Roger news and articles III [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Roger news and articles III

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NYCtennisfan
07-16-2008, 07:05 PM
Isn't it a copout to ignore the clay result? Shouldn't Roger at least be able to be 4-5 instead of 1-9 on clay?

No, it isn't. Federer could've been losing in the QF's and SF's of clay tournments all this time and he would have avoided 8 losses or so. It's not just a very good clay player he has lost to, but the 2nd best ever and perhaps on his way to becoming the greatest ever.

As for a 'tarnished' legacy, I think the loss at Wimby will be more devastating on that front 15 years from now than any he lost on clay.

nobama
07-16-2008, 07:52 PM
FedFan_2007 I have a hard time taking you seriously.

Sunset of Age
07-16-2008, 08:42 PM
FedFan_2007 I have a hard time taking you seriously.

Who, me or NYC? :p :p :p

juninhOH
07-16-2008, 09:29 PM
the wimbledon loss wont mean anything if roger wins more slams.

It will be remarkable if he never wins anymore, then the wimbledon loss will become emblematic.

nobama
07-16-2008, 10:24 PM
Who, me or NYC? :p :p :pFedFan_2007

Sunset of Age
07-16-2008, 10:24 PM
FedFan_2007

Righty matey. I see the problem. :angel:

jasmin
07-16-2008, 11:36 PM
Higueras not being at Wimby was a sign that perhaps that partnership was over. I was hoping he had someone but I can't see who Roger would be with. People don't seem to want Gilbert these days although I know as a coach he has great skills. I can only see Gilbert talking someone to death and thinking he's right about everything. I wonder if he got worst as he aged.

wackykid
07-17-2008, 01:17 AM
Isn't it a copout to ignore the clay result? Shouldn't Roger at least be able to be 4-5 instead of 1-9 on clay?

no... how many ppl have beaten nadal more than once on clay?? who else but borg have won 4 consecutive french?? who else but nadal could accumulate 81 consecutive clay court wins? who else but nadal could accumulate a run of 115-2 (since 2005) record on clay -- where one of it came from federer??


regards,
wacky

FedFan_2007
07-17-2008, 02:49 AM
I'm not buying this myth of Nadal as "clay GOAT". Roger simply chokes every time on clay vs Rafa. Roger losing all those times has made Rafa the "Clay GOAT". If Rogr wins his share of those finals, then Nadal is simply the Gustavo Kuerten of this generation.

Fed's Clay Choking = Nadal's Clay Goatness!!!!

Sunset of Age
07-17-2008, 02:57 AM
I'm not buying this myth of Nadal as "clay GOAT". Roger simply chokes every time on clay vs Rafa. Roger losing all those times has made Rafa the "Clay GOAT". If Rogr wins his share of those finals, then Nadal is simply the Gustavo Kuerten of this generation.

Fed's Clay Choking = Nadal's Clay Goatness!!!!

Oh, COME ON, here. As much as you dislike Rafa, please give him the credits he truly deserves. He's a FANTASTIC clay court player, and yet a very good one on all other courts as well. It doesn't take anything away from Roger. Both players are truly wonderful, as both of their ranking points say.

Besides that, don't you EVER say anything bad about Guga!

wackykid
07-17-2008, 03:24 AM
Oh, COME ON, here. As much as you dislike Rafa, please give him the credits he truly deserves. He's a FANTASTIC clay court player, and yet a very good one on all other courts as well. It doesn't take anything away from Roger. Both players are truly wonderful, as both of their ranking points say.

Besides that, don't you EVER say anything bad about Guga!

agree... while i dislike nadal... i respect him and his skills -- NOT just on clay... as much as roger respects him...

saying nadal is GOAT on clay because roger chokes on clay is as good as the critics/skeptics who are saying that federer appears to be GOAT because the rest of the field is of sub-standards....:rolleyes:



regards,
wacky

Sunset of Age
07-17-2008, 03:29 AM
saying nadal is GOAT on clay because roger chokes on clay is as good as the critics/skeptics who are saying that federer appears to be GOAT because the rest of the field is of sub-standards....:rolleyes:

Spot on. Both kind of reasonings are despicable, an insult to the players to whom it concerns, and in general... sad. :(

Daniel
07-17-2008, 01:05 PM
Klahn calls warm-up 'pretty special'
By Jake Fisher
UNION-TRIBUNE

July 17, 2008

The day before the men's championship match last week at Wimbledon, Roger Federer was looking for a practice partner as he prepared to face nemesis Rafael Nadal.


Advertisement After several calls between Federer's agent and a coach for the United States Tennis Association, Federer found his man. It was Bradley Klahn, an aggressive, athletic lefty.
Klahn, 17, a graduate of Poway High this spring, was available after participating in the Junior Wimbledon competition. It would be Klahn's job, in the hours leading up to the match, to play the part of Nadal, also a left-hander.

“It was pretty special to warm up possibly the greatest player of all time,” Klahn said.

Little did Klahn know that his practice session on July 6 would be a prelude to what is being called one of the greatest Grand Slam finals of all time. Federer, owner of 12 Grand Slam championships, had his string of five straight Wimbledon titles snapped by Nadal, who triumphed in a five-set match that lasted 4 hours, 48 minutes.

For Klahn, trading shots with Federer on an outer court at Wimbledon provided an exclamation point to his first visit to London's All England Club. The youngster found himself in awe of the venue's atmosphere and history.

“At Wimbledon, it's hard to explain,” Klahn said. “I've been growing up watching it so much. It was hard to believe that I was actually there and playing.”

In singles, Klahn won two matches before falling in straight sets to third-seeded Cesar Ramirez of Mexico. Klahn teamed with American Ryan Harrison in doubles, where the second-seeded tandem lost in the quarterfinals.

Klahn has competed in three junior Grand Slam events this year, establishing himself as one of the world's top young players. He is ranked 17th in the International Tennis Federation junior world standings. In the United States, Klahn is ranked third in the Boys-18 Division.

In the Junior Australian Open, Klahn lost in the third round of singles, but not before downing the tournament's 14th seed. He did not fare as well in the Junior French Open. On the red clay of Roland Garros, Klahn lost in straight sets in the opening round of singles and doubles.

Despite his early exit at the French Open, Klahn relished the experience. He and his mother, Nancy Klahn, spent the extra days in Paris, touring the city and visiting sites such as the Louvre and the Eiffel Tower.

“Just being at those tournaments, the Grand Slams, there's such an electric atmosphere,” Klahn said. “There's so much energy – the crowd, the sights, the history – especially at the French and Wimbledon. It's pretty cool to know that you've played there.”

Later this summer, Klahn will complete his Grand Slam tour at the Junior U.S. Open in New York.

“To play in all the Grand Slams before he goes to college was exciting for him and the rest of the family,” Nancy Klahn said.

Next season, Klahn will take a break from the international scene to play tennis at Stanford. His ranking and mental toughness made Klahn a blue-chip recruit at Poway, where he won the San Diego Section singles championship as a junior and helped the Titans win two section team titles.

Klahn said he hopes to refine his game at Stanford, gain strength and help the Cardinal win an NCAA championship.

“If his success in the past is any indication of the future, I think he has a great chance of being a professional tennis player,” said Lee Merry, Klahn's personal coach.

Merry, who has coached Klahn since he started to play competitively at age 11, spent two years on the pro tour in the 1970s.

Klahn said when the time is right, he will give the pro tour a shot. Someday, perhaps Klahn will have a chance to compete against Federer instead of warming him up.

Daniel
07-17-2008, 01:07 PM
Link: http://msn.foxsports.com/tennis/story/8352384/7-pivotal-matches-in-tennis-history#

7 pivotal matches in tennis history
Special to FOXSports.com

Updated: July 16, 2008, 9:03 PM EST

Earlier this month, Rafael Nadal defeated Roger Federer in a Wimbledon final for the ages. It had everything — high quality of play, great drama in which Federer rallied from two sets down to finally lead and a battle to finish the match before impending darkness.
It had history riding on it. Federer was bidding to break the record he shared with Bjorn Borg of five straight Wimbledon titles, and Nadal was aiming to become the first man since Borg in 1980 to win the French Open and Wimbledon in the same year.

Tennis fanatics hit the lottery at Wimbledon.


Before the final began, many wrote of this match being a possible changing of the guard, in which the torch is passed from the present king (Federer, who has ruled tennis for the last several years) to his successor (Nadal, who became the first man in the history of the ATP rankings to finish as world No. 2 for three consecutive years).

Frankly, I'm not convinced this match can conclusively be called a changing of the guard, since a point or two in Federer's favor would have won him the match and Nadal has yet to surpass the U.S. Open quarterfinals.

Only time will tell.

Tennis is not a sport like boxing in which a contender can defeat a champion and in the course of one fight elevate himself from challenger to champion. For all we know, Federer could win the next 10 majors and not play Nadal in any of the those tournaments.

Since many are talking about pivotal matches that signaled a shift in tennis supremancy, let's review the history books to determine what matches might truly signal the passing of the torch. Let's define a match as one player who ruled tennis for at least one or more years losing to another player who would be the No. 1 for at least two consecutive years. It avoids the problem in recent years of certain players becoming No. 1 for about one second and then dropping from their lofty perch.

In reviewing tennis history prior to the advent of the computer rankings, it can be tricky to state a true No. 1 in certain years, since different lists often defined different top-ranked players. Perhaps the match may not immediately signify the changing of the guard, but it may be a preview of things to come in the future, in which the player defeating the champion may become world champion later.


Here are a few of the matches that signaled the changing of the guard in tennis:

1. Bill Tilden defeats Bill Johnston 6-1, 1-6, 7-5, 5-7, 6-3 in the 1920 United States Nationals final

Tilden had finished as the losing finalist to Bill Johnston the years before, with Johnston apparently picking on Tilden's weaker backhand. Tilden worked to correct this weakness during the winter of 1919-1920 in Providence, R.I. This was the turning point in their rivalry and Tilden defeated Johnston in the final in five sets. Tilden went on to dominate the tennis scene as no man ever had, arguably, perhaps even up to the present day.

2. Rene LaCoste defeats Bill Tilden 4-6, 6-4, 8-6, 8-6 in the 1926 Davis Cup

The first major defeat by Tilden in years and the first of many successes by the French Musketeers against a player many consider to be the finest ever. Tilden was injured during the match, which obviously hindered his play (and may have affected him just days later at the U.S. Nationals when he lost to Henri Cochet in five sets). In some ways, this was not just a passing of the torch from Tilden to LaCoste but from the entire U.S. Davis Cup team to the French Davis Cup team.

3. Rod Laver defeats Ken Rosewall 7-5, 4-6, 5-7, 8-6, 8-6 in the 1964 Wembley final

In a rivalry that may have spanned as many as 200 matches, this was perhaps their best match, and that's saying a lot. Both players were at or close to their peak. To quote from Joe McCauley's great book "The History of Professional Tennis": "The final was a connoisseur's masterpiece lasting 2 hours, 44 minutes. In a match of many winners and few unforced errors, Laver fought back brilliantly from the perilous position of 3-5 in the fifth set to win. ... It was one of the greatest matches it has been my privilege to watch, but I must say that I thought Laver was a goner when his opponent served for the match at 5-4. Suddenly Rocket raised his game and, from playing steady but safe tennis, he went all out on the attack to break back. Continuing to go boldly for winners, he broke again for victory when Rosewall's service failed him."

Laver was arguably No. 1 that year and was the best player in the world for years afterwards.

4. Bjorn Borg defeats Jimmy Connors 3-6, 6-2, 6-1, 5-7, 6-4 in the 1977 Wimbledon Final


Jimmy Connors had won the majority of their matches before they played this final and was favored to defeat Borg again. Borg led 4-0 in the final set before Connors played a streak of great tennis to actually lead slightly at 4-4, 15-0. Borg has confessed that even he thought he was going to lose at this point.

However, Connors unfortunately chose this moment to hit one of his rare double faults. This give Borg the feeling he could still win, and the Swede won the last two games and the match 6-4. It would be a very rare occasion after this that Connors would even give Borg a close match. Connors had won six of seven meetings, with Borg leading up to the 1977 final, but Borg would reverse that trend in winning 13 of their final 15 meetings, including nine in a row to wrap up this rivalry. Borg was ranked by some to be the top player of 1977 even though some gave their support to Connors and others to Guillermo Vilas, who beat Connors to win the 1977 U.S. Open at Forest Hills. The 1978 Wimbledon final could have been chosen here also.

5. Martina Navratilova defeats Chris Evert 6-1, 3-6, 6-2 in the 1982 Wimbledon final

It seemed like every major had Evert and Navratilova in the final in those days. They were just so far ahead of every other player. Evert was the defending Wimbledon champion and the top-ranked player in the world virtually every year except for 1979, when Navratilova was world champion. The left-handed serve-and-volleyer beat the right-handed baseliner to spark a streak of dominance that has not been matched in the Open era. In a stirring span of championship tennis from 1982-86, Navratilova won 70 of 84 tournaments that she entered. Tennis commentators considered it fantastic if Navratilova's opponents lasted more than one hour. The Evert-Navratilova rivalry is undoubtedly the gold standard in women's tennis history.

6. Steffi Graf defeats Martina Navratilova 5-7, 6-2, 6-1 in the 1988 Wimbledon final


Admittedly, Graf was already No. 1 in the rankings when this match was played, but many still considered Navratilova No. 1 since Martina won Wimbledon and the U.S. Open the previous year over Graf in the finals. Martina got off to a great start in the match, winning the first set and leading 2-0 in the second before Graf went into overdrive and won 12 of the next 13 games. I have never seen Graf hit her backhand return so well. She was so good with her backhand return that match that her husband, Andre Agassi, would be proud. Graf went on the win the Grand Slam that year and was undisputed No. 1 for a number of years until Monica Seles came to the forefront.

7. Ivan Lendl defeats John McEnroe 7-6, 6-3, 6-4 in the 1985 U.S. Open final

John McEnroe was the defending champion, the No. 1 player in both 1983 and 1984, and had defeated Lendl the previous year in straight sets with the loss of only eight games. McEnroe started out well, controlling play for the first few games before Lendl took control and won the set in a tiebreak. This was the first of three straight U.S. Open victories for Lendl and the fourth of his eight consecutive final appearances in the tournament. Lendl finished No. 1 and would do the same in 1986 and 1987 before Mats Wilander took over the No. 1 ranking from him in 1988.

I'm sure there are a number of matches I could have included here, as well as a number of matches I may have missed. It's a rare occasion in tennis history where you can point to the changing of the guard in tennis, and it's even rarer when you can say you felt it was so at the time.

These are seven matches I believe changed the power structure in tennis. Sound off with your thoughts below.

Daniel
07-17-2008, 01:09 PM
Roger's rationality, betting against Venus and Nadal's hard-court case Story Highlights
Federer answered plenty of questions about his willingness to scrape and claw
Few even noticed how radically Venus Williams repaired her game at Wimbledon
Encountering a softer, more accessible side of the new Anna Kournikova


An unconditional Roger fan, I also felt crushed. Still I was able to come up with the following positives: 1) What Rafa did to win the match was extra-terrestrial and such a performance must be rewarded; 2) Roger is more rational than I am in interpreting the meaning of his wins and his losses; 3) Roger is not Justine, he will not disappear because the competition fundamentally suits his body and his mind.
-- Barbara Katzenberg Lexington, MA

• Yes, Nadal's effort was super-human -- and even so, he barely won the match. Roger is not Justine -- he will be back. I take issue with your other point. I fear his "rational" nature is not always conducive to success. "Rational" could mean: this is NOT happening again! I'm kicking his butt next time. "Rational" could also mean: jeez, the kid beats me on grass. Maybe my reign really is winding down.

If we're looking for signs of encouragement, how about this? Federer was down two sets to love and faced match points in the fourth set. He responds with reserves of courage I'm not sure we've ever seen before. Ironic that it came in defeat, but he answered plenty of questions about his willingness to scrape and claw and sacrifice art and creativity for street-fighting. He called this the worst defeat of his career and, given what was at stake and how drama-saturated the match was, that's understandable. But -- particularly after the debacle in Paris --there's plenty of reason for optimism.


Link: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/writers/jon_wertheim/07/16/mail.0716/?eref=sircrc

Sunset of Age
07-17-2008, 01:31 PM
^^ Good reads, thanks for posting! Finally something level-headed and positive.

Frankly, I'm not convinced this match can conclusively be called a changing of the guard, since a point or two in Federer's favor would have won him the match and Nadal has yet to surpass the U.S. Open quarterfinals.

Spot on. :yeah:

SUKTUEN
07-17-2008, 02:38 PM
Roger moved his home from Oberwil to Wollerau. He said he has found a very beautiful place and has many friends also there. So he is happy about it

FedFan_2007
07-17-2008, 06:20 PM
Karin, you have to know that Rafa will improve his level. I think for sure he's making the US Open final this year.

scoobs
07-17-2008, 06:43 PM
Karin, you have to know that Rafa will improve his level. I think for sure he's making the US Open final this year.
Not convinced by that really - I think hardcourts are like kryptonite for his knees and feet, increasingly so as he gets older. He may make the odd run at a hardcourt slam but I struggle to see him getting to the finals every single time like Roger was mostly able to do.

We'll see what he can do, of course, but for me it's still for him to prove he can lay the game out effectively and handle the physical stresses it places on him.

Sunset of Age
07-17-2008, 07:53 PM
^^ What Scoobs says.

Just one thing - I really hope Roger will be able to make his mark during this part of the season, thus: continue to reach the finals of most of the tournaments (in reaction to Scoob's "was able...'' ;))

FedFan_2007
07-17-2008, 09:59 PM
Karin, the interesting thing is that there's a lot of nice prizes on the table. Roger could still end up having a "near-epic" year.

Toronto MS
Cincy MS
Olympics
US Open
Stockholm
Basel
Madrid
Paris
TMC

That's a lot of hardware.

SUKTUEN
07-19-2008, 03:00 AM
So this is Roger's new house that is making all the news in Switzerland....there was even a piece on the local evening news in Basel.Apparently Roger has been renting this flat for a couple years now and decided to buy it. It has 5 1/2 rooms with a small pool and a view of Lake Zurich. Quite honestly from this pic it doesn't look like anything special except for the awesome view of the lake.

http://www.zsz.ch/storys/img/p0085703.jpg

FedFan_2007
07-19-2008, 07:49 AM
^^ Location, location, location! Besides you don't know what it looks like inside. Probably wood floors, granite countertops, surround-sound, etc...

nobama
07-19-2008, 12:06 PM
Why the hell is Nadal even entering the GOAT discussion at this point? :rolleyes: I think that word gets thrown around way to much anyway. Reminds me of that idoit on the Sports Illustrated website who said two years ago that maybe we were watching the GOAT but his name wasn't Roger Federer. :retard:

Lets talk about these guys as GOAT potential when their careers are over (or nearly over). One thing I will say though is no way in hell will Nadal or Djerk or any other current player ever put together 4 years like Roger did from 04-07. In fact we may never see that in tennis again.

SUKTUEN
07-19-2008, 04:19 PM
Roger win ESPNY the best tennis player again~~~

tennizen
07-21-2008, 01:23 AM
Article with quotes from Federer

http://www.globesports.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080720.tennis21-web/GSStory/GlobeSportsOther/home

Sunset of Age
07-21-2008, 01:51 AM
Article with quotes from Federer

http://www.globesports.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080720.tennis21-web/GSStory/GlobeSportsOther/home

Nice article. Thanks for posting, Hema. :wavey:

SUKTUEN
07-21-2008, 09:56 AM
thanks!!

riddle05580
07-21-2008, 03:04 PM
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=50965

ROGERS CUP

July 20, 2008

Roger Federer

TORONTO, ONTARIO

THE MODERATOR: We can start with questions in English.

Q. Have you had much sense in the last couple of weeks of the impact the Wimbledon's final had around the world?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, to some degree. I haven't read the press at all the last two weeks, so -- because I tried to get away from it all, tried to forget really the loss. But at the same time I heard rumors through friends and whatever, you know, that people really picked up on this unbelievable match. And it is great to hear.

So now I'm back again on the tennis tour, I hear even more which is great news. And so, yeah, I guess it is a good time in tennis and exciting end of the year. Also starting here in Toronto and then going over to the Olympic games as well and U.S. Open, I think it is a great time.

Q. Roger, congratulations on that Wimbledon final. Certainly was epic for all of us to watch, and the media and fans alike have enjoyed it so much and it has done so much to raise tennis' popularity. Do you take an extra bit of incentive or an extra bit of joy in playing Nadal? It seems like you bring out the best in each other.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, of course, I enjoy playing against him to some degree. You know, I mean, it is always good to have a rival. I don't like when matches turn out like they do at the French Open when you have high hopes and after a few games, you realize it is probably not going to happen for you.

But playing him in a fair-play match, in surroundings that are unbelievable like at Wimbledon or other tournaments, it is definitely a thrill for me.

Now, after maybe missing that a little bit at times because Agassi left the game, Sampras left the game and for me playing against them was always the sort of biggest moment in my career. And now, I think, Rafael has proven himself as a great guy and a great champion as well.

So when I play against him, it is not like I was playing Agassi, Sampras but it definitely becomes more and more special the more times we play against each other.

Q. Roger, did you watch the match after it was over? Did you get a chance to see the tape? And if you did, what were your thoughts?

ROGER FEDERER: Like I said, I didn't read or see anything. So I didn't see a point, no.

Q. Just switching gears a bit, looking forward to the Olympics, you have always said that's always been an important tournament for you.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah.

Q. How -- where would you rank a gold medal compared to your other Grand Slams?

ROGER FEDERER: To me it ranks as high now. My situation is obviously different. If maybe I am a player who doesn't have any Grand Slams, you know, maybe a Grand Slam would still do more for my own career.

But because I have 12 already, for me an Olympic gold ranks as high, you know? So I was very proud, you know, to represent the Swiss in the 2000 Olympics and really just missed that -- very close on the medal.

And like last time, was quite disappointing losing the second round. But, nevertheless, going there was one of the biggest experiences in life I've ever had, going to my first Olympics in 2000. So as long as I can walk and play, I will always come and play the Olympics.

And who knows maybe I will carry the flag like I did in Athens into the stadium. That would be a great honor as well. So, yeah, my birthday is on the opening day as well so that's going to be nice, too. It ranks very, very high in my scale, absolutely.

Q. Roger, how did summer with the two Masters Series here and in Cincinnati and the Olympics having an extra one for you and Djokovic and Nadal, how do you think that plays into the rankings and leading up to the U.S. Open?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I don't know how much -- I mean, maybe the rankings maybe to some degree are a factor. But it is not really my number one concern. Like I did in stages, just trying to hope to get into a rhythm on hardcourt because we'll be on hardcourt for -- what is it -- nine months now until Monaco next year. So let's not forget that.

It is important to start off well. It would be great for the confidence, gearing up for the Olympics and then New York. So that's really what I look at, at the moment, you know? But I am -- for sure it is an interesting time for the rankings at the moment, especially for Rafael, we know winning back-to-back Wimbledon and Paris. It is always going to be a subject until the end of the year. So should be -- should be exciting. I hope we can (indiscernible) play well until the end of the year.

Q. A few questions in one. I think you take some vacation after Wimbledon. And if, yes, when did you come back on the court for training? And, second, last year you take vacation after Wimbledon and you come back at Rogers Cup. But this year the Rogers Cup is earlier than usual. So is this something that bothers you?

ROGER FEDERER: Bothers me that it is earlier?

Q. Yes.

ROGER FEDERER: I wish we had two months in between, you know, but what to do? It is just life on the tennis tour. It starts in January until November. So we have no choice. But I mean, it is true.

It is a rough time for us. You know, we have to -- especially if you make the finals of the Slams, you know, that eats up even more of your time. So for me and Rafael, I think it has been particularly hard. Novak has had time off while we were playing at Wimbledon, for instance.

But I think for Raf and myself, it has been solid the last couple weeks. It makes it even more hard. And it was a big trip also to China and back. It is going to be quite hard.
But I think mentally we're all ready for it. Important most to get away. I took one-week vacation and started practicing again Sunday/Monday and arrived here yesterday morning. So I have been practicing for the last -- what is it -- four, five days now.

So don't ask a whole lot of information how my game is at the moment. It is definitely to play on hardcourt than on clay or grass. We don't have the bad bounce. We have the normal bounce again, and that's good to see. I am very excited to be playing on hardcourts again.

Q. With the emergence of Rafael on grass the last couple of years, do you feel that men's tennis finally has a rivalry that can compare to Agassis, Samprases, the Borgs, Conners and McEnroes?

ROGER FEDERER: I guess, matches like we had with Wimbledon will only enhance that, even though we've had some great finals in the past but sometimes didn't get the recognition like the wrong final or the finals in Miami when we also had a five-setter and then we played each already four times in Grand Slams before this, at the Wimbledon Finals. We've played many, many times on big occasions and twice in the Shanghai Masters and the semis.

Yes, some of it takes a big match like this to really break through for both of us, unfortunately. But I think we did that, and I think it should be -- every match we play on from now on will be very interesting between us.

Q. You mentioned that Novak has had some time off being eliminated early from Wimbledon. I know you are ranked Number 1 in the ATP, but should be considered the favorite for this tournament, the fact he's had extra rest?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yes and no. I mean, it's yes, he's had the time off. Yes, he is maybe not as confident as he was, you know, because he lost the second round at Wimbledon. Whereas, maybe we come in with a little less rest but at the same time, we still had one week off and one week practice so it is enough to get us in great shape. And we obviously have the confidence going for us.

So this is a tough tournament to win. You know, I mean, I couldn't tell you if my draw is easier or tougher than Rafael's or Novak's or whoever's. I just think it is a tough tournament to win. It depends on your form some days because you have all the good-enough players here to beat you and upset you in if I given day.

So I think -- I wouldn't put it as an advantage or disadvantage. I think it is just a different type of preparation we've had.

Q. Roger, people love to group you and Rafael and Novak together for good reason. When you look at your styles as far as tennis-wise, what are some of the similarities you think the three of you have and what are the clearer differences from a tennis perspective?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think we were all quite complete as, you know -- from a standpoint we can hit all the shots in the book. And at the moment, I guess, we're the best movers in the game as well, which gives us the edge from offense and defense, you know? That's a similarity I see.

Obviously each one of us has something particularly good in the game, you know? I think it is more obviously my game and then Rafael's game, you know, what really stands out.

Whereas, Novak is more, you know, just very complete player. Doesn't miss very much and has just really become a good player over the last year or so. He obviously still has to prove himself a little bit more, I think.

But still we have great assets in our game.

Q. You had an opportunity yesterday to hit with Peter Polansky on center who, of course, is a local boy around here. I know you've hit with him in the past, albeit sporadically. Have you seen any developments in his game or did you notice any changes to the way he was playing?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I think we hit for the first time here four years ago, so it has been a while. He was quite young back then and sort of coming up. I saw back then already that he was quite talented. He hit a good ball, good technique, you know?

I just think it is important at the beginning -- and then it is important to see the development he does physically, you know? And when I saw him again, you know, although his hair is longer, he looks a little bit bigger and tougher and I think that's exactly how you want to evolve, you know?
And now he's old enough to really move onto the next level, and it is important now to make his move. And I think being around the top players and the top tournaments will only motivate him even more so. And what he told me is also he played quite a bit on clay as well, which I think is a good thing for him.

So we'll see what happens in the future for him. I wish him all the best.

Q. (Indiscernible). A lot of people are saying it could go either way. How concerned are you and the other players about what the outcome could be?

ROGER FEDERER: We are concerned about the game. We are concerned that things will be good for the players for the tournament at the end, whatever outcome that will be. We are very involved at the moment, you know, not in that particular case but in politics in general and on the tour.

And I have spoken a lot to (indiscernible) in the past, and we get along very well. And we have similar views and ideas about what's good for the game. I mean, he lets me have the lead a little bit more because, obviously, I'm more experienced, been around longer for -- you know, double as long as he's been around. But it is still great at his young age shows interest in the game. And that's why we also went on the player council; Novak as well. He is interested as well.

So I think it's interesting time for the game of tennis. And I think it is heading into the right direction because it's maybe been a long time back since the top players reunited and really wanted to have a positive effect on the game.

Q. The outcome of the case could throw all that off track, couldn't it?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, we'll see what happens. Yeah I mean, look, we have to see what happens. It is all speculation. So I'm not going to comment on speculation.

Q. For a long time, it seemed like Nadal was chasing you. Now world rankings aside, are you now chasing him?

ROGER FEDERER: All depends on how you look at it, you know? I guess I am chasing another Grand Slam title after he snatched the last two. So I'm chasing my next Grand Slam title. So that's sort of what's happening.

But in the rankings, he's still chasing me. It depends on how you look at it really.

Q. I would like to welcome you to the City of Toronto, one of the best cities in the world.

ROGER FEDERER: Thank you.

Q. Now, what are your expectations for this tournament? What do we expect to see from Roger Federer having just come out from a gracious defeat from Nadal?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I hope I can -- I really hope I can win the tournament here. I've been able to do it for the last two times when I was here in Toronto. I played always good here. It is a surface I really -- it is good for my game. I don't mind the humidity anymore. The heat and everything is not a problem, even though it is not going to be -- looks like it is not going to be terribly hot this next week. I am feeling well. I am really eager and motivated to show what I can do again on the hardcourt.

It is a different type of season. It's been hard, Paris and Wimbledon. You know, the whole stress level. So I have been able to come down a little bit and regroup and it is important for me to start off well, you know? And it will give me a great momentum going into Cincinnati, Beijing and U.S. Open the rest of the season. So I hope I can really do well here and play well. Always trying to get the title.

Q. You just said that Nadal is chasing you in the ATP ranking. Do you feel increased pressure after the loss in Wimbledon? Do you think this is going to affect you in this tournament or not?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, I don't think things like this will affect me, the way I play. You know, I've been trying to prove as a player for the last 15, 20 years, since I played tennis, especially since I became number one in the world. I think I've worked as hard as I could, you know, trying to always stay ahead of the pack.

And I have had challenges from you name it: Hewitt, Roddick, Agassi, Ferrero, Safin, Nadal, Djokovic. It hasn't really changed a whole lot. Obviously Rafael has made his move now. He's come closer.

Like I said, the rankings will be a subject for the next week, months to come. And he deserves to be in the position to be put in the great playing he's done this year. So we'll see what happens.

I'm happy where my level of play is again after a rough start to the season which wasn't easy. I didn't play very much. And then I struggled a little bit. But I'm back playing well. Unfortunately, I didn't get the reward I was hoping for with a big title after working maybe harder than I had to in the past, just getting back into shape.

So I hope I get the reward now end of summer. So we'll see what happens.

Q. You talked about your birthday in Beijing. Most of the top male players of the past 25, 30 years have peaked at 25. You're going to be 27. Do you feel that time is ticking, or do you feel as though there's still another level you can achieve?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know about another level. I think I can still improve as a player. Tennis is -- as a tennis player, you're never complete, you know? There's always something you can work on and improve. That's not something really a whole not new.

The thing is when you are 15, I prove a lot more than when you are 25. There is not much more you can really change or -- there is little improvements but the thing is at 25, 26, 27, little improvements make a big difference after all because of all the experience you have because my fitness is not something I really need to work on a whole lot more because I don't lose matches anymore because of that. Whereas, when I was 20 I did. So that changes as well. And that really allows me to focus on tennis -- solely on tennis, which is a good thing.

And then what was -- no, I think really at 27, you know, it is not like I'm 32yet, you know? I mean, I still have -- I don't believe in those saying that at 25 you are going down. I'm sorry, you know, even though -- I only made my move in 2003 on a Grand Slam level. It's only been five years really, or six years. So I still have a lot of great years ahead of me.

And if I would have maybe won my first Grand Slam at 19 or 18, maybe it would have changed but I only won my first Grand Slam when I was 22. That's why I think I have many, many more years left.

End of FastScripts

riddle05580
07-21-2008, 03:39 PM
http://news.smh.com.au/sport/tennis-legends-to-face-off-in-malaysia-20080721-3iqq.html

Tennis legends to face off in Malaysia

July 21, 2008 - 8:25PM

Tennis fans will flock to Malaysia in November, where Roger Federer will face off against Rafael Nadal and Bjorn Borg will clash with John McEnroe in exhibition matches, organisers said.

The four have confirmed their participation in the "Countdown of Champions", set for November 18 at the Bukit Jalil stadium south of Kuala Lumpur, executive secretary of the Lawn Tennis Association of Malaysia Jaafar Abu told AFP.

"Last year, we had Pete Sampras and Richard Gasquet along with Nadal and Federer," he said.

"It has become something of a tradition for us to have a celebrity exhibition match every November."

World No.1 Federer will get another chance to avenge his losses in this year's French Open and Wimbledon finals to world No.2 Nadal.

Borg and McEnroe will give fans a chance to walk down memory lane, remembering the highs and lows of their bitter rivalry, typified by the 1980 Wimbledon final won by Borg in five gruelling sets.

The 49-year-old McEnroe, who won seven grand slam singles titles during his storied career, now works as a television commentator.

Borg, 52, captured 11 grand slam singles titles - six at Roland Garros and five consecutive titles at Wimbledon.

Eden
07-21-2008, 06:40 PM
Thanks for posting Roger's official presser :) Always good to hear what he has to say.

About the exho against Nadal: What's the need for this again? :shrug: These two players promote tennis throughout the whole year, critizice the tight schedule and then don't say no to the money they are offered to play in such a match :rolleyes:

I know, it's just an exho and you can't compare it with a real tournament, but nevertheless there is a flight into a different country, a new timezone and lots of media stuff to do.

nobama
07-21-2008, 07:44 PM
Thanks for posting Roger's official presser :) Always good to hear what he has to say.

About the exho against Nadal: What's the need for this again? :shrug: These two players promote tennis throughout the whole year, critizice the tight schedule and then don't say no to the money they are offered to play in such a match :rolleyes:

I know, it's just an exho and you can't compare it with a real tournament, but nevertheless there is a flight into a different country, a new timezone and lots of media stuff to do.
I have no words. It's ridiculous. :o

Or Levy
07-21-2008, 08:14 PM
Mellow yellow, that was my original reaction "What was he thinking?!!!"

But giving it a second thought, I think that chickening out of it would have sent an even worst message, I'm sure he's taking the result of the Wimby final (and his other results this year, especially against Rafa VERY seriously), but I'm glad he's not having a freakout.

nobama
07-21-2008, 08:26 PM
Mellow yellow, that was my original reaction "What was he thinking?!!!"

But giving it a second thought, I think that chickening out of it would have sent an even worst message, I'm sure he's taking the result of the Wimby final (and his other results this year, especially against Rafa VERY seriously), but I'm glad he's not having a freakout.He certainly could have said no, they get someone else and no one is the wiser....and even if it leaks out....no one cares about exhos anyway....except maybe the fedal fans will care about this one. :rolleyes:

I didn't care so much last year, but given what Roger's all gone through this year it would be nice to have a proper off season where he could take a nice break and still have time for intensive training/practice. I'm sure he still will be able to. It's just these exhos seems so meaningless to me. Let the old timers who are retired (and maybe need the $$) do it.

Sunset of Age
07-21-2008, 08:35 PM
Thanks for posting Roger's official presser :) Always good to hear what he has to say.

About the exho against Nadal: What's the need for this again? :shrug: These two players promote tennis throughout the whole year, critizice the tight schedule and then don't say no to the money they are offered to play in such a match :rolleyes:

I know, it's just an exho and you can't compare it with a real tournament, but nevertheless there is a flight into a different country, a new timezone and lots of media stuff to do.

I fully agree that there's no need for it at all, but I gather Roger quite likes to play these exho's. I can't see him do it merely for the $$$$, and the same thing goes for his 'opponent'.

And indeed, it's not just 'play-the-match-and-run', like some seem to think (see the - alas - of course deteriorated thread in GM about it) - I remember well the 2006 version, and there was a lot of press/media stuff they both had to deal with.

I remember also that Roger said on court at that time that he wanted to do it again, btw. Apparently he meant it when he said so.

Eden
07-21-2008, 08:36 PM
Mellow yellow, that was my original reaction "What was he thinking?!!!"

But giving it a second thought, I think that chickening out of it would have sent an even worst message, I'm sure he's taking the result of the Wimby final (and his other results this year, especially against Rafa VERY seriously), but I'm glad he's not having a freakout.

Why do you think that they would have called it chickening out if he would have refused to take part in an exho? It's still up to him to say "No, not this year" and maybe offering instead to play doubles with Nadal at a tournament next year. I guess that's probably something a lot of tennisfans are waiting for: To see those two playing doubles.

He certainly could have said no, they get someone else and no one is the wiser....and even if it leaks out....no one cares about exhos anyway....except maybe the fedal fans will care about this one. :rolleyes:


Apparently they think the Asian fans are willing to buy tickets. I don't know if they are Fedal fans, they probably just want to see the two best players in action ;)

Sunset of Age
07-21-2008, 08:38 PM
Apparently they think the Asian fans are willing to buy tickets. I don't know if they are Fedal fans, they probably just want to see the two best players in action ;)

The 2006 Seoul exho drew in a huge crowd, the place was sold-out. No surprise the organizers want to do hold it again.

robinhood
07-21-2008, 09:07 PM
Oh my goodness. Another exhibition, AGAIN???!!
It's kind of getting old, and SO IS HE.

scoobs
07-21-2008, 10:39 PM
The 2006 Seoul exho drew in a huge crowd, the place was sold-out. No surprise the organizers want to do hold it again.
True - and when November comes and tennis is over and I'm staring bleakly at the 6 week gap ahead of me, I'll be looking forward to it. Right now though, I'm like :o

Sunset of Age
07-21-2008, 10:51 PM
True - and when November comes and tennis is over and I'm staring bleakly at the 6 week gap ahead of me, I'll be looking forward to it. Right now though, I'm like :o

I'm a bit :o :D :o :D myself about it as well - but I take this as a sign that despite all the Rivalry Hype, the lads themselves still don't see a problem in continuing to do these kind of things together. There's quite a part of me that's very happy about that. ;)

MissMoJo
07-22-2008, 01:23 AM
World No.1 Federer will get another chance to avenge his losses in this year's French Open and Wimbledon finals to world No.2 Nadal.
Yes, because clearly this is so on the same level as those tournaments :lol:

Roger's had chances all year to avoid playing Nadal in matches where the outcome actually means something, so the idea that he feels obligated to play some inconsequential hit n' giggle to save face doesn't make a whole lot of sense. Whatever his reasons for choosing to do it, I'm pretty sure they don't revolve around Nadal.

nobama
07-22-2008, 02:06 AM
Yes, because clearly this is so on the same level as those tournaments :lol:

Roger's had chances all year to avoid playing Nadal in matches where the outcome actually means something, so the idea that he feels obligated to play some inconsequential hit n' giggle to save face doesn't make a whole lot of sense. Whatever his reasons for choosing to do it, I'm pretty sure they don't revolve around Nadal.$$$

yanchr
07-22-2008, 02:41 AM
So here we go again......

