, 09:13 PM
Anyone love peppers? That comes close to zucchini for my favorite vegetable

I'm very intolerant of peppers lol. Too spicy for me, unless they are like bell peppers or something, which I love. I hate the taste of zucchini but I'm willing to eat it. It's probably much more healthier than a cucumber.

the biscuit
11-03-2011, 10:23 PM
substitues?
what substitues? you mean vegetables? :confused:
so eating fruits and vegies is demanding? more that eating meat?

Yes, it's a lifestyle, you have to be very conscious about it. It's also so that the amount of veggies and fruit you have to eat to get to the equivalent of a piece of meat, is pretty high. For example, 100g of spinach and 100g of red meat both contain more or less 3,5g of iron. But 100g spinach is a lot more on your plate than a 100g steak. I don't even think you can fit 100g of spinach on a plate (when it's not cooked). That's why my sister was often snacking on chickpeas, because she had to get her protein and iron for the day. I think if you can do it and be healthy, good for you, but I don't think it's easy, it requires an effort.

JG, please, if you don't eat a portion of half a kilo, there is no issue. 100-150g, as is advised.

I like variety in my diet, I love veggies but all beans and no meat would make me a very sad girl. Still, it's personal, I guess.

BTW, I love peppers. Stuffed with lamb mince. :p

shiaben
11-04-2011, 06:30 AM
Biscuit, that's why lots of vegetarians don't strictly eat them raw. They try to cook these things or turn them into stews and dishes which makes it easier to tackle.

nadejda
11-04-2011, 08:13 AM
Yes, it's a lifestyle, you have to be very conscious about it. It's also so that the amount of veggies and fruit you have to eat to get to the equivalent of a piece of meat, is pretty high. For example, 100g of spinach and 100g of red meat both contain more or less 3,5g of iron. But 100g spinach is a lot more on your plate than a 100g steak. I don't even think you can fit 100g of spinach on a plate (when it's not cooked). That's why my sister was often snacking on chickpeas, because she had to get her protein and iron for the day. I think if you can do it and be healthy, good for you, but I don't think it's easy, it requires an effort.

JG, please, if you don't eat a portion of half a kilo, there is no issue. 100-150g, as is advised.

I like variety in my diet, I love veggies but all beans and no meat would make me a very sad girl. Still, it's personal, I guess.

BTW, I love peppers. Stuffed with lamb mince. :p

actually it is not that simple for example the iron absorbtion into your body. There are pleanty of foods that interfefere whit each other and can increase/decrese the absorbtion of a certain element, sometimes 5-10 times! If you for example eat thet meat with some cheese or cream souse you may not absorb it at all or absorb very few. Those simple calculations here and there are to a big degree irrelevant for me. 100g of spinach can come in a salad with other vegs and is not a problem at all. Cooking them is also possible, you don't eat the meat row too, no?

BTW I also don't understand that protein concerns. You can hardly become protein deficient is you eat some 2000 calories per day no matter what you eat. There is a protein into absolutely everything. Also nobody is mentioning about if the protein consumtion is too much? Do you think that is healthy?

the biscuit
11-04-2011, 12:44 PM
actually it is not that simple for example the iron absorbtion into your body. There are pleanty of foods that interfefere whit each other and can increase/decrese the absorbtion of a certain element, sometimes 5-10 times! If you for example eat thet meat with some cheese or cream souse you may not absorb it at all or absorb very few.

Isn't that the same for vegetables?

Those simple calculations here and there are to a big degree irrelevant for me. 100g of spinach can come in a salad with other vegs and is not a problem at all. Cooking them is also possible, you don't eat the meat row too, no?

If you incorporate spinach in a salad, how much do you use? 20g? In the end, with other vegetables added, the salad will contain about the same amount of iron as a whole bag of spinach. If you cook the spinach, you don't have many other options combination-wise.

BTW I also don't understand that protein concerns. You can hardly become protein deficient is you eat some 2000 calories per day no matter what you eat. There is a protein into absolutely everything.