This is BULLSHIT :rolleyes:

SUKTUEN
07-22-2008, 05:03 AM
my GOD~~~~~

Daniel
07-22-2008, 01:05 PM
Federer ranked No. 1 but Becker says Nadal is world's top male tennis player

TORONTO — Roger Federer has the world No. 1 ranking but there's no doubt in Boris Becker's mind who's the best player in men's tennis.

That distinction, Becker contends, belongs to Spain's Rafael Nadal, who is ranked second behind Federer despite having beaten the Swiss star in both the French Open and Wimbledon finals this year.
"Obviously in the world rankings there is still a No. 1 called Federer," Becker said Monday during a news conference at the Rogers Cup. "But I think if you talk to anybody in the world of tennis who is considered for now the No. 1 player in the world, it's the winner of the French Open and Wimbledon.

"I think there's a change in the position at the moment."
Becker, 40, faced Toronto's Daniel Nestor in a one-set exhibition match Monday evening, won 6-3 by the Canadian. Afterwards, he was formally inducted into the Rogers Cup Hall of Fame.
"I'm very very proud and honoured," Becker said. "It's one of the biggest tournaments in the world.
"I practised and was in good shape but that's not what this day was about. It's about celebration . . . it's not about the result."

Nadal and Federer combined to make plenty of decent backhands and serves in this year's men's final at Wimbledon. Nadal captured the grass tournament's championship with an epic five-set rain-interrupted thriller against Nadal that required more than four hours to complete. Many tennis pundits have called the match the best-ever in the men's game.

Nadal, 22, became the first player since Bjorn Borg in 1980 to win the French Open and Wimbledon titles back-to-back.
Becker says while Federer remains one of the sport's elite players, Nadal has simply overtaken the Swiss star.
"I think it's a case where Nadal has just improved to a level that nobody expected," he said. "Federer is playing as good as always.
"But you can only give credit to Nadal for really raising his game to another level and winning."
Becker believes tennis needs rivalries like that of Federer and Nadal.
"Tennis needs players that bring out the best in each other," he said. "Tennis is in a good place right now having Federer and Nadal really at the very top of their careers.

"Whoever saw the Wimbledon final, I was just amazed at the quality of play from both players."
Becker appeared in three Rogers Cup events. He captured the title the first time he came to Canada in 1986 before reaching the semifinal the following year. He remains the only German man to have won Canada's biggest tennis tournament.

Becker enjoyed a brilliant 15-year career before retiring in 1999. He captured six Grand Slam singles titles (three at Wimbledon, two Australian Open titles and the U.S. Open), Olympic doubles gold at the '92 Barcelona Games, and two year-end ATP Tour World Championship crowns. In 1985 he became the youngest-ever Wimbledon winner at age 17, a record that still stands.

Overall, Becker captured 49 singles titles and 15 doubles crowns. He reached the World No. 1 ranking in 1991 and in '03 was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame.
And when Becker retired, he stopped playing tennis cold turkey.
"I didn't pick up a racket for two and a half years after I stopped," he said. "That's always difficult when you stop something you love so much and been doing for so long.
"Today, I probably enjoy tennis more because it's my hobby. I don't play every day anymore but I have some exhibitions and some senior tournaments so I do enjoy it a lot."
Becker's athleticism and never-die attitude on the court always made him a fan favourite wherever he went. Fans always admired his tenacity and the reckless abandon he often displayed in diving to reach volleys.

But Becker also made headlines off the court.
In 1993, he married Barbara Feltus, an actress and designer, and the couple had two children. Before the marriage, Becker and Feltus posed nude for the cover of Stern, with the photo being taken by Feltus' father.

However, the couple endured a very messy divorce in January 2001, with the pre-trial hearing broadcast live in Germany. Becker was granted a divorce Jan. 15, 2001 after reaching a US$14.4-million settlement and custody of Noah and Elias.

The following month, Becker admitted fathering a daughter, Anna, with Angela Ermakova in '99. He originally denied paternity but made the admission following a DNA test.

In 2002, Becker was convicted of tax evasion after admitting he lived in Germany from '91 to '93 while saying he resided in Monte Carlo. He was fined $500,000, put on two years probation and ordered to pay all court costs.

"You don't to be in the paper every day or on television every day," Becker said. "Germany doesn't have many other good tennis players or good sports stars so naturally I was in the spotlight."

As for this year's Roger's Cup, Becker expects Federer and Nadal to be the players to beat.
"Well, everybody playing is supposed to play here," he said. "Obviously our focus will be on Roger and Rafa and how they recover from the Wimbledon final.
"It will be exciting how both men recover and how others will come close and challenge them."

Link: http://canadianpress.google.com/article/ALeqM5i5cDyp4XvL7UZ-5_enfxcDFPJgng

Daniel
07-22-2008, 01:08 PM
Federer focused on Olympic gold not grand slam glory

TORONTO, July 21 (Reuters) - World number one Roger Federer launches his Olympic preparations and his North American hardcourt campaign this week at the Toronto Masters, targeting Beijing gold as his top priority for the remainder of the year.[/FONT]
Federer, who lost in the French Open and Wimbledon finals to Rafael Nadal, will travel immediately after the Beijing Games to defend his U.S. Open title in New York.
"If maybe I am a player who doesn't have any grand slams, maybe a grand slam would still do more for my own career," Federer told reporters on Monday. "But because I have 12 already, for me an Olympic gold ranks as high.
"I was very proud to represent the Swiss in the 2000 Olympics and really just missed a medal.
"Last time was quite disappointing losing the second round but nevertheless, going there was one of the biggest experiences in life.
"So as long as I can walk and play, I will always come and play the Olympics.
"Who knows maybe I will carry the flag.
"That would be a great honour as well; my birthday is on the opening day (Aug. 8) as well so that's going to be nice, too.
"It ranks very, very high in my scale, absolutely."
While Federer has enjoyed his Olympic experiences they have yet to yield a medal.
At the 2000 Sydney Games, Federer lost the bronze medal match to Arnaud Di Pasquale then four years later crashed out in the second round to Tomas Berdych of the Czech Republic at Athens.
Most of the world's top 20 players will be in Beijing, including Spain's Nadal, though the world number two does not quite put the same value on Olympic gold as Federer.
"A little bit less," said Nadal, comparing a grand slam title with an Olympic medal. "For us grand slam is different. Grand slam is special.
"Olympics are important but after a grand slam."
(Editing by Greg Stutchbury)

Link: http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/feedarticle/7668314 (http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/feedarticle/7668314)

Daniel
07-22-2008, 01:10 PM
Nadal remains relaxed as he gains on Federer
By Bill Scott, dpa

Toronto (dpa) - Rafael Nadal refuses to consider himself world number one despite winning Wimbledon over Roger Federer as the pair begin play at the Toronto Masters.

The Spaniard who starts in the second round after a bye, said Monday that until the rankings show differently, he remains second in the world behind Swiss star Federer.

"I'm having a good season, but still number two," said Nadal, the four-time French Open winner. "But I still have the same motivation to continue improving my tennis."

Nadal, the 2005 champion in Canada and a semi-finalist last year against Novak Djokovic, said he still hopes to someday reach the top spot.

"Everybody wants to be number one, I do for sure. But right now I only want to play a very good tournament here in Toronto."

After the right wrist injury pullout of Marcos Baghdatis, Nadal will play the winner from a match between a qualifier and a Canadian.

He is seeded to meet top-seed Federer in the final. And he's not taking anything for granted despite pulling close to Federer in the points chase.

"I have less points to defend, but normally he plays better than me on this kind of surface. He did very well for the last five years in this tournament," Nadal said of Federer, last year's losing finalist to Novak Djokovic and the 2004 and 2006 winner.

European seeds advanced into the second round of a day interrupted around midday by rain, with Stan Wawrinka, the number nine, leading the way.

Federer began his week with a defeat of Italian Simone Bolelli 6- 4, 7-6 (7-4), while 10th seed Richard Gasquet, fighting to get back into the Top 10, advanced over compatriot Michel Llodra 6-2, 4-6, 6- 3.

"I'm happy to win this match but it's difficult to win against a friend," said Gasquet after handing Llodra his fifth defeat without a win in Canada.

"Michael has a big serve and he tried to play one or two strokes to win the point. I tried to fight but I'm happy to have gotten through in the wind."

There was victory for Spain's number 12 Tommy Robredo as he predictably dashed early Canadian hopes with a win over number 208 Frederic Niemeyer 7-6 (7-4), 6-1.

Chile's number 14 Fernando Gonzalez beat Frenchman Julien Benneteau 6-2, 6-1 while Germany's Nicolas Kiefer eliminated American Mardy Fish 7-5, 7-6 (7-4).

Daniel
07-22-2008, 01:13 PM
Nadal offers Federer no easy answers

Swiss star looks to live up to No. 1 ranking

Bruce Arthur, National Post Published: Tuesday, July 22, 2008

Technically, it was the first day of the Rogers Cup yesterday, complete with top-10 players, a rain delay, the works. It all looked like the real thing, from the matches to the practice courts to the sandwiches on ciabatta bread.

But everybody knew the tournament hasn't really begun yet, because of the Tiger Woods rule: If the best player in the world isn't playing, it's just not the same. In tennis, however, there are two Tigers -- No. 1 Roger Federer, and fast-closing No. 2 Rafael Nadal, and the tournament doesn't truly start until they do.

The consensus that is supposed to be tested this week is that Nadal has finally surpassed Federer by overcoming him in yet another French Open and -- more significantly, in the greatest match anyone can remember -- at Wimbledon. As tennis legend Boris Becker put it, "There is still a No. 1 called Federer, but I think if you talk to anybody in the world of tennis [the person] who is considered for now the No. 1 player in the world [is] the winner of French Open and Wimbledon. I think there's a change in position at the moment."

Federer, of course, disagreed on Sunday, putting Nadal just a level above fallen or unproven challengers like Lleyton Hewitt, Andy Roddick, Marat Safin, and the world's current No. 3, Novak Djokovic. Nadal, too, deflected the suggestion that he is the best, though he also admitted he wouldn't say it if he felt it was true.
"First of all, I never going to say something like this from me," the Spaniard said in his charming and idiosyncratic English. "Second, I don't think so, no? ?I think nobody don't wants to be No. 1. I wants to be No. 1 for sure, but right now I don't want to be No. 1. Right now I only want to play a very good tournament here in Toronto."

Everyone else wants that, too -- another epic Federer-Nadal final, the tennis of the gods. But as much as this week could provide another chapter in the world's most compelling sporting rivalry of the moment, it's also just the first step of a long march that will visit Beijing, the U. S. Open, and the season-ending Masters Series in Shanghai. There's still time for Federer -- who suffered silently from mononucleosis early in the season -- to redeem his year of living dangerously.
"I think for me, Roger is the best player ever in the world, and Nadal is one of the best for the moment," says Stanislas Wawrinka, Federer's Swiss countryman and doubles partner, ranked 10th in the world in singles. "We didn't realize what [Federer] did the last few years, and now of course, Rafa is in good shape -- he's been very good.
"But I want to see the next few months to see what's going to happen, because if you see the last few years Nadal didn't really play good in the end of the season ? and I think Roger is going to play very well."

Nadal has never quite soared on hardcourt, but he seems unconcerned. But then, he seems unconcerned about everything. Yesterday, he was a thickly muscled human shrug.
"I can improve my game in every surface, no?" he said. "On clay, grass, hard, indoor, every place I can improve, no?"

That's a terrifying thought, given that at age 22 he is already probably the best clay-court player in history, and his improvement on grass was enough to deny Federer a sixth consecutive Wimbledon title. As Becker puts it, "You cannot really blame [Federer] for playing badly. You can only give credit to Nadal." This begs the question: Where can Federer, who will turn 27 on the first day of the Olympics, get better?

Ask Wawrinka, who knows Federer well, and his face scrunches up like it's a final exam.
"Is difficult, is tough question," he says after a pause. "I think there is always something you can do to improve, to be better, to win more and more matches, and to be the best player. But I don't know what, exactly.
"Maybe, maybe -- maybe for him it is good that Nadal is better now," Wawrinka adds. "Because you know what? I think when you are number one -- and you are like him, you're number one easy -- it's difficult to be better, to see you need to be better, because you are the best player. But now you have Nadal, he's coming, coming, and he's knocking on the door. So maybe [Federer's] going to try to find something to be better. He has to be, because if not, Rafa is going to be number one, I think."

Richard Gasquet has beaten Federer and while he says a meeting on anything but clay is 50-50, he also agrees that "With Nadal, [Federer] has to improve." But how? Federer insists he can do it because he only started winning Grand Slams at 22, he has "many, many more years left." On the other, he says "I've worked as hard as I could trying to always stay ahead of the pack." So harder work doesn't seem like the answer, if there is one to be found.

Will this week decide anything? Only if Nadal wins another epic final. If tennis is truly fortunate, this Valhallan wrestling match will continue for years. If Toronto is truly fortunate, it will make it through the week.

barthur@nationalpost.com

Link: http://www.nationalpost.com/opinion/columnists/story.html?id=50c97b91-e9ed-419f-87d7-33f0fea02d7f

SUKTUEN
07-22-2008, 06:12 PM
Federer ranked No. 1 but Becker says Nadal is world's top male tennis player

:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

FedFan_2007
07-22-2008, 09:00 PM
Federer can only get worse from here on out which means more beatdowns by Nadal on every surface. Final H2H:

Nadal 22 Federer 6

nobama
07-22-2008, 09:28 PM
Do we need to post like every article that mentions Roger? Most of these are BS anway.

*esther*
07-23-2008, 05:45 AM
I know, it's just an exho and you can't compare it with a real tournament, but nevertheless there is a flight into a different country, a new timezone and lots of media stuff to do.

The exho will be playing right after TMC Shanghai, we, Malaysia shares same timezone with China, it's only takes 5 hours flight to Kuala Lumpur. It's our pleasure to watch although it's only an exho because we dont have major ATP tournaments here. Last year we had really great fun.:angel:

SUKTUEN
07-23-2008, 11:18 AM
Roger can spent many money play exho match~~~
but I don't think it is good play with Nadal.

Daniel
07-23-2008, 12:20 PM
Do we need to post like every article that mentions Roger? Most of these are BS anway.

No one forces you to read every article and yes I post every article that mentions Roger for everyone to read and enjoy :wavey:

Minnie
07-23-2008, 10:54 PM
I just wish the media could get it right ... Nadal is the most successful player so far in 2008 but is not the "real" No 1 ... as far as I recall (and my memory does fail me at times) 2008 isn't over yet ... we are still only in July aren't we ... or did I miss a few months here and there? It isn't nearly Christmas is it :eek:

Sunset of Age
07-24-2008, 12:25 AM
I just wish the media could get it right ... Nadal is the most successful player so far in 2008 but is not the "real" No 1 ... as far as I recall (and my memory does fail me at times) 2008 isn't over yet ... we are still only in July aren't we ... or did I miss a few months here and there? It isn't nearly Christmas is it :eek:

For some people, the tennis season only lasts from March to July. Can't really help 'em, no? :D

tennis2tennis
07-24-2008, 05:44 AM
I just wish the media could get it right ... Nadal is the most successful player so far in 2008 but is not the "real" No 1 ... as far as I recall (and my memory does fail me at times) 2008 isn't over yet ... we are still only in July aren't we ... or did I miss a few months here and there? It isn't nearly Christmas is it :eek:

they judge a season by grandslams won.....so technically nadal is 2-0 up even if roger was to win the US open it'd be 2-1...get it

Daniel
07-24-2008, 06:36 AM
Roger Federer drops 1st match since Wimbledon loss

TORONTO (AP) — Top-ranked Roger Federer was knocked out of the Rogers Cup with a 2-6, 7-5, 6-4 loss to France's Gilles Simon in a second-round match Wednesday night.

Federer, who won the tournament in 2004 and '06, was playing his first match since losing the Wimbeldon final in five sets to Spain's Rafael Nadal.

"That's just unbelievable for me to win against him," Simon said.

Federer, who became the first top seed to lose in his first match here since Lleyton Hewitt in 2002, finished second here last year to Serbia's Novak Djokovic.

"The problem was my game today," Federer said.

It was the biggest surprise of a soggy day at the tournament that saw play disrupted for nearly six hours by thundershowers.

Daniel
07-24-2008, 06:36 AM
Link: http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5hpA4-lk3z3Nmwu5aVqE4ox7K3hlg

Federer in tennis ranking crisis after opening Toronto defeat


TORONTO (AFP) — Roger Federer's number one ranking slid into the danger zone as the Swiss suffered an opening-match loss to Gilles Simon 2-6, 7-5, 6-4 in the second round of the ATP Masters Series event.

After starting 2008 with a lead of 1,445 ranking points over Rafael Nadal, an off-the-boil season which now counts 10 defeats in 53 matches has Federer facing the possibility of losing the top spot he has held for 234 weeks since 2004.

"It's a bad start, no doubt," said Federer. "I wish it could have been different. Now I'm going to get some practise in."

While Nadal cannot take over the top spot even with a second title in Canada, site of his first career hardcourt crown, the pressure is now huge on 12-time Grand Slam champion Federer.

Only a few hundred points will separate the leading pair if Nadal does well this week.

The Swiss went out in the first round just under five months ago, losing to Andy Murray in Dubai in early March, and was sent packing again in his first match since surrendering his Wimbledon crown.

Federer was beaten in this month's classic Wimbledon final by Nadal, who reached the third round in Canada on after a day delayed six hours by rain.

Daniel
07-24-2008, 06:42 AM
Agitated Federer Unravels in Toronto First Round Loss to Simon

by Sean Randall

I guess in retrospect calling Roger Federer’s Toronto draw “dicey” was being kind to the Swiss after he got bounced just a short while ago in three sets by Frenchman Gilles Simon.

Federer, in a very rare display, looked about as agitated and irritated as I’ve ever seen him. Up a break in the third set, seemingly back in control and serving at 4-3, 15-15 Federer got an out call along the baseline on a perceived forehand winner. With only one challenge left and following a brief chat with ump Norm Chryst, Federer opted to forgo using the challenge thereby losing the point, and eventually the game and his break advantage. But more importantly, at that point mentally Federer simply lost the plot. A rarity.

Per shotspot replay, the ball was on the line so had Federer challenged he would have won the point and kept his challenge, and maybe things would have worked out differently. Would have, could have…

But it looked like the call and his lack of challenge just ate away at Roger as he sprayed forehands all about the court, giving Simon a very well-earned 2-6, 7-5, 6-4 win.

Credit to Simon who I thought going in figured to be very rough customer for Roger. It didn’t look like that early but Simon steadied up and ultimately let Roger self-destruct.

Overall, I’m not really stunned that Federer would lose in this situation to Simon, but I am stunned by the way Roger lost - a mental meltdown late in the match. I just have never really seen that from him in such a crucial time in a match. And I have to think it’s in part due to the sub-par year he’s had and the fact that Rafael Nadal’s is ever so close to his precious No. 1 spot. It seems to be all closing in on Roger, and as I said before we are going to find out a lot about the Swiss the next 45 days. And right now it doesn’t look good.

Nadal meanwhile didn’t look great this afternoon in a 6-4, 6-2 win over Jesse Levine, but he dug out of a 4-1 hole in the first set and unlike Roger, he got through in the end. And with Federer now out Nadal has got to recognize and take advantage of the situation. No. 1 is now there for the taking. And I have to think he’ll be the top seed at the Open now.

In other matches today, James Blake needed a surprising three sets to beat Jonas Bjorkman. Igor Andreev, Nadal’s foe Thursday, sent home Tomas Berdych. Robin Soderling, Jose Acasuso, Dmitry Tursunov, Marin Cilic, Nikolay Davydenko and Richard Gasquet were some of the other winners.

Link: http://www.tennis-x.com/xblog/2008-07-23/550.php

riddle05580
07-24-2008, 01:39 PM
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=51024

ROGERS CUP

July 23, 2008

Roger Federer

TORONTO, ONTARIO

G. SIMON/R. Federer
2-6, 7-5, 6-4

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. What happened today?

ROGER FEDERER: Missed opportunities, I guess. One of those matches maybe I think I should have never lost, you know. Having an easy volley in the, what was it, 3-1 and game point. That one cost me dearly in the end, so it was a disappointing match today.

Q. Seems as though your mentally and physically drained from Wimbledon.

ROGER FEDERER: You wouldn't have asked me that if I would have won, right? So I guess.

Q. Talk about part of Simon's game that was the most troubling to you or just the most difficult to play against tonight.

ROGER FEDERER: No, I think the problem was my game today, you know. I had everything to really put him away. I didn't think I served well today at all. It's tough. Different balls than at Wimbledon.

I was serving 70% in Wimbledon and here I'm serving 50%. Can't serve any aces, so it's just a different type of the match.
Maybe I guess first match on hard court couldn't sneak through maybe the way I usually can, so it hurts obviously. It hurts your momentum because I think I get through the match and I get into the tournament and start playing better.

But I got caught cold, so it's kind of hard.

Q. In the last game of the match, I think a lot of people were expecting you to still come back and maybe take it to 5-All. The four unforced errors in a row was so unusual to see that from you. What happened there?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't remember those points. It's all a blur right now, so...

Q. How do you regroup?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, what do we got, four days?

Q. Yeah.

ROGER FEDERER: Great. So, no, I don't know. Play doubles. Try to win the doubles here. That's what I'm looking at here.

Q. I saw you were not too happy with the officiating?

ROGER FEDERER: With the what, the umpire?

Q. Yeah.

ROGER FEDERER: Never an issue for me. I'm never going to win or lose because of an umpire, so I don't care.

Q. To some extent, do you agree with Justine Henin's decision to retire at the peak of her career?

ROGER FEDERER: Do I agree with that? Not today. Ask me another day. Please don't kill me with questions like this.

Q. In the third set I think you guys were tied 4-4 and he was up 15-Love on his serve. You had a ball that was called in and he challenged it and it was in. It was right, but it seemed they didn't award you a point. I don't know if you caught that, but some of us watching picked that up, and he won the next point and you weren't really awarded anything.

ROGER FEDERER: What happened there?

Q. It was 15-Love on his serve.

ROGER FEDERER: Then?

Q. He challenged a call and it was in and it remained 15-Love and you didn't get anything and he picked up the next point and it went to 30-Love.

ROGER FEDERER: But it was supposed to be replayed, so I don't think I could have taken the point. The best I could get out of that situation was to replay the point. That's what I got, and I lost the point.

Yeah, I mean, that's the problem sometimes like on clay, right? You stop play and it's good so you replay the point. If it was a clean winner, yeah, then obviously it's 15-All, but not in that situation.

Q. Seemed that he was very willing to trade forehands with you, sort of crosscourt forehands, which seems a bit unusual. Did you pick up on that?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, he's a good baseliner. We saw that today. He moves well. He's deceiving because he's kind of thin and tall but moves really well for his height, you know. He flicks a lot of balls with his backhand as well, so when you come in you can't see where he plays.

Yeah, I mean, I think I did really well for a long time trading forehands with him. As the match went on I struggled a little bit to put the forehands away. Got maybe a little bit unlucky to get broken in the second set when he had a net cord and a shank on the line. I ended up losing that game.

Of course I came back, but I think I had really good momentum and I was playing well. I should have put him away in two sets. After that I guess he got a little bit of a lift and he was comfortable trading forehands with me. So, you know who knows, maybe in the long run paid him the match really. I don't know.

Q. At 4-3 in the third I believe you were serving. You had an exchange with the chair umpire. Could you talk about that?

ROGER FEDERER: Not today.

Q. No?

ROGER FEDERER: Didn't lose because of that.

Q. Everyone has losses...

ROGER FEDERER: Another try. Here we go.

Q. Sorry.

ROGER FEDERER: No problem.

Q. How do you regroup from something like this for the rest of the hard court season?

ROGER FEDERER: It's a bad start, no doubt. Wish it could have been different. Like I said, going to try to do well in doubles and practice on the side.

Only really three, four days of practice since Wimbledon. It's not an excuse in any way, but I'm going to get some practice in. There's plenty of players around, so don't know when I'm leaving this place and going to Cincy yet. Depends on the doubles much.

It's important to stay positive. Hard court season just started. It's the start of, what is it, nine months of hard court. It's not the end of the world, but I wish it could have started better.

I like this surface and like this tournament. I've done well here in the past, so it definitely hurts.

But like you say, I've got to regroup and look forward. Bigger picture is the Olympic Games and the US Open. This is really the place where I want to win, so I have to make sure I'm ready for that.

End of FastScripts

anon57
07-24-2008, 01:43 PM
He comes across very snappy and irritated in the transcript. Unfortunately unless he raises his level he'll have to deal with these kind of press conferences more often so he'd better get used to it.

riddle05580
07-24-2008, 01:57 PM
http://tennisworld.typepad.com/travelblogue/2008/07/toronto-roger-a.html

Toronto: Roger and the Monster

Posted 07/24/2008 @ 6 :36 AM

Were those tears again?

One of the most poignant moments following the Wimbledon final was watching Roger Federer being interviewed by John McEnroe and having to turn hurriedly away as his disappointment liquefied.

Now his return to the court had just ended in a 2-6, 7-5, 6-4 defeat to Gilles Simon in Toronto, and again his face betrayed the tell-tale signs of eyes welling up. :sad: :sad:

Poor Roger. Who could have imagined thinking those words a year ago?

The result itself is minor compared to the context. First the "hardest loss" of a career, then an opening-round exit in the following tournament -- two events that reverberate against each other and create an exponentially bigger ripple about Federer's game and state of mind. Is his confidence shattered?

More immediately, is this a Wimbledon hangover?

Federer shrugged. "You wouldn't have asked me that if I would have won, right?"

True enough, but that only highlights what's changed for Federer this season. For so much of the past four years, he's pre-empted probing questions by somehow always managing to slip through the dangerous contests that crop up week in and week out. On his way to the Toronto title two years ago, Federer dropped the second set 7-5 twice -- to heavy hitters Dmitry Tursunov in the third round and Fernando Gonzalez in the semis -- but lifted his game and hit some spectacular winners to soar through in the third. This time, he slumped instead, losing his grip on his forehand and serve in what's becoming an increasingly common theme to his defeats this year.

The shift is small, but the difference is enormous. Federer used to win the matches he could have lost. Now, he's losing matches he could have won.

"I guess, first match on hardcourt, I couldnt' sneak through maybe the way I usually can," he said. "I think I get through the match and I get into the tournament and I start playing better. But I got caught cold, so it's kind of hard."

Defeat never actually seemed imminent until it actually arrived. Federer had cruised through the first set, looking like his usual free-flowing self while Simon blinked in the glare of the stadium lights and the glitter of Federer's game.

But Federer's forehand, which had been working so well in the early going, increasingly began to go astray during the late stages of the second set. The two exchanged breaks in the sixth and seventh games, but Federer played a loose game to drop his serve to love at 5-6 and suddenly found himself in a deciding third set.

The ship looked like it had been righted once again when Federer took a 3-1 lead in the third, but by now, an emboldened Simon was putting increasing pressure on Federer during rallies and taking advantage of the top seed's erratic serving. Despite the cool evening, Federer was pink and glowing with sweat, having testy conversations with umpire Norm Chryst. Another exchange of breaks followed, and then, serving in the dangerous territory of 4-5, Federer produced four straight unforced errors to hand victory to a stunned Simon.

"Missed opportunities," was how Federer summed up the match afterwards. "I think I had everything to put him away... having an easy volley at 3-1, game point -- that cost me dearly in the end.

"One of those matches maybe I think I should never have lost."

It will probably cost him the No. 1 ranking over the next few weeks.

He couldn't hide the hurt afterwards, clutching his face with his hands when an oblique question about Justine Henin's retirement was lobbed out during the post-match press conference. "Not today. Ask me another day. Please don't kill me with questions like this." :sad:

But why the inability to find an extra gear these days? The setback at the beginning of the year, combined with the tantalizing closeness of the Grand Slam record, may have created a little extra pressure and concern that destabilized the near-perfect calibration he had managed to achieve. Recently, the trigger has been squeezed too hard -- or sometimes, not enough. And as the losses pile up, the situation only feels more urgent. Roddick echoed this sentiment when talking about himself earlier in the week: "I felt like I was trying to play catch-up the whole time. I think that slowly kept at me and kind of culminated in what you saw in that match."

It's hard not to think back to Federer's classic comment at the Australian Open. "I've created a monster," he had said. "I always need to win every tournament."

The monster has not been fed often this year, and its roars are growing increasingly loud. If Federer has a task now, it's to stop this match he should have won from causing him to lose others down the road. He said he was rusty, having practiced for only three or four days after Wimbledon -- something he plans to rectify over the next few days. But a few more exits like this, and the season wil soon be unsalvagable.

And he's already got a plan for the rest of the week: "Try to win the doubles here. That's what I'm looking at."

A small victory to aim for, but the monster might settle for it at this point.

SUKTUEN
07-24-2008, 02:20 PM
Q. To some extent, do you agree with Justine Henin's decision to retire at the peak of her career?

ROGER FEDERER: Do I agree with that? Not today. Ask me another day. Please don't kill me with questions like this.



I hate this Fu**ing reporter!!!!:fiery::fiery::fiery:

Rommella
07-24-2008, 05:45 PM
The joy of tennis seems to have been sucked out of him. Maybe he needs to take a break from everything.

Eden
07-24-2008, 07:06 PM
With loss, questions resurface about Federer's state of mind
By Kamakshi Tandon
July 24, 2008,

TORONTO -- Were those tears again?
One of the most poignant moments following the Wimbledon final was watching Roger Federer being interviewed by John McEnroe and having to turn hurriedly away as his disappointment liquefied.
Now his return to the court had just ended in a 2-6, 7-5, 6-4 defeat to Gilles Simon in Toronto on Wednesday, and again his face betrayed the tell-tale signs of eyes welling up.
Poor Roger. Who could have imagined thinking those words a year ago?
The result itself is minor compared to the context. First the "hardest loss" of a career, then an opening-round exit in the following tournament -- two events that reverberate against each other and create an exponentially bigger ripple about Federer's game and state of mind. Is his confidence shattered?

http://assets.espn.go.com/photo/2008/0724/ten_a_federer_200.jpg
AP Photo/The Canadian Press,/Frank Gunn
Roger Federer suffered his worst loss in Canada since 2002.

More immediately, is this a Wimbledon hangover?
Federer shrugged. "You wouldn't have asked me that if I would have won, right?"
True enough, but that only highlights what's changed for Federer this season. For so much of the past four years, he's pre-empted probing questions by somehow always managing to slip through the dangerous contests that crop up week in and week out. On his way to the Toronto title two years ago, Federer dropped the second set 7-5 twice -- to heavy hitters Dmitry Tursunov in the third round and Fernando Gonzalez in the semis -- but lifted his game and hit some spectacular winners to soar through in the third. This time, he slumped instead, losing his grip on his forehand and serve in what's becoming an increasingly common theme to his defeats this year.
The shift is small, but the difference is enormous. Federer used to win the matches he could have lost. Now, he's losing matches he could have won.
"I guess, first match on hard court, I couldn't sneak through maybe the way I usually can," he said. "I think I get through the match and I get into the tournament and I start playing better. But I got caught cold, so it's kind of hard."
Defeat never actually seemed imminent until it actually arrived. Federer had cruised through the first set, looking like his usual free-flowing self while Simon blinked in the glare of the stadium lights and the glitter of Federer's game.
But Federer's forehand, which had been working so well in the early going, increasingly began to go astray during the late stages of the second set. The two exchanged breaks in the sixth and seventh games, but Federer played a loose game to drop his serve to love at 5-6 and suddenly found himself in a deciding third set.
The ship looked like it had been righted once again when Federer took a 3-1 lead in the third, but by now, an emboldened Simon was putting increasing pressure on Federer during rallies and taking advantage of the top seed's erratic serving. Despite the cool evening, Federer was pink and glowing with sweat, having testy conversations with umpire Norm Chryst. Another exchange of breaks followed, and then, serving in the dangerous territory of 4-5, Federer produced four straight unforced errors to hand victory to a stunned Simon.
"Missed opportunities," was how Federer summed up the match afterwards. "I think I had everything to put him away … having an easy volley at 3-1, game point -- that cost me dearly in the end.
"One of those matches maybe I think I should never have lost."
It will probably cost him the No. 1 ranking over the next few weeks.
He couldn't hide the hurt afterwards, clutching his face with his hands when an oblique question about Justine Henin's retirement was lobbed out during the postmatch press conference. "Not today. Ask me another day. Please don't kill me with questions like this."
But why the inability to find an extra gear these days? The setback at the beginning of the year, combined with the tantalizing closeness of the Grand Slam record, may have created a little extra pressure and concern that destabilized the near-perfect calibration he had managed to achieve. Recently, the trigger has been squeezed too hard -- or sometimes, not enough. And as the losses pile up, the situation only feels more urgent. Roddick echoed this sentiment when talking about himself earlier in the week: "I felt like I was trying to play catch-up the whole time. I think that slowly kept at me and kind of culminated in what you saw in that match."
It's hard not to think back to Federer's classic comment at the Australian Open. "I've created a monster," he had said. "I always need to win every tournament."
The monster has not been fed often this year, and its roars are growing increasingly loud. If Federer has a task now, it's to stop this match he should have won from causing him to lose others down the road. He said he was rusty, having practiced for only three or four days after Wimbledon -- something he plans to rectify over the next few days. But a few more exits like this, and the season wil soon be unsalvagable.
And he's already got a plan for the rest of the week: "Try to win the doubles here. That's what I'm looking at."
A small victory to aim for, but the monster might settle for it at this point.

Source: http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/columns/story?id=3503254

Minnie
07-24-2008, 10:00 PM
they judge a season by grandslams won.....so technically nadal is 2-0 up even if roger was to win the US open it'd be 2-1...get it


... er yes I do ... but that's not how I look at the world rankings which is based on a roll over from the previous year. Anyway, after last night it looks pretty academic ... sadly.

Minnie
07-24-2008, 10:09 PM
Q. To some extent, do you agree with Justine Henin's decision to retire at the peak of her career?

ROGER FEDERER: Do I agree with that? Not today. Ask me another day. Please don't kill me with questions like this.



I hate this Fu**ing reporter!!!!:fiery::fiery::fiery:

I'm as angry as you Suktuen about that question ... and Roger's reply made me want to cry ... and he's still classy enough to say "Please .... ". I'd have told them to F Off or words to that effect!

wackykid
07-25-2008, 12:53 AM
The shift is small, but the difference is enormous. Federer used to win the matches he could have lost. Now, he's losing matches he could have won.

that's where mental strength comes in most importantly... roger used to have great mental strength... that was when he was in a roll... so at critical moments he always had been able to dig out of the hole he was in... but now it shows how fragile state he is in...


regards,
wacky

SUKTUEN
07-25-2008, 04:56 AM
I'm as angry as you Suktuen about that question ... and Roger's reply made me want to cry ... and he's still classy enough to say "Please .... ". I'd have told them to F Off or words to that effect!

YES!!!!!!!!!:mad::mad:

Daniel
07-25-2008, 08:39 AM
Link: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20080725.TEBBUTT25/TPStory/Sports

The 'monster' that consumes Federer
TOM TEBBUTT

ttebbutt@globeandmail.com

July 25, 2008

TORONTO -- The angst was so palpable after Roger Federer's loss at the Rogers Cup on Wednesday that grief counsellors might have been helpful for fans of the great Swiss player.

It was heart-wrenching for Federer-philes to watch him collapse so utterly in the final games of both the second and third sets of his 2-6, 7-5, 6-4 loss to Gilles Simon of France.

Nerves were clearly a factor. He was painfully incapable of controlling a wayward forehand that landed everywhere but in the court.

Yesterday, everyone had questions.

Simon, ranked No. 22, had won last week's ATP event in Indianapolis and played at a high level. But that is still not the main reason for Federer's 50 unforced errors and, after the first set, his inability to put away the Frenchman.

The most likely explanation is that in the three previous years, Federer, a creature of habit, had a four-week or five-week break after Wimbledon and before the North American hard-court season. That gave him time to relax and tune up, usually at his residence in Dubai.

This year, with the compressed schedule because of the Beijing Olympics, he had only two weeks, not as much as he would like.

Also, Federer's malaise may date to last November. After another long year - and during the week after a gruelling win at the season-ending Masters Cup in Shanghai - he played exhibitions with Pete Sampras in South Korea, Malaysia and Macau.

Those were in his bulletproof days, when he had won three of the four Grand Slams for the third time in four years. In hindsight, maybe he pushed the envelope, cutting into his off-season, and it contributed to the mononucleosis that subsequently afflicted him at the Australian Open, where he lost to eventual champion Novak Djokovic.

After that defeat in January, Federer tellingly remarked: "I've created a monster. So I know I need to always win every tournament."

He appeared to be over the mono by April, but by then he had lost to Andy Murray (Dubai), Mardy Fish (Indian Wells, Calif.) and Andy Roddick (Miami). He was badgered with subtle and not-so-subtle variations of "What's wrong?" at news media conferences week in and week out.

His honeymoon years of success had made repetitive questions bearable, but losing precipitated a noticeable weariness in his relations with the media.

Tiger Woods once told Federer that he never did more than 30 minutes of media conferences at a tournament. The affable Federer, after one Australian Open triumph, could be seen answering questions - in English, French or Swiss German - more than three hours after his win.

Wednesday, he was red-eyed and distraught after losing, when questioning reached a nadir.

Reporter: "To some extent, do you agree with Justine Henin's decision to retire at the peak of her career?"

Federer: "Do I agree with that? Not today. Ask me another day. Please don't kill me with questions like this."

Jim Courier, who went through "what's wrong?" questioning repeatedly when he fell from No. 1 and well behind Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi during the mid-1990s, said yesterday: "I have long admired Roger's patience and grace with fans and media. Persistently negative questions will surely [and rightly] irk Roger. [But] it's simply something prominent people have to deal with."

That is little consolation for Federer, who will play in Cincinnati next week and the Olympics next month.

Maybe some consolation for his devoted fans is his loss to Roddick in March, when he played a horrendous, error-strewn game (as against Simon) to lose serve to love at 3-4 in the final set of his first loss in 13 matches against the American.

He bounced back with a solid clay-court season and then a sensational performance in the Wimbledon final.

In the end, the best thing for tennis about Federer's debacle on Wednesday is that it shows how people care so passionately, on an almost visceral level, for this sublime player and essentially fine person.

Daniel
07-25-2008, 08:42 AM
Link: http://uk.reuters.com/article/tennisNews/idUKL2498631320080725?sp=true

Federer seeks golden tonic in Beijing

By Martyn Herman

LONDON (Reuters) - Roger Federer's crown has lost its lustre and a shiny medal of Olympic gold would be very welcome for the king of men's tennis.

After being thrashed by Rafael Nadal in the French Open final, the Swiss maestro lost again at Wimbledon to the Spaniard who won a five-set epic on Federer's Centre Court fortress.

The world number one turns 27 on the day of the Beijing opening ceremony and he will have to rediscover his A-game after also suffering a surprise defeat in the Toronto Masters to France's Gilles Simon.

Nadal is again lurking in the strongest field at an Olympic tournament since it returned to the Games in 1988.

The top five men in the world and seven of the top 10 women will gather in Beijing. Women's champion Justine Henin retired this year and Amelie Mauresmo, silver medallist in Athens, is also absent, with an injury.

Wimbledon champion Venus and sister Serena will start as favourites to emulate their domination in Sydney eight years ago when Venus won the singles and then teamed up with her "little" sister to win the doubles.

"I love the Olympics," Venus said at Wimbledon where she claimed her seventh grand slam title by beating Serena.

"To add to my medal would be amazing. It's probably bigger than a slam, I think so, definitely."

The highlights of Federer's two previous Olympic Games amount to meeting his long-standing girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec in Sydney and carrying the Swiss flag at the opening ceremony in Athens four years ago.

SPECIAL VIBE

In 2000 he lost a semi-final to Tommy Haas and then let a bronze medal slip through his fingers against Frenchman Arnaud Di Pasquale. Four years later he lost in the second round to Tomas Berdych.

"Last time was quite disappointing, losing in the second round but nevertheless, going there was one of the biggest experiences in life," the Swiss said in Toronto this week.

More used to staying in fancy hotels, Federer appreciates the special vibe of the Olympic Village and says winning gold in Beijing would be one of the highlights of his career. It could also be his last chance.

Nadal said recently Beijing was his third priority behind the French Open and Wimbledon. With those two in the bag this year, the 22-year-old will be going full tilt next month.

Despite a hard DecoTurf surface that does not compliment his game as well as clay or grass, nobody will be better prepared for the blast-furnace heat expected in Beijing than the dynamic Spaniard who could oust Federer from the top spot by 2009.

The surface suits world number three Novak Djokovic of Serbia as he demonstrated at Indian Wells this year.

"It's my dream to play at the Olympics," said Djokovic, who is expected to carry the Serbian flag at the opening ceremony in his first Games. "It unites all athletes from around the world, it's very special."

Reigning champion Nicolas Massu, who also partnered Fernando Gonzales to victory in the doubles in 2004, needed a special ITF invite and is unlikely to last long.

Zheng Jie's run to the women's semi-finals at Wimbledon has stoked home hopes of Chinese success. Zheng won the Wimbledon and Australian Open doubles titles in 2006 with long-time partner Yan Zi and will be aiming to repeat the feat of Athens gold medallists Sun Tiantian and Li Ting.

Serbia have high hopes for women's world number one Ana Ivanovic and Jelena Jankovic while Russia have a formidable quartet of Maria Sharapova, Svetlana Kuznetsova, Elena Dementieva and Dinara Safina.

(Reporting by Martyn Herman, editing by Robert Woodward)

(For more stories visit our multimedia website "Road to Beijing" here; and see our blog at blogs.reuters.com/china)




© Thomson Reuters 2008 All rights reserved.

Sunset of Age
07-25-2008, 02:16 PM
Reporter: "To some extent, do you agree with Justine Henin's decision to retire at the peak of her career?"

Federer: "Do I agree with that? Not today. Ask me another day. Please don't kill me with questions like this."


Absolutely horrible to read Roger's emotional answer to this :rolleyes: question. But I have to admit that me and many of my friends - not surprisingly fans of Roger - had the same question roaming around in their heads as well...

There is however a difference between thinking of this question and actually asking it the poor victim after such a humiliating loss. :mad:

SUKTUEN
07-25-2008, 02:26 PM
Federer seeks golden tonic in Beijing

~~

Roger!! See you in China!!!!:D:D

Rommella
07-25-2008, 03:55 PM
Bachchans outplay Federer
25 Jul 2008, 0000 hrs IST, VICKEY LALWANI ,TNN
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Entertainment/India_Buzz/Bachchans_outplay_Federer/articleshow/3273129.cms

So this is why Federer lost ...:ignore:

Sunset of Age
07-25-2008, 03:56 PM
Bachchans outplay Federer
25 Jul 2008, 0000 hrs IST, VICKEY LALWANI ,TNN
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Entertainment/India_Buzz/Bachchans_outplay_Federer/articleshow/3273129.cms

So this is why Federer lost ...:ignore:

I guess that was a poor attempt of being funny. :shrug:

Rommella
07-25-2008, 04:03 PM
I guess that was a poor attempt of being funny. :shrug:

Anything to snap me out the Toronto doldrums.

Sunset of Age
07-25-2008, 04:06 PM
Anything to snap me out the Toronto doldrums.

Well, I hope it served its purpose then! :D

nobama
07-25-2008, 05:59 PM
Absolutely horrible to read Roger's emotional answer to this :rolleyes: question. But I have to admit that me and many of my friends - not surprisingly fans of Roger - had the same question roaming around in their heads as well...

There is however a difference between thinking of this question and actually asking it the poor victim after such a humiliating loss. :mad:What got me was when he used the word 'please'. Had it been me I would've told that reporter to f-off. Even in his depressed state he's able to be polite. :sad:

Sunset of Age
07-25-2008, 06:04 PM
What got me was when he used the word 'please'. Had it been me I would've told that reporter to f-off. Even in his depressed state he's able to be polite. :sad:

Yes, very admirable indeed... :worship:
I think I already posted quite some 'less appreciative' words on the board here after that match - let alone what I would have said if I were Rogi, in that particular situation... :mad: :help: ;)

scoobs
07-25-2008, 06:08 PM
I can understand why they asked that question on the one hand, but on the other...not enough to stick the knife in, they have to start twisting it too :sad:

Minnie
07-26-2008, 01:26 AM
Absolutely horrible to read Roger's emotional answer to this :rolleyes: question. But I have to admit that me and many of my friends - not surprisingly fans of Roger - had the same question roaming around in their heads as well...

There is however a difference between thinking of this question and actually asking it the poor victim after such a humiliating loss. :mad:


Really? This question never entered my head ... Roger is not a quitter. It was a cruel question to ask him ... and only proves once more how heartless those media cretins really are.

Minnie
07-26-2008, 01:31 AM
Daniel .. thanks for posting that article from the globeandmail. I'm sure there are quite a few people who thought it madness for Roger to play those 3 exhos in 3 different countries coming straight after Shanghai where he played amongst the most aggressive, attacking high-energy tennis for 3 matches that I've seen him play in very long time. If that was in any way a contributing factor, he's paid a very high price for it.

Rommella
07-26-2008, 03:13 AM
Link: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20080725.TEBBUTT25/TPStory/Sports

The 'monster' that consumes Federer
TOM TEBBUTT

ttebbutt@globeandmail.com


In the end, the best thing for tennis about Federer's debacle on Wednesday is that it shows how people care so passionately, on an almost visceral level, for this sublime player and essentially fine person.

This I understand, but not the glee that come from many members of the media and even retired tennis players or champions (or rather, those who think they are) over what Roger is going through.

Sunset of Age
07-26-2008, 03:41 AM
Really? This question never entered my head ... Roger is not a quitter. It was a cruel question to ask him ... and only proves once more how heartless those media cretins really are.

Well, it did to me, and many of my friends as well.
Borg's decision wasn't an expected one at that time either, remember that. ;)

SUKTUEN
07-26-2008, 04:21 PM
Bachchans? What is that mean?:confused:

scoobs
07-26-2008, 04:31 PM
It does make you wonder if the problem is as simple as losing some motivation and he just doesn't want to face up to that, hoping he can fight through and get it back, but each new defeat saps a little bit more.

I hope not.

soraya
07-26-2008, 06:38 PM
Bachchans? What is that mean?:confused:
Indian/Bollywood actors who were in Toronto for a stage show...:rolleyes:

Daniel
07-26-2008, 06:57 PM
A pleasure Minnie :hug: :smooch:

Link: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/41013-is-roger-federer-still-the-best

Is Roger Federer Still the Best ?

A few years ago, I would sit in my room waiting for The Simpsons to ruin my education at 6 p.m. on BBC2, oblivious to the world of tennis. It's a funny old game.

One day, after getting a stern telling off, I was waiting for Homer and Co. to lighten my evening. It was the start of July and Wimbledon was on.

I frustratedly sat on the bed and began watching this tennis lark. As I watched the match, I became agitated and couldn't understand the point of the game. It was fascinating.

The match wasn't great by all means, but my brain was intrigued by this newfound joy. Tennis was good to watch, but nothing compared to what I was about to encounter.

A 6-foot-1 dark-haired Swiss man took to the court. At this point, I was by no means experienced as a tennis spectator, but this guy was in different league. The man went by the name of Roger Federer.

He was superb, spectacular and at the same time subtle. He was arrogant, yet full of respect for the man on the other side of the net.

His shots blazed through the air like a duck through water. He wore his opponents down not just as a player, but as a person. By the end of a straight-sets loss to Roger Federer, opponents were half the man they were when they stepped onto court. Total domination.

Since then, I have watched this player obliterate everyone before him, earning nearly 60 tour titles, 12 Grand Slams, and I imagine there are more to come.

But, unfortunately, every man has his nemesis. Federer's is Rafael Nadal. In every GS final Federer has lost, it has been to the young Spaniard.

His forehand somewhat rivals Federer's; not many people can boast that. Combined with Roger's form of late, it gives us all reason to be concerned. Is there a new king of tennis?

Nadal, 22, has already won 5 Grand Slam titles, including one at Wimbledon (or Fort Federer). I know Federer has had glandular fever, which apparently really knocks you for six, but Nadal is also supremely talented.

Like Federer, he is modest about his success, but he knows he is good. Is he the best?

In my opinion, he isn't. Roger had won 12 Grand Slams by the age of 26. Nadal will do well to win that many in his entire career.

Many will say Federer's days are gone, but I disagree. I expect him to bounce back at the US Open in September. When he is fully fit for Wimbledon next year, I expect him to retrieve his crown as the king of SW19 and all of tennis. All hail King Roger!

Daniel
07-26-2008, 06:59 PM
http://desicritics.org/2008/07/26/092450.php

The New Roger Federer

Let me start with some facts. Federer has not won a single Grand Slam title this year, he may not even defend his US open title. Heck, Federer has not even won a single Masters series this year. He lost on his favourite turf, Wimbledon, to his arch-nemesis Rafael Nadal. His lead at the top of the ranking will be cut down to sub-300 by end of this week and definitely subsequently will be given to Nadal. He may not be year-end number 1.

Here is my answer: I DON'T CARE!!! Not that the Wimbledon loss did not hurt. Not that after almost 250 weeks Federer will have to give up his #1 ranking wouldn't wrench my heart. This was supposed to be the year where he could potentially have a golden slam (four Grand Slam titles and an Olympic gold, only achieved by Steffi Graf — men or women), but it has been totally the reverse. A consensus has been reached by fans who have realized that the time has come to accept that their hero is a human. Stupid journalists are getting courageous enough to ask questions like "To some extent, do you agree with Justine Henin's decision to retire at the peak of her career?" only to see Federer red-eyed and replying "Do I agree with that? Not today. Ask me another day. Please don't kill me with questions like this."

In spite of all these points, I am still looking forward to the rest of the year. I will not even say how I have savoured being a Federer fan with not just winning but subtletly and perfection that took the tennis to a new level. I will stay in present. As Monx put it, now is the real time to be a Federer fan. I will no longer be a supporter of man-at-the-top but an underdog. An underdog, whose competition now will not only be with Rafael Nadal but also with the rest of the world. An underdog, whose every victory will not be taken for granted and an underdog, whose win will pump up the adrenaline rather than "yeah.. it was just another victory" For long Rafa fans have enjoyed his dark horse status and Federer fans have faced the questions "oh, so he lost? Is that end of Federer?"

No more my friends! NO MORE! All Rafa fans around me, beware. As wonderful a player as Rafa is, be prepared to face the taunts as he is the number one, while I sit back and see my hero challenging #1. Go Roger!

Daniel
07-26-2008, 07:02 PM
Federer vs. Nadal in Malaysia---Perhaps

Following the success of the lucrative Roger Federer v Pete Sampras series of Asian confrontations at the end of last year, the world no.1 will headline the “Showdown of Champions Kuala Lumpur 2008”, alongside legends Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe as well as potentially the man likely to unseat the Swiss at the top of the ATP rankings, French Open and Wimbledon champion Rafael Nadal.

The extravaganza of challenge matches will take place at Kuala Lumpur’s 12,000 seat Putra Stadium in Bukit Jalil, on November 18, just two days after the final of the concluding Tennis Masters Cup in Shanghai.

Nadal’s participation will be determined by the outcome the Davis Cup semi-final battle between Spain and the US in Madrid on September 21. If the man from Majorca is required for the final, James Blake will step in as a replacement. If Spain loses, Nadal will travel to Kuala Lumpur after Shanghai and if the US goes down, then Blake will play.

The format of the event is especially interesting as it will culminate in a doubles showdown involving all four players. The format of the event will see one set between Borg and McEnroe followed by one set between Federer and the fourth player. The final doubles set will pit Federer and Borg against McEnroe and the other star.

Link: http://www.tennisnews.com/exclusive.php?pID=25543

Minnie
07-27-2008, 01:26 AM
Well, it did to me, and many of my friends as well.
Borg's decision wasn't an expected one at that time either, remember that. ;)

Borg's decision to walk away from the game was actually initially very unexpected at the time - and what he originally wanted was a break from the game but the "powers that be" insisted on his return that he played qualifiers to get into the big tournaments. It was almost like being made to start over. Mac has always said it was a disgusting way to treat one of the all time greats of the game.

And anyway, Roger is not Borg ... he is not a quitter. He is so close to the Sampras record its inconceivable to me that he wouldn't want to at least go on trying to beat it. Though I do wish he'd forget about records, history, and all that stuff .. .it just piles pressure on himself.

Btw, Daniel .. again, thanks for your "positive" article posts. I'm going to stay positive and hope for the Real Roger Federer to return .. even if it doesn't happen until Jan 2009!

Sunset of Age
07-27-2008, 02:23 AM
Borg's decision to walk away from the game was actually initially very unexpected at the time - and what he originally wanted was a break from the game but the "powers that be" insisted on his return that he played qualifiers to get into the big tournaments. It was almost like being made to start over. Mac has always said it was a disgusting way to treat one of the all time greats of the game.

My memory, which isn't actually flawless (;)), tells me otherwise.
Anyway, as far as I remember, it wasn't any 'powers that be' that insisted him to return to the game, but rather the fact that he ran out of money, due to his 'bimbo's-coke-partying' lifestyle that he got into after retiring... :rolleyes:

I also remember very well that he never ever managed to win ONE SINGLE match at ATP level when he attempted his comeback.

Fortunately he eventually managed to achieve having a proper way of life and having a family after he split with Marianna Simiounesco, but it took him quite a long time...

Eden
07-27-2008, 11:59 AM
Federer facing career adversity for first time

Friday, July 25, 2008

Posted by Peter Bodo, TENNIS.com

For nearly three critical years, only one thing has stood between Roger Federer and a degree of domination previously unseen in the game of tennis. That has been Rafael Nadal. This is, in and of itself, extraordinary: The man who may wind up acknowledged as the popular choice as the GOAT (Greatest Of All Time) can't consistently beat one guy in his own era.

But now there might be another thing standing in Federer's drive to shatter what significant records remain to be broken: career fatigue. In the long run, Nadal's emergence as Federer's rival in 2005 might have bought Pete Sampras, Rod Laver, Bjorn Borg and other all-time greats just the breathing room they need to avoid being flung into Federer's shadow. Nadal has held off Federer just often enough, and long enough, to help pitch him into what might be the definitive crisis of his career.

Federer fans will recoil at the word "crisis." After all, but for the excruciatingly close loss to Nadal at Wimbledon, it would be business as usual -- Federer conceding Nadal the red clay while using Wimbledon and the U.S. Open to continue his assault on Pete Sampras' record of 14 Grand Slam singles titles (Federer has 12). But the Swiss star's listless loss Wednesday in Toronto suggests that we are no longer doing business as usual.

A number of frustrations have closed on The Mighty Fed at one time, suggesting that the recent Wimbledon final was not just an epic for the ages, but perhaps a watershed moment in two careers (Federer's and Nadal's) and one rivalry (theirs). If you're familiar with pop lingo, Wimbledon might be where Federer "jumped the shark."

For one thing, Federer will be 27 soon, and that's right around the time that even great players discover that winning majors can suddenly appear as difficult as it once seemed natural, if not exactly easy. It's the period when they turn a little sour about various aspects of their jobs: dealing with the press, making good on their commitments (how many danged times do I have to win Cincinnati, anyway?), the machinations of peers counting the days until traces of blood appear in the water, signaling the beginning of a feeding frenzy.

This Wimbledon-Toronto one-two punch has drastically affected Federer's chances to finish No. 1 for a fifth consecutive year (even Federer die-hards are hard-pressed to rate his chances as greater than 25 percent). A tumble from the top spot would put the kibosh on one significant record Federer is chasing -- Sampras' six consecutive years at No. 1. It also seriously damages his future prospects of finishing the year No. 1 as often as did Sampras.

The all-time Grand Slam singles title record is still in Federer's sights, but the three more he needs will be the three toughest he's ever had to earn. The speed at which his march to immortality is turning from seeming cakewalk to bitter, grungy, thankless slog is striking, and turning a deaf ear to his doubters is high on his to-do list.

But this next year or two also embodies a great opportunity, because the one thing Federer has yet to triumph over in his career is serious adversity. If he doesn't rally and produce the classic Act III of a career champ (proving all the naysayers wrong), he'll be described less as a great and inspirational competitor than as a gifted and prolific talent who enjoyed one of the most dizzying career rides ever taken in the game.

The job won't be easy -- those are shark-infested waters out there.

Source: http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?entryID=3504994&name=bodo_peter

Sunset of Age
07-27-2008, 12:04 PM
^^ what a disgusting article.
The wordings of a vulture shark who can't wait to see happening what he writes. :(

EDIT: Oh, it's Bozo. Of course... yawn. :zzz: :zzz: :zzz:

scoobs
07-27-2008, 12:07 PM
Bodo writes in the most commonplace, tedious clichés ever.

I'm not complaining about the thrust of the article or who it's about, just that I find his writing so lazy.

Could he be more uninsightful? Could he point out the obvious a little more?

suggesting that the recent Wimbledon final was not just an epic for the ages, but perhaps a watershed moment in two careers

What? Really? Such things had not occurred to me before :rolleyes:

SUKTUEN
07-27-2008, 02:16 PM
Indian/Bollywood actors who were in Toronto for a stage show...:rolleyes:

thanks for the reply~~~~

soraya
07-27-2008, 06:14 PM
Bodo conveniently forgets that Pete's 6 years as # 1 were not consecutive.

Only five players have been No. 1 every week of a calendar year:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f3/Flag_of_Switzerland.svg/20px-Flag_of_Switzerland.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_Switzerland.svg) Roger Federer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Federer) in 2005, 2006 and 2007 (consecutive years)
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_the_United_States.svg) Jimmy Connors (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jimmy_Connors) in 1975, 1976 (consecutive years) and 1978
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2d/Flag_of_Czechoslovakia.svg/22px-Flag_of_Czechoslovakia.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_Czechoslovakia.svg) Ivan Lendl (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Lendl) in 1986 and 1987 (consecutive years)
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_the_United_States.svg) Pete Sampras (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Sampras) in 1994 and 1997
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b9/Flag_of_Australia.svg/22px-Flag_of_Australia.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_Australia.svg) Lleyton Hewitt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lleyton_Hewitt) in 2002

anon57
07-27-2008, 06:36 PM
Bodo conveniently forgets that Pete's 6 years as # 1 were not consecutive.

Only five players have been No. 1 every week of a calendar year:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f3/Flag_of_Switzerland.svg/20px-Flag_of_Switzerland.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_Switzerland.svg) Roger Federer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Federer) in 2005, 2006 and 2007 (consecutive years)
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_the_United_States.svg) Jimmy Connors (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jimmy_Connors) in 1975, 1976 (consecutive years) and 1978
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2d/Flag_of_Czechoslovakia.svg/22px-Flag_of_Czechoslovakia.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_Czechoslovakia.svg) Ivan Lendl (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Lendl) in 1986 and 1987 (consecutive years)
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_the_United_States.svg) Pete Sampras (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pete_Sampras) in 1994 and 1997
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b9/Flag_of_Australia.svg/22px-Flag_of_Australia.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_Australia.svg) Lleyton Hewitt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lleyton_Hewitt) in 2002
I think Bodo means the fact that Sampras finished year end #1 for 6 consecutive years, and he just simplies that to 6 consecutive years as #1 which isn't true since Sampras lost the #1 ranking a couple of times during those years, he just regained before the end of the year.

Sunset of Age
07-27-2008, 06:53 PM
I think Bodo means the fact that Sampras finished year end #1 for 6 consecutive years, and he just simplies that to 6 consecutive years as #1 which isn't true since Sampras lost the #1 ranking a couple of times during those years, he just regained before the end of the year.

I'm sure Mr. Bozo knows that pretty well, but just chose to not exactly indicate what he meant... for obvious reasons. Any way of diminishing Roger's achievements is welcome when you want to see the lad going down asap, no? :o

Seriously, that guy is a hater, one of the vile specimen that won't admit it openly, but just by giving little sneers at any a possible occasion, preferably hidden within his overly floral wording. What a moron.

riddle05580
07-27-2008, 10:58 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080727/sp_wl_afp/tennisatpusafederer

Federer shrugs off Nadal top-spot danger
Sun 27 Jul, 09:58 PM

CINCINNATI, Ohio (AFP) - Roger Federer said Sunday that Rafael Nadal's seemingly unstoppable advance towards his world number one spot is not a major drama.

"I feel good, I'm focussed," said the Swiss, who is hoping to put his game right this week as he defends his title at the Cincinnati Masters.

"I'm not focussed on Rafa, he's on the other side of the draw. Of course he's been playing great and is on an unbelievable winning streak."

Nadal claimed a seventh title this season on Sunday as he defeated Nicolas Kiefer in straight sets for the Toronto Masters trophy.

"We're back on hardcourt again and it's hard to keep winning. But what he's doing is terrific."

Federer said that fighting off Nadal cannot produce any more stress than a Wimbledon final, where he won five titles in succession before falling to his Spanish rival in an epic five-set final earlier this month.

"There's always pressure, but I expect to win my matches and tournaments. I've had that four or five years. It's nothing new. It's only that number one is in more danger than in the past."

But the 26-year-old is sticking to the long-range approach which has always characterised his game.

"I focus on big picture, prepare well and try not to go crazy over the ranking. I know there's a lot of talk about it now, and Rafa does deserve the credit."

But the keen follower of the game added: "Rafa would have been number three had he lost his semi-final with (Novak) Djokovic in Hamburg. It has all changed now, but I don't feel pressure in any way.

"I just hope to get in a hardcourt roll this week and be in great shape for the Olympics."

SUKTUEN
07-28-2008, 07:38 AM
:worship:

Daniel
07-28-2008, 11:20 AM
Federer focus shifts to keeping top spot in Cincinnati


CINCINNATI, Ohio (AFP) - Roger Federer moves into the ATP Masters Series event starting here Monday downshifting to survival mode as Rafael Nadal chips away at his world number one ranking.

In any other year, the top-ranked Swiss would either be coming to the steamy American Midwest as a tournament champion the prior week or aiming to fine-tune after another successful edition on the grass of Wimbledon.

But this time will be radically different, with Federer forced to fight to hold his four-year reign on the top spot as the Nadal juggernaut continues to steam through the season.

The event is the last chance for major players to boost their game before the long flight to China for the August 8 start of Beijing Olympics, to be followed by a trans-Pacific dash to US Open just over a fortnight later.

"It's important to stay positive. The hard court season has just started," said 12-time grand slam winner Federer, who was slammed in the Toronto second round by Frenchman Gilles Simon after winning the first set.

"It's the start of, what is it, nine months of hard court. It's not the end of the world, but I wish it could have started better. I've got to regroup and look forward.

"The bigger picture is the Olympic Games and the US Open. Those are the places where I want to win."

Federer gets a first-round bye at the event he has won for two of the past three editions. He awaits the winner between American Robby Ginepri and a qualifier.

The Swiss went through a heavy training session on Saturday, convinced that only practise will snap his formerly unstoppable game back into shape.

While Federer sweats, rival Nadal goes from strength to strength, reaching the final in Toronto this weekend after winning Wimbledon over Federer and also claiming a fourth consecutive Roland Garros crown at the Swiss ace's expense.

The confident Spaniard will take on either another qualifier or 86th-ranked Florent Serra of France, with the second seed eager to make up less than the 1,000 points which now separate him from Federer.

Nadal has little to lose at the event, exiting a year ago in the second round after a 2006 quarter-final.

The top-16 seeding lineup echoes that of Toronto this week, with Serbian Novak Djokovic on third ahead of Russian Nikolay Davydenko and number five Spaniard David Ferrer.

American Andy Roddick, the number six who crashed to Croatian Marin Cilic in the Canadian third round, stands sixth ahead of Davis Cup teammate James Blake and Scotsman Andy Murray.

Link: http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/news;_ylt=AgR0FXxmxlW88HWGmyg..uCkurkF?slug=afp-tennisatpusa&prov=afp&type=lgns

SUKTUEN
07-28-2008, 02:49 PM
Come On Roger!

Eden
07-28-2008, 04:58 PM
I found this interview of Roger and Billie Jean King from July 2006 and couldn't see it posted here in the forum so far.

Maybe you would like to read it :)


Roger Federer: as a kid he'd throw his racket and burst into tears when he'd miss a shot, but today its Roger Federer's opponents who just can't get no satisfaction.

Tennis legend Billie Jean King gets the scoop on the man many are saying may just be the best the game has ever seen

Interview, July, 2006
by Billie Jean King

These days it's not unusual for witnesses to Roger Federer's game to reach for superlatives like "magician" and "genius" when describing his particular brand of on-court artistry, but a mere three years ago this tennis phenomenon was just another inconsistent, if immensely talented, player. All that began to change in 2002, however, with the death of his mentor Peter Carter in a car crash in South Africa and the arrival one week later of his 21st birthday. Together the two events served as a kind of wake-up call for Federer--that the train was leaving the station and if his destination was indeed tennis greatness, then he'd better get on board. Well, did he ever. In fact, over the last few years players on the tour have been known to refer to his game as "the Federer Express"--a smooth, high-speed journey bearing down on a variety of circuit highlights (Wimbledon, the U.S. Open, the Australian Open) and earning him the men's No. 1 ranking for much of the last three years. With Federer set to defend his Wimbledon title this month for a third consecutive time, we asked tennis great Billie Jean King--a woman who knows a thing or two about blazing trails--to show us what he's got.

BILLIE JEAN KING: So to start, tell us a little about your early days, your family. Do you have any siblings?

ROGER FEDERER: Mm-hmm, a sister named Diana. She's 20 months older than me, and she was never really into tennis. I started playing very early, when I was 3 or 4. I would go on weekends to the tennis courts; I ran around with the other kids, and occasionally I got to hit with my parents. Then I got into a tennis club and, a little later on, a soccer club. When I was 12, I had to decide between soccer and tennis, because both at the same time was a little much. So I chose tennis, and I'm happy I did.

BJK: Why do you think you made that choice?

RF: I prefer to be in control of what's happening, whereas in soccer if the goalie makes a mistake, everyone has to pay for it. I also thought I was better at tennis, and I got results faster. I think in the end I probably enjoyed playing tennis more.

BJK: What other sorts of things do you like to do when you're not playing tennis?

RF: Mirka [Federer's girlfriend and manager] and I try to go to musicals when we're in New York or London--we've seen The Boy From Oz, The Lion King, Beauty and the Beast--and I've been to one opera with a friend of ours in Paris. We also go to the museums in New York, like the Met and MoMA. We try to see things other than just the courts and the hotels--we try to be more like tourists sometimes. I also like to dance, but Mirka doesn't.

BJK: Do you play a musical instrument?

RF: I used to play a little piano, but I would love to be a guitar player. I just love the sound.

BJK: What kind of music do you like?

RF: Elton John, U2, Madonna, early rock. I also like piano and violin.

BJK: I've seen you at the White Tie & Tiara Ball, the annual Elton John AIDS Foundation benefit. You and Mirka are so supportive of it. Each year the party falls on the first Thursday of Wimbledon, so I always look to see what time you leave---I used to play a little tennis myself, so I'm always checking the time. And what I noticed is that every year you leave exactly at 11 o'clock. Maybe it's due to your Swiss upbringing, but you are clearly very disciplined. Afterward you always say to me, "I missed the fun," since the entertainment tends to just get started around then.

RF: Exactly. And the two times I went I had to play the next day. The funny thing is, the first time I went to the party, it had rained a little bit, and the opponent I was supposed to play couldn't finish his match, so they ended up postponing the whole section, including my match, but I only heard about it once I was in the car! [laughs] I was like, "Mirka, should we go back?" And she was like, "Yeah, let's." But in the end we didn't, and we went to bed around one o'clock and stayed in the room the next day, and I ended up winning Wimbledon that year. Last year was easier--I really wanted to play the next day. But that first time was quite a disappointment.

BJK: Who exciting have you met there?

RF: I met Sharon Stone. [laughs] That was good fun. But then I've also met athletes, like David Beckham, and that's pretty cool, too.

BJK: When you were growing up, were there any turning points or big events in your life that changed your feelings about tennis?

RF: Well, to be honest, initially I didn't enjoy awards presentations and walking the red carpet and all that stuff because I always wondered what I was going to talk about with all those people. And usually when I had to make a speech, it really freaked me out--I mean, just being in a suit made me uncomfortable. So Mirka suggested I put one on once in a while when we were just going out for dinner so it would start to feel normal. And that actually helped me to feel pretty confident when I put a suit on, though I still get nervous when I have to give a speech. I think it helps you to face fear so you can move on. I also think you learn from meeting all these famous people and not being intimidated by them--knowing you can handle it.

BJK: The thing about the suit makes me think of the way one hears British actors often get into character, which is through their costumes. A lot of American actors go from the inside out. It's like that suit got you into character. Who inspired you when you were a kid?

RF: Boris Becker was my idol. Since he's from Germany, we really felt the impact of his success in Switzerland. When he played those great finals with [Stefan] Edberg, that really got me inspired about tennis. I remember sitting in the living room watching Wimbledon when I was 5, 6, 7 years old. He was my first hero, and then I also started to enjoy watching and following Edberg, too. I followed the NBA quite a bit as well, and Michael Jordan was a big hero. He was the man.

BJK: When you were just starting out you had a coach, Peter Carter, who passed away. Did that have a big effect on you?

RF: Mmmmm ...

BJK: Okay, we'll skip that one. I've also read you had quite a temper as a young player.

RF: I was very emotional. I was never the angry person, more the sad and disappointed person. I would cry a lot after losing matches; I would throw my racket in disappointment. It was very hard for me to accept missing three, four points in a row. The first one I could sort of accept. The second one would be like, well, now you better not miss the next one, but if I did, then the racket went flying. I'd have to scream or something, because it just wasn't acceptable. But as time went by, I started to relax. You get on center courts around the world, people are watching, and you're like, "Well, now I can't throw my racket," because it's embarrassing. Today I'm much more in control of myself, whereas before it was a weak point of my tennis. People would say, "If you can get to him mentally, you've got it." And now it's become a strong point in my game.

BJK: You seem very emotional when I watch you, but you keep it really internalized. You might seem irritated or something until you get to the point where you have victory, but one senses there's always a lot of emotion there. I see it and feel it, but you direct it really well. Of course, I didn't see you that much as a very young person, but I've watched your career for quite a while now, and my generation loves the way you play because you have a one-handed backhand, you're fluid, and you make it look so easy--which, of course, requires enormous effort. I don't know if people realize how difficult it is to maintain a No. 1 ranking over even one year. It's quite an accomplishment.

RF: It was never easy for me. Because people were constantly saying I was talented and that I was going to make it, I always had that burden. It was like, if I make it, then I'm only doing what's expected of me, and if I don't, then I'm a disaster because I missed on a great career or wasted my talent. I also had a hard time working out. I would ask, "Why do I have to do this? I'll just be tired tomorrow." But I think by asking a lot of questions, I was able to learn. And then over the years, through hard work, my game started to become really fluid. I never really thought it was that way naturally, because I always felt I had to make a great effort. My technique was always sort of nice, but I was shanking a lot of balls, and I really had a tough time keeping the ball in the court. But by getting stronger mentally and physically, my game started to evolve, and all of a sudden I found myself where I am right now, dominating the game.

BJK: Did you always want to be No. 1?

RF: It was more, "I want to win Wimbledon." When I was 12 or 13 I would play tennis with friends, and if I won a match I'd fall to my knees and go, "Ah, I win Wimbledon!" And then 10 years later, I did win Wimbledon. I remember when I was around 17, I beat Guillermo Coria to become Orange Bowl champion, which meant I finished the season as the top junior player. That got me thinking, If only I could be the same in men's tennis. It was really then that I realized being first is great--you feel on top of the world--so it started to become more of a goal at that point.

BJK: Are there certain rituals or superstitions that you observe before playing?

RF: I try not to be superstitious. So in a way I am superstitious because I'm trying not to be. [laughs] But I'm generally very laid-back.

BJK: Talk a little about the Roger Federer Foundation in South Africa.

RF: We started it a few years ago in my hometown of Basel, Switzerland. My mom's from South Africa, and I was there a lot when I was growing up. I thought hard about the right way to approach having a foundation. I've lived through so many great things, I want to give something back. And I concluded that the way to do that would be to help kids in South Africa because of the connection to my mother. So we started this project, and my goal is to try to reach more and more kids over the years and to try to build funds so we can do even more.

BJK: What sorts of things do you provide for the children?

RF: Education--we principally give them the opportunity to go to school. So many kids there are just living on the streets and don't have that opportunity.

BJK: Why at your young age do you think you're even thinking about these things?

RF: I think we had a great role model in tennis with Andre Agassi. He's one of the all-time greats, and you see what he does, both on the tour and beyond. And as a player you get many requests for charity--people want your name, a racket, clothes. They want you to attend an event, and it makes you wonder. So I decided I was going to do something myself, and I figured I might as well start early.

BJK: Yeah, when you can do the most good.

RF: Exactly. So this is when I made the decision with my girlfriend, my parents, and the people around me. I said, "I would like to start as early as possible," because I remember hearing Andre say once he wished he had started earlier. So I said, "Let's get it going and do as much as we can now. I know this is the prime of my career, and it's hard to attend many things, but let's get it underway and work it up and make it bigger, and try to help more and more people." That is really my objective.

BJK: Do you ever think about what kind of legacy you would like to leave?

RF:I would like to be remembered as a fair player. I think I'm living up to that already, given the awards I've received over the last couple of years for sportsmanship and for being the fans' favorite and stuff--I don't think you get those for nothing. Also being polite with the people, because in life you can count on the elevator going in both directions--you always meet people twice, once on the way up and once on the way down. And then, obviously, there's the foundation; that's an ongoing thing, after my career.

BJK: Can you think of a moment you're most proud of?

RF: I think whenever you receive awards, you're always very proud, but the Laureus World Sportsman of the Year award really gave me the feeling that I was on the same level as some of the all-time greats like Lance Armstrong or Tiger Woods or Michael Schumacher or Valentino Rossi. That felt really great, because at the same time I could promote tennis. It was a good thing for me personally and a good thing for the game of tennis.

BJK: Is there anything that people don't ask you about that you'd like to talk about?

RF: I think a lot of people don't quite understand what it takes to be No. 1--it's not like I'm trying to give myself compliments, but there's so much you have to handle and be able to cope with. People ask me, "What are your goals?" And the answer is: "I want to play well, enjoy life, and travel the world." But then I've got so many commitments--you have the sponsors, the TV, the radio, the newspapers, your own charity, other charities--so many things that you need a vacation. Also you've got to work--conditioning, practicing. And I sometimes feel like people forget about all this. I have to fight every day to try to find spare time for my girlfriend and me, and that's very hard. But at the same time, I enjoy doing interviews, I enjoy playing tennis, and I enjoy working. So you can't have everything. I think maybe it's interesting for the people to know that, too.

BJK: For me, you're the past, present, and future of tennis. Every time I watch you play, I'm aware that you think more like my generation did on the court than many players do, but I also think you're pushing the envelope for the next generation, too. Is being the game's all-time great important to you?

RF: It's hard to say who the all-time great is. Obviously, if I explode all records, if I win 20 slams, then it's a different story. But if you're close to somebody else's career, it's tough to say who was the best ever. But sure, I would love to be considered the game's all-time great. I think everybody would. But at the same time, I respect the older generation so much that in a way it would feel sort of strange to be considered the best ever. I mean, what about when Becker was playing at his best? Or Pete Sampras or Rod Laver or Ken Rosewall or Bjorn Borg? It always goes in phases.

wackykid
07-28-2008, 05:19 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080727/sp_wl_afp/tennisatpusafederer

Federer shrugs off Nadal top-spot danger
Sun 27 Jul, 09:58 PM

CINCINNATI, Ohio (AFP) - Roger Federer said Sunday that Rafael Nadal's seemingly unstoppable advance towards his world number one spot is not a major drama.