You totally missed my point tbh. I never said that it is unhealthy or that meat is better for your health. I do think it requires less of an effort being healthy as a meat-eater than as a vegetarian, if only because most of us are omnivores and we have more options while vegetarians need to actively look for substitutes. If you can't put in the work, you can end up with a vegetarianism-related deficiency quite easily. It's not a lifestyle for lazies. This is what I have been saying for the past three posts and what everybody is ignoring (because they want to?). If you can be healthy as a vegetarian, great, yayyy, but some fail to do so because it's demanding.

Also nobody is mentioning about if the protein consumtion is too much? Do you think that is healthy?
Probably nobody is talking about it because it isn't relevant to the discussion.

Sham Kay
11-04-2011, 01:55 PM
I'm the type to refuse salad at a barbecue to make room on the plate for more meat.

I generally cannot stand fruit and vegetables despite their various health benefits. Must be because I was brought up on junk food and homecooked meaty meals, while even the adults used to frown at veggies, but tried their best to make some veggie meals for the health benefits, so any veggies made tasted horrible and left untouched. Guess in my case it's because of my upbringing.

I visited a friends place recently and him and his wife are full vegetarians (including no fish, eggs, chicken etc). Staying there for a couple days, eating his wife's vegetarian cooking I realised how great veggie meals can actually be when done properly. One meal involved spicy mixed rice (with sweetcorns, peppers, celery, chickpeas, various beans), homecooked pitta (can't spell it) bread, half a pepper filled with chili cous-cous and various sweet and sour dips. Dessert was a fruit salad with syrup - not that I normally eat meat for dessert, but that's alot healthier than triple chocolate ice cream.

It was like a whole new world opening up to me, and I could easily replace numerous meaty meals throughout the week with vegetarian food of that quality.

Unfortunately, I'll never be able to cook food like that, it'll just end up tasting awful, so I'll end it here to get back to my double cheeseburger.

nadejda
11-04-2011, 03:19 PM
[QUOTE]You totally missed my point tbh. I never said that it is unhealthy or that meat is better for your health. I do think it requires less of an effort being healthy as a meat-eater than as a vegetarian, if only because most of us are omnivores and we have more options while vegetarians need to actively look for substitutes. If you can't put in the work, you can end up with a vegetarianism-related deficiency quite easily. It's not a lifestyle for lazies. This is what I have been saying for the past three posts and what everybody is ignoring (because they want to?). If you can be healthy as a vegetarian, great, yayyy, but some fail to do so because it's demanding.

That is exactly what I've been opposing too. No, it is not more difficult to be vegetarian. Why do you think omnivories doesn't develop defeciencies? They do. Very often, just not those that vegetarians do, but other nutrients are quite often missing.(vitamin C, vitamin E, fiber, folate, magnesium ect.) I am against that to qialify vegetarianism as some sort of very hard daily regime, while eating meat is just that easy to get all your needed nutrients. It is not that way. Omnivores can also develop certain number of deficiencies, even though those are more than often ignored to be mentioned. I know peaople on a meat eating diet who looks pale, not healthy and are deficient even in nutrients they are not supposed to be - like iron for example. Eating meat doesn't solve the problem just like not eating it. Lifestyle for laziest doesn't guarantie health on both vegetarians and non vegetarians. It is ironically that people pay more attention to vegetariansm related defeciencies more , even though they are as common as those to the meat eaters one.

For that matter I think both meat eaters and vegetarians should have to take care and eat healthy to avoid any kind of defeiceincies.

shiaben
11-04-2011, 06:01 PM
As long as you eat what you need to eat to have sufficient nutrients you should be fine.

I think Vegan level is a little bit more challenging but even then they say there are ways to get them nutrients.

shiaben
11-04-2011, 06:02 PM
So far I would say I feel more calm, relaxed, and getting better sleep patterns out of a vegetarian diet.

Moose Limb
11-06-2011, 04:13 PM
In some sciences (I think psychology and maybe even biology) they use to categorize them as having an "eating disorder". I'm wondering if getting getting zinc, iron, omega3 and other key nutrients found in meat, are satisfactory or not if they are taken in through chocolate (in the case of zinc), iron (say through apples and carrots), and omega3 from walnuts. I'm assuming vegetarians would have to eat tons of these (especially for omega3) in addition to supplements, just to be safe enough to make sure their body absorbed enough nutrients.