"I feel good, I'm focussed," said the Swiss, who is hoping to put his game right this week as he defends his title at the Cincinnati Masters.

"I'm not focussed on Rafa, he's on the other side of the draw. Of course he's been playing great and is on an unbelievable winning streak."

Nadal claimed a seventh title this season on Sunday as he defeated Nicolas Kiefer in straight sets for the Toronto Masters trophy.

"We're back on hardcourt again and it's hard to keep winning. But what he's doing is terrific."

Federer said that fighting off Nadal cannot produce any more stress than a Wimbledon final, where he won five titles in succession before falling to his Spanish rival in an epic five-set final earlier this month.

"There's always pressure, but I expect to win my matches and tournaments. I've had that four or five years. It's nothing new. It's only that number one is in more danger than in the past."

But the 26-year-old is sticking to the long-range approach which has always characterised his game.

"I focus on big picture, prepare well and try not to go crazy over the ranking. I know there's a lot of talk about it now, and Rafa does deserve the credit."

But the keen follower of the game added: "Rafa would have been number three had he lost his semi-final with (Novak) Djokovic in Hamburg. It has all changed now, but I don't feel pressure in any way.

"I just hope to get in a hardcourt roll this week and be in great shape for the Olympics."

not sure if i'm the only one who feels this way... but i don't like federer such apparent "laid back" attitude now... it's quite clear that his reign is at threat at hands of nadal... but is he in self-denial or something and refuse to acknowledge the danger looming behind him... so he try to give a picture of "everything is well" ...? i know this kind of positive attitude works on court... when being down a set or facing match point... it's important to stay focused on the game and maintain strong mentality... but we are off the court now...

so i rather hope he would acknowledge that things are not going as well as he would like now... and he'll focus on one match at a time to find his A-game back... instead of aiming for any titles...


regards,
wacky

nobama
07-28-2008, 06:43 PM
not sure if i'm the only one who feels this way... but i don't like federer such apparent "laid back" attitude now... it's quite clear that his reign is at threat at hands of nadal... but is he in self-denial or something and refuse to acknowledge the danger looming behind him... so he try to give a picture of "everything is well" ...? i know this kind of positive attitude works on court... when being down a set or facing match point... it's important to stay focused on the game and maintain strong mentality... but we are off the court now...

so i rather hope he would acknowledge that things are not going as well as he would like now... and he'll focus on one match at a time to find his A-game back... instead of aiming for any titles...


regards,
wackyHe doesn't need to say in words that 'all is not well'. His results speak for themselves. He needs to remain positive and just focus on his game, focus on one match at a time. NOT think about what he can't control (i.e. what Nadal does). No way will he get is game and confidence back on track if he's constantly fretting about Nadal or Djerk or whoever.

Sunset of Age
07-28-2008, 06:45 PM
He doesn't need to say in words that 'all is not well'. His results speak for themselves. He needs to remain positive and just focus on his game, focus on one match at a time. NOT think about what he can't control (i.e. what Nadal does). No way will he get is game and confidence back on track if he's constantly fretting about Nadal or Djerk or whoever.

Indeed. This is exactly the way he should continue carrying himself in front of the vultures media. Can you imagine what would happen if he would indeed say something like, "Yeah I'm pissing my pants when I have to play Nadal, and actually cry myself to sleep every night as I know I'm losing my #1 ranking very soon..." :help:

nobama
07-28-2008, 07:01 PM
Indeed. This is exactly the way he should continue carrying himself in front of the vultures media. Can you imagine what would happen if he would indeed say something like, "Yeah I'm pissing my pants when I have to play Nadal, and actually cry myself to sleep every night as I know I'm losing my #1 ranking very soon..." :help:I know it's hard for some because his words could seem to imply that he's not worried, doesn't care, doesn't see what we all see, etc. He does. He knows. But like any top athlete he's not going to project doubts to the world via the media. OK maybe he could be more forthcoming about what he thinks he needs to work on and what he's doing in that regard, but all I care about is the end result. Whatever he does to get the winners circle again, if he wants to keep that private that's fine by me.

SUKTUEN
07-29-2008, 04:44 AM
Roger! You are the best!!!:worship:

riddle05580
07-29-2008, 01:36 PM
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=51182

WESTERN & SOUTHERN FINANCIAL GROUP MASTERS

July 28, 2008

Roger Federer

CINCINNATI, OHIO

ROGER FEDERER: You know, it's the start of the hard court season really for the next, Jesus, eight, nine months really until Monaco next year.

So this is the start, you know, so I hope I can start well.

Q. Defending is one thing, but like you said, this is also the time you start to tune up for the US Open and then you start to look at those hard court tournaments. Is this a good round to start gearing your game towards that?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I think most important is trying to win some matches here, you know. I didn't get that last week unfortunately, which just disappointing.

But, you know, I've been able to get some good practice in and looking forward to this week and then obviously two huge events in front of us with the Olympic Games and then coming back for the US Open.

So it's an important time. I'm feeling fit and healthy, which is always key as well after a very difficult schedule this year for us players.

For this reason I'm really pleased actually from where I've come from at the beginning of the this season to where I am today. It's actually very good.

Q. You mentioned the Olympics. How do you think this tournament is going to prepare you for the Olympics in a couple weeks?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, obviously Olympics is, again, a whole different tournament, you know. It's just so different because it's only every four years. You know, you're part of that whole Olympic experience, which is quite different for us players.
You know, we're used to the hotel feeling and then come to the courts and always see the same people. At the Olympic Games it's just a huge tournament and we're just one of the sports. So it obviously changes a little bit in the mindset.

Nevertheless, I think it's -- you know, anyway, for me - I can only speak for myself - it's as important like a Grand Slam. I hope that this will prepare me well. If it doesn't, you know, I'll still have enough practice ahead of the Olympics.

Q. That's how you view it though, as a Grand Slam, that type of an event?

ROGER FEDERER: For me it is because I've already won 12 Grand Slams. I mean, another Grand Slam here or there doesn't make that much of a difference. It's nice to get them, but the Olympic Games is something I have never been able to get. Didn't get that many chances obviously because it's only once every four years.

But it's definitely something, you know, representing Switzerland, you know, being the flag bearer in 2004, all these things make it a very special event for me.

Q. Do you feel really fortunate to be on top of your game when the Olympics are coming up like this?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I was No. 1 in the world four years ago already. Missed that chance. You know, I had a tough draw. Davydenko first and lost to Berdych in a close match.

I hope this year it goes better, you know. But, no, I mean, I'm happy I'm one of the guys with the best chance to win. I'm happy it's on hard court, which is one of annoy best surfaces. So it's all good.

Q. You won Wimbledon five times in a row. The sixth year you lost to Nadal. Have you gained any perspective on that, and how do you plan to come back?

ROGER FEDERER: Come back? I don't know. I mean, look, wait a year and then try again next year for Wimbledon. No, I mean, like I said, it's a tough schedule this year for us.
You know, it's not easy. We only had two weeks in between Wimbledon and Toronto, and normally it's four to five weeks. You feel that.

Instead of having maybe two weeks practice and two weeks off you have one week off and four days practice kind of thing. Just makes it that much more difficult.

But I'm feeling good, you know, with where my mind is. I think even though it hurt a lot in the moment itself, it was the hardest loss I've ever had and maybe th hardest one I'll ever have in my career, you know, being so close in such a thriller match in a Grand Slam final.

And then to lose it's hard, whereas the year before I got the five-setter against Rafa. So that makes up for it a little bit. Who knows. But I thought it was a great match and I think it was great for tennis. Many people were talking about it, like you said, and I think that's a very positive thing.

I hope that tennis will grow from here on. I always say I think tennis is in great shape right now with our rivalry and many new guys coming up and Andy and Blake and all these guys still around, Safin and Hewitt, you name it, Ferrero.

So I just think it's a really good time for tennis right now.

Q. You mentioned rivalry is good for the game and the sport. Can you put the rivalry with Nadal in more of personal context, how you view it when you he's a potential on the other side of the net?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think ours is particularly intriguing because we have such different characters and different styles, you know, like what maybe Borg and McEnroe had in a way.
But then they only played a handful of times almost and we played twenty times, you know. It's not like it's not going to happen anymore. We have the feeling it's going to happen for another twenty times.

That's why I think we're right in the prime of this rivalry. On top of that, he was able to beat me more often that I've beaten him even though I'm No. 1 for so long.

I think all these things make it that much more intriguing. Of course we're not American or German or whatever in a big market. Of course Rafa from Spain is big, you know, but I've gone beyond just being a Swiss. I think now also with me winning the US Open so many times and being so successful in the States, I think it's just posed to be one of the great rivalries.

Q. With Nadal being in this field and him really emerging this year, how would you rate your chances of winning your third title this year in Cincy?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, this has been actually kind of a tough tournament for me. I lost early or I won the it. There was no quarters or semifinals or finals for me here. It's either make or break. Look, I try to play well here.

In the beginning I've always struggled early on just because the surface is way more quick than last week, for instance, or maybe even than Wimbledon.

It's just hard to control the ball here. If flies a lot more and it's the beginning of the hard court season. So it's difficult, but I feel good.

I mean, the focus is on Rafa right now, you know, because he's all the way on the other side of the draw since over four years. So this is nothing new.

He's been playing great and he's on an unbelievable winning streak since, I don't know, since Hamburg he hasn't lost. So it's great to see that, you know, but this is hard court again. A different tournament. It's hard to always keep on winning, but what he's doing is definitely terrific.

Q. Obviously being No. 1 is something that's important to you. Is there any added pressure for you this week with Rafa kind of creeping up on you in the standings?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know if it's more pressure than at Wimbledon, you know. There's always pressure when I go out on court. I expect myself to win the match, win the tournament. The fans, you know, the tournaments, the sponsors. I've had it for four and a half, five years now, you know, so it's nothing new just now that maybe new No. 1 position looks a bit more in danger than in the past.

All I can do is I have to look at the big picture and try to play well and prepare well and not go crazy over it. I know there's more talk about it the last couple weeks and months. That's okay. Rafa deserves the credit, because first he had to defend his No. 2 ranking against Djokovic in Hamburg. Since then he's been on a winning streak. But if he would've lost that semifinal he would No. 3 in the world, which now looks crazy, right? So I think it's interesting, you know, but I don't feel extra pressure in any way honestly. I just try to get on a roll on hard courts and then hopefully be in great shape for the Olympics.

Q. What is it that attracts you to this specific tournament in Cincinnati, Ohio every year?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, it's got a good week in the calendar, you know. I mean, that's something where Cincinnati gets all the players from as well, you know.

But they try hard to make it a good event for the players. You see all of them show up here. I think also the crowds are great here all the time. When we play, day and night sessions are always pretty much sold out, so that's also very nice for us players to see. Obviously makes us want to come back.

Q. Because the Olympics fall in the middle of things, do you adjust your preparation physically and/or mentally at this time of year when you know that that's on the horizon?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I've adjusted my entire season around the Olympic Games because I knew I was not going to have the holiday and practice I was going to get as usual after Wimbledon. Except if I was going to miss Toronto and Cincinnati, then I would have had obviously three more weeks off.

I didn't want to do that, so that's one of the reasons why I didn't play much in the beginning of the season, you know. People were really questioning why I was doing that. I said, There's always a plan behind what I do.

Because I was sick in the beginning of the year, then I had to work harder to get back and feel good again. So that took actually more energy out of me, and that's why the last couple months have been very draining for me and the season has become very long.

But at the same time, I'm happy I didn't play at the beginning of the season a whole a lot more, because I tried to save myself through this entire tough period where I have to travel like crazy, you know. It takes its toll on you, and I'm happy I'm still feeling fresh actually.

It's not like I'm feeling under the water or just completely drained. I feel good, and I hope it's going to stay this way for hopefully another month or so.

Q. I know you're all about tennis while you're here, but does this tournament do anything to help you relax? Are there some side things that make this good for you in terms of your mind and taking it well and reinvigorating yourself at all?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I like sometimes a little bit more quiet tournament. After Wimbledon there was a very quite tournament to go to in Germany to play as well. I consider Hamburg also a little bit more quite just because the city is more laid back and everything. The same thing here.

It's going to be crazy enough the next couple weeks. Sometimes it's good to actually get away from the big cities and go to the movies and so something else a little bit, go to the coffee shop, just taking it more easy than, you know, always this hassle. So that is one of the reasons this is a good event for us.

End of FastScripts

Daniel
07-29-2008, 01:49 PM
Link: http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2008/jul/29/tennis?gusrc=rss&feed=networkfront

Federer feeling the pressure as Nadal closes in on his No1 spot

Last year Roger Federer gave Rafael Nadal a ride from the Canadian Masters to the Ohio plains in his private jet. Since then their professional relationship has changed dramatically. There will be no such cosiness this time.

Instead Federer has been sent packing from Canada several days early and Nadal has jetted in behind him, preparing for the chance to push in front of the world No1 and bring the biggest upheaval in the rankings for four and a half years.

Federer would have to lose before the semi-finals in the Masters Series here for that to happen this week. But whether he does or not, the pressure from such a possible sea-change has never been greater, nor could the timing of it have been worse. Almost immediately after the loss of his Wimbledon title Federer is fighting the fear of another crushing blow and, wisely chosen though his words have been, the mask they seek to maintain is evident.

"It's the start of a hard-court season of eight or nine months. So I hope I can start well," he said, conveniently dropping the opening chapter of last week's loss to Gilles Simon, and reversing the telescope to project the sequence into the distance beyond the impending Olympics and US Open. "Maybe there's a little bit of extra pressure," he admitted, "but at the same time you know you are on a winning streak at this tournament."

In fact Federer won here last year and before that in 2005. But in 12 tournaments this year he has won just two, Estoril and Halle. Still, he is better rested than Nadal, and is possibly still the favourite despite all his disappointments this year. And revealing though his perspectives are, they are the best available.

How much extra pressure was there, he was asked. "I don't know if there is more pressure than Wimbledon," he said. "When I go out there I expect to win the match, win the tournament. It's not anything new that the No1 position looks in more danger than in the past. I have to focus and look at the big picture, and prepare well and not go crazy over it."

And there were other clever deflections. His rivalry with Nadal was greater than the legendary one between McEnroe and Borg, he pointed out, because they had played each other so many more times, 20 times (it's actually 18).

"And we have the feeling it will happen another 20 times. We are right in the prime of the rivalry." Message to himself here: time to make amends.

To do so here Federer may have to survive a last 16 meeting with Ivo Karlovic, the steepest server on the tour, and a quarter-final with Andy Roddick, a former champion here. As for Nadal, he spent every day last week saying he was world No2 and content to be so, and he is still saying it. So often has he denied that No1 has even crossed his mind, that the prospect has become all the greater

Daniel
07-29-2008, 01:51 PM
Link: http://www.bangkokpost.com/sportsplus/sportsplus.php?id=129126

Federer out to repair season at Cincinnati Masters
By Bill Scott

Cincinnati, Ohio (dpa) - Roger Federer will begin resuscitating his summer after last week's Canadian crash out, as the opening day of the Cincinnati Masters was hit by a pair of late injury defections on Monday.

The Swiss superstar learned the name of his opening opponent in Tuesday's second round, as US player Robby Ginepri overcame Swedish veteran qualifier Jonas Bjorkman 6-0, 7-6 (7-5).

Federer is looking for a vast improvement in his game with Toronto champion Rafael Nadal breathing down his neck, just 300 points behind in the rankings race after winning his last five tournaments.

Nadal has beaten the world number one this year at the French Open and Wimbledon to establish his credentials as the most serious threat yet to the top ranking that Federer has now held for 235 weeks.

"The most important is trying to win some matches here," said Federer, who lost in the Toronto second round to France's Gilles Simon. "I didn't get that last week, unfortunately, which was just disappointing."

"It's an important time. I'm feeling fit and healthy, which is always key as well, during a very difficult schedule this year for we players."

Federer's Davis Cup teammate Stanislas Wawrinka, the ninth seed, withdrew as a precaution before the August 8 start of the Beijing Games with right knee pain.

Doctors have advised him to rest before travelling to China for the Olympic event, resulting in a pullout from his opening match against Swede Thomas Johansson in the Ohio tournament.

"I have some small pains in the knee, and I don't want to take risks," Wawrinka said. "My goals are the Olympics and the US Open. I'll go home and rest a few days, then begin light training."

Wawrinka said that he felt the problem during his third-round Toronto loss to Andy Murray.

Daniel
07-29-2008, 01:53 PM
Link: http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/07/29/sports/AS-TEN-Champions-Federer-and-Borg.php

Federer and Borg to team up against McEnroe and maybe Nadal
MACAU: Roger Federer and Bjorn Borg will team up in doubles in a special event here in November, possibly against the men who finished their famous Wimbledon streaks, in a Blackrock Tour of Champions event.

Federer and Borg both won five consecutive Wimbledon singles titles, with Federer's run only ending earlier this month with a loss in the final to No. 2-ranked Rafael Nadal.

Federer and Borg, who won five straight Wimbledon titles from 1976-80 before losing the '81 final to John McEnroe, face McEnroe and possibly Nadal on the other side of the net.

McEnroe's partner against the Federer-Borg combination will be either Nadal or American James Blake at The Venetian Macau Tennis Showdown. His partner will come from whichever country loses the Davis Cup semifinal between Spain and the United States in September.

The tournament will start with a one-set showdown between old foes Borg and McEnroe.

It will end with Federer and Borg teaming up against McEnroe and his partner in a 10-point doubles tiebreaker.

Blondie1985
07-29-2008, 03:00 PM
I don't like borg....:rolleyes:

Link: http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/07/29/sports/AS-TEN-Champions-Federer-and-Borg.php

Federer and Borg to team up against McEnroe and maybe Nadal
MACAU: Roger Federer and Bjorn Borg will team up in doubles in a special event here in November, possibly against the men who finished their famous Wimbledon streaks, in a Blackrock Tour of Champions event.

Federer and Borg both won five consecutive Wimbledon singles titles, with Federer's run only ending earlier this month with a loss in the final to No. 2-ranked Rafael Nadal.

Federer and Borg, who won five straight Wimbledon titles from 1976-80 before losing the '81 final to John McEnroe, face McEnroe and possibly Nadal on the other side of the net.

McEnroe's partner against the Federer-Borg combination will be either Nadal or American James Blake at The Venetian Macau Tennis Showdown. His partner will come from whichever country loses the Davis Cup semifinal between Spain and the United States in September.

The tournament will start with a one-set showdown between old foes Borg and McEnroe.

It will end with Federer and Borg teaming up against McEnroe and his partner in a 10-point doubles tiebreaker.

wackykid
07-29-2008, 04:04 PM
He doesn't need to say in words that 'all is not well'. His results speak for themselves. He needs to remain positive and just focus on his game, focus on one match at a time. NOT think about what he can't control (i.e. what Nadal does). No way will he get is game and confidence back on track if he's constantly fretting about Nadal or Djerk or whoever.

Indeed. This is exactly the way he should continue carrying himself in front of the vultures media. Can you imagine what would happen if he would indeed say something like, "Yeah I'm pissing my pants when I have to play Nadal, and actually cry myself to sleep every night as I know I'm losing my #1 ranking very soon..." :help:

actually i feel that there is nothing wrong to admit to the media that he is not having a good year -- but not to the extend of "throwin in the towel" or "fretting/grumbling" -- need some tact here... it's like if u tell the media that "all is well" ... the media/public will continue to expect him to win matches... and there will be this pressure on him to win them... otherwise the next time he loses to someone ranked #902452613534 in the world again... he'll have face those @#$% qns.... :rolleyes:

but outside the media... he should continue to be positive and examine wat is wrong with his game now... or wat new adjustments/tactics/techniques he can improve on to take out his opponents...


regards,
wacky

Sunset of Age
07-29-2008, 04:19 PM
actually i feel that there is nothing wrong to admit to the media that he is not having a good year -- but not to the extend of "throwin in the towel" or "fretting/grumbling" -- need some tact here... it's like if u tell the media that "all is well" ... the media/public will continue to expect him to win matches... and there will be this pressure on him to win them... otherwise the next time he loses to someone ranked #902452613534 in the world again... he'll have face those @#$% qns.... :rolleyes:

There should be nothing wrong with it, but alas, this world - at least the media & other haters - is so nasty to people losing their position, that it's in fact better not to further 'feed' them. And he hasn't at all said that 'all is well' - between the lines you can easily read his worries and disappointments, I think.

It's sad, but as he has had such incredible achievements the past four years, it will take a long time before the Vultures stop asking him questions when he has a bad loss. That is one of the very difficult things one sees ahead when having had such an awesome run... it is inevitable that it will end some day, but the media will continue making a big fuss of it for quite a while.

Here's to hoping for a good run for Roger in Cincy! :rocker2:

Minnie
07-29-2008, 05:41 PM
Roger should just keep answering the vultures, morons, haters with a list - a long list - of his achievements over the past 5 years. They will then have no more time to ask him any other dumb questions :D

Sunset of Age
07-29-2008, 05:49 PM
Roger should just keep answering the vultures, morons, haters with a list - a long list - of his achievements over the past 5 years. They will then have no more time to ask him any other dumb questions :D

:lol: :yeah:
I can see all the 'arrogant' :bs: coming out again if he'd indeed do so, alas.

riddle05580
07-30-2008, 12:41 AM
http://uk.reuters.com/article/sportsNews/idUKL950329720080729?pageNumber=1&virtualBrandChannel=0&sp=true

Federer almost leaves the door open for Nadal

Richard Eaton

CINCINNATI (Reuters) - Roger Federer came close to suffering three successive losses for the first time in five years before scrambling to a 6-7 7-6 6-0 win over Robbie Ginepri at the Cincinnati Masters Series on Tuesday.

Federer was staring defeat in the face when he lost his serve to go 5-6 down in the second set, but Ginepri, an American ranked down at 64 in the world, did not quite have what it took to close the match out.

Had he done so it would have left the door open for Rafael Nadal to end Federer's record four-and-half year reign as world number one this week.

Instead, Federer limped on into a second set tiebreak which he won only after 12 tense rallies when Ginepri hit a not too venomous forehand drive from the Swiss back across court and just wide.

It may nevertheless have strengthened Nadal's belief that he can take over as number one quite soon, and possibly still this week. If Federer fails to reach the semi-finals and Nadal wins the tournament, it will still happen.

"I enjoy the challenge of being number one in the world," Federer said, despite his scare. "I like that. I would rather be me than him.

"I have had a great run so far, and although I have been disappointed that my hard work has not paid off with a grand slam win, I am over it now."

Federer created many opportunities to win rallies which he could not take, and crucially could not convert three break points at 4-3 in the second set, when he had Ginepri floundering in wider and wider positions.

Each time the American, who came close to beating Federer here in the semi-finals three years ago, managed to get the ball back just one more time, and long enough for an anxious Federer to make a mistake.

This match followed Federer's loss of the Wimbledon title to Nadal in the final three and a half weeks ago, and a shock opening round loss to Frenchman Gilles Simon in Toronto last week.

Federer broke immediately at the start of the final set and the danger was over. He accelerated to 4-0, and by the end of the contest, his release of tension was palpable.

riddle05580
07-30-2008, 02:23 PM
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=51205

WESTERN & SOUTHERN FINANCIAL GROUP MASTERS

July 29, 2008

Roger Federer

CINCINNATI, OHIO

R. FEDERER/R. Ginepri
6-7, 7-6, 6-0

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. The opening matches in tournaments can sometimes be the hardest, but if you survive then things change. Do you think both of those things showed in this match?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, we, the top players, always know the fear and the danger of the first round. We saw it here last year when Rafa lost early and Novak lost early, right? I've lost early here in the past as well.

It's a tough tournament, you know. It's a Masters Series, and here in Cincinnati the ball flies quite a bit so it's hard to control.

But, yeah, I don't know. With this place there's just a little bit more danger around maybe because of the quickness coming from Toronto where it's actually very slow.

Takes a little bit of an adjustment, and some guys who were here maybe longer and played a match before, and we have the seeds all the time. It's just maybe we tend to feel that maybe just a little bit more.

Q. Did it make you feel about what happened three years ago when you played him?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, it was a tough three-setter. Yeah, I mean, I've played him as well, in when was it, Madrid maybe last year. He's a good player, you know, especially in the States.
Obviously the Americans are always, you know, most dangerous. I think this court suits him, and he's been playing well recently, you know.

Yeah, I mean, I actually played okay I thought throughout the match. Just missed some opportunities. Thought I was the better player actually throughout the match. Was down a set and 6-5 with the break, you know.

So it was dangerous today no doubt, but I believed in my chance all the way to the end.

Q. Talk about the conditions out there today. Seemed like your unforced errors were a little bit higher than normal. Was that true?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, like I said, it's so quick. Depends always who takes the stats. How much do these people know? But, well, you got to go for you shots here.

I think in some ways you'll always see a little bit more unforced errors, and I think Robby played me in a way that I had to go for big shots. Unforced errors is a common thing then.

Q. He said yesterday that he thought this time period right now would be the best time to play you. He was hoping to pull off an upset based on you coming here losing two straight matches. How much would you agree with that?

ROGER FEDERER: Who said that? I said that?

Q. Robby said that yesterday.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, maybe. You know, I don't know. I've come here with, you know, four weeks no tournament in the past and came here and won, so I don't know. I don't think there's ever a good or a bad time, you know.

But maybe for him in his case, yes, because he's been here and played another match before. Like I said, he's got that advantage. He's had more preparation here in Cincinnati than maybe me. All these things, maybe for him, made that quote come out.

Q. I guess he thought you would be pressing to hold onto the top ranking.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I don't feel the heat because of that, to be honest, so that's not the reason why he would have a better chance.

Q. With so much of that talk lately with the ranking possibly switching, what is your take on being No. 1? Seems you're so nonchalant about some things in your game. Is that one of the things that it's not all that important to you at this point?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it is important. But if Rafa were to get it, look what he had to achieve to get it, you know. That's what I like to see. I would have been disappointed if I would have lost first round in Paris and Wimbledon. Then I wouldn't be sitting here being so nonchalant about it.

If he gets it he deserves it. He's been No. 2 for a long, long time. Let's not forget about that. He had his chances in the past and now he's closer than ever just because he could really get Wimbledon. I think that was a big one for him, you know, and he's been on an incredible roll.

He hasn't made it yet, you know. I'm still hanging in there, and I hope I can now get on a roll after this match today.

Q. Your goal wasn't necessarily to stay at No. 1, it's to...

ROGER FEDERER: Well, of course it's my big goal. But what are you going to do? I'm going to try to win match by match, and I cannot say I want to be No. 1 in the world and not play tennis anymore, you know.

You got to go out on the tennis court and win the matches. Then you break it down and go point by point. That's unfortunately the grind you have to go through.

I'm now I'm back with a one-match winning streak. Let's call it that way. Because last week was ridiculous that I lost that match. I thought I should have never lost, so that sort of hurt me. Today would have been similar again if I would've lost.
So I'm happy I could turn it around today. Let's see what happens now.

Q. How do you feel right now? Are you happy and relieved a little bit that you finally have that win?

ROGER FEDERER: No. I mean, not that crazy relieved, but, you know I would've just been disappointed having lost another match like I did last week here again. Didn't happen, so it gives me sort of a second life.

I know how well I can play once I get on a roll. It's just the beginning of the whole American hard court season and everything, so maybe it's not always that easy to get right on a roll again after playing on clay and grass for so long.
I've been able to do it many times in the past, so that gives me obviously great confidence to know that I can do it now again. Looking ahead, it's important to know that I'm in good shape for the Olympics and the US Open. I'm looking at the big picture, you know, right now.

Q. What was the key of the match today? First two sets were so closely contested. Did you do anything different in the third set?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I thought maybe -- I just felt he was getting tired, you know. He had trouble breathing or whatever it was actually throughout the second set, whereas I had absolutely no problem.

I really hoped, because I was on top of him all the way through the second set, that I would get that crucial break and then I could sort of race away with it.

He just started to tee off that one game and he broke after I had a 30-Love lead. So it hurt to go down like that. But I knew at once if I could just turn it around a little bit things would swing my way.

Obviously once I was back on even terms, you know, he let his head hang a little bit. Obviously he was feeling even more tired. And I took advantage of it, which was nice for me.

Q. 6-5 when he was serving for it, I noticed that you might have change the game plan a little bit. Seemed as though you went a little bit more defensive. I don't know if consciously did that, but everything we saw other than breakpoint were slice backhands and you just allowed him to miss. Did you think he was going to get tight in that situation, and did you consciously tell yourself that?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, hope he misses and makes four double faults. That's what you hope for. That's not the way you want to break. I mean, it doesn't give you a whole a lot confidence if the guy just gives it or to you.

Sure, it's a situation where you want to give the guy an opportunity to miss. You don't want to just start to go for outright winners and then you miss four and he wins. You want to make it a little bit difficult for him. I don't know what exactly happened, but it was important to get ahead in the score. You know, Love-15, sort of Love-30, maybe 15-30.
That's what I got, and that maybe made him a little bit more nervous. In those situations I'm usually very good, so I handled it well today.

Q. He broke and then you broke back, in the first set actually reversed there, but how do you stay cool? How do you not just lose it when you know you have an opportunity?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I was disappointed that the first break I got, you know, at 40-15 I hit this ridiculous backhand slice into the corner. You know, that's sometimes how close it is. A match can turn around because of one shot like this, and it did actually.

I shouldn't be crying about it, because I'm still leading 40-30 and it's quick conditions here and I'm serving. But it is, it's a momentum shifter sometimes. One shot like this and he got back on even terms and all of a sudden was in the match, you know.

I mean, usually I stay very calm, and I did again today. For me there's really no reason to freak out in anyway. I'm playing well and trying my best.

As long as that's happening, you know, I don't lose it, whereas before I always had the feeling maybe just a completely wrong game plan, I trying too much and expecting too much. Then you have a tendency to obviously go crazy a little bit more.

Q. Are you enjoying at all this challenge of trying to hold onto the top ranking when it's getting so close?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah. I mean, I have no other choice, you know. But I do enjoy the challenge that I'm the No. 1 in the world. Yeah, I like that, so what more can I tell you?

Rather it be me than rather it be him. So I've had -- I'm on a great run with my No. 1 ranking. If I would lose it I would want it back, so that's an obvious situation. I hope I can get on a run and then got two massive tournaments ahead of us.
So far it's just been disappointing that my hard work hasn't paid off with a Grand Slam win after being so close at Wimbledon. That definitely hurt, you know. But I'm over it now and I'm looking forward.

Q. Do you get the sense that the guys are playing you any differently now than they were maybe two, three years ago?

ROGER FEDERER: Not a whole lot. The guys are pretty one dimensional all out there, you know, baseliners, good returns.
The big difference I see from eight years ago when I came on tour is everybody has a good serve today. Everybody can serve clutch serves when they need them and they serve so close to the lines.

Everybody's got a good second serve I would like to say, because I think you always say you're as good as your second serve. Today nobody has a shocking second serve anymore like some of them had in the past.

That's why people were really struggling on grass, some of them, because they just had such a bad serve. Today that doesn't exist anymore, and you neutralize your opponent much more with such a good baseline game and with a decent first serve, and especially a second serve.

That's also one of the reasons now I think everybody is doing much better on all kinds of surfaces.

End of FastScripts

nobama
07-30-2008, 03:41 PM
As everyone here knows I'm not a Nadal fan, but I thought this response from Roger was A1 class act. :worship:

Q. With so much of that talk lately with the ranking possibly switching, what is your take on being No. 1? Seems you're so nonchalant about some things in your game. Is that one of the things that it's not all that important to you at this point?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it is important. But if Rafa were to get it, look what he had to achieve to get it, you know. That's what I like to see. I would have been disappointed if I would have lost first round in Paris and Wimbledon. Then I wouldn't be sitting here being so nonchalant about it.

If he gets it he deserves it. He's been No. 2 for a long, long time. Let's not forget about that. He had his chances in the past and now he's closer than ever just because he could really get Wimbledon. I think that was a big one for him, you know, and he's been on an incredible roll.

He hasn't made it yet, you know. I'm still hanging in there, and I hope I can now get on a roll after this match today.

scoobs
07-30-2008, 03:53 PM
Roger has had the odd bad loss here and there this year but for the most part, he has made Nadal take this from him, and that's what Nadal has managed to find a way to do (very likely).

I'd rather it were that way.

SUKTUEN
07-30-2008, 04:27 PM
:worship:

Sunset of Age
07-30-2008, 05:22 PM
As everyone here knows I'm not a Nadal fan, but I thought this response from Roger was A1 class act. :worship:

The mutual respect between the two is nothing new, and I expect it to continue even when their roles are reversed. :)

Eden
07-30-2008, 06:09 PM
Federer May Be Struggling, but He Is Still Ranked No. 1

By JOSH KATZOWITZ

Published: July 30, 2008

MASON, Ohio — Roger Federer joked Tuesday that after uncharacteristic back-to-back losses, he was thrilled to be on a one-match winning streak. But with his No. 1 ranking potentially hanging on the results of the Cincinnati Masters this week, he is happy with a victory of any kind.

At times, Federer can sound nonchalant when talking about the No. 1 ranking and what it means to him, but he is serious about keeping No. 2 Rafael Nadal from displacing him from the spot he has held since Feb. 2, 2004.

“If he gets it, he deserves it,” Federer said. “He’s been No. 2 for a long, long time. Let’s not forget about that. He had his chances in the past and now he’s closer than ever. He’s been on an incredible roll.”

The proper term is Federer-like. Since losing in the second round of the Rome Masters in May, Nadal has gone 29-0 and won five tournaments, including the French Open and Wimbledon. He beat Federer in the final of three of them.

He defeated Federer on clay at the French Open, then dispelled the notion that he could not stop him on grass by winning an epic Wimbledon final.

Nadal will play his first match here Wednesday night, against Florent Serra of France. If he wins this tournament and Federer is eliminated before the semifinals, Nadal will be the new No. 1.

Federer, meanwhile, has been faltering. After losing at Wimbledon, he was upset last week by Gilles Simon in the second round in Toronto. On Tuesday, Federer had trouble defeating Robby Ginepri, 6-7 (2), 7-6 (5), 6-0.

Ginepri, ranked 64th, was serving for the match at 6-5 in the second set, but could not hold serve. Federer, however, no longer appears to be an unstoppable force.

“I think guys have seen that he’s human,” Ginepri said. “In the last four years, he’s had such a stellar career that it’s hard to keep that up. Maybe he’s not as steady as he used to be.

“I think guys are feeling that a little bit more now, especially in the past couple weeks. He’ll find his way if he doesn’t stay at No. 1 this week or in two weeks. I think he’ll find his way back up to the top.”

Publicly, at least, Nadal has said that he is not thinking about the top spot.

“I don’t think about the No. 1 because I’m the No. 2,” Nadal said Tuesday. “If any day I’m No. 1, I’m going to think about the No. 1. Sure, it is a goal, yes. For me, if I am No. 1 any day, it will be very nice. But right now, my goal is to continue playing like I did before.”

He has certainly been playing like the top player in the world. Even if Nadal cannot unseat Federer this week, it seems that a change at the top may be only a matter of time.

“Nadal is having one of those years that Federer has had for the last four years,” said Tommy Haas of Germany, who is ranked No. 42. “If he can have a decent hardcourt season and do well at the Masters Series, he deserves to be No. 1. I’m sure Roger would be the first one to admit that.”

But Haas raised some caution flags, adding: “We’ll see if he can make that happen. We all know what Roger has done the last four years. I don’t think he’s worried about the No. 1 ranking. I think he’s frustrated that he hasn’t won a big tournament yet this year. I think that’s all that matters to him.”

Federer said he was not feeling any pressure about the possible transfer of the No. 1 ranking. He said he just wanted to start winning again.

“He hasn’t made it yet, you know,” Federer said. “I’m still hanging in there.”

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/30/sports/tennis/30tennis.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

FedFan_2007
07-31-2008, 12:01 AM
Bottom line, it's all over. Fed's dead.

Rommella
07-31-2008, 04:12 AM
Stick Shift: Time for Federer to rethink his racquet?
Forget about tactics, strokes and psychology, the solution to Roger Federer’s woes could lie right in his hands. Here’s the case for why Federer should change from a mid to a midplus racquet frame.

By Miguel Seabra

Six years ago, a young prospect named Roger Federer took a small 5-inch step that ended up being a giant leap in his career. Now, after a dozen major titles and 234 weeks at No. 1, it may be time for another 5-inch step – one that would better equip him to face nemesis Rafael Nadal and make the most out of the second phase of his celebrated career.

No radical changes are needed, just a small but difficult one: stop using the smallest racquet frame on tour, even though it’s the one that has guided him to 12 Grand Slam titles. Federer's racquet is extremely demanding because the tiny sweet spot affords very little margin for error, and a more forgiving stick could allow him to swing a little more freely and be a confidence booster.

A GIANT 5-INCH LEAP
Back in the spring of 2002, Roger Federer felt his game was stagnating and he was shanking too many balls. He had been playing with the iconic but rather small 1984 Pro Staff model, one of the winningest frames in tennis history. With only subtle updates made over a decade and a half, the racquet with an 85 square-inch head had been used by champions such as Chris Evert, Stefan Edberg, Pete Sampras and Jim Courier.

The young Swiss had adopted the Pro Staff – used by his idols Edberg and Sampras – in the early 1990s, becoming junior world champion with it in 1998. But his game was different from his heroes’ – he was hitting his forehand with a lot more topspin than Sampras’s flat drives.

Watching Roger Federer play in his 1998 junior Wimbledon win and taking a closer look at him during a 1999 loss to Spain’s Joan Balcells in the first round of a Challenger in Espinho, Portugal, it was obvious the kid could play. His game flowed on the court and his classic style was already quite attractive, even if his tremendous racquet acceleration created the occasional mishit.

Federer’s transition to the pro tour was fairly rapid, and by the end of 2001 he was closing in on the top 10. But despite a landmark victory over Pete Sampras at Wimbledon, he had yet to make it past the quarterfinal of a Grand Slam. The following spring, he made a bold decision right in the middle of the clay court season – switching to a 90 square-inch version of the Pro Staff. The larger sweet spot allowed him to hit fewer balls off the frame and reduce his unforced errors.

The results were almost immediate. In his second tournament with the new racquet, he won Hamburg for his first Masters Series title, producing a scintillating performance in the final against then-No. 4 Marat Safin and declaring it “the best game of my life.”

The following year he became Wimbledon champion and soon afterwards started an unparalleled run at the top of the rankings, seducing everyone with his smooth technique and exquisite timing.

There was still the occasional shanked shot, of course, particularly when he was trying to impart 4,400 rpm on his topspin forehand. After all, even with the 90 square-inch head, he was still playing with the smallest stick on the tour. Other Wilson players currently on the tour choose midsize versions between 93 and 98 square inches, and the average size of the racquets on tour is leaning towards 100 square inches.

Federer’s racquet, now called the Wilson KFactor KSix-One Tour 90, has barely changed since.

At the Australian Open, I asked him about whether he would consider making a switch. The question elicited a negative response, even though he spoke positively about his earlier change.

“No, I've always been very happy,” said Federer. “I never really tried a bigger head-size racquet. I don't think it would maybe help me much.

“I switched from 85 to 90 back in 2002 just before I won Hamburg. That was for me a big move because I was really shanking a lot of balls. Then I changed to a 90. I asked Wilson to make something special for me. Yeah, I mean, it's a great racquet for me.

“Funny, I wanted to play with the racquet of Sampras, now Sampras is playing with the racquet of me,” Federer smiled. “Kind of weird... he changed to mine now.”

Champions are stubborn and stand by their choices – maybe that’s one of the reasons they’re champions. But champions are also able to adapt to new circumstances and face the challenges of new opponents in a new era.

A slightly bigger frame with the same specs (balance, stiffness, swing weight, stringbed pattern) would keep the stability and control Federer craves, but be more forgiving and give him a bigger sweetspot. Isn’t it at least worth a try?

“ALMOST LIKE CHEATING”
Just ask Federer’s exhibition partner and friend Pete Sampras, who's admitted he regrets not experimenting with a bigger frame while he was still on tour.

Sampras played his whole glorious career with one racquet – the Wilson Pro Staff 85, strung with gut. He won his last Grand Slam at the US Open in 2002, but for some years he’d been already struggling against a new generation of players who were born clutching an oversized racquet in their hands. Apart from his famed fitness, one of the reasons Andre Agassi lasted so long on tour was that from early on in his career he used an oversized frame and was quick to convert to polyester when the Luxilon craze started.

Only recently has Sampras made the move towards a bigger size, but was able to give Federer a hard time in their exhibition matches. Much like it did for Federer, the 90-inch frame with hybrid polyester/gut stringing has helped Sampras produce more power with less effort whilst maintaining touch and a solid response. “You can still swing hard and have control,” said Sampras in San Jose. “It’s a great combination, almost like cheating!”

Though the game’s champions tend to stick to their sticks, changing to a bigger size has brought welcome results for some. The best move was probably John McEnroe’s switch from the conventional wooden Dunlop Maxply McEnroe to the Dunlop Max 200G, which helped him to his Wimbledon title in 1983 and then record the best season win-loss in men’s tennis history in 1984.

Martina Navratilova adopted a Yonex mid-plus racquet in the early 1980s that helped her dominate the tour, while Chris Evert was able to get a late surge in her career and break her rival’s utter dominance by switching to the Wilson Pro Staff 85 and going on to beat Martina at the 1985 and 1986 Roland Garros finals.

In the 1990s, Michael Chang was able to stay close to the top using an extended frame that made up for his lack of height – rather like Marion Bartoli, who uses an extended frame to make the most of her two-handed shots. Thomas Muster also got better results on faster surfaces after he started using an extended racquet, though he admitted afterwards that the same extended frame made him lose his edge on clay courts.

THE WEAPONS OF A NEW GENERATION
Federer himself describes Rafael Nadal’s game as “awkward,” and against it he – and everybody else – needs as much help as they can get.

An ailing Federer lost to a 17-year-old Nadal in Miami in 2004 the first time they met; by 2005, they had started facing each other regularly and it became clear that the Spaniard’s vicious lefty spins affected his execution not only on the baseline but also at the net or returning his slice serve on the ad court. Armed with a powerful 100 square-inch frame and using a polyester string, Rafael Nadal has developed a game style that has almost literally been molded by new technology – the modern racquet is big enough to give him margin for error even with his extreme grips and heavily topspun forehands, which are hit with an estimated 4,800 rpm (400 more than Federer’s). The power of the Babolat frame is tamed with a stiff string that tremendously enhances spin while keeping the ball within the limits of the court.

Three years into their rivalry, Roger Federer is still playing with the smallest racquet frame on tour and is no longer the dominant force he once was. He lost the epic Wimbledon final against Nadal after 4 hours and 48 minutes in dark conditions – the 10 inch. discrepancy in their racquet heads must have been more significant than ever at 9.16 pm. Could the mere five points that separated them on the Centre Court eventually have been reversed with five more square inches in Federer racquet?

The lack of square inches is even more evident on clay, especially when Nadal is hitting his high-bouncing shots to Federer’s backhand. Sampras’s Pro Staff 85 seemed too small in his Roland Garros campaigns, and these days, so does Federer’s.

Does racquet size really matter? Most professionals opt for control over power, and tend to use smaller frames than recreational players. Making the right pick depends on matching the type of racquet and style of play, plus fine-tuning of the racquet specs and string combination. A sweet spot that is five percent bigger could provide a lot more comfort, boosting the margin over error when under pressure and providing a little more power to break the best defense.

Andy Murray was spot-on at Wimbledon when he described the shanking nightmare that is facing Nadal: “He puts so much spin on the ball that it is difficult to find the middle of the racquet.”

So perhaps the first step for Federer should be not a new set of tactics or change in approach, but simply getting a bigger ‘middle of the racquet’ – a bigger sweet spot, thanks to a slightly bigger racquet.

http://www.tennis.com/features/general/features.aspx?id=140804

Rommella
07-31-2008, 04:13 AM
FRAME OF REFERENCE

Comparing the head sizes of the racquets used by Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, as well as some players who have defeated Nadal recently. All use a larger head size than Federer.

Player Racquet Headsize (sq. in)

Roger Federer Wilson KTour 90
Rafael Nadal Babolat Aeropro Drive Cortex 100

Novak Djokovic KBlade Tour 93
David Nalbandian Yonex RDS001 MidPlus 98
Nikolay Davydenko Prince Ozone Tour 100
Andy Roddick Babolat Pure Drive Roddick Plus 100
David Ferrer Prince Shark 100
Thomas Berdych Dunlop Aerogel 2Hundred 95
James Blake Dunlop Aerogel 2Hundred 95
Mikhail Youzhny Head Microgel Extreme Pro 100
Juan Carlos Ferrero Prince Graphite Classic 107

http://www.tennis.com/features/general/features.aspx?id=140804

ExpectedWinner
07-31-2008, 05:09 AM
He hasn’t made it yet, you know,” Federer said. “I’m still hanging in there.”



Somebody skipped math classes in an elementary school. :rolleyes:

FedFan_2007
07-31-2008, 05:10 AM
Stop trolling.

SUKTUEN
07-31-2008, 05:50 AM
Roger is always the world NO.1 in my heart~~:D

Sunset of Age
07-31-2008, 01:30 PM
Richard Krajicek talking out of his ass in his column in Dutch Newspaper 'De Telegraaf' today:

Twijfels over olympische deelname Federer

Nog precies acht dagen voordat op de achtste dag van de achtste maand de Olympische Spelen van start gaan. Het grootste sportevenement ter wereld dat, en dat is toch mooi om vast te stellen, tegenwoordig ook door de tennisprofs meer dan serieus wordt genomen. Dat is in het nog niet eens zo heel grijze verleden wel anders geweest, niet in de laatste plaats bij ondergetekende.

Wanneer volgende week de beste atleten in vele sportdisciplines zich in Peking verzamelen, bevinden ook de beste tennissers van de wereld zich in dat sportieve gezelschap. Daar gaat iedereen in ieder geval wel van uit, maar ik houd met betrekking tot één tennistopper toch nog even een stevige slag om de arm. Zijn naam? Roger Federer.

Inderdaad, de man die al sinds mensenheugenis de nummer één van de wereld is, maar die positie binnenkort kwijt gaat raken. Want dat Federer binnen niet al te lange tijd troonsafstand moet doen, staat voor mij vaster dan zijn deelname aan de Spelen. Rafael Nadal gaat de nieuwe nummer één van de wereld worden. Je hoeft geen hogere wiskunde te hebben gestudeerd om dat rekensommetje te kunnen maken.

De Spanjaard heeft in een voor hem tot nu toe fantastisch verlopen tennisjaar zijn puntenachterstand op Federer enorm verkleind en heeft de rest van dit seizoen niet al te veel wereldranglijstpunten te verdedigen. Federer daarentegen moet de komende maanden een karrenvracht aan punten verdedigen, onder meer in New York, waar hij direct ná de Olympische Spelen als titelverdediger aan de US Open begint. En dat is nu precies de reden waarom ik twijfel aan zijn aanwezigheid in Peking.

Ik vergelijk Roger Federer graag met Pete Sampras, de man die tijdens een groot deel van mijn actieve profcarrière de scepter zwaaide. Voor Sampras draaide alles om het bezetten van de nummer 1-positie en dan vooral aan het einde van het tennisjaar en het veroveren van grandslamtitels. Federer denkt er volgens mij net zo over. En in zijn visie hebben de Olympische Spelen (nog) niet dezelfde exclusieve status als de grandslamtoernooien.

Nu wil het geval dat Federer niet alleen vrijwel zeker de koppositie op de ranking gaat verliezen, maar ook nog eens voor het eerst sinds 2002 een jaar zonder een grandslamtitel dreigt af te sluiten. Natuurlijk zijn de twee door hem al bereikte finales (Roland Garros en Wimbledon) en een halve finale (Australian Open) prestaties waarvan veel van zijn collega's watertandend dromen. Maar Federer zal een jaar zonder grandslamtitel slechts 'teleurstellend' noemen; zo hoog heeft hij de lat nu eenmaal voor zichzelf gelegd.

De US Open wordt voor hem dus een soort 'alles-of-nietstoernooi' en in dat kader is een uitstapje naar China de allesbehalve ideale voorbereiding op het Amerikaanse grand slam. Het gaat me te ver om te stellen dat deelname aan de Spelen funest is voor zijn US Open-prestatie, maar Federer weet als geen ander hoe belastend het olympische uitstapje zal zijn. Denk alleen maar eens aan die twee lange reizen over de Grote Oceaan, zoiets gaat je echt niet in je kouwe kleren zitten. Vergeet daarbij niet dat Federer aan het begin van dit jaar nog kampte met (de naweeën van) de ziekte van Pfeiffer.

Is Roger Federer echt in de ban van de ringen of doet hij de ringen toch in de ban? Hoe belangrijk of onbelangrijk hij de Olympische Spelen ook vindt, het evenement is op z'n zachtst gezegd 'behoorlijk lastig' in te passen in zijn schema. Voeg daarbij het feit dat het volgende olympische tennistoernooi wordt afgewerkt op het gras van het Londense Wimbledon. Inderdaad, het favoriete tennispark van de Zwitser, die al heeft laten doorschemeren dat het olympische tennistoernooi van 2012 op zijn geliefde gras misschien wel de mooiste plaats is om afscheid te nemen van de tennissport.

Dit alles speelt deze dagen door het hoofd van de (nog) wereldleider in de tennissport, die deze week in het Amerikaanse Cincinnati aan de misschien wel belangrijkste periode van zijn seizoen is begonnen. Het is maar de vraag of een retourtje Peking in die periode past. Een vraag die alleen Federer kan beantwoorden, maar het zal mij niet verbazen als dat antwoord op het laatste moment 'nee' blijkt te zijn.


(sorry, in Dutch)

Basically, Krajiced states that he believes that Fed will withdraw from the Olympics to not further disturb his chances at the USO, as it fits so badly in his schedule. Hey, right! Fed didn't know that until yesterday, didn't he? :retard:

Another one on the 'Fed-is-done' bandwagon, apparently. :rolleyes:

riddle05580
07-31-2008, 02:31 PM
This press report says that Roger has been appointed as Switzerland's flagbearer at the Beijing Olympics

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2008/07/136_28590.html

Quote:

...and tennis world No. 1 Roger Federer of Switzerland will tote their countries’ flags during the opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympics on Aug. 8.

...Swiss tennis star Roger Federer will carry his nation's red and white flag around the stadium. Federer, who has remained No. 1 in the world rankings since February 2004, was also a flag bearer at the Athens Olympics in 2004...

SUKTUEN
07-31-2008, 04:04 PM
Congrat Roger!!!!!:D

FedFan_2007
07-31-2008, 04:07 PM
Stop trolling.

Daniel
07-31-2008, 04:14 PM
We're on vacation this week and next, so the 'bags might be thinner than normal....

In an earlier post, you mentioned that we should get back to you in mid-July to see if we were talking about a Federer slump. Well, it is late July now. So I will ask this again. What is going on with Roger Federer?
-- Michael Elias, Tarzana, California

• WTHIGOW Roger Federer was the big question this week. For many of you, the Gilles Simon loss last week in Toronto consecrated this inconvenient truth: we're officially in a Federer recession. Sadly, I tend to agree that the Simon match said a lot. It told me that a) his protestations to the contrary, Federer still hasn't recovered from the aftershock of the Wimbledon final. It told me that he's fatigued. Losing to a lesser player after being up a break in the third, it told me that his confidence isn't where it needs to be.

Again, I encourage realism on both sides. Federer's run of winning 90 percent of his matches as a matter of course lasted for four-plus glorious years. Inevitably, it had to come to an end, the same way the housing market had to cool off eventually. We wish the boom times could last forever but that's not how capitalist markets work and it's not how human nature works either. Inasmuch as you can call a "slump" two Grand Slam finals and a Grand Slam semi, Federer's result are, indisputably, down this year. Whether or not the rankings reflect it this week, next week or after the Open, the torch has been passed to Rafael Nadal.

Having said that, who's to say that Federer can't reclaim his spot. The housing will rebound eventually. Federer can as well. He's barely in his late 20s. He's still immensely talented. His "annus miserabilis" is a dream season for any other player. These rumors of his quitting tennis after Beijing are preposterous. Part of being a champion is responding to defeat and adversity. How Federer bounces back (or doesn't) to the Challenge of Nadal will be a vital chapter in his legacy. Stay tuned.

Link: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/writers/jon_wertheim/07/30/mailbag.0730/?eref=sircrc

SUKTUEN
07-31-2008, 04:16 PM
Roger will go to Macau again in Nov~~~

Daniel
07-31-2008, 04:24 PM
Roger Federer is hoping to become the first player to win a gold medal while being ranked No. 1.



"If maybe I am a player who doesn't have any Grand Slams, maybe a Grand Slam would still do more for my career," Federer said in Toronto. "But because I have 12 already, for me an Olympic gold ranks as high, you know?



"I was very proud to represent the Swiss in the 2000 Olympics, and really just missed that -- very close on the medal. And like last time, was quite disappointing losing the second round [to Tomas Berdych]. So as long as I can walk and play, I will always come and play the Olympics."

Link: http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/columns/story?columnist=garber_greg&id=3511808

SUKTUEN
07-31-2008, 04:32 PM
GOOD Luck in China Olympics Games Roger!!:devil::devil:

FedFan_2007
07-31-2008, 05:42 PM
Stop trolling.

nobama
07-31-2008, 06:04 PM
According to this article Roger will be carrying the flag for Switzerland at the Olympics. Haven't seen it confirmed by Swiss media yet though...
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2008/07/136_28590.html

Eden
07-31-2008, 11:13 PM
Reign Over? Federer Falls To Karlovic
By Tennis Week
Thursday, July 31, 2008

Roger Federer's 234-week reign as World No. 1 will come to an end if Rafael Nadal wins the Cincinnati title.

The blurring ball loomed as large as a BB as it sped by Roger Federer and bounced off the back wall. Ivo Karlovic crushed yet another ace as Federer could only turn his head watching the ball and his hopes of defending his Cincinnati title fly by him.

Federer never surrendered serve yet still lost the match, 6-7(6), 6-4, 6-7(5) and will likely lose his No. 1 rank as a result.

The 6-foot-10 Croatian cracked 22 aces in earning his first victory over Federer in seven meetings and opening the door for Rafael Nadal to end Federer's reign as World No. 1.

The second-ranked Spaniard, who trails Federer by only 300 points in the rankings, can snap the Swiss's streak of 235 consecutive weeks as World No. 1 by winning the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters title.

When Federer's final backhand landed beyond the baseline on the second match point, Federer failed to reach the quarterfinals for the second straight week and Karlovic crashed to the court falling flat on his back and rising with a memorable triumph. Winless in six prior matches against Federer, the tallest man on the ATP tour had lost 13 of the previous 15 sets the pair had played, but nine of those sets ended in tie breakers and today Karlovic refused to bend in the breakers.

The reigning Roland Garros and Wimbledon winner will carry a 30-match winning streak as well as five consecutive tournament titles into tonight's match against Tommy Haas. Nadal has held the World No. 2 ranking for a record 157 weeks.

Interestingly, it was Karlovic who nearly knocked Nadal out of last month's Queen's Club tournament. But the top-seeded Spaniard withstood a barrage of 35 aces delivered by the tower of power and advanced to the Artois Championships semifinals without the benefit of a service break in a 6-7(5), 7-6(5), 7-6(4) victory.

Federer has long said Karlovic owns the most lethal serve in tennis and today he got a taste of it.

Swatting seven aces, Karlovic forced a tie break in a first set that featured no service breaks. Reaching back to rip a 132 mph ace, Karlovic earned his first set point, which Federer immediately erased with a stirring inside-out forehand winner to forge a 6-6 tie. A Federer forehand barely missed the mark beyond the baseline, but was not called out. Karlovic challenged and Hawk-Eye showed the ball was long handing Karlovic a second set point. This time, he converted with a riveting forehand that found the corner and forced a Federer reply that missed the mark wide to seal the opening set.

Federer, who lost the first set tie break in his second-round match against Robby Ginepri, rallied again. He broke at 30 to take a 3-2 second-set lead and saved two break points in the set to force a decisive set.

Both men were untouchable on serve for much of the final set: Federer won 21 of 23 first-serve points and all eight of his second serve points, while Karlovic dropped two points (23 of 25) on his first serve and three points (seven of 10) on his second serve.

With his expansive reach, exceptional racquet head speed and rapid wrist snap, Karlovic is adept at exploiting extreme corners of the service box unexplored by even the best servers on the ATP Tour. Karlovic's substantial reach makes his serve as easy to return as catching a marble tossed from the top of the Washington monument.

"His serve is probably the biggest weapon in tennis," said Andy Roddick, who holds the record for fastest serve. "You can’t teach being 6-foot-10. It’s like he’s serving out of a tree. Just the angles that he’s able to create, he makes you hit his serves over your head where you’re normally hitting them from around your hip."

The 22nd-ranked Croatian earned the early mini-break in the tie break and stretched his lead to 4-2. Federer eventually saved the first match point, but on a second serve, Karlovic converted the second to seal the two hour, 1-minute match that may well signal a changing of the guard in the rankings if Nadal wins the the title to displace the 12-time Grand Slam champion at the top of tennis.

Source: http://www.tennisweek.com/news/fullstory.sps?inewsid=6615122

riddle05580
08-01-2008, 12:07 AM
http://www.talkabouttennis.com/content/showentry.php?e=8263

July 31, 2008

I. KARLOVIC/R. Federer
7-6, 4-6, 7-6

An interview with:
ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.


Q. You weren't broken in this match. How...

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, it's disappointing losing without getting broken, but it's not the first player it happens to. You know, especially against a guy like Ivo. He served really well, so it was always going to be a hard match.


Q. What do you think the difference was in the match? Seemed to be determined on a couple of points.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, like you said, a couple points here and there really made the difference.I mean, I don't know where and when they were, but he got the upper hand in the end.

Q. Did you find anything in these last two matches that gives you a positive feeling going ahead?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I don't know what to take out of this match, you know. There's always going to be a nothing match, these type of matches, you know. I mean, what are you going to do? I just tried to serve well.

Yeah, I mean, there's always danger in tough matches against Ivo. I knew that from the start.


Q. How discouraging is it for you that another Masters Series event goes by without you winning it?

ROGER FEDERER: No problem. It wasn't an Olympic or a US Open, so I can live with that.


Q. Have you already thought about how you're going regroup?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not yet. Too early.


Q. Will you follow the rest of the tournament and see how Rafa does?

ROGER FEDERER: No.


Q. In the tiebreak sets were you attacking his backhand a little bit more? It looked like in the tiebreak he maybe changed his tactics a little bit as opposed to the regular sets.

ROGER FEDERER: He or I changed?


Q. He.

ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, I guess his backhand is his more safe shot, but it allows you to maneuver him around a little more. His forehand is more dangerous. So always I guess depends how the point sort of starts with start with your own serve.

Yeah, I mean, maybe I got a little bit unlucky on a couple. I don't know. But he definitely served well. Maybe in the last tiebreaker when I had three chances on second serves I wasn't able to get one when I really needed to be on even terms with him.

I guess that cost me the match, which is hard to accept.


Q. To what extent would you hope that Nadal doesn't win this tournament?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't care.


Q. How tough is that serve compared to the other big servers? Do you think the height is a factor?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, sure. His trajectory is unbelievable. He's definitely got the best serve in the game. Don't know about his second serve. I'm surprised he doesn't serve and volley off it because he could.

But his first serve is definitely I mean, against nobody do I have to guess on the serve except against Ivo. Especially here with the light in the back. It's very bright and hard to see the ball.

Yeah, I mean, I basically have to guess on every serve and it makes it hard. On top of that he got the unreturnable serves. Sometimes on the ad side and down the T, if he clocks it on the line there's nothing you can do. Makes it extremely difficult.


Q. Were you happy your preparation coming into this week?

ROGER FEDERER: Lack in preparation?


Q. Were you happy with it?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, no, of course not. I wish I could have had more practice, but the schedule this year makes it hard for us players. It's the way it is. It's the same for everybody.

But I think for Rafa and myself it's particularly hard, because we were in the finals of Wimbledon so we didn't get an extra week or two.

Look, he's doing well, and I have done well in the past as well. This year was hard I guess with the start of the year. But nevertheless, I still think it's been a good year.
I just hope I can show it now at the Olympics and the US Open.


Q. At what point do you start losing confidence in yourself and your game? And will that ever happen?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know. So far it's okay. You know, I mean, I guess I'll analyze and assess my game after the US Open. For the moment it's just all a blur. I mean, it's so many tournaments in a row, big tournaments in a row, it's hard, you know.

I mean, it's a tough trip we got up in front of us now, going back to China and coming back to the Open. I'm looking forward for the next two tournaments. Those are really the ones that can make this season from a good one to a great one again. I hope I can manage to pull off something in the next couple weeks.


Q. Last match you mentioned that the courts here are quicker that Toronto. Was that a factor at all? Does it take you that long to adjust from maybe a slower to a faster court?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I have a tendency to think it's easier going from a fast court to a slow court, you know. Then again, in this match I don't think it played a factor. I've played Ivo on clay, on grass, hard court, on indoor. I played him on all surfaces and his serve comes the same speed, you know, so it doesn't help a whole lot. Actually he get more play action on the slower surfaces, so he has a tendency to be more dangerous in these conditions.

But what are you going to do today if he serves like that? Maybe if I would have gotten the first set I would be sitting here winning 7-6, 6-4. That's not the case, so it's kind of brutal.

Minnie
08-01-2008, 12:38 AM
Thanks for posting the interview ... what kind of dumb question is that "To what extent do you hope Nadal doesn't win this tournament" :rolleyes:

FedFan_2007
08-01-2008, 12:39 AM
Maybe Roger can more brutally run into the knife next time he plays Nadal? Amazing how karma works...

SUKTUEN
08-01-2008, 05:39 AM
allez Roger!! Don't give up!!

SUKTUEN
08-01-2008, 05:41 AM
Allez Roger! Don't give up!!

Daniel
08-01-2008, 06:58 AM
Federer out in Cincinnati, could slip from No. 1
By JOE KAY, AP Sports Writer


AP - Jul 28, 9:11 pm EDT 1 of 24 Tennis Gallery MASON, Ohio (AP)—Roger Federer lost another match and, perhaps, his longtime grip on No. 1, as well.

The world’s top-ranked player had another out-of-character setback on Thursday, a three-set loss to Ivo Karlovic that left the Croat exulting on his back and opened the way for Rafael Nadal to take over the No. 1 spot by winning the Cincinnati Masters championship.

Nadal stayed on course for the seismic shift by beating Tommy Haas 6-4, 7-6 (0) later Thursday, reaching the quarterfinals with his 31st consecutive win. Three more wins and the top spot in the world rankings belongs to him next week.

Even if he doesn’t win the championship in Cincinnati, he can pile up enough points to overtake Federer in the next few weeks.

“I know I’m in good position,” Nadal said. “In truth, I don’t think about it too much.”

It’s been a long time coming.


Federer has been ranked No. 1 since Feb. 2, 2004, a record of 235 consecutive weeks. He and Nadal have held the top two spots since July 25, 2005. They will swap if Nadal extends his run of five consecutive tournament titles.

Asked about the possibility, Federer said, “I don’t care.”

He’s got bigger concerns.

Since his epic five-set loss to Nadal at Wimbledon, Federer has lost in the second round in Toronto and failed to make the quarterfinals in Cincinnati, where he won the title last year. The 26-year-old Swiss star has been struggling to regain his aura of domination since he started the year with mononucleosis.

Nadal has taken advantage by improving his hard-court game and surpassing Federer on the court if not in the rankings.

“Look, he’s doing well and I have done well in the past,” Federer said. “This year was hard, I guess, with the start of the year. But nevertheless, I still think it’s been a good year. I just hope I can show it now at the Olympics and the U.S. Open.

“I’m looking forward for the next two tournaments. Those are really the ones that can make this season from a good one to a great one again.”

There was nothing great about his few days in Cincinnati.

Federer needed three sets to get through his first match. Then, he lost for the first time in his career when he didn’t drop a game on his serve. He simply couldn’t crack Karlovic’s tough serve.

Federer had won the six previous times he faced the 6-foot-10 Karlovic, but their matches were close. Federer had won 13 of those 15 sets, although nine ended in tiebreakers.

Appropriately, two of their three sets on Thursday ended in tiebreakers, as well. Using his overpowering serve, Karlovic got the best of them both.

He started the decisive one with a pair of aces—he had 21 overall in the match—and went up 6-3 with a 140 mph serve that Federer couldn’t return. After Karlovic let a couple of match points slip away, Federer hit a backhand long, ending the match.

Karlovic fell on his back and raised his arms in triumph over a win that didn’t totally surprise him.


“I already played against him six times and it was always close, so I knew that I’m going to have a chance today,” Karlovic said.

Daniel
08-01-2008, 07:02 AM
Link: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-08/01/content_8889706.htm

Federer looks to Olympics savior despite losing again

BEIJING, August 1 (Xinhua) -- World number one Roger Federer hopes to turn around his bad fortune of the season at the Beijing Olympics after his another shock loss to Croat Ivo Karlovic at the Cincinnati Masters on Thursday.

Karlovic powered 22 aces and some more service winners to overcame the Swiss 7-6 (8), 4-6 and 6-7 (7), who prevailed in all their six previous meetings.

"This year was hard, I guess, with the start of the year. But nevertheless, I still think it's been a good year. I just hope I can show it now at the Olympics and the U.S. Open," said Federer, who will be playing his third Olympics.

"I'm looking forward for the next two tournaments. Those are really the ones that can make this season from a good one to a great one," he added.

Elsewhere, Rafael Nadal stayed on course for the power shift by beating German Tommy Haas 6-4, 7-6 (0) later Thursday, reaching the quarterfinals with his 31st consecutive win.

Should Nadal win the Cincinnati Masters this weekend, he would dethrone Federer, who has held top spot in the world rankings for 235 consecutive weeks (since February 2004). Federer and the Spaniard have held the top two spots since July 25, 2005.

In the opening-set tiebreak it all went with serve till 6-6 when Federer topspun a drive which was called in, only for it to be changed after Karlovic appealed to the Hawkeye. Karlovic then hit a winning forehand drive on the next point.

Federer chiseled out one break of serve in the fifth game of the second set but in the deciding third-set tiebreak, Federer suffered a chronic piece of ill-fortune.

Swiss delegation fielded Federer and Stanislas Wawrinka, who now ranked 10th in the world, to the Beijing Olympic tennis event.

Daniel
08-01-2008, 07:04 AM
Link: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/tennis/article4440150.ece

Roger Federer prepares to step aside for Rafael Nadal after his world crashes in
Simon Cambers

So now we know. Roger Federer’s four-year - or 235-week - reign as world No 1 is almost over. The Swiss’s 7-6, 4-6, 7-6 defeat by Ivo Karlovic, of Croatia, in the third round of the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters, last night means that if Rafael Nadal wins the title in Cincinnati this week, he will usurp the Swiss to become the 24th man to top the ATP world rankings.

Having lost his Wimbledon crown to the Spaniard last month, Federer is now on the verge of losing the other thing most dear to him. And if it does not happen this week, then, depending on how far Nadal goes, it will almost certainly happen next week. Only 300 points separated the two at the start of this week and the 350 points that Federer won in reaching the final in Toronto last year drop off the computer on August 11, compared with 225 for Nadal.

At the very latest, August 18 – the beginning of the week when the seedings for the US Open are announced – will be D-Day.

For many, Nadal became the unofficial world No 1 the moment he denied Federer a sixth straight Wimbledon title. When it does happen, no one will be able to say he does not merit it.

Federer ready to make amends in Beijing
“I’m looking forward to the next two tournaments,” a defiant Federer said. “Those are really the ones that can make this season from a good one to a great one again. I hope I can manage to pull off something in the next couple of weeks.”

Last week Federer had said: “If Nadal gets it [the No 1 ranking] he deserves it. He’s been No 2 for a long, long time. He had his chances in the past and now he’s closer than ever just because he could really get Wimbledon. That was a big one for him and he’s been on an incredible roll.”

When, come December, we reflect on the year as a whole, the manner of Nadal’s 6-3, 6-0, 6-1 destruction of Federer in the final at Roland Garros may be seen as a watershed. The win at Wimbledon four weeks later was a massive blow, the effect of which has been clear in the past two weeks.

First Federer was beaten by Gilles Simon, of France, in the second round of the Rogers Cup in Toronto. Then, last night, he fell under a barrage of 22 aces from Karlovic, a man who had taken just three sets from him in six previous meetings.

The loss of top spot would surely be hard for Federer to take. Pete Sampras’s record of 14 grand-slam titles had seemed his for the taking, but now who is to say he will even win another grand-slam title? Nadal seems to be improving each week and Novak Djokovic, the Australian Open champion, is a growing threat.

Federer has won only two titles this year, in Estoril and Halle, he lost in the semi-finals of the Australian Open and in addition to his defeats by Nadal in Paris and at Wimbledon, he has suffered several shocking losses. Now we will see what he is made of. If he rebounds, then he will probably be considered an even greater champion. If not, as strange as it seems, it could be the end of him as a grand-slam threat.

Federer’s defeat was Andy Murray’s gain as the British No 1 moved into the last eight last night with a 6-3, 6-3 win over Dmitry Tursunov, of Russia. A semi-final against Federer had been his goal at the start of the week, but his path is relatively clear. His next opponent will be either Igor Andreev, of Russia, or Carlos Moyà, of Spain. Maria Sharapova has pulled out of the Beijing Olympics after an MRI scan on her right shoulder revealed two small tears. The Russian world No 3 was examined after withdrawing from the Rogers Cup on Wednesday evening with a sore shoulder.

Handover of power

- Roger Federer has been the world No 1 for 235 consecutive weeks, since February 2, 2004

- Rafael Nadal has been world No 2 for 158 consecutive weeks

- At start of this week 300 points separated the two

- Nadal will become world No 1 on August 4 if he wins the event in Cincinnati

- The Spaniard could become No 1 on August 11, depending on the Cincinnati result – this is because Federer will lose 125 more points than Nadal once last year’s result in Toronto drops off the computer

avocadoe
08-01-2008, 11:39 AM
This doesn't really belong here, but not sure where to put it.I'll put it in the chat thread too
SIGNS: Here are a couple of contrasting ones: the first from rogerfederer.com poster, and the second my experience yesterday.
Steerpike60GOOD NEWS!! You guys, I'm crying but not because of this match, I'm crying because I'm happy!!!

Let me explain I was pretty upset at work when I was watching the scores and I saw Roger lose. It was strange because from what I read, I knew that Roger had played a good match but just came up a bit short. I guess that is better than what happened in Toronto, but this year...that doesn't mean much to us fans.

Anyway, all the way home, I'm cursing to the world. I mean, I was "F**K this and F**K that. I was so sad and mad FOR Roger. I mean...how much does this guy have to take this year? He has been beaten down so many times; and every time it takes a little bit more from his heart and from his confidence. But God love him....he keeps trying. He chose to play thru his illness rather than take time off. He blew leads, he gifted matches, and he just struggled. He gets his butt handed to him at the FO and he suffers a heart-breaker at Wimbledon. But does he stay away? No, he comes back out facing all the media scrutiny and his own doubts. He once again loses a match he shouldn't have at Toronto, but he perseveres. He comes here and toughs out a win, but then once again...he loses a heart-breaker.

I was just so angry at God (not justified, I know) but I had no one else to yell at. I was angry for myself because I know that I can't take any more of this. My heart is breaking. And if my heart is breaking...man, how much is Roger feeling? It's bad enough for him to suffer a bad illness and once again fall short at the FO, but then to lose his beloved tournament...and now probably his #1 ranking. Why everything? Why all of it at one time?

And then to top it off....I started thinking about the GENIUS banner...you know the one - the one my brother and Mom made that has been around the world. Well, it's been lost in the mail for over a month now (coming from Germany). I have been distraught over that for a few weeks and all these losses by Roger were not helping. So...while I was cursing God...I thought I would blame him for the loss of the banner as well.

DAMN EVERYONE! DAMN 2008!

So...I come home, eyes red, voice scratchy from screaming, and there it was....a package from Germany.

OMIGAWD!! The banner!!! I just burst out crying again! But I was crying tears of joy! Why today? Why did it arrive today?

Now, only once before in my life have I ever thought I got a sign from God...but I gotta tell you....I'm feeling it. I truly think the banner arrived today to tell me to 'have faith' to 'hang in there and believe'.

Man...I'm going to have to pray big time tonight and apologize to God because I really did go off on him and the world.

It's going to be okay, you guys. The GENIUS banner is back and I truly believe with all my heart that the genius that is Roger Federer will be back too.

Smile everyone...good times are a-coming!!! And Mine:
The weirdest thing happened yesterday. I was working on a chapter and wanted to know Roger's ranking at two different moments in his career and went to the ATP site where its easy to plug in a players name and check ranking history, year, and month, even at a particular tournament with two or three clicks. I do it a fair amount. Anyway, yesterday, as I hunted, I got a "Virus Alert", from by security company that it had blocked the weird spelling, Fbderrer Virus and my computer was safe. I couldn't get back into Federer's histroy etc again, it's been wiped OUT. The worst feeling, and annoyingly, the alert came up many times (it always does that for the day) reminding me. I wonder if someone had hacked his material, or IF it was just my computer. Anyway, felt unsettled, and then he lost, too. I'm afraid to go check and see if it's still a proble. Then, this morning, went to listen the his interview at the Master's site, listened to a couple before him, but when I clicked on him, my browser, Internet Explorer, put up a meesage that it had to close, sorry for the inconvenience!

I'd appreciate knowing if anyone else had this problem and if it appears top be safe to ener and access the data today. Thanks in advance.

riddle05580
08-01-2008, 02:48 PM
ATP - ROGER TO LEAD SWITZERLAND


One of the athletes of each country has the honour of carrying the national flag during the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games. This year it will be Roger to head the Swiss delegation into the stadium! After having marched in front of the nation’s group in Athens four years ago he will have the privilege to do so again on August 08 in Beijing – a fantastic birthday present for our champion!

“It is a true honour for me to lead the Swiss athletes into the stadium, carrying the Swiss flag. I have had the privilege to experience many wonderful things; the Olympics are and will always be one of the best. So I am really looking forward to those moments - of course also since this is one of the most wonderful birthday presents I could possibly wish for.

During my first Olympics in Sydney 2000 I had the opportunity to attend competitions in swimming and badminton. Those are great, lasting memories. Four years ago my schedule didn’t allow following any other tournaments. This year I would love to see some basketball-action with the American ‘Dream Team’.

I am certainly looking forward to these Games enormously in many different respects.”

So far 36 female and 48 male Swiss athletes have qualified for Beijing. They represent the following sports: tennis, athletics, shooting, fencing, cycling, mountainbiking, judo, swimming, sailing, triathlon, rowing, gymnastics, badminton, riding, canoeing, pentathlon, taekwondo, archery and beach volleyball. The Swiss won five medals at the Olympic Summer Games in Athens 2004 and nine in Sydney 2000. And of course we are hoping for a good result in China as well! The Olympic Stadium was, after all, designed by the Swiss star-architects Herzog & de Meuron.

PS: August 01 is the Swiss national holiday!

http://www.rogerfederer.com/en/rogers/news/newsdetail.cfm?uNewsID=772

alfonsojose
08-01-2008, 03:20 PM
Hi :wavey: OK, i'm not a roger fan :o but this is interesting
http://www.tennis.com/features/general/features.aspx?id=140804

Sunset of Age
08-01-2008, 03:25 PM
Hi :wavey: OK, i'm not a roger fan :o but this is interesting
http://www.tennis.com/features/general/features.aspx?id=140804

Thanks for posting. It is an interesting article indeed. But Roger is a stubborn fellow, alas, so I don't see him experimenting with a different racket soon.