Not true. A lacto-ovo vegetarian diet provides all necessary nutrients. Veganism, on the other hand, would require a supplement or two to obtain all necessary nutrients.

shiaben
11-06-2011, 05:08 PM
For Omega3 is there any other efficient ways to get it outside of walnuts and fish oil supplements?

Moose Limb
11-06-2011, 06:14 PM
For Omega3 is there any other efficient ways to get it outside of walnuts and fish oil supplements?

You can get O3 fatty acids in flax seeds, winter squash, olive oil, and various beans, such as soybeans, navy beans, and kidney beans. The highest concentrations are found in flax seeds, followed by walnuts, which you mentioned. You can also obtain O3 eggs which come from hens who were fed an O3 rich diet. But eggs are not an option for many vegetarians.

shiaben
11-06-2011, 06:56 PM
Had no idea they were in other beans outside of soy. Interesting. I love kidney beans so I would be comfortable with those. I've heard of people getting them from certain eggs, didn't know how, but now it makes sense, feed the hens with that specific kind of diet.

I'm assuming some vegetarians don't eat eggs because of high cholesterol?

Do you or anyone else know if sesame tahini is low in cholesterol? Because I know peanut butter is high in fat but low in cholesterol, so I thought perhaps sesame tahini should be similar; higher in fat but low in cholesterol.

Cloudygirl
11-06-2011, 07:11 PM
:yeah: I put flax and/or hempseed oil in my smoothies (as well as eating raw nuts) and go through good olive oil very quickly. Great for the skin and hair and blood quality.

what smoothies do you make?

Always like new food ideas

Moose Limb
11-06-2011, 07:47 PM
Had no idea they were in other beans outside of soy. Interesting. I love kidney beans so I would be comfortable with those. I've heard of people getting them from certain eggs, didn't know how, but now it makes sense, feed the hens with that specific kind of diet.

I'm assuming some vegetarians don't eat eggs because of high cholesterol?

Do you or anyone else know if sesame tahini is low in cholesterol? Because I know peanut butter is high in fat but low in cholesterol, so I thought perhaps sesame tahini should be similar; higher in fat but low in cholesterol.

Sesame Tahini is indeed as you suspected - high in fat and the cholesterol is virtually non-existent.

Regarding vegetarians and eggs, if one is a lacto vegetarian, they would not consume eggs. It could be for a bevy of reasons, harming future life, for example. I am of the lacto-ovo variety, so I do consume eggs and dairy products.

Mae
11-15-2011, 09:41 AM
I have to say I have never heard of Spinach and/or Kale in a Smoothie. But that's what I like about MTF you can learn all kinds of things here not just tennis information :)

merryploughbhoy
11-15-2011, 09:46 AM
I read a stat recently that vegetarians were 70% more flatulent than non vegetarians, strange but true...

Topspindoctor
11-16-2011, 04:12 AM
Not eating meat is not natural. Humans evolved as omnivores, thus the structure of our jaw and presence of sharp teeth designed for tearing meat. I will never understand vegans or vegetarians because eating SOME meat can be good for you and not eating animal products based on religion and belief is quite ridiculous.

abraxas21
11-16-2011, 04:16 AM
I read a stat recently that vegetarians were 70% more flatulent than non vegetarians, strange but true...

90.43% of stats are made up

abraxas21
11-16-2011, 04:19 AM
i have a few vegetarian friends and a couple of very close vegan friends.

one of them is a girl who is a raw vegan (a more hardcore version of veganism) and i can safely say her diet is healthier than the vast majority of the population. she puts a lot of dedication on it, though.

MaxPower
11-16-2011, 08:54 AM
I read a stat recently that vegetarians were 70% more flatulent than non vegetarians, strange but true...

likely true. It's linked to eating more fibres. http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=16336

But it's a small side effect all things considered. But you might wanna open the window every now and then if you live with one :)

tripwires
11-17-2011, 07:53 AM
Humans are also supposed to be more intelligent than other animals and we are also supposed to have develop some form of a conscience, so it makes sense that some of us choose not to eat meat because of moral objections to eating animals, among other reasons.