SUKTUEN
08-01-2008, 03:57 PM
ROGER TO LEAD SWITZERLAND


:bigclap::bigclap:

riddle05580
08-02-2008, 02:22 AM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/2486167/The-age-of-Federer-heads-to-a-close---tennis.html

Roger Federer's dominance over men's tennis nears its end as Rafael Nadal eyes the crown

An age of elegance in men's tennis seems for all the world to be drawing to an inelegant close, with Roger Federer's hold on the world No 1 ranking, which was once a strong two-handed grasp, now just a loose one-fingered grip.

By Mark Hodgkinson
Last Updated: 12:12AM BST 02 Aug 2008

Rafael Nadal, the world No 1 to-be, is a modern, powerful, grunting, wonderfully confrontational tennis player, but Federer at his finest has swished his racket with a sophistication that should have earned him bonus points for artistic impression.

Perhaps no one will ever dominate tennis as Federer has over the last four-plus years. They certainly will not dominate with the same style and elan. The age of elegance goes when he loses the No 1 ranking – even if he later retakes it, that first loss of the top ranking would mark the psychological, emotional end to the Federer Years.

Federer's defeat to Croatian Ivo Karlovic in the third round of the Cincinnati Masters meant that Nadal could become the world No 1 by taking the title on the blue Ohio cement tomorrow. Even if Nadal does not take the top ranking in Ohio State, then he has every chance of doing so at the Beijing Olympics or at New York City's US Open, but it would be a pity if Federer's record run as the world No 1, which stands at 235 unbroken weeks, is remembered for some of the average, emotionally fragile tennis he has played over the last seven months.

It once seemed easy, almost too easy, for Federer, but now he is losing to players who barely have a fraction of his talent for elegant annihilation.

With Nadal, you admire the brutish energy and athleticism, but with Federer it has all been about the grace and the beauty; even when Federer's shots flew violently off his strings, they were somehow imbued with an elegant, beautiful violence. Spin, slice and swerve, and the sort of placement that would not shame a laser-guided warhead – Federer can make a tennis ball do almost anything apart from take up yodelling. And all without seemingly having a single sweat-gland in his body. Federer has never done mechanical, has never been a grinder, a slugger or a hacker.

Federer, a player who has regularly been smoother on court than a bar of Lindt chocolate, has won 12 grand slams, including 10 during his time as the world No 1 – the other two were his first Wimbledon trophy, in the summer of 2003, and the 2004 Australian Open title that brought him the top ranking. He won five Wimbledon trophies in a row, equalling Bjorn Borg's record, and came within a few shots of scoring a sixth in succession, as he had his chances in the near-darkness of Centre Court in that final set against Nadal.

He has been the King of Queens Borough in New York City, winning the last four US Open tournaments. He has won three Australian Open titles. He has also proved himself to be the second best clay-court player in the world, with three appearances in the French Open final – if it had not been for Nadal, he would have completed the near-mythical calendar grand slam in 2006 and 2007.

Federer turns 27 next week, which is middle-aged for a tennis player. Life certainly does not begin after the big three-oh for those on the tour. He has suggested in the past that he could carry on until his mid-thirties, but whether he does so or not will depend heavily on what happens at the Olympics, the US Open, and at the slams next season. Federer is not going to be happy if he is not winning grand slams. If Andy Murray had had the season that Federer has had so far – the Swiss has been a semi-finalist at Melbourne Park, a finalist at Roland Garros and the runner-up at the All England Club – then that would have been a hugely impressive effort by the Briton, but Federer is judged by very different standards to the rest. By losing his Wimbledon title, and probably now his world No 1 ranking too, Federer has lost two of his most precious possessions.

But perhaps Beijing will give him what he craves more than almost any other title – an Olympic gold medal around his neck. Federer duffed up his chance to win a bronze medal at the 2000 Sydney Games, and was emotional after he went out early in Athens four years later. Perhaps Federer will go into the Olympic tournament as the world No 1, perhaps as the world No 2. But how will be bare up mentally and emotionally? At the moment, Federer's confidence is dangerously low. Does Federer still have it in him to beat Pete Sampras' record of 14 grand slams? Probably? Perhaps? No one in tennis wants to see Federer start trashing his own legend.

Federer's Aces
Winning a fifth successive Wimbledon title when he beat Rafael Nadal in the summer of 2007 to equal Bjorn Borg’s record.
Scoring a fourth successive US Open trophy by beating Novak Djokovic in last season’s final.
Going on a 41-match unbeaten run, just five wins short of Guillermo Vilas’ 46-match record.
Achieving his only victory against Nadal on a clay court - in the final of the 2007 Hamburg Masters.
Reaching three French Open finals - although he lost them all to Nadal.

SUKTUEN
08-02-2008, 09:08 AM
:worship:

Eden
08-02-2008, 12:41 PM
By any measure, Federer's reign was quite remarkable

By JON SPENCER
• News Journal
• August 2, 2008

Feb. 2, 2004. That was the day Roger Federer took over the No. 1 ranking in men's tennis, but you probably didn't notice.

The local sports pages were crammed with bigger headlines. An NBA rookie named LeBron scored a then-career-high 38 points in a win over the Wizards. "Pudge" Rodriguez accepted $40 million from the Tigers, making the division rival Indians shrink in their small market cocoon. And, lest we forget, a former Michigan Wolverine (ugh) threw three touchdown passes to lift the Pats past the Panthers in Super Bowl XXXVIII.

Thanks to her infamous "wardrobe malfunction" during halftime of that game, even Janet Jackson got more, um, exposure.

But few celebrities, whether they are incredibly-gifted athletes or pop stars who get more mileage from their cleavage than music, have had more staying power than Federer, whose precision-crafted game should give us an even greater appreciation of Swiss engineering.

Unfortunately, he's been so consistently brilliant for so long that Federer's battle to stave off Rafael Nadal for No.1, especially in the wake of their epic five-set final this year at Wimbledon, has garnered him far more attention than his record-235 consecutive weeks at the top.

"It was the hardest loss I've ever had and maybe the hardest one I'll ever have in my career," said Federer, a ballcap from his own "RF" designer label perched on his head as he addressed the media this week from the Western & Southern Financial Group Masters in greater Cincinnati.

"To lose, after being so close in a thriller match, is hard, but I thought it was a great match and great for tennis. Many people were talking about it and I think that's a very positive thing."

Nadal, ranked No. 2 for 158 straight weeks, ended Federer's five-year Wimbledon reign with a 6-4, 6-4, 6-7, 6-7, 9-7 victory that last 4 hours and 50 minutes (not including two rain delays) and is hailed by many historians as the greatest match of all-time.

After watching their pyrotechnics from courtside, NBC commentator John McEnroe joined that chorus, calling it the best he's ever seen, but obviously he wasn't able to watch himself in his 1980 five-set final with five-time champ Bjorn Borg. From this vantage point, that duel is hard to top, with Borg prevailing 8-6 in the fifth after losing an 18-16, 22-minute tiebreaker in the fourth.

"I think our (rivalry) is particularly intriguing because we have such different (personalities) and different styles, like maybe Borg and McEnroe had," said Federer, who is the ice, like Borg, to Nadal's (and McEnroe's) fire. "But then they only played a handful of times and we played 20 times ... and we have the feeling it's going to happen another 20 times.

"That's why I think we're right in the prime of this rivalry. On top of that, he was able to beat me more often than I've beaten him (especially on clay, where Nadal has won four French Open titles), even though I'm No. 1 for so long. I think all these things make it that much more intriguing. I think also with me winning the U.S. Open so many times (four) and being so successful in the States, I just think it's poised to be one of the great rivalries."

Federer, who turns 27 next week, insists the pressure of being No. 1 hasn't gotten to him, but this year has been a struggle. Although his loss to Nadal in Paris was no shocker, he also fell to eventual champ Novak Djokovic in the semifinals of the Australian Open and has lost three of his last four matches, starting with the Wimbledon finale.

He's had great success in Cincinnati, winning the title last year and in 2005, but he came within a few points of being ousted in his opening match by American Robby Ginepri before losing in the next round to Croatia's 16th seed Ivo Karlovic, whose greatest distinction is being 6-foot 10 inches tall.

"I've had (pressure) for five years now, so it's nothing new, just that maybe the No. 1 position looks a bit more in danger than the past," said Federer, who lost a three-setter to Karlovic without once losing his serve. "All I can do is look at the big picture and try to play well and not go crazy over it. I know there's more talk about it the last couple of weeks and months. That's OK. Rafa deserves the credit."

Ginepri agrees with Djokovic, who created a stir at the outset of Wimbledon by saying Federer is more vulnerable than in the past.

"I think guys have seen that he's, you know, human," Ginepri said. "He's had such a stellar career that it's hard to keep that up. Maybe he's not as steady as he used to be. I think guys are feeling that a little bit more now, especially in the last couple of weeks. But if he doesn't stay No. 1, he'll find his way back to the top. He's a tremendous athlete."

No question, but Federer's suddenly flighty forehand has become higher maintenance than Manny Ramirez or Brett Favre.

A title this weekend by Nadal will enable him to overtake Federer at the top.

"To be No. 1 for your career is an important goal," the 22-year-old Spaniard said, "especially when I have five Grand Slam (titles) already, 12 Masters Series (titles), 30 tournaments (titles). So a lot of good results, but I don't have the No. 1 -- not yet."

Whatever happens, Federer can take comfort in knowing his game has had a longer shelf life than Janet Jackson's "Super" embarrassing decolletage.

"I do enjoy the challenge that I'm No. 1 in the world -- I'd rather it be me than him," Federer said. "If I would lose it, I would want it back. But if Rafa were to get it, look what he had to achieve to get it. If he gets it, he deserves it. He's been No. 2 for a long, long time. Let's not forget about that."

Source: http://www.mansfieldnewsjournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080802/SPORTS/808020328

Daniel
08-02-2008, 12:46 PM
Link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/606/A39034037

Is this the end of the Federer era?
by Sarah Holt - BBC Sport (U1654858) 02 August 2008

After a masterful four-and-a-half year reign at the top of the tennis tree, Roger Federer is about to be toppled by the unstoppable rise of Rafael Nadal.

Federer's third-round defeat by Ivo Karlovic in Cincinnati was more than just another of his, increasingly unsurprising, shock defeats of 2008 - it opened the door for Nadal to make the world number one spot his own.

Federer - a 12-time Grand Slam winner - has been ranked world number one since 2 February 2004, a record of 235 consecutive weeks.

But if Nadal, who has muscled his way into the semi-finals, takes the Cincinnati title he will be crowned world number one on Monday 4 August.

Should the 22-year-old lose Sunday's final he must wait another week to top the rankings, while a semi-final defeat by Novak Djokovic would delay his coronation until 18 August.

The date won't matter much to Federer.

At 26 years old - the same age that 11-time Grand Slam champion Bjorn Borg chose to quit the sport - the Swiss is grappling with the end of his own era.

What's worse for Federer is that right now any light at the end of the tunnel is being blocked out by the imposing figure of Nadal.

His nemesis, always unbeatable on clay, has worked to improve his game on hard courts and grass too, building himself into the complete tennis player.

Nadal displayed his new-found mastery of the grass, first by triumphing at Queen's and then by ending Federer's five-year winning run at Wimbledon, denying the Swiss a record sixth straight title.

Federer and Nadal fought tooth and nail in a dramatic five-set final.

In the gathering evening gloom, there was a palpable sense on Centre Court that one of them was going to crack first - and this time it was Federer.

With few spoils left to play for this season, can Federer fight back or has the Fed Express run out of steam?

Asked about losing his number one ranking, Federer replied, "I don't care.

"Look, he's doing well and I have done well in the
past.

"This year was hard, I guess, with the start of the year but nevertheless I still think it's a good year."

Federer's topsy-turvy form can in part be excused by illness.

Just after the Australian Open, where he lost in the semi-finals, the Swiss was diagnosed with mononucleosis (glandular fever), a virus causing fevers, sore throat and swollen lymph glands.

If the illness lingers it can develop into chronic fatigue syndrome which can last for years.

But Federer is showing no signs of slowing down just yet.

He will carry the Swiss flag at the opening ceremony for the Olympic Games in Beijing next Friday before turning his attention to the US Open - the only Grand Slam still in his possession - on 25 August.

"I'm looking forward to the next two tournaments," said Federer. "Those are really the ones that can make this season from a good one to a great one again."

Federer might be overestimating the importance of a potential Olympic gold and a fifth victory at Flushing Meadows.

But after Federer's annus horribilis, a return to winning ways might just give him enough belief that there is life in old Rog yet.

anon57
08-02-2008, 12:46 PM
That's a nice article, Thanks for posting Doris.

Daniel
08-02-2008, 12:47 PM
Link: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-08/02/content_8907576.htm

Federer to carry flag for Switzerland in Beijing

BEIJING, Aug. 2 (Xinhua) -- World number one Roger Federer said on Friday that he will bear the Swiss flag at the Olympic Games opening ceremony on Aug. 8.

Federer, who will be celebrating his 27th birthday on the day ofthe ceremony, also led out his country at the opening of the Athens Olympics four years ago.

"It is a true honor for me to lead the Swiss athletes into the stadium, carrying the Swiss flag," Federer said on his official website.

"I have had the privilege to experience many wonderful things. The Olympics are and will always be one of the best.

"I am really looking forward to those moments -- of course also since this is one of the most wonderful birthday presents I could possibly wish for."

Federer came into the Athens Games as a heavy gold medal favorite but suffered an upset against Czech Republic's Tomas Berdych in the second round.

The 12-times grand slam champion hit low form this season as he could lose his world number one ranking before the start of this month's Games.

On Thursday he made another early exit after losing to Croat IvoKarlovic in the third round of the Cincinatti Masters, while Spanish rival Rafael Nadal, who beat Federer in this year's French Open and Wimbledon finals, could now end Federer's 235-week dominance over the top ranking if he claims the Cincinatti title.

"During my first Olympics in Sydney 2000 I had the opportunity to attend competitions in swimming and badminton. Those are great, lasting memories. Four years ago my schedule didn't allow following any other tournaments. This year I would love to see some basketball action with the American 'Dream Team'."

So far 36 female and 48 male Swiss athletes have qualified for Beijing. The Swiss won five medals at the Olympic Summer Games in Athens 2004 and nine in Sydney 2000.

Daniel
08-02-2008, 12:52 PM
Link: http://www.hindu.com/2008/07/31/stories/2008073157021800.htm

Rafael Nadal will be the man to beat

“The Olympics comes around only once every four years, and the U.S. Open is there every single year. It has been a dream of mine ever since I was a little girl,” said Russian Maria Sharapova on what the Olympics meant to her.

Primarily, tennis at the Olympics allows the element of intrigue.

The prospect of watching some of the game’s biggest stars free from the routine interwoven battles is, if nothing more, a new viewing experience. The dynamic here changes.

A potential Federer-Nadal clash in the Olympics brings forth a different response to the compelling rivalry. Will stars of the sport bring forth their best games against each other ahead of the U.S. Open? Is a gold medal worthy enough of the extra stretch at crunch time?

Federer, whose loss to Tomas Berdych in Athens reportedly shattered him, has conveyed a healthy desperation in seeking the Olympic gold. Nadal appears less infatuated. The Spaniard, while conceding to diplomacy in showing interest in the Olympics, has made it clear that Grand Slams are unmatched.

SUKTUEN
08-02-2008, 04:11 PM
Federer to carry flag for Switzerland in Beijing

:worship::worship:


Roger!! Hope you have a happy time in China!!!!:wavey:

juninhOH
08-02-2008, 04:23 PM
anyone knows if he is in china already?

SUKTUEN
08-02-2008, 04:25 PM
anyone knows if he is in china already?

not yet~~~:devil:

freeandlonely
08-03-2008, 02:19 AM
Roger happy birthday, also, happy to see you to carry flag for Switzerland at Olympics the same day.
By the way August 8 also is our Father's Day here,
Roger's birthday is special.:D:)

SUKTUEN
08-03-2008, 07:20 AM
Roger happy birthday, also, happy to see you to carry flag for Switzerland at Olympics the same day.
By the way August 8 also is our Father's Day here,
Roger's birthday is special.:D:)

8 in Chinese is means rich and lucky!!:D:D

Hope Roger can very lucky in China!!:devil::devil:

Rommella
08-03-2008, 08:06 AM
Wow, flag-bearer at the Olympics on his birthday in arguably the largest market on earth? Nike's doing the flips.

Sunset of Age
08-03-2008, 12:48 PM
Unfortunately, he's been so consistently brilliant for so long that Federer's battle to stave off Rafael Nadal for No.1, especially in the wake of their epic five-set final this year at Wimbledon, has garnered him far more attention than his record-235 consecutive weeks at the top.

How true and sad this is.

SUKTUEN
08-03-2008, 01:59 PM
ummmmmmm, hope Roger can find his own way in Beijing~~~~

riddle05580
08-03-2008, 03:27 PM
http://en.beijing2008.cn/news/official/noc/eoc/n214500611.shtml

Swiss delegation head: 5 medal goal, Federer not living in Olympic Village

Updated: 2008-08-03 17:32:46

(BEIJING, August 3) -- In the Olympic Village, you don't need to visit every single apartment to find where the Swiss delegation lives. Once you come upon the apartment with pictures of Federer plastered on the windows, you know that you have come to the Swiss apartments.

We spoke with Swiss delegation head, Werner Augsburger, about his team and the Olympics after he had gone to the fitness room. He used to be a professional volleyball player, and still manages to exercise every day, although he has already retired for several years.

http://img09.beijing2008.cn/20080803/Img214500613.jpg
The Swiss Flag and Federer (Photo credit: Zuo Shan)

When speaking of the Olympic village, Werner Augsburger was similar to the other coaches in raving: "The Olympic village isn't very big; the apartments are classical and beautiful; everything has been organized very well. This is the most beautiful Olympic village I have ever seen. Everything is very convenient and accessible. Our athletes have been going to the same cafeteria ever since they arrived; I don't know if it's because they're too lazy or because the food there is just that good!"

When asked about the weather in Beijing, Werner Augsburger says, "Beijing weather changes so much in the course of one day. After the rain, the air is very cool and clear. But after a few hours, that uncomfortable humidity is back again. It's something that our athletes have to get accustomed to." When asked about Olympic village service, Werner Augsburger contends that, "Everybody here is very eager to help. No matter what kind of question you have, they will always give you a complete answer or help you get to somebody who can. They're very warm and welcoming."

The Swiss t-shirt design is a very unique one. The images on the t-shirt are the same as the two posters hanging from the Swiss apartments. Augsburger explains: "The pictures on our uniforms are that of a flower and a dragon. The flower is a lily, because to the Swiss, the lily is a beautiful flower that came to us from the Chinese. The five petals of the flowers all have a hidden meaning: one represents the Swiss flag, the other shows an eye to represent how people view the scores and results of athletes, the third is of a dragon to pay tribute to the host (China), the fourth of a sun to signify ability and strength, and the final/fifth is of the Alps.

The other picture is of a dragon with the cross of the Swiss flag. It pays homage to the host and also brings luck to the athletes during the Games. At the start of the 2000 Sydney Olympics, the Swiss Olympic team hired a Swiss artist to design their uniforms. Since then, he has worked on uniforms for the Swiss Olympic team in the 2004 Athens Olympics and the 2006 Turin Winter Olympics.

According to Augsburger, the first sport the Swiss Olympic team played, like many other European nations, was soccer. The Swiss have always been recognized for their record-breaking stunts at the Winter Olympics, but performance at the Summer Olympics has always been weak in comparison. This year, Switzerland has sent 82 athletes to compete in the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Out of the 82, 34 are female.

Augsburger reveals: "At the Olympics, we don't set our goal at how many gold medals, but how many total medals. We don't care what color the medal is; if we get five, we'll be very happy. A month ago, we were Europe's host. Now we are Beijing's guest. We weren't able to give our own countrymen an exciting match. I just hope that we'll make that up in Beijing."

http://img08.beijing2008.cn/20080803/Img214500615.jpg
The Symbolic Lily (Photo credit: Zuo Shan)

Augsburger continues to say that events that could potentially win medals for Switzerland are tennis, archery, triathlon, marathon, men's 800 meters, and track cycling. Ironically, the only athlete to be featured on a poster in the Swiss apartments, Federer, will not be living in the Olympic village. Augsburger explains: "The star of the Swiss team is, no doubt, Federer because he has given us so much pride and joy in the tennis world. He is sure to draw a lot of attention."

Augsburger further explains, "It's not because Federer doesn't like living in the Olympic village. It's because he has his own habits and prefers to live by himself." It looks like this is the case for many star athletes, who in an effort to avoid harassment from the press and fans, are staying away from busy areas. "But Federer will definitely find some day to come visit everybody at the Olympic Village and walk around," Augsburger added.

http://img08.beijing2008.cn/20080803/Img214500616.jpg
Swiss Dragon (Photo credit: Zuo Shan)

http://img10.beijing2008.cn/20080803/Img214500617.jpg
Dragon Kite (Photo credit: Zuo Shan)

The day of the Opening Ceremony (August 8) is also, coincidentally, the day of Federer's 27th birthday. Will Federer celebrate with his delegation after the Opening Ceremony, where he is the Swiss flag bearer? It has been a tradition in Olympic history that whenever it's an athlete's birthday, a simple birthday party will always be thrown and a special present given to the birthday man/woman. Will Federer enter the Olympic Village then? When asked, Augsburger only smiled but said nothing.

TennisGrl
08-03-2008, 07:22 PM
No offense to the "great Roger Federer" ( I know how sensitive some people here are with any critisms) BUT I think as the leader of the Swiss team (symbolically speaking) he should stay with his peers and his other fellow athelets. I get that he's used to staying in different more upscale places....but it's a once in a lifetime oppurtunity and he's not going to be there the next time around (probably)...I think all athletes should embrace the games for what they are...an amazing way of bringing together the world's best. He should be there bonding with the other players, getting to know people from other sports and really enjoying the whole experience. I have not heard of any other tennis player that will stay "off campus". It comes across, IMO, elitist and borderline snobby. Surprising from someone that will be such an intrical part of the Swiss Olympic team. Other journalists have suggested it's because of Mirka. She apparently would not be allowed to stay in the village (only athletes and coaches can sleep there) and she doesn't want to be apart from him. Either way, I personally don't see a good excuse to not be in the village...where the rest of the world's best will be sleeping.


http://en.beijing2008.cn/news/official/noc/eoc/n214500611.shtml

Swiss delegation head: 5 medal goal, Federer not living in Olympic Village

Updated: 2008-08-03 17:32:46

(BEIJING, August 3) -- In the Olympic Village, you don't need to visit every single apartment to find where the Swiss delegation lives. Once you come upon the apartment with pictures of Federer plastered on the windows, you know that you have come to the Swiss apartments.

We spoke with Swiss delegation head, Werner Augsburger, about his team and the Olympics after he had gone to the fitness room. He used to be a professional volleyball player, and still manages to exercise every day, although he has already retired for several years.

http://img09.beijing2008.cn/20080803/Img214500613.jpg
The Swiss Flag and Federer (Photo credit: Zuo Shan)

When speaking of the Olympic village, Werner Augsburger was similar to the other coaches in raving: "The Olympic village isn't very big; the apartments are classical and beautiful; everything has been organized very well. This is the most beautiful Olympic village I have ever seen. Everything is very convenient and accessible. Our athletes have been going to the same cafeteria ever since they arrived; I don't know if it's because they're too lazy or because the food there is just that good!"

When asked about the weather in Beijing, Werner Augsburger says, "Beijing weather changes so much in the course of one day. After the rain, the air is very cool and clear. But after a few hours, that uncomfortable humidity is back again. It's something that our athletes have to get accustomed to." When asked about Olympic village service, Werner Augsburger contends that, "Everybody here is very eager to help. No matter what kind of question you have, they will always give you a complete answer or help you get to somebody who can. They're very warm and welcoming."

The Swiss t-shirt design is a very unique one. The images on the t-shirt are the same as the two posters hanging from the Swiss apartments. Augsburger explains: "The pictures on our uniforms are that of a flower and a dragon. The flower is a lily, because to the Swiss, the lily is a beautiful flower that came to us from the Chinese. The five petals of the flowers all have a hidden meaning: one represents the Swiss flag, the other shows an eye to represent how people view the scores and results of athletes, the third is of a dragon to pay tribute to the host (China), the fourth of a sun to signify ability and strength, and the final/fifth is of the Alps.

The other picture is of a dragon with the cross of the Swiss flag. It pays homage to the host and also brings luck to the athletes during the Games. At the start of the 2000 Sydney Olympics, the Swiss Olympic team hired a Swiss artist to design their uniforms. Since then, he has worked on uniforms for the Swiss Olympic team in the 2004 Athens Olympics and the 2006 Turin Winter Olympics.

According to Augsburger, the first sport the Swiss Olympic team played, like many other European nations, was soccer. The Swiss have always been recognized for their record-breaking stunts at the Winter Olympics, but performance at the Summer Olympics has always been weak in comparison. This year, Switzerland has sent 82 athletes to compete in the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Out of the 82, 34 are female.

Augsburger reveals: "At the Olympics, we don't set our goal at how many gold medals, but how many total medals. We don't care what color the medal is; if we get five, we'll be very happy. A month ago, we were Europe's host. Now we are Beijing's guest. We weren't able to give our own countrymen an exciting match. I just hope that we'll make that up in Beijing."

http://img08.beijing2008.cn/20080803/Img214500615.jpg
The Symbolic Lily (Photo credit: Zuo Shan)

Augsburger continues to say that events that could potentially win medals for Switzerland are tennis, archery, triathlon, marathon, men's 800 meters, and track cycling. Ironically, the only athlete to be featured on a poster in the Swiss apartments, Federer, will not be living in the Olympic village. Augsburger explains: "The star of the Swiss team is, no doubt, Federer because he has given us so much pride and joy in the tennis world. He is sure to draw a lot of attention."

Augsburger further explains, "It's not because Federer doesn't like living in the Olympic village. It's because he has his own habits and prefers to live by himself." It looks like this is the case for many star athletes, who in an effort to avoid harassment from the press and fans, are staying away from busy areas. "But Federer will definitely find some day to come visit everybody at the Olympic Village and walk around," Augsburger added.

http://img08.beijing2008.cn/20080803/Img214500616.jpg
Swiss Dragon (Photo credit: Zuo Shan)

http://img10.beijing2008.cn/20080803/Img214500617.jpg
Dragon Kite (Photo credit: Zuo Shan)

The day of the Opening Ceremony (August 8) is also, coincidentally, the day of Federer's 27th birthday. Will Federer celebrate with his delegation after the Opening Ceremony, where he is the Swiss flag bearer? It has been a tradition in Olympic history that whenever it's an athlete's birthday, a simple birthday party will always be thrown and a special present given to the birthday man/woman. Will Federer enter the Olympic Village then? When asked, Augsburger only smiled but said nothing.

Rita
08-03-2008, 07:27 PM
No offense to the "great Roger Federer" ( I know how sensitive some people here are with any critisms) BUT I think as the leader of the Swiss team (symbolically speaking) he should stay with his peers and his other fellow athelets. I get that he's used to staying in different more upscale places....but it's a once in a lifetime oppurtunity and he's not going to be there the next time around (probably)...I think all athletes should embrace the games for what they are...an amazing way of bringing together the world's best. He should be there bonding with the other players, getting to know people from other sports and really enjoying the whole experience. I have not heard of any other tennis player that will stay "off campus". It comes across, IMO, elitist and borderline snobby. Surprising from someone that will be such an intrical part of the Swiss Olympic team. Other journalists have suggested it's because of Mirka. She apparently would not be allowed to stay in the village (only athletes and coaches can sleep there) and she doesn't want to be apart from him. Either way, I personally don't see a good excuse to not be in the village...where the rest of the world's best will be sleeping.

he stayed in the village in 2000 and i think 2004 as well...
many athletes have said it is however not the best place to relax and have a peaceful time which is excatly what he needs now:shrug:

SUKTUEN
08-04-2008, 09:19 AM
he said he need very forcus in matches, so he will live in hotel~~

riddle05580
08-05-2008, 05:06 AM
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/columns/story?columnist=drucker_joel&id=3515077

No shortage of spectacular moments from Federer

By Joel Drucker
Special to ESPN.com

1. 2008 Wimbledon final: Loser and still champion
How can you put a loss as the most memorable moment of a regal reign? Simple: Play a match of exquisite drama and quality on the world's biggest stage, Centre Court at Wimbledon. Just as Muhammad Ali's 1971 loss to Joe Frazier revealed how great a fighter Ali really was, this five-set epic conclusively showed how much over the last four years Federer has raised the bar -- and how much respect he has generated through his excellence. Just three years earlier, Rafael Nadal had stumbled badly on the grass. But in large part due to the high standards set by Federer, Nadal had enhanced his game. Federer on this day was forced to dig deep and fight as he never had in a Grand Slam final. Rallying from two sets to love down, fending off two championship points in the fourth, Federer threw himself boldly into this match. And though he came up empty, the brilliant ballstriking, tenacity and sportsmanship shown by both players was at once gladiatorial, theatrical and enchanting. What more could you ask from a tennis match?

2. 2007 Wimbledon final: Five for five
Federer had lost the previous two French Open finals and been surprisingly tested by Nadal in the '06 Wimbledon final. So it was likely the '07 Wimbledon final would be an even tougher test. Taking two of the first three sets, Federer appeared ready to drop the hammer. But Nadal fought back in trademark style -- and Federer grew surprisingly rattled, in the fourth even verbalizing his chagrin with the electronic instant replay system. Nadal's 6-2 fourth-set victory meant Federer would have to play a fifth set in a Grand Slam final for the first time. It wasn't easy. Nadal held break points in two of Federer's opening service games. But it was Federer who pulled away, winning the final set 6-2.

3. 2007 Australian Open semis: Long live the King
An enthused Roddick entered this semifinal feeling optimistic. He'd strongly tested Federer four months earlier in the final of the U.S. Open and later held three match points versus the Swiss at the season-ending Masters Cup. With the legendary Jimmy Connors in his corner, Roddick marched his way through five victories and figured he'd have a good shot versus Federer. No way. Federer emphatically bludgeoned Roddick, his 6-4, 6-0, 6-2 rout a consummate demonstration of power, movement and airtight play. He'd go on to win the title, becoming the first man since Bjorn Borg at the '80 French Open to win a Slam singles tournament without the loss of a set.

4. 2004 U.S. Open final: A pair of goose eggs
Less than a year prior to taking on Lleyton Hewitt in the U.S. Open final, Federer had suffered a meltdown versus the tenacious Australian in a Davis Cup match, blowing a two sets-to-love and 5-3 lead. At this point Hewitt had won seven of their 12 matches. Hewitt, a past U.S. champ, felt quite comfortable in New York, while 2004 had marked the first time Federer had ever advanced past the fourth round. But as he pursued his first U.S. Open title, the quality of Federer's play was nearly flawless. He pummeled Hewitt 6-0, 7-6, 6-0. The notion of winning two love sets versus a competitor of Hewitt's caliber is staggering.

5. 2005 U.S. Open final: No mercy
All sentiment was in Agassi's corner, and when the 35-year-old American icon took a 4-2, 30-love lead in hopes of going up two sets to one, Federer seemed about to enter a deep hole. But a superb down-the-line backhand earned him the next point and soon enough the two commenced a tiebreaker for the set -- which Federer won handily 7-1. A deflated Agassi had nothing left, losing the fourth 6-1.

6. 2004 Australian Open final: Top of the world
Federer has been dominant for so long that it's hard to recall a time when he wasn't ranked No. 1. But at the end of 2003 he was ranked No. 2 in the world behind Andy Roddick. At the 2004 Australian Open, though, the man making headlines was not Federer but Marat Safin, who earned impressive five-set victories in the quarters over Roddick and in the semis versus Andre Agassi. Quietly reaching the finals, Federer by this point had earned only one Slam -- as many as Safin -- so was obviously eager to prove himself an enduring champion. After a tight first set, he handled Safin easily, winning 7-6, 6-4, 6-2 -- and also notching enough points to commence his reign as the world's No.1-ranked player.

7. 2004 Wimbledon final: The best defense is a good offense
Defending a title is a major test. In this instance Federer had to contend with a flame-throwing Roddick, who at this point was the defending U.S. Open champion and out to prove that he, not Federer, was indeed the world's best player. Roddick shot out of the blocks, pounding big serves and forehands to snap up the first set. Though Federer squeaked out the second to even the match, in the third Roddick went up 4-2 -- before a rain delay gave the Swiss time to rethink his strategy. Returning to Centre Court, Federer began to serve and volley -- and won the next two sets.

8. 2005 Australian Open semis: Dethroning the King
Defeats usually don't rank as highlights, but one year into Federer's reign, this semifinal match validated just how much Federer had raised the bar. Nothing but the very best tennis would do -- supreme all-court play on both sides of the net. Playing his heart out on his 25th birthday, Safin fought off a match point in a scintillating fourth-set tiebreak and won the fifth 9-7. It was only fitting that Safin went on to win the title.

9. 2006 Tennis Masters Rome: A compelling loss
The best match of 2006, this one too showed that those who hoped to beat Federer in a long match had better bring out their best stuff. Variety and attack put him on the verge of earning his first clay-court victory over his primary nemesis, Rafael Nadal. Federer led 4-1 in the fifth and even held two match points. But it wasn't enough. Nadal won this 5-hour, 5-minute epic in a fifth-set tiebreak.

10. 2004 Tennis Masters Cup
In the semis of the year's season-ending competition, Federer and Safin, the mercurial Russian, played an incredible second-set tiebreak -- one that lasted an epic 38 points. Federer won it 20-18. The next night, he dispatched Hewitt 6-3, 6-2 to win his second straight Tennis Masters Cup title.

Bonus: Federer's finest: A medley
Featuring 10 of Federer's finest shots, topped off by a nearly 50-shot exchange with Hewitt in the finals of the 2006 Pacific Life Open that Federer called the best rally of his career -- a rally he lost, but a match he won.

Joel Drucker is based in Oakland, Calif., and writes for Tennis Magazine and Tennis Channel.

Rita
08-05-2008, 12:43 PM
:yeah:Thanks riddle
that's a very nice TENNIS article for once

SUKTUEN
08-05-2008, 04:49 PM
:worship:

Daniel
08-05-2008, 05:37 PM
Thanks for the article riddle :D

neenah
08-05-2008, 05:54 PM
That was a great read for someone like me who wasn't following tennis until a few years into Federer's reign and hasn't seen all of these matches. Thank you very much for posting it. :)

riddle05580
08-05-2008, 07:53 PM
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5h7MhlnfvC9ucyBGa06FkMFHp8jJg

Federer plans to turn season around in Beijing


BEIJING (AFP) — Roger Federer said Tuesday he is anticipating a "dream Olympics" that will help turn around his disappointing season by winning one of the few titles to elude him.

"For me it is really important over the next couple of weeks, starting here at the Olympics, going on to the US Open," he told AFP in an interview.

"I still have plenty of tournaments to do well in, and I hope I can start here at the Olympics and fulfill my dream to win gold."

After failing to overcome arch-rival Rafael Nadal at the French Open, he then fell to the Spaniard in an epic five-set Wimbledon final before going out in the early rounds in Toronto and Cincinnati.

But he is feeling lucky in China, where he will carry the flag for Switzerland at the Olympics opening ceremony.

"I've had a lot of luck in China," said the Swiss ace, whose 27th birthday coincides with Friday's opening ceremony on August 8.

"I know eight is the lucky number here, maybe because my birthday and everything that has also brought me luck here in China, who knows."

Eight is considered lucky because the Chinese character 'ba' sounds similar to the word for luck, or 'fa'.

Because of this the Games opening ceremony has been slated to start at 8pm on the eighth day of the eighth month of the year 2008.

"I hope being able to carry the flag for Switzerland, which is a great honor for me, starting with that, and then hopefully performing well, it's going to be a dream Olympics for me," Federer added.

The Swiss star flew into Beijing on Monday night on a chartered flight from Cincinnati, where he lost to Croat Ivo Karlovic in the third round last week.

Now chasing an elusive Olympic gold medal, he has opted to stay in a hotel instead of the athletes village for the first time.

"I usually always stay at hotels, all year long, at tournaments. So I said, you know, this time I'll try this way," he said.

"But I have to say the village is beautiful, very nice, very well done here with the vegetation and everything, so it's nice to be able to be part of the team like that."

Federer finished fourth at his first Games in Sydney eight years ago then headed to Athens as the top seed in 2004 but got a shock when Czech player Tomas Berdych knocked him out in the second round.

This time he is doing things differently to give himself an edge over Nadal and his other challengers.

"I'm here a few days earlier than in previous Olympics," said Federer.

"For our purposes usually we're there 2-3 days ahead but now 7-8 days so actually that's a lot of practice. And I had a good flight in from the States, which is a long trip, but I feel fine."

Federer gets to keep the world No.1 status he has owned for a record 235 weeks for the early part of the Games courtesy of Nadal's loss to Novak Djokovic in the semis of the Cincinnati Open.

Despite the fact that he will have to surrender it to Nadal on August 18, Federer said he does not feel any extra pressure here.

"Everyone has a chance. We'll see down the stretch who is going to have the best day, and I hope it's going to be me."

Federer was constantly pestered by fans and athletes in Athens and he got another taste of that on Monday night when he was mobbed by airport officials, and again on Tuesday when volunteers hounded him for autographs.

"The volunteers struggled to hold themselves back, but it's part of the spirit so it's no problem," said Federer.

Or Levy
08-06-2008, 07:58 AM
http://www.dailyitem.com/0200_sports/local_story_219001516.html


The stars are out in Beijing

Hello again from the other side of the world. Things here in Beijing are still going well and continue to excite us every day. Yesterday might have been my most exciting day yet.


Let me just say that I will no longer even walk to the cafeteria without my camera.

The team met early in the morning for some breakfast before practice. As I was getting some coffee with a teammate, we ran into some fellow American athletes. We had a little small talk over adding the sugar and cream and when we walked away, I looked at my teammate Jesse Gey and said, "you have no idea who that was, do you?"

Not surprising to me, she did not. It was none other than the Gold Medal beach volleyball duo of Misty May and Kerri Walsh. I knew Kerri first for her long lean structure, but I guess Jesse needed to see them in a two-piece bathing suit to really recognize the duo. Fully clothed or not, I knew some friends and family would love a picture of the two. Therefore, I made a pact to keep the camera with me at all times.

Thank goodness I did!

Walking to lunch with camera in hand, I thought to myself, "I can't believe that I am carrying this thing with me to eat." When I walked in the dining hall and saw Roger Federer sitting with some friends just relaxing, I knew it was a brilliant idea.

I did not want to disturbed him, but didn't need to because someone else eventually did. After one picture with a stranger, half the cafeteria recognized the tennis star and also wanted a chance to meet him. He was patient, friendly, and much cuter than I would have expected.I went back to my table because I was sure that my chicken was cold at this point. Again, I was star struck before taking a bite.

Michael Phelps was sitting only a few seats away. He is one of my mom's favorite Olympic athletes, so I had to ask for a picture with him. He is an extremely nice guy and in the midst of a conversation, I found out that he is staying only a few doors down from us in the USA apartment building. We have bumped into each other many times since that meal and no longer do I look at him as the guy that is on ESPN and CNN every day.

By sundown -- yes we could see the sun today -- I was lucky enough to run into two other big stars. Dirk Nowitzki and Rafael Nadal were also found wondering the village. I could not wait to send these pictures to my family and friends. I knew they would get a good laugh!

To close out a very eventful day, the team joined other USA athletes and delegates for the raising of the American flag. The ceremony took place in the village amphitheater. I was proud to be part of the event, representing my country and the Susquehanna Valley.

We are departing for practice in a few minutes. So, until next time, take care!

n Keli Smith is a Selinsgrove High graduate and a member of the U.S. field hockey team. She will be writing regular blogs during her time in China.

SUKTUEN
08-06-2008, 02:33 PM
:worship::worship:

riddle05580
08-07-2008, 12:24 PM
http://www.canada.com/topics/sports/beijing2008/story.html?id=b57ac06e-ac31-4f46-8b09-42f90abed311

Federer gunning for top spot

Rob Vanstone, CanWest News Service
Published: Thursday, August 07, 2008

BEIJING - Roger Federer is poised to relinquish his world No. 1 ranking in men's tennis, but he remains a No. 1 attraction.

That was evident Thursday afternoon at the Beijing Olympics' Main Press Centre, where Federer fielded a torrent of questions before an estimated 400 reporters and a swarm of photographers in a congested conference room. He seemed unfazed by the commotion, despite the cameras that flashed throughout the half-hour session.

"I do a lot of press throughout the year with a lot of media," said the Swiss-born tennis star, who is to carry his country's flag on his 27th birthday at Friday's opening ceremonies. "Obviously, this is a little bit bigger - and better, maybe - so hopefully I'll get some good questions."

One of which was: Do you still feel like No. 1?

"I guess until the ranking changes in the computer, I do, yeah," Federer said in an unusually truncated response. He was unblinking in the face of inquiries about this struggles this season. After dominating the Grand Slam circuit for five years, Federer has lost his Wimbledon and Australian Open titles in 2008. In the Wimbledon final, Federer lost an epic match against Spain's Rafael Nadal.

"The last couple of weeks haven't been the best," acknowledged Federer, who will lose the No. 1 ranking to Nadal on Aug. 18, after 236 weeks atop the field. "I think I lost matches I should never have lost. So in a way, they hurt, but at the same time I didn't play bad by losing, which is obviously important."

With that in mind, Federer is optimistic that he can reclaim top spot in the rankings.

"Sure, I think it's possible," he said. "If I want my Number 1 ranking back in a couple of weeks, I've got to play rock-solid for the rest of the year. That means winning many tournaments. I know I can do it, because I've done it in the past for many seasons now. I hope I can do it. Otherwise, I think I can get it back in 2009. It's all speculation. We'll see what happens.":yeah:

Federer is poised to compete in his third Summer Olympics, having previously appeared in Sydney (in 2000) and Athens (2004). He has yet to win a medal, but there have been other benefits.

In Sydney, Federer was introduced to Mirka Vavrinec, who was also representing Switzerland in tennis at the 2000 Games. They have been a couple for eight years.

So, Federer was asked, what was his Olympic highlight - carrying the flag for Switzerland in 2004 or meeting Vavrinec in Sydney?

"Ummm, different kind of circumstances," said Federer, eliciting chuckles. "Meeting my girlfriend at the Olympic Games was obviously also a highlight in my career. Carrying the flag was a different highlight. I don't know what's nicer, but I guess it was meeting the girlfriend because we've been together for eight years, whereas the flag was only there for 10 minutes.":lol: Federer will also spend a brief time in the athletes' village. He plans to visit, but will not be lodged there during the Games.

"I'm going there once in a while to see the other Swiss athletes and get the Olympic feel," he said. "I was there the other day and it's not possible, really. I cannot escape. There are so many athletes who want pictures. I don't mind it, but every day for I don't know how long, it's not the ideal preparation for trying to win a gold medal.

"I went through (living in the village) in Sydney and Athens. I had those great experiences. I know what the Olympic Games are all about. I have the option to go back to the village if I want to, but if I don't want to, I can get away from it all and really prepare in a perfect way. That's what I'm trying to do this time around."

The objective is to perform at his accustomed level en route to supplanting Nadal.

"I think our rivalry is great for tennis right now," he said. "It's not just Wimbledon . . . He's only 22. I'm only turning 27, so I have a feeling we're going to play 20 more times. It should be great for the next generation as well.

"It's good to have rivalries because I didn't have maybe that many rivals in the last four years. I've had rivals on and off but I think with (Nadal), there's something special to it because we've already played six times in Grand Slam finals. We have very different characters, but it's very much on the fair-play side, which I think is very nice for not only tennis, but for sports in general."

The questions kept coming. The cameras kept flashing. A functionary, seated beside Federer, informed the media that there was time for "five more questions" . . . "three more questions" . . . "last question."

And then Federer got up, creating another frenzied among the photographers, and walked the gauntlet toward the exit.

Roger, over and out.

Daniel
08-07-2008, 01:52 PM
Link: http://www.nbcolympics.com/tennis/news/newsid=180908.html#gold+could+help+save+federers+s eason

Gold could help save Federer's season By The Associated Press

BEIJING (AP) - Roger Federer is thinking more about the number eight than the No. 1 ranking he will lose after the Olympics.

The 12-time Grand Slam champion's birthday coincides with Friday's opening ceremony for the Beijing Olympics, which are being staged on one of the luckiest days in the Chinese calendar.

His more than four-year reign at No. 1 will end Aug. 18, regardless of how he fares in Beijing. Rafael Nadal earned enough points to overhaul the Swiss star.

The number eight has long been considered a good omen in China, where people pay a premium to have it included in their telephone numbers and license plates. With the official start of the 2008 Olympics on the eighth day of the eighth month of the eighth year, Federer is hoping some luck will rub off on him.

He has not won an Olympic medal in two previous trips, and for the first time since 2003 he has reached August without at least one major title for the season. He was upset in the Australian Open semifinals after an illness interrupted preparation, and he lost the final at the French Open and Wimbledon to Nadal to end his streak of five titles at the All England Club.

"People expect more from me after my great last five years. But I hope I can still save this season with either this or the U.S. Open," Federer said at news conference Thursday. "Right now, the focus is on the Olympic Games ... not the rankings.

"Winning Wimbledon, I was only a few points from that. That hurt, but I'm over that and looking forward now. Anything that comes now - the Olympic Games or the U.S. Open would help my confidence a lot."

Federer spoke to the media for the first time since it was confirmed he would lose the top spot he has held since February 2004.

"Rafa has done very well in the last year or so to become the No. 1 in the world, but that's not my focus right now," Federer said. "Before the U.S. Open, maybe there will be more talk. But we're a few days ahead of the Olympic Games, where I hope I can do well."

Besides, he still feels like a deserving No. 1.

"Until the rankings change on the computer, I do, yeah," he said.

There's no doubt Federer still has the pulling power of a No. 1 player. The news conference was set up for 168 reporters but crowded with more than 400, including 42 TV cameras.

Federer, who plays Russia's Dmitry Tursunov in the first round, said winning an Olympic gold medal would be among his greatest achievements. To that end, he's not living in the athletes' village.

"I go down once in a while to see the other Swiss athletes and get the Olympic feel. I was there the other day and it's not possible really. There's so many athletes who want pictures - I don't mind it, but every day for I don't know how long, it's not the ideal preparation to try and win the gold medal," he said. "I went through it in Sydney and Athens. I had those great experiences and I know what the Olympic Games are all about.

"Now I can get away from it all and really prepare the perfect way, that's what I'm trying to do."

Federer is staying at a hotel instead of the village. But he says that wherever an athlete stays, the intent is the same.

"Some of us are millionaires, some or not," he said. "I don't think it really matters. We're all chasing the same thing - an Olympic gold and not money."

Federer lost the semifinals and bronze-medal matches at the 2000 Olympics and finished fourth. He did, however, meet and start dating girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec, so he had something pleasant to remember from Sydney. He carried the Swiss flag into the opening ceremony in Athens, where he was upset in the second round.

On Friday, he again will carry the flag into China's National Stadium, which will be at full capacity with 91,000 spectators in an event with a broadcast audience of billions.

"It's one of my dreams to do very well in the Olympic Games," he said. "Carrying the flag is one of those moments you only dream about. Walking into the stadium with the Swiss flag. The stadium, the biggest I've ever been in. I enjoyed it a lot."

He expects Beijing to be even more memorable, falling on his 27th birthday.

"This will probably be my most unique - unless I have a baby on my birthday, but that's not planned yet," he said. "It'll be very special. I'm thrilled it's on the opening ceremony, that I get to carry the flag for Switzerland. The whole combination is really, really nice."

And his birthday wish, apart from the day off practice and a cake?

"I hope," he said, "I don't stumble when I walk into the stadium."

Daniel
08-07-2008, 01:53 PM
Link: http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/08/07/sports/OLYTENNIS.php

As his rule ends, Federer chases gold
By Christopher Clarey

Thursday, August 7, 2008
BEIJING: Amid the buzz about hurdlers, swimmers and protests, the Olympic family made room for Roger Federer on Thursday.

His packed news conference, filled with clicking cameras that were insistent enough to make it hard for him to hear the questions, could have given the impression that Federer still rules men's tennis. And he does, but only for 11 more days.

The Swiss star's record streak of 237 consecutive weeks at No. 1 will end on Aug. 18. Rafael Nadal, the Spaniard who has been doggedly chasing Federer for four seasons, will take over no matter what happens in the men's tournament that begins here on Sunday.

"Obviously the focus right now is on the Olympic games and not on the rankings," Federer said. "But Rafa has done very well the last year or so to become number one in the world."

Nadal earned it by becoming the first man in 28 years to win the French Open and Wimbledon in the same season, ending Federer's five-year run of victories at the All England Club in a five-set classic that is already being referred to in hushed tones.

Federer looked drained and devastated after that defeat, and his results since then would indicate that he is still reeling. He was upset by Gilles Simon, a quick-footed French counter puncher, at the Masters Series event in his opening round in Toronto and beaten again by the imposing Croatian Ivo Karlovic in his second round in Cincinnati.

Federer hardly embarrassed himself against Karlovic: he lost without losing his serve. But his body of work this season has not been up to the historically high standards of a man who has won 12 Grand Slam singles titles.

"The last couple weeks have not been the best; I think I lost matches I should never have lost," Federer said. "In a way they hurt, but at the same time I didn't play badly by losing which is obviously important. Toronto and Cincinnati weren't the tournaments that are going to make me cry for months and months. It's really the Olympic games and the U.S. Open that matter to me in this point of my career."

It will be a brutal double for all involved, with only one week separating the final here and the first day of the Open in New York. But at least nearly all the leading men will be taking up the challenge together. Of the top 10, only Andy Roddick, currently ranked ninth, is not in Beijing, choosing to focus his energy on New York.

The good news for Federer in a season that has rarely been reassuring is that the three other leading candidates for the Olympic gold medal - Nadal, Novak Djokovic and the in-form Andy Murray of Britain - are all in the other half of the draw.

Now for the caveats. Federer has never been enamored of the hot, humid conditions that will prevail here. He will also be playing doubles here with Swiss teammate Stanislas Wawrinka: something he never does in a major tournament. In his singles draw, he faces huge-hitting Dmitry Tursunov of Russia in the first round and has Karlovic, Simon and Tomas Berdych in his quarter.

Berdych, an erratic Czech, upset Federer in the second round at the last Olympics in Athens in 2004. For all Federer's brilliance in the 2000s, he has yet to win an Olympic medal, finishing fourth in 2000.

But he still has fine Olympic memories, having carried the flag for Switzerland in 2004 and having met his longtime companion Mirka Vavrinec in 2000. Vavrinec was part of the Swiss tennis team that year and was standing nearby as Federer spoke on Thursday, tapping away at her smart phone.

"I don't know what's nicer, but I guess it was meeting the girlfriend," Federer said. "Because we've been together for eight years whereas the flag was only there for 10 minutes."

The flag will be back in Federer's hand on Friday night, when he carries it for the Swiss team again on what happens to be Federer's 27th birthday. Nadal will have to wait for another Olympics for that honor. The Spanish flag will be carried by David Cal, a canoeist.

No one can accuse Nadal of not embracing the Olympic experience. In 2004, he only played doubles, missing the opening ceremony because of a prior commitment to play in a tournament in Poland and leaving quickly after losing in the first round. This year, Nadal arrived on Monday and is living in the Olympic Village.

"I have spent so many years being the world No. 2, so it feels great," he said of his imminent change in status. "But now I have no time to enjoy this feeling, and the Olympics are ahead. I will enjoy this event first. It's a great experience."

Federer, who lived in the village in 2000 and 2004, is in a hotel this time: concerned about the demands on his time from his peers, a feeling that was reinforced when he visited the village this week.

"It's just not possible really; I cannot escape," he said. "There are so many athletes who want pictures, and I don't mind it, but everyday for I don't know how long, it's not the ideal preparation to try to win a gold medal. I went through it in Sydney and Athens. I had those great experiences, and I know what the Olympics Games are all about."

Daniel
08-07-2008, 01:55 PM
Link: http://www.ptinews.com/pti%5Cptisite.nsf/0/5D9F1AEC8BADEC256525749E00337221?OpenDocument

Tired of attention, Federer leaves Village to maintain focus

Amlan Chakraborty
Beijing, Aug 7 (PTI) After surrendering the silverware, aura and much more to Rafael Nadal in Wimbledon, Roger Federer simply cannot afford to lose focus here and the world number one today said he would not stay in the Olympic Village to avoid the constant attention from other athletes.

Tired of requests from athletes to pose with them or scribble on their autograph book, the tennis icon said enough is enough and he is moving out of the village.

"It's impossible really, there are so many athletes asking for photos and so on. It is not ideal to prepare," Federer, who turns 27 tomorrow, told reporters here today.

"I'll go down once in a while to see other Swiss athletes," added the Swiss star, who would surrender the world number one spot to Nadal later this month.

"Rafa has done well this year but my focus is on this tournament," said Federer, who was not too keen to dwell on contemporary tennis' most intriguing rivalry.

Instead, Federer waxed eloquence on how Olympic is as important as Wimbledon for him. PTI

Daniel
08-07-2008, 01:56 PM
Link:

Olympics: Federer 'disappointed' by protests

Roger Federer, who will carry the flag for Switzerland in tomorrow's opening ceremony, has expressed his "disappointment" in the torch protests earlier this year in London and Paris - and claimed that winning an Olympic gold would be as important as winning Wimbledon.

Federer, who is still the world No1 until the new rankings are published on August 18, said the protests over Tibet and China's human rights abuses had not affected his thinking over whether to compete in Beijing.

"I know the issues but there was never a question about taking part in an Olympic Games," he said. "I was disappointed what happened to the torch when it came to Europe and particularly Paris and London. It's not nice to see those things. It's supposed to be a celebration, right?

"I hope the Olympics will improve getting to know the Chinese people and the other way round so hopefully it will be good for everybody."

Some ATP players, including Lleyton Hewitt, have admitted that an Olympic gold matters less to them than winning a grand slam but Federer was quick to disagree. "In my position, as someone who has won a lot of grand slams, it's right up there," he said. "Winning would mean as much to me as an Wimbledon victory."

Federer's ambitions have been helped by an easier draw - his main rivals, Rafa Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray are all in the other half - although he admits that he is wary of his first-round opponent Dmitry Tursunov. "He's a dangerous player who hits a very hard ball and serves very well, so I will have to be careful," he said.

Federer also insisted that while he was disappointed to be losing the No1 spot to Nadal their rivalry was "great for tennis and sport in general". "We've already played 16 times so far in our careers - he's only 22 and I'm only 26 and I've got a feeling we're going to play another 20 times," he said. "It's great to have such an intense rivalry because I've not had that many rivals over the last few years, but with Rafa it is something special."

Despite not winning a grand slam so far this season, Federer was quick to dismiss suggestions that he had a poor season. "It's been a solid year," he said. "I tried really hard to come back from the sickness at the start of the year and losing at Wimbledon obviously hurt, but I reached the semi-finals at the Australian Open and the final of the French as well.

"To say I've had a bad season just because I didn't win that epic at Wimbledon and I've lost a couple of matches I should have won recently is a bit harsh."

· Andrew Murray will play Yen-Hsun Lu, the world ranked 72 player, in the first round of the men's draw. Meanwhile Murray and his brother Jamie have been drawn against Canada's Daniel Nestor and Frederic Niemeyer in the men's doubles.

About this articleClose Olympics: Roger Federer 'disappointed' by protests
This article was first published on guardian.co.uk on Thursday August 07 2008. It was last updated at 11:52 on August 07 2008.

SUKTUEN
08-07-2008, 03:54 PM
:worship:

riddle05580
08-08-2008, 04:58 AM
http://www.rogerfederer.com/en/rogers/news/newsdetail.cfm?uNewsID=775

ATP - 08.08.08 - WHAT A DAY!


Dear fans

It is an absolutely fantastic combination to be celebrating my birthday and the start of the Olympic Games - on the very same day!

The Olympic opening ceremony here in Beijing will start on the 08.08.08 at 8:08:08 pm - that's quite a few eights! Eight has always been my personal lucky number. And eight is considered one of the luckiest numbers in Chinese tradition because of its unique pronunciation. So being here in China on this specific date and time, celebrating my birthday during such an amazing event... It is almost impossible to find the right words to describe this feeling.

I am looking forward to tonight enormously, leading Switzerland into the stadium with our national flag. The huge crowd, the amazing ceremony and the best athletes from all over the world gathered here, will all make for another memory to last forever. What a privilege it is to be here!

I also want to take this opportunity to thank you all for your unconditional support. I love to come to my website and find you all discussing the future, the present and also the past. Your interest in all different topics around me, tennis and sports in general is fascinating. Thank you for all the time so many of you have invested in writing me messages, letters and cards and making me special gifts. This means a great deal to me and it fills me with pride to have so many of you thinking of me.

Our community is steadily growing towards the barrier of 200'000, what an amazing number. So many individuals from all over the world with a common interest meeting in one spot - precisely like here in Beijing for the Olympics! I would like to say thank you one more time and hope you enjoy the Games, wherever you are.


Sincerely
Roger

trickcy
08-08-2008, 05:49 AM
Roger's fanletter is very nice:D Hope he has a great time today and the following days in Beijing.

http://www.deccanherald.com/Content/Aug82008/beijingolympics20082008080783352.asp

Federer keen to salvage pride

DH News Service, Beijing:



His crown is slipping and his form is slumping. He has no major titles under his belt this year either. Indeed, Roger Federer's reputation in the tennis world is not quite the same. No wonder then, the Swiss master is keen to salvage his season with an Olympic gold medal...


Federer will lead the Swiss contingent at the opening ceremony on Friday, which happens to be his birthday. As he spoke of his desire to do well here, it became crystal clear that he wished no better present than the Olympic gold medal.

“People expect more from me after my great last five years. But I hope I can still save this season with either this or the US Open,” Federer, who will lose the No 1 spot to Rafael Nadal on August 18, said at a press conference on Thursday.

“Rafa played very well at Wimbledon, that defeat hurt me a lot. But I have gotten over it now and my focus is the Olympic Games now,” said Federer. “Walking into the Olympic stadium, with the packed crowd on one side and the athletes on the other, that too on your birthday – it's a dream. I don't know anything else come close to that. Perhaps having a baby on your birthday, but that's not planned yet,” said Federer.







Federer is playing in his third Olympics. He was fourth at Sydney and went out early at Athens. This time, he will be playing Dmitri Tursunov of Russia in the first round. “There are a clutch of players who can win the gold and I am among them,” he said.

With the skies turning hazy, the question inevitably turned to the pollution. “I felt it was very hot out there when I practiced. I don't know whether it was the heat or the pollution, I was struggling. But I am not scared about it,” said Federer, who also denounced the attack on the Olympic flame during its tour of Europe.

“I was disappointed with what happened during the torch relay. It is supposed to be a celebration. I hope the Games spreads more awareness about China and its culture,” he said.

Federer is not staying in the Games Village, but he said werever he stayed, the goal remained the same.

“I go down once in a while to see the other Swiss athletes and get the Olympic feel. There are so many athletes who want pictures — I don't mind it, but every day for I don't know how long, it's not the ideal preparation to try and win the gold medal,” he said.

SUKTUEN
08-08-2008, 08:47 AM
Happy Birthday Roger!! All Best wish to you!!

lsy
08-08-2008, 03:24 PM
The Olympic opening ceremony here in Beijing will start on the 08.08.08 at 8:08:08 pm - that's quite a few eights! Eight has always been my personal lucky number. And eight is considered one of the luckiest numbers in Chinese tradition because of its unique pronunciation. So being here in China on this specific date and time, celebrating my birthday during such an amazing event... It is almost impossible to find the right words to describe this feeling.


It is indeed special.

I hope this will be the event to turn the year around for Rogi!

SUKTUEN
08-08-2008, 04:57 PM
Thanks GOD!!!:worship:

Roger is the most handsome flag holder!!!:hearts::hearts::hearts::bigclap::bigclap :

Blondie1985
08-08-2008, 10:12 PM
Olympics: crowds celebrate as seven-year dream cames to fruition; America, France, Russia and Roger Federer sent the crowd into spasms of joy.

As the official Olympic opening ceremony unfolded inside the Bird’s Nest stadium, thousands of people packed the streets of the central shopping district to hold a dirtier, stickier and altogether wilder shindig.

The crowd, wet with sweat and tears, gathered in front of the biggest outdoor screen in Beijing, to scream, cheer and cry as a seven-year dream finally came to flawless fruition.

“I feel like crying,” exclaimed Yu Hangyu, 19, his face so hot with excitement that the red flags he had painted on his cheeks were starting to melt. “But I keep telling myself not to cry because this is such a happy occasion. So many people are here from all over the world, like one big family. This belongs to all of us.”

Just to the west, thousands more people gathered around the edge of Tiananmen Square to watch as a series of fireworks were let off from the south of the city towards the Bird’s Nest along the city’s main axis.

The square was shut off to the public and there was no television screen, but the fireworks more than made up for a few missed minutes of the ceremony, said Li Haifen, a 20-year-old spectator.

“They were extraordinary,” she said, as she described how one had formed an outline of China in the sky. “It was definitely worth coming here, but now I am going to go home as fast as I can to watch the rest of the show with my family.”

Kang Weiyun, 57, and his wife, Mai Weijin, 55, had travelled more than 500km from a remote village in Inner Mongolia. They had no tickets to any of the events and looked lost as they clutched each other and their flasks of tea amid the heaving masses. He asked: “How could we not come to our nation’s capital for such a momentous night?”

Away from Tiananmen Square and the bright outdoor screens in several parks across the city, the streets were all but deserted last night. Most shops and restaurants were closed. Those that were not were empty, members of staff crowded around flickering televisions set up on plastic stools outside.

For an unlucky few, however, life continued as normal. In the harshly lit accident and emergency unit of Beijing Hospital, Meng Tianhui, the on-duty nurse, was stoic about her unlucky shift. “At first I was really upset but we were told our shifts a long time ago, so I had a while to prepare myself. This is our job; we’re used to it.”

In Chongwenmen subway station, Ma Ling sat in front of a blank baggage X-ray screen, possibly the only screen in Beijing showing something other than the opening ceremony. “Even though I’m not watching the ceremony, I still feel part of it. It’s an honour to be here protecting people,” she said. She admitted, however, that so far there had been very few people to protect.

Back in the central district of Wang-fujing, the athletes marched on screen. America, France, Russia and Roger Federer sent the crowd into spasms of joy. When Team China appeared, the cheers were so loud that they boomed through the streets for miles in every direction.

Flags obscured the screen. People jumped and danced and everyone, Chinese and foreigners alike, joined in and chanted as one: “Go China!”

“This,” shouted a spectator over the noise, jabbing a finger in the air, “this is the meaning of ‘One World, One Dream’

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/olympics/article4488799.ece

Blondie1985
08-08-2008, 10:14 PM
All dressed up: Runway winners and losers

BEIJING - The Opening Ceremony is always the most-watched event of an Olympic Games. Most of that has to do with flag and country, but even though I'm no Tu Ly, I think fashion plays a big part.

Tu Ly, for those who don't know, is the man behind the uniforms worn by Canadians as they marched into the Bird's Nest on Friday. He was also one of the most criticized members of the Canadian Olympic team, if you can call him that, in the lead-up to these Games.

But you know what?

Those Canadians uniforms weren't that bad - and they were certainly a heck of a lot better than the clothing being sold in HBC stores and handed out to Canadian media in Beijing earlier this week.

The hats were cute, the crisp white skirts on the women and casual pants on the men looked nice. And the short-sleeved jackets, in white, red and gold, were great.

But despite a Canadian Olympic Committee release stating "Internet Buzz Judges Canadian Uniforms 'Best Dressed,' " the Canucks weren't really the talk of the Olympic runway.

Here, in a nutshell, are the winners and losers:

Best dressed: Now, it could be because Roger Federer was carrying their flag, but my pick is Switzerland. Formal enough, yet still casual - in red capris for the men and red skirts for the women, cream tops and beige jackets - they easily maintained their place amongst the best-dressed nations. They had nice walking sandals and their bags were appropriate for both sexes. Plus, Federer proved he looks as good in short pants as his rival Rafael Nadal.
Runner-up: Croatia, which gets kudos for dressing weather-appropriate. The men were in short sleeves, the women in very cute checked red and white tank tops with light flowing red pants. They screamed Croatian national team, but would look great on the street.

Casual chic: Before the Swiss came the Danes, also in capris but in a much more casual denim with red shirts. They looked athletic, which is what this is about. Good on 'em for spurning the suits and providing an answer to that age-old question: can men wear capris? Apparently yes, if they're Olympians.

Most elegant: Romania, whose athletes wore climate-appropriate suits - pretty light sea blue jackets atop, for the ladies, subtle printed skirts and form-fitting shirts.

Worst dressed: It's a toss-up. Lesotho deserves to be right up there, given its unfortunate athletes appeared to be draped in badly dyed fur, but so do the Kazaks, who looked awful in bright orange bottoms and bright teal on top.

Smart dressers: A tip of the hat to American Samoa. They wore loose flowing clothes, the men wore skirts and one went shirtless, which was the only possible way to be comfortable in that heat.

Dumb dressers: Since we don't want to recognize Lesotho twice, we'll give it to Malawi. It's athletes were in scarves. Seriously. Unless they were testing looks for 2010, there's no excuse.

Biggest disappointment: Argentina. Wearing white with pale blue trim, they were likely cool but they were as exciting as hospital orderlies.

Most predictable: All those countries that chose to dress their athletes in white suits, starting at the top of the parade with Greece. Show some daring - just not too much.

Daniel
08-09-2008, 08:07 AM
Link: http://uk.reuters.com/article/tennisNews/idUKL846290920080808?sp=true

Federer looks for gold on Beijing horizon

BEIJING (Reuters) - A golden showdown between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal looms on the murky Beijing horizon as the Olympic tennis tournament begins on Sunday.

Swiss Federer, the dominant force in men's tennis for the past five years, leads a grand slam quality field with serious questions to answer over his flagging form.

Nadal, who will replace Federer as the new world number one the day after the men's final whatever happens here, has no such worries, although a gruelling year may yet catch up with him in the sauna-like heat of Beijing.

Serbia's rise as a force in tennis is underlined by men's third seed Novak Djokovic and especially in the women's singles, where Ana Ivanovic and Jelena Jankovic, who takes over as world number one on Monday, top the seedings.

Russia are also well-served despite the absence of Maria Sharapova, with world number three Svetlana Kuznetsova their best hope on her favourite hardcourt surface.

Eastern Europeans swamp the draw, but many predict American sisters Venus and Serena Williams will go home with gold in their racket bags.

"I love playing for my country," fourth seed Serena, a doubles winner with her sister in Sydney in 2000, where Venus also won the singles, told reporters on Friday.

"Of all my trophies, my favourite is my Olympic gold medal. It was a life-changing experience."

TAKING IT SERIOUSLY

Twenty years after the sport returned to the Games in Seoul amid some mild scepticism, there is no longer any doubt how seriously the players take the Olympics.

Germany's Rainer Schuettler even went to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) this week in his desperation to grab a late place in the 64-strong draw after falling short of the stringent ranking cut-off point in June. His appeal was successful, but the row with the International Tennis Federation has rumbled on all week.

Federer, who failed to make an impact in Sydney or Athens, has long set his sights on an Olympic gold medal to add to the 12 grand slam titles he has already won.

The Swiss, who turned 27 on the day of the opening ceremony, has been working overtime in practise all week in stifling humidity, searching for the spark that could yet turn his year round after a gut-wrenching defeat by Nadal at Wimbledon.

While containing the powerhouse Majorcan is proving difficult for Federer, the thought of meeting him in a gold medal match is enticing.

"Our rivalry is great for tennis right now. I think we've played each other 16 times and given our ages ... we will probably play another 20 times," he said.

"We are very different characters but it is on the fair play side. I think we will leave our mark on the sport."

In the doubles events American twins Bob and Mike Bryan are seeded one while compatriots Lindsay Davenport and Liezel Huber offer hope of more American gold in the women's.

(Editing by Alex Richardson)

(For more stories visit our multimedia website "Road to Beijing" here; and see our blog at blogs.reuters.com/china)

Daniel
08-09-2008, 08:08 AM
Link: http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/sport/2008/0808/1218142761869.html

Federer has them swooning in the village

Keith Duggan was present as Roger Federer met the press ahead of his opening game on Sunday

IT IS surely Beijing's good fortune that these Olympics fall at a perfect time to stage the latest chapter in the fascinating rivalry between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. The Swiss genius must be regarded as a totemic figure by the Chinese, whose faith in the luck of the numeral eight has been symbolised in the date and time of tonight's opening extravaganza.

This day also marks Federer's birthday, an occasion he will mark by carrying the Swiss flag into the Bird's Nest. Yesterday at lunchtime, Federer made a scheduled appearance at Olympics-land, strolling into a hugely crowded conference room and answering questions with his usual combination of absolute charm and mild self-effacement. Interest in Federer has deepened since that transcendent Wimbledon final in July, when he relinquished his reign after five years of supremacy in that unforgettable fifth set played out in the London dusk.

Since then, there has been indifferent form and suggestions that Federer has, for the first time, been battling the kinds of demonic mental torments that can unhinge the most gifted of sportsmen. There have even been rumours that he was bound to go the same way as Bjorn Borg and quit the sport while in full possession of his rare gifts.

Perhaps those were the reasons that people stood outside the conference room doors to hear his views yesterday but there is also no doubt that Roger Federer has become one of the public sensations of world sport.

The era of the press corps as fans with typewriters may be locked in the 20th century but in this steamed-up room in Beijing yesterday there were any number of fans with video phones and other recording devices eager to record their own Federer moment for posterity. Plenty were swooning - and it had nothing to do with the balmy weather.

Federer causes a stir. It is the chief reason that he cannot stay in the Olympic village this week, opting instead for the seclusion of a hotel suite. He stayed in the athlete's quarters in Athens and Sydney and, as he reminisced, it was clear that he enjoyed engaging with fellow competitors, but since then Federer's star has continued to soar and when he walks around the compound now, other Olympians revert to unabashed fans.

"I go down to see the other Swiss athletes and to get the Olympic feel," he said. "But I went there the other day and it is not possible. I cannot escape. There are so many athletes that want pictures and I don't mind it . . . but every day for I don't know how long? It is not the ideal preparation for winning a gold medal. I went through them at Athens and Sydney and I know what the experiences are like. Here, I am trying to prepare for the perfect way."

If Federer has truly been feeling the strain of being the poster boy of international tennis and of late finding himself eclipsed by the passionate power play of his Spanish adversary, then he masks it well. Tennis badly needed a performer capable of challenging Federer's seemingly effortless mastery of the game and the emergence of the fiery Nadal has bestowed the sport with the latest in a rich lineage of enduring tennis duels.

"I think so. Absolutely. Our rivalry is great right now. It is not just since Wimbledon. We have already played one another 15 times. He is only 23, I am 27 so I feel we could play maybe 20 more times. So it is going to be great for the next generation as well and it is good to have this because I didn't really have that many rivals over the past few years. With Rafa there is something special to it - we played six grand slam finals and have very different characters but you know, it is very much on the fair play side and I feel we will definitely leave our mark on tennis."

Federer makes his Beijing debut on Sunday, when he plays Russia's Dmitry Tursnuov, and as he stared into endless flashing light bulbs and cameras broadcasting his latest appearance around the world, it was hard not to feel a little sympathy for the guy who has it all. It was clear as he spoke that he was nostalgic for the relative obscurity that he enjoyed eight years ago in Sydney - when he was also flag bearer for Switzerland.

It was at those games that he met his partner, Mirka Vavrinec, as well.

"Yeah, eight years ago, meeting my girlfriend at the Olympic Games was obviously also a highlight of my career," he smiled when asked about that time.

"Carrying the flag was a different highlight. I don't know what's nicer but I guess it was meeting the girlfriend because we have been together for eight years whereas the flag . . . it was only there for 10 minutes."

When Federer leads the Swiss delegation into the Bird's Nest tonight, he will cause a blinding volley of camera flashes and probably a few screams of delight. He has given himself a day off tennis as a birthday treat.

"Hope to get a big cake," he grinned. "And to make sure I don't trip when I walk into the stadium with the flag. This is going to be the most unique birthday of my life - unless I have a baby on my birthday or something, and that is not planned right now."

Like all the great entertainers, he left them laughing. Federer comes across as hatefully perfect - in addition to re-imagining the borders of tennis, he is fluent in five languages, does untold work with disadvantaged children and, unlike most major sports stars, enjoys laughing at himself - were he not so genuinely charming. And, of course, that quality was at its most vivid in the twilight of Wimbledon, when he accepted his defeat to Nadal with a sense of grace that befitted the occasion.

Yesterday, he insisted that he has moved on from that disappointment and that winning his first Olympic gold would represent a full atonement.

"In my position, it is right up there with the Grand Slam. It is a different feeling because you feel as though you are carrying your country as well. It would mean as much as Wimbledon victory. It is up there."

© 2008 The Irish Times

Daniel
08-09-2008, 08:09 AM
Link: http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/olympics/tennis/federer-rejects-dubious-distractions-of-village-life-888150.html

Federer rejects dubious distractions of village life

Tennis' world No 1 opts for a hotel to avoid the starstruck athletes in 'adult Disney World'. By Nick Harris in Beijing

Friday, 8 August 2008
Some athletes are just so annoyingly famous that even their fellow stars cannot stop badgering them for autographs. Such a fate has befallen Roger Federer, and the fact that the world's No 1 tennis player cannot walk peacefully through the Games village means he will be staying in a hotel instead.


At least the Swiss insists the pestering is to blame. "It is impossible really [to stay in the village]" he said. "There are so many athletes asking for photos and so on. It is not ideal to prepare." Federer, who will celebrate his 27th birthday today by carrying Switzerland's flag in the Olympics opening ceremony, may also find the village less attractive these days because he is happily attached to his long-term girlfriend, Mirka Vavrinec.

The village offers its most attractive distractions to those free and single. Where did Roger and Mirka meet, for example? At an Olympic village, in Sydney in 2000. And that village, like so many other temporary hormone-packed homes for super-fit sports people, gained itself a reputation as party central. The athletes collectively drained the locality of all available contraception, prompting the distribution of 130,000 free condoms to athletes in Athens in 2004. That's roughly 13 condoms per athlete during a Games fortnight. Beijing will not be providing any, although individual Olympic Associations, including Australia's, will provide baskets full of them in communal areas.

Sex is not yet an Olympic sport but it certainly seems to be an Olympics village activity. As the 1992 double gold medal-winning American swimmer Nelson Diebel once said, the Games is "a two-week-long private party for thousands of hard bodies".

One village logistics planner says, "It's like an adult Disney World for two weeks." And Breaux Greer, an American javelin thrower participating here has said: "There's a lot of sex going on. You get a lot of people who are in shape, and, you know, testosterone's up and everybody's attracted to everybody." Australia's women's swimming team famously stripped off on the village balcony in 1992 to tease onlookers. Village-plotted shenanigans do not start and end with nudity though.

Another Australian swimmer, Dawn Fraser, stole out of the Tokyo village one night in 1964 and pinched the Emperor of Japan's flag from his palace. She was banned from swimming for 10 years, a punishment later reduced to four. The decision over whether to stay in the village or elsewhere is down to the individual. Most athletes stay there. Megastars like America's NBA basketball giant, Kobe Bryant, will not. But Michael Phelps, who could win eight golds in the pool, will. The US tennis sisters, Venus and Serena Williams, will give the village a miss to prepare away from the hubbub. But Britain's Andy Murray will be one of the village people, as will Spain's Rafael Nadal.

Circumstances rather than taste dictate the accommodation arrangements of other sports people at the Games. Argentina's footballers, including Lionel Messi, have been based away from Beijing because their games are elsewhere.

Most of the British team will be staying in the village. The only Britons who will not be are the equestrian team, in Hong Kong, the sailors, in Qingdao, and the rowers and canoeists, who are staying nearer their competition venue on the outskirts of the capital. There is a no-alcohol policy, however, while gambling is strictly banned and the only DVDs on sale are wholesome family titles. Maybe Federer just fancies a nice glass of wine and a movie that isn't a "12".

Daniel
08-09-2008, 08:10 AM
Link: http://www.theage.com.au/news/tennis/no-gold-yet-but-no1-attraction/2008/08/07/1217702253643.html

No gold yet, but No.1 attraction

Linda Pearce, Beijing | August 8, 2008

ROGER Federer's press conference started late and loudly, with cameramen screaming at photographers in a packed interview room way too small for the occasion.

Someone had underestimated the interest in this global superstar, which presumably had more to do with the constant questioning of tennis' legitimacy as an Olympic sport than the imminent end to Federer's extraordinary 236-week reign at No. 1.

Rafael Nadal will dethrone him when the next rankings list is released, but the winner of five of the past six Wimbledon titles is still the nominal top dog eyeing a title that ranks with the French Open as the only two important tournaments he is yet to win.

"You feel like you're carrying your country as well and you want to do well because of that, so that adds a little bit of an extra pressure," said Federer, who will spend the night of his 27th birthday carrying the Swiss flag at the opening ceremony.

Federer, who will play Russian Dimitry Tursunov in the first round, is staying in a hotel rather than at the Olympic Village. "I was there the other day and it's not possible, really. I can't escape, there's so (many) athletes that want pictures.

"I don't mind it, you know, but every day for I don't know how long, it's not the ideal preparation for trying to win a gold medal."

Village-dwelling Nadal will open against Potito Starace and could then face Australia's Lleyton Hewitt, who will first need to stretch his career record to 7-0 against Swede Jonas Bjorkman.

Hewitt (with partner Chris Guccione) could also run into Nadal (and Tommy Robredo) in the second round of the doubles, while Guccione's first singles opponent will be American eighth seed James Blake.

SUKTUEN
08-09-2008, 03:55 PM
:worship:

Blondie1985
08-09-2008, 05:27 PM
"The crowd also cheered loudly when Cuba, Pakistan, North Korea, Taipei, Australia, Germany, Italy, Hong Kong and Iraq entered the arena. Interestingly, Nowitzki, Federer and Kobe Bryant -- when shown on the video boards -- received larger ovations than most countries."
http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080808/SPORTS09/808080415/1367/SPORTS

SUKTUEN
08-10-2008, 09:50 AM
many Chinese people love Roger!!

lina_seta
08-10-2008, 07:36 PM
I was pleasantly surprised to see roger on the main page of the olympics.
its about Roger, Mirka and the olympic Gold
http://en.beijing2008.cn/news/special/review/n214527227.shtml

Roger Federer: Olympic Love Game
2008-08-10 17:56:59


World No. 1 tennis player Roger Federer may have a locker full of Grand Slam titles -- but he has come to Beijing courting an elusive medal: Olympic gold.

Despite finishing fourth in Sydney and surprisingly failing to progress past the Second Round in Athens, you could say Federer is in love with the Olympics.

Eight years ago, at Sydney 2000, single women across the world sadly took out their pens to cross Federer's name from their list of eligible bachelors after the Swiss ace met his long-term partner, former professional tennis player Mirka Vavrinec.

He didn't get the gold, but he did get the girl -- although more recently Federer has been fending off the advances of a different kind of suitor -- 22-year-old Spaniard Rafael Nadal has eyed Federer's coveted Men's No. 1 tennis crown and will finally succeed him as the sport's top-ranked player on August 18.

A relatively poor 2008 by his own high standards hasn't prevented Federer from being seeded No. 1 for the Beijing 2008 Men's Singles contest. Indeed, he celebrated his 27th birthday in style on Friday (August 8), by proudly carrying the Swiss flag into the National Stadium during the Olympic Games Opening Ceremony.

"My most unique birthday of all time," he said, although not his happiest Olympic memory so far. "Meeting my girlfriend at the Olympic Games eight years ago was obviously a highlight of my career. Carrying the flag was different…I've been with my girlfriend for eight years, carrying the flag took ten minutes."

A few years ago the Olympic Games lacked the fame, glamour and riches of the tennis professional circuit, but players like Federer no longer view it that way.

"I grew up watching the likes of Carl Lewis and, in 1992, seeing Mark Rose win a Swiss tennis gold. It is great to be part of it."

Indeed, some critics have questioned whether there is a place in the 'Olympic family' for the richest stars of professional sports in basketball, football and tennis. But for Federer, the Olympic Games is about respect: "We're are all chasing the same thing -- Olympic gold, not money."

That's why the Olympic tennis tournament is no longer an opportunity for lower-ranked players to Hoover up easy medals. Other than a handful of injured players, most of the world's top men's and women's players are in Beijing, so it won't be a walk in the park for the likes of Federer or 2008 Women's Wimbledon champion, Venus Williams.

"Ninety-five percent of the high level tennis players are here. We're proud that tennis is part of the Olympic Games," said Federer.

"At every tournament there are a handful of players who are the favorites and I am one of them," he commented, when asked about the likely challenge from the likes of Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray.

He describes his battle with Nadal for supremacy at the summit of men's tennis as "great for tennis," and "something special. We have very different characters."

Federer is considered by many commentators to be the greatest tennis player of all time. He has been ranked World No. 1 for a record 238 consecutive weeks and his 12 Grand Slam titles include three Australian Open, five Wimbledon and four US Open titles. On top, you can add four Tennis Masters Cup titles and fourteen ATP Masters Series wins.

He is also Mr. Consistency -- reaching 17 consecutive Grand Slam singles semifinals since the 2004 Wimbledon championships -- small wonder he was named 2008 Laureus World Sportsman of the Year for a record fourth consecutive time.

But while you'll find Federer's name in the record books, one place you won't spot him is in the Olympic Games Athletes Village. For a sportsman who lists the Swiss Alps as a favorite hideaway haunt, he finds the Village atmosphere too intense.

"There is too much attention, including from other athletes. I want to prepare perfectly so that means getting away from it." Not that Federer is bored with Beijing or the Olympics Games. "There are so many things to see and do. It is a dream come true to be here."

The question is, having found the love of his life at the Olympics, can Federer clutch something else to his heart -- an Olympic medal? We will soon find out.

Federer's quest for Olympic glory started on August 10 with the first round of the Men's Singles.

:):):):):)

SUKTUEN
08-11-2008, 04:22 AM
Good article!!!!:worship:

Daniel
08-11-2008, 09:49 AM
http://www.nationalpost.com/sports/beijing-games/story.html?id=715419

Federer back in top form

For a day, Roger Federer was back. His game, dulled since Wimbledon, had regained its keen edge. His bearing, worn at times, was again imperial. In Swiss red and white at the Olympics, Federer looked again like his Olympian self.


The result was a win in his first game in Beijing in his last week as the No. 1 player in the world. Regardless of the result here, Spain's Rafael Nadal will wrest the ranking away from Federer on Aug. 17. But in yesterday's 6-4, 6-2 win over Dmitry Tursunov, Federer looked capable of wresting it back again for the first time since losing to Nadal in an epic Wimbledon final.


"I guess he's going to be No. 2, but I don't think that he's No. 2," said Tursunov. "I still think he's a better player [than Nadal]. Not a better ahtlete, maybe, but a better player."


Not everyone could maintain their tip-top shape. Canadian Frank Dancevic looked capable of pulling a major upset, taking the first set from ninth-ranked Stanislas Wawrinka of Switzerland 6-4. But the native of Niagara Falls, On., who was only added Wednesday as an injury replacement, lost the next two sets 6-3, 6-2 to fall out of the tournament. Canada's other men's singles player was Frederic Niemeyer of Sherbrooke, Que., who was also an injury replacement. But he retired with a sore elbow against Guillermo Canas of Argentina, and will now focus on doubles with Toronto's Daniel Nestor.


Like Dancevic, Federer was not handed a cupcake draw in this tournament, which thanks to some quirks features played ranked 598th, 762nd, and 1025th. Instead he faced Tursunov, ranked 35th and bearing cannon-like groundstrokes. But Federer was clearly in command. The forehand? Fine. The backhand? Back. The razor sharpness? Relocated.


"I've always asked, 'How can I get better?'" said Federer. "What I don't like to do is you don't play so well, and you freak out and have emergency meetings. That's not going to happen."


The Swiss star rarely shows emotion in first-round matches, but after breaking Tursunov in the third game of the second set, he unleashed a brief but telling exhortation, and hopped just a little in the air. When he sent a backhand past a helpless Tursunov for another break at 4-1, Federer pumped his fist, yelled "yeah!", and looked back at his entourage as though he had just secured a title.


It seems obvious that this matters to Federer, who has compared Olympic gold to his most prized Slam, Wimbledon. It is the Swiss flagbearer's third Olympics, but a medal, along with a French Open, is about the only hole in his glittering resumé. Add that importance to the fact that Federer had lost three of his four matches, and you had a recipe for pressure.


Federer has, of late, trembled under pressure. He lost in Toronto thanks to a sudden bout of errant forehands, and then had to save match points to escape Robby Ginepri in Cincinnati. Yesterday, however, he looked nothing like the man whose return from Wimbledon displayed some of his most vulnerable tennis since assuming the No. 1 spot on Feb. 2, 2004.


Yesterday, the invulnerability returned, and it was Federer's rival who showed a softer side. Nadal struggled with Potito Starace of Italy, winning 6-2, 3-6, 6-2. Nadal admitted upon arriving here that he was tired, and he has also placed far less emphasis on the Games than has Federer. Yesterday, it felt like Nadal's long chase for No. 1 could quickly turn into a fight to keep it.

Daniel
08-11-2008, 09:51 AM
http://www.rte.ie/sport/olympics2008/2008/0811/federerr.html

Federer comes out fighting

Roger Federer flew into the Olympics second round on Monday and then warned Rafael Nadal that he was gunning to win back the number one ranking.


Federer hammered Russia's Dmitry Tursunov 6-4, 6-2 as Nadal stuttered against Italy's Potito Starace.


'My goal is to try to get number one ranking back,' he said.


'I need to play well again. I need to win the big matches. That's what I'm looking at at the moment.'


Federer's record 235 weeks at number one ends on August 18, the day after the Olympic final.

He insisted he wouldn't 'freak out' over his losses this season and said he was hatching plans to spend up to 15 years in the top 10.

'You can't keep your ranking forever. I think you have to have a different approach, see what the next step is.

'What I don't like to do because you don't play so well is freak out and have emergency meetings. That's not going to happen.'

Federer lost the French Open and Wimbledon finals to Nadal and has since fallen to Gilles Simon and Ivo Karlovic.


Now 27, he said he was reappraising his career to remain competitive well into his thirties.

'Being at the top doesn't mean number one in the world,' he said.


'It can mean deep into Grand Slams, you know, being in the top five, top 10 for, whatever, 10 years, 15 years, just be up there and having a shot at Grand Slams.'

He added that the Olympics had made it a difficult year with his usual routine disrupted.

'I'm not criticizing. It's just a fact. With the Olympic Games, everything shifted. It made it really hard for us to have proper preparations,' he said.


Federer is chasing his first Olympic medal after finishing fourth in 2000 and winning just one match four years ago.


The Swiss will face either Lee Hyung-taik or Rafael Arevalo in the second round.


Nadal, 22, was taken to a deciding third set by the 71st-ranked Starace before winning 6-2, 3-6, 6-2.

Federer has the kinder draw with Nadal facing the prospect of matches against Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic before the final.


The Swiss said his confidence was coming back after last month's shock defeats to Simon and Karlovic.


'You start to doubt yourself just a touch, even though I felt like I was playing well, moving well,' he said.

'It's just maybe for me a matter of just getting a bit more time on the hard courts.'

Daniel
08-11-2008, 01:38 PM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2008/aug/11/tennis.olympics.nadal

It is illustrative of the high regard with which the Chinese hold tennis that when the producer of the opening ceremony looked for stars among the athletes massed in the Birds Nest he directed his cameras first at Rafael Nadal, second at Roger Federer, and third, and most remarkably, at Andy Murray. Tennis is growing in China and, one suspects, it's about to grow a whole load bigger.

Its cause will be helped should Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal make it to Sunday and what might be a career-defining showdown over five sets in the Beijing Coliseum, the Chinese having knocked out a concrete Wimbledon just for this tournament. Everything is new and pristine. The stadium itself has huge V shaped spaces studded around the top tier which aid ventilation and afford views, in so far as the haze allows any views, of Beijing. It will provide a perfect setting for one of the clashes of the Games, and the collision is still very much on after both the contenders recorded relatively facile victories yesterday.

Nadal was the first to perform, against the suitably named Italian Potito Starace. The humidity was brutal. "I had to change my shirt every ten minutes, it is difficult, no," he said afterwards. He had little difficulty acclimatising, racing through the first set 6-2, combining astonishing court craft and speed.

Starace, to his credit, responded with a mighty effort winning three
straight games and the second set. "I am happy with my tennis. I play very well in the second set," he said. Nadal might have suffered a minor blip in concentration but there is little that can be done when the ball is being pinged past you on either side.

Normal service was resumed in the final set as Nadal closed out the match 6-2, 3-6, 6-2. "I had a shot in the third at 15-40 [2-4] and I tried to make a winner," said Starace, "but I miss by 10, 15cm. That's tennis."

Federer, meanwhile, had to cope with the 200kph-plus serves of Dmitry Tursunov from Russia. He too acclimatised quickly once he had established a rhythm against the serve. The ease of his play was demonstrated by a pinpoint overhead from the baseline being followed by a running forehand pass to win his opening game in the second set. 200 girls in matching yellow shirts chanted "Roger". Some innocuous lift muzak was played over the loudspeaker system. And a strange electrical hum, quite similar to the one generated by the Aswan Dam, zizzed from one side of the arena to the other.

Federer's game went from strength to strength as he unpicked the Russian with a series of sliced backhands and then unleashed those sweeping ground-strokes which indicate his imperial game is near its zenith. Certainly he played better in the first two sets of this tournament than he did in the first two sets of the Wimbledon final.

He closed out the match with an ace, celebrated by hitting a ball through one of the Vs and politely applauded the crowd before lobbing his headgear into it and initiating a headband fight.

Speaking afterwards he was at his most relaxed, quickly establishing a comedy double act with his Chinese interpreter. "I think I played well in the second set, I played some great winners and got some good balls back," he said. Asked about his two recent hard court defeats he admitted "you start to doubt yourself just a touch but I am not going to freak out and have emergency meetings." Nor is he inconvenienced by the conditions. "there are not many places this humid. It's something I used to struggle with, humidity, that's one of the reasons I went to practise in Dubai which has been key."

Things being key is a touchstone phrase for the Swiss, who today looked supremely comfortable and at home. In this form the only man capable of disturbing his peace is Nadal.

SUKTUEN
08-11-2008, 06:54 PM
:worship::worship:

Daniel
08-12-2008, 08:35 AM
http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/sports/articles/2008/08/11/20080811spt-bickley.html
Federer-Nadal could be highlight
BEIJING

The decline of American tennis has shielded our eyes from the beauty of Roger Federer. But the rest of the world gets it, and him.

You should've heard the ovation when he walked into the opening ceremony carrying the Swiss flag. You should've heard the entire section full of Chinese youngsters chanting his name during a first-round victory over a very dangerous opponent.

The man is as graceful as he is talented. He may be the best tennis player ever, even if he's not the best tennis player at the moment. And everything you need to know about him can be found in his official motto: "It's nice to be important. It's more important to be nice."

But you know what? While the rest of the world's media converged on the swimming pool Monday morning, I stood before Federer, lobbing a tricky question about his fall from the top. And you can tell he's starting to get some edge.

Good. He's going to need it.

"I have no problems," he said after a blistering his way past Russia's Dmitry Tursunov. "I based my schedule around the Olympic Games. I had some difficulties at the beginning of the year with my sickness, so for me, it's just a matter of getting back in shape. And it hurts, obviously, losing the Wimbledon finals. And then the speculation starts. And I ended up losing my No. 1 ranking over it as well. (But) if I would've won a few more points there, we wouldn't be talking this way today."

First of all, give Federer much credit for being here. The U.S. Open is just around the corner, and if he goes an entire season without a Grand Slam victory, the tremors will be felt throughout the tennis world. But he wants to lift Olympic tennis, a sport that has been a disaster since its reinstatement in 1988.

Just look at the winners, a list that includes Nicolas Massu, Yevgeny Kafelnikov, Marc Rosset, and Miloslav Mecir. Not a top five player in sight. Only Andre Agassi's victory in 1996 produced the kind of champion that befits the Olympic stage, but even then, Pete Sampras and Boris Becker both chose not to participate.

Too often in this sport full of spoiled teenagers, perspective is corrupted or lacking completely. The Olympics are viewed as a hassle, not a privilege. It has led to uninspired performances, early upsets that rob the draw of flavor, and the kind of apathy that makes the blood boil.

This year, the highest ranked American male, Andy Roddick, chose to play in the Los Angeles Classic instead. Meanwhile, Russia's Marat Safin, a two-time Grand Slam champion, took it one stop further.

"I don't care about the Olympics," he said recently. "It doesn't make sense to fly 15 hours over and 15 hours back for that."

That's disgraceful. But here in Beijing, inside yet another beautiful venue, the best individual rivalry in sports could also make for one of the best confrontations of the Olympics.

If you don't care about Federer vs. Rafael Nadal, it's time to start. It's everything that Tiger Woods vs. Phil Mickelson should be and isn't. Their recent clash at Wimbledon was stamped as the best in the sport's history. And then there's this wonderful psychological drama going on inside Federer's head.

During his rise to prominence, Federer won 12 grand slam titles in a flash and spent nearly 240 weeks as the top-ranked player in tennis. It seemed like a lock that he would one day pass Pete Sampras for the all-time record (14), so much that a somewhat bored Federer began to court approval of his boyhood heroes, like Bjorn Borg and Rod Laver, inviting them to watch some of his matches.

But then the gritty Nadal came along and changed everything. Now, Federer faces the biggest fight of his career at an age (27) when tennis players start to decline. At Wimbledon, Borg successfully picked against Federer, irking the Swiss star. And no less an authority than John McEnroe is beginning to wonder aloud whether Federer will reach Sampras' mark.

"My goal is to try to get my No. 1 ranking back," Federer said. "You know, I need to play well again. I need to win the big matches."

Few would be bigger than a date with Nadal on Aug. 17 with a gold medal on the line. Stay tuned.


Reach Bickley at dan.bickley@arizonarepublic.com or (602) 444-8253. Check out his online column at bickley.azcentral.com.

Daniel
08-12-2008, 08:37 AM
Link: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2008-08/11/content_9193303.htm

Federer: at the top doesn't mean No. 1 in the world

BEIJING, Aug. 11 (Xinhua) -- Roger Federer admitted that it is impossible to stay at the top of the world for long time, but said he needs to find what works best for him to get the world number one spot back again.

"At the top doesn't mean No. 1 in the world. It can mean deep into Grand Slams, being in the top five, top 10 for, whatever, 10 years, 15 years, just be up there and having a shot at Grand Slams," said Federer, who will lose the world number one ranking officially after the Olympic tennis event.

"You can't keep your ranking forever. If ever that were to happen, I think you have to have a different approach to what's the next step. Is it come down to the majors? Is it do you want to chase it again? I mean, I know myself, I'm sure my goal is to try to get No. 1 ranking back, I need to play well again. I need to win big matches.

"I think once sort of 2004 and '05 came around, I always tried to look for new ways to improve. Had a coach. You know, didn't have a coach in '04. I always to improve physically, because mentally, it wasn't a problem any more. I alwyas think you have to question yourself, no matter if it's good or bad."

After being thrashed by Rafael Nadal in the French Open final, the Swiss maestro lost again at Wimbledon to the Spaniard who won a five-set epic on Federer's Centre Court fortress.

The world number one turns 27 on the day of the Beijing opening ceremony and he will have to rediscover his A-game in the Olympics after also suffering early exit from the Masters events in Toronto and Cincinnati last month.

Federer, who keeps hold on the world number one spot for more than 250 weeks since early 2004, said that all these losses should partly be blamed on the calendar and the ATP rules.

"It is not a secret that I base my schedule around trying to get the best preparation for the Grand Slams, but this year has been difficult for everybody, having a proper schedule, because we've been forced to play certain tournaments in some ways.

"I'm not criticizing. It's just a fact. With the Olympics, everything shifted. It made it really hard for us to have proper preparations. That's maybe one of the reasons some players play better, some players play worse.

"And I think next year you can control your schedule much more again yourself, which I think is going to be key for next year."

Federer did not arouse media hype in Beijing by exiting early like he did in the previous two tournaments last month. He eased past Dmitry Tursunov of Russia 6-4, 6-2 in the opening round on Monday despiting committing some unforced errors which he seldom made before this season.

The Olympics have always been labelled one of his dreams and Beijing might be his last chance to fulfiling it.

"I agree (that the Olympics won't bring you prize money or ranking), but in some way it's such a nice change to the regular tour we play in, first of all.

"But then also, being part of the biggest sort of sports event in the world. Now that tennis is finally accepted by the Olympic Committee, it's something I wish to move it forward.

"I guess when I speak to some players now, who didn't used to play the Olympics back in '96 and 2000, you name it, I know that some of them have regrets that they didn't play it, seeing how big the Olympics has become and how important tennis has become to the Olympics.

"I hope that with my presence, and also, Rafa's presence, Roddick's presence, Hewitt's presence in the past years, I think that's only gonna make it more important for the future generation.

"But also having the chance to represent my country is one of the reasons, just living the dream, being part of the Olympic Village, the Olympic spirit. Just being here is something that is quite unique."

The highlights of Federer's two previous Olympic Games amount to meeting his long-standing girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec in Sydney and carrying the Swiss flag at the opening ceremony in Athens four years ago.

In 2000 he lost a semifinal to Tommy Haas and then let a bronze medal slip through his fingers against Frenchman Arnaud Di Pasquale. Four years later he lost in the second round to Tomas Berdych.

SUKTUEN
08-12-2008, 11:08 AM
thankyou

riddle05580
08-12-2008, 02:22 PM
Press Conference after the first round

http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=51541

XXIX OLYMPIC GAMES

August 11, 2008

Roger Federer

BEIJING, CHINA

R. FEDERER/D. Tursunov
6-4, 6-2

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Would you say the second set, it looked like you had a real bounce in your legs, confidence, fully restored. Is that the best set you've played since the Wimbledon final in the brief hard court season?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, I thought I played a very good first set against Gilles Simon, where I won 6-2 actually. You know, I was feeling good, playing aggressive and everything.

This was another good set. You know, it's different conditions here. It's pretty quick. Obviously there's also a lot in Dmitry's power, how he wants to keep the score going, because he can serve so well.

I think I played well, you know, hit some great winners, got some good balls back. I really thought, you know, I was playing very solid. That's really what I was expecting from myself today. I'm really happy with the result because I knew the danger against Dmitry.

Q. What is it like to play in this humidity or pollution, the conditions in general? How would you describe that?

ROGER FEDERER: I mean, it is pretty humid, comparing it to other places we play during the year. There's not many places - if any - that are that humid. I don't think today was the hottest day out there. You know, in the preparation week, I thought we had some days that were way more difficult than today.

But it's something that I used to struggle with actually, you know, humidity. Actually, I remember one of the matches I played against Guillermo Canas back in Canada way back, five, six years ago, maybe six years ago in Toronto. I remember it was brutally hot and I couldn't handle the humidity. That was one of the reasons I wanted to go and practice in Dubai, you know. So we have 45 degrees, a lot of humidity.

Ever since I started doing that, I don't have a problem any more in it, which is key, you know. Because in Switzerland, we don't get heat like this. It's something you better get used to because, especially in the States or in Australia, it can get very hot.

Well taken care of, fit and everything, so today it was not a problem at all.

Q. When you lose a match like you lost to Simon and Karlovic, very close, do you start to just not trust yourself quite so much on the really big points? I'm thinking of the 10th game of the first set where you missed a couple forehands where you normally would have made them.

ROGER FEDERER: I mean, I don't think the problem maybe is on big points. It's just a matter of losing some matches where I feel like I shouldn't of lost. And then sometimes it plays a trick in your mind where you think maybe you're not playing that well actually, but it's actually not the case.

So it's a matter of keeping yourself in a positive mindset. I think it's more than anything else, you know. It's not really on the big points because I don't think you lose those kind of matches maybe on big points.

Maybe Karlovic a little bit more because it's always tight. I mean, you can always win or lose against Karlovic because of that serve. He'll always put you in that position where it's dangerous. That's why you can't overrate a match like that.

But against Simon, I was playing well. I had the match under control. I should have never lost. But, you know, he did well and dug deep. He was, you know, on a roll, winning Indianapolis the week before and everything. He was my first match on hard courts, you know, for a long time.

So, I mean, the positive part is, you know, I got more practice out of those next few days, which maybe usually I would play matches. So that's the positive part. The negative part is maybe that you start to doubt yourself just a touch, even though I felt like I was playing well, moving well. It's just maybe for me a matter of just getting, you know, a bit more time on the hard courts, which I think I did now since I played that first match in Toronto.

Q. You talk about the humidity. What about the pollution as a separate issue? There's been a lot of discussion about it here. How much concern about it did you have coming in? Has it affected your preparation at all?

ROGER FEDERER: I mean, one day maybe, I don't know, I think it was just really, really hot, you know. Maybe that first shock of jetlag and heat and the whole combination, maybe being a bit tired, getting used to different conditions. I think I felt it a little bit.

But then, honestly, when I'm out there, I don't feel, you know, a pollution problem. I think it's more humidity than anything else for us, the players. That's my personal opinion.

Q. I thought I read somewhere that the ranking officially changes with the 11th. I could be mistaken. My question is, in the time that you spent with Pete Sampras last fall on tour, I was wondering if the subject ever came up about when a player who has had tremendous success in winning Grand Slams gets to that point in their career where the ranking becomes less important than the winning of the big events, and therefore the focus shifts, whether it's which tournaments you play, maybe even skipping the way Pete skipped a couple of Frenches. Did you ever discuss that with him or if you've played it around in your head a little bit?

ROGER FEDERER: We didn't speak a lot about rankings in any way. I just think more about, you know, being at the top for a long time. I mean, at the top doesn't mean No. 1 in the world. It can mean deep into Grand Slams, you know, being in the top five, top 10 for, whatever, 10 years, 15 years, just be up there and having a shot at Grand Slams. I think that's what we talked about more, you know, in general, just how difficult it is, but how great it is at the same time.

And I always knew -- I mean, you can't keep your ranking forever. If ever that were to happen, I think you have to, you know, sort of have a different, maybe, approach, see what's the next step. Is it does it come down to the majors? Is it do you want to chase it again? I mean, I know myself, I'm sure my goal is, to try to get No. 1 ranking back, you know, I need to play well again. I need to win the big matches. That's what I'm looking at at the moment.

I always said that every tournament counts for me that I enter. But, obviously, it's not a secret that I base my schedule around trying to have the best preparation for the Grand Slams because this is where the focus is, the biggest, you know, on me. This is where I really want to try to do best.

But this year has been difficult for everybody, having a proper schedule, because we've been forced to play certain tournaments in some ways. I'm not criticizing. It's just a fact. With the Olympic Games, everything shifted. It made it really hard for us to have proper preparations. That's maybe one of the reasons some players play better, some players play worse. And I think next year you can control your schedule much more again yourself, which I think is going to be key for next year.

Q. Since the Wimbledon final in particular, have you at all at any time sat down and questioned whether you have any sort of the fundamental things wrong, like the number of tournaments you play, the way you train, your coaching, that sort of thing? Or do you feel those things are all basically right?

ROGER FEDERER: I've always been doing it. I mean, no matter if I was, you know -- I mean, I've been No. 1 for so long, that obviously this is really when I was most professional, you know. I mean, in the beginning you try to find what works best for you. And once I found that, I think back maybe 2003, 2004, you know, I first just started to do what I did best, play tennis and, you know, have a proper schedule, try to be injury-free.

But I think then once sort of 2004 and '5 came around, I think I always tried to look for new ways to improve, you know. Had a coach. You know, didn't have a coach in '04, that kind of thing. I always look for new ways to improve physically, because mentally, it wasn't a problem any more.

So for me, it was more physically and just, you know, playing. I mean, one of the reasons I started working with Tony Roche was trying to improve my volleys, which I did then.

So I always -- those moments where I sat down with my team and discussed, How can I get better? It's not really something that's gonna change. But the day will come that I will definitely want to sit down and say, What are my next steps, my next goals? What can I improve? You know, because I always think you have to question yourself, no matter if it's good or bad.

What I don't like to do is, sometimes because you don't play so well, is freak out and have, like, you know, emergency meetings. That's not going to happen because, thank God, I was actually doing it already for the last basically three or four years already, which I think was a good thing.

Q. This is your third time to participate in the Olympics. Why do you always come to the Olympics? There's no prize involved and little scores for the ranking and it will affect your other tournaments.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean -- okay, I agree. But at the same time, you know, in some ways it's such a nice change to the regular tour we play in, first of all. But then also, being part of the biggest sort of sports event, you know, in the world. Now that tennis is finally, you know, accepted by the Olympic Committee, you know, it's something I wish to sort of, you know, move it forward, you know, in a way.

I guess when I speak to some players now, who didn't used to play the Olympics back in maybe '96, 2000, you name it, I know that some of them have regrets that they didn't play it, seeing how big the Olympics has become, you know, in tennis and how important tennis has become to the Olympics really.

I hope that, you know, by my -- with my presence, and also, let's say, Rafa's presence, you know, Roddick's presence, Hewitt's presence in the past years, I think that's only gonna make it more important for the future generation, as well. So I think that's one of the reasons I play.

But then also having the chance to represent my country is the second one. Third, just sort of living the dream, as well, being part of the Olympic Village, the Olympic spirit. Just being here is something that is quite unique, especially after spending an incredible couple of weeks in Sydney, which for me will always stay in my memories as one of the greatest sports experiences I ever had. It was, for me, clear that I would never want to miss an Olympic Games ever again if I would have the chance to compete in them.

End of FastScripts

SUKTUEN
08-12-2008, 04:29 PM
thanks!!

Rommella
08-13-2008, 12:51 AM
Interpreter leaves Federer sheepish
Aug 11, 5:22 am EDT


BEIJING (AP)—Roger Federer’s timing was a little off Monday at the Olympics. He easily won, but at a postmatch news conference he kept stepping on the interpreter translating questions and answers into Chinese.

Federer milked the situation for laughs, belying his image as a stoic Swiss.

Following the first question, Federer and the interpreter began talking at the same time. Then, he again tried to answer before she was done translating the question. When she finally finished he smiled and said, “She answered for me.”

Federer stepped on the interpreter again after the second and third questions.

“Excuse me,” he said sheepishly.

Following the fourth question, he finally had the routine down, and gestured grandly toward the interpreter as she began to translate. After another question, Federer leaned into the mike and feigned speaking as the interpreter began.

And after the translation of one question, he let several seconds pass in silence, then looked at the interpreter with a grin.

“Just giving you time,” he said.

Despite being lost in translation, Federer was in a good mood because he successfully began a bid for his first Olympic medal by beating Dmitry Tursunov 6-4, 6-2.

SUKTUEN
08-13-2008, 05:41 AM
thanks!

Daniel
08-13-2008, 10:25 AM
www.inet.co.za - 8/13/2008 7:13 AM

Federer joins Phelps fan club

Roger Federer lavished praise on swimming superstar Michael Phelps as the American became the greatest Olympian of all time today.

BEIJING - Roger Federer lavished praise on swimming superstar Michael Phelps as the American became the greatest Olympian of all time today.

Federer said he appreciated the effort and sacrifices which have gone into the 23-year-old's march to a record 11 Olympic golds, more than any other athlete in history.

"What he's doing is quite incredible. He's been doing it for so many years," said Federer who is seeking a first Olympic tennis gold here and is desperately chasing down his own piece of history - Pete Sampras's record of 14 Grand Slam titles.

"He's doing it in different competitions at different lengths. He's very impressive and he's one of the greatest athletes out there at the moment."

Phelps started today with a career nine Olympic golds to stand alongside greats Paavo Nurmi, Carl Lewis, Mark Spitz and Larysa Latynina.

But the man from Baltimore clinched his place in the history books when he won the 200m butterfly in a new world record time of 1min 52.03sec, shaving six-hundredths of a second off the world mark of 1:52.09 he set in winning the world title in Melbourne last year.

An hour later he returned to lead the United States to victory in the 4x200m freestyle relay in 6:58.56 - crushing the previous world mark of 7:03.24 set by a US squad at the the world championships in Melbourne last year.

He has now won five golds in Beijing's Water Cube, to go with six he collected in Athens four years ago.

If Phelps can win all eight of his Beijing events, he will surpass the record of seven gold medals at one Games set by US swimmer Spitz at Munich in 1972.

His fellow countrymen were dazzled by his achievements.

"He's one of the greatest swimmers of all time," said Dwayne Wade, part of the United States' powerful men's basketball squad here.

Rommella
08-13-2008, 01:54 PM
Federer retains composure under fire

Rob Vanstone
The Leader-Post
Wednesday, August 13, 2008

BEIJING -- Roger Federer is as difficult to dislike as he is to defeat. I discovered that the other day, when the Swiss superstar met the media following his opening match in the 2008 Summer Olympics' tennis competition.

Federer had a bemused expression throughout the yak session, which was extended -- and enhanced, in terms of comedic content -- by the translation of every utterance into Chinese.

The first question, for example, was posed in English.

As Federer started to respond, a translator (seated to his left) repeated the question. Federer stopped his answer, pretended to be shocked, grinned, sat back and listened to the translation.

Due to the necessity of translation, some of the media conferences can become eye-rollers. Federer, however, turned the rigidities of this format in his favour and made it part of the show, exuding charisma and demonstrating the decency that has elicited plaudits from such outlets as Sports Illustrated.

Later, the translator repeated a question posed by Harvey Araton of the New York Times. Federer then turned to the translator, looked at Araton and joked, "She answered it for me.''

The interludes were as memorable as the responses, which were invariably courteous and expansive. After one never-ending question was read aloud in Chinese, Federer quipped: "I forgot the question.'' Then he grinned, again.

I marvelled at how effortlessly Federer handled the world's media corps. For lesser individuals, it can be intimidating to face a grilling from representatives of giants such as the Times (of New York and London), China Daily and the Leader-Post.

But Federer ate it up, as did we all.

In a career of attending press conferences, I have never witnessed anything quite like the session with Federer. He made every interrogator, including this one, feel as though it was a one-on-one interview. While sitting at a table at the front of the room, he looked everyone directly in the eye and provided thoughtful answers.

Over 22 years at the Leader-Post, I have been subjected to some excruciating press conferences, at which quotes have been surgically removed from reluctant participants who are not world-renowned. And then, by contrast, you see one of the planet's pre-eminent sports figures in a situation where he is totally engaged by the process.

Obviously, Federer has had plenty of practice. This can work both ways. For someone who meets the media as often as Federer, the process could easily become tiresome. Or, as in the case of Federer, the repetition can create a comfort level.

Some athletes would bristle when confronted with incessant questions such as the ones Federer has fielded. Within a week, he is to be unseated as the top-ranked men's singles player in the world. Federer is unruffled when the topic is raised.

"You can't keep your ranking forever,'' reasoned the impossibly graceful Federer, who has sat atop the ATP's list for four years.

Federer is to be supplanted by Spanish sensation Rafael Nadal, who won an epic Wimbledon final back in July. Nadal was featured at a media conference before the aforementioned gabfest with Federer. Both gatherings provided comedy relief, but for different reasons.

Nadal does his best to answer questions, albeit in fractured English that is not easily decipherable. Whereas Federer charmed the audience, Nadal (who also seemed friendly) left people wondering what, exactly, he was saying.

Yet, some people wanted more.

After the formal question-and-answer session, Nadal excused himself and walked toward a video monitor to check out the day's other scores. He was followed by a handful of salivating, snorting reporters, only to breeze past them after perusing the results.

One scribe rushed toward Nadal, determined to ask another question. At that point, an International Tennis Federation functionary intervened and aggressively stood between Nadal and the reporter, while upbraiding the seeker of truth.

"No! No!'' she screeched at the reporter during an amusing flare-up. "Out! Out!''

Just like that, it was over.

Game, set, match.

- Rob Vanstone is in Beijing as part of the Canwest News Service Olympic Team.
© The Leader-Post (Regina) 2008


Close

riddle05580
08-13-2008, 02:51 PM
Press Conference after the Second Round

http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=51553

August 12, 2008

Roger Federer

BEIJING, CHINA

R. FEDERER/R. Arevalo
6-2, 6-4

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You will play Tomas Berdych. Time for Olympic revenge?

ROGER FEDERER: I guess in Olympic terms, yes. We've played almost everywhere since. You know, it was our first match four years ago. And we've played on many occasions - some very good matches against each other, some less good, you know, when he was maybe a little tired or injured, Wimbledon, Paris.

But I always thought he had a great talent. To this day, I don't think he still has lived up to his potential yet, you know, because I think he has got a great game. So obviously I'm aware of the danger tomorrow.

Q. These games are a lot about Michael Phelps. Have you seen any of his races and what do you think about him in general?

ROGER FEDERER: I only saw highlights when he won the relay, for instance. But I've never met him before. You know, I've been in, how do you say, like awards shows, nominated in the same category, Sportsman of the Year in the Laureus, for instance. Obviously what he's doing is quite incredible. He's been doing it also now for many years. He had a great Olympics last time around. You know, to come back next time and basically do the same thing again, or maybe even better, it's quite incredible.
And he's doing it in different competitions, you know, different lengths. So he's obviously very impressive and he's one of the greatest athletes out there at the moment.

Q. I wanted to ask you about the crowds here. Sometimes they start cheering if there's a particularly long rally before the point is over. Jankovic was annoyed by that. Hewitt thought it was great. What are your thoughts about the crowds here?

ROGER FEDERER: I think they're good, you know. I think they're really getting into the whole tennis thing. Same thing in Shanghai. You know, they get excited for different reasons, you know, here in China, it seems like.

Like you said, sometimes before the point is over, sometimes on a double-fault where you're like, okay, double-faults happen. But they're like, oh, no, how bad for the other guy, or something like that. So it's actually quite a unique experience. It's a different cultural experience, in a way.

Honestly, I enjoy it. I've played great in Asia. At times they're reserved and then at times they really get excited. I think it's especially night sessions here, I think, are obviously even more special than the day session. I think they feel like this is the big stage, you know, with the lights and everything.
It was a nice experience tonight.

Q. What do you think about Arevalo?

ROGER FEDERER: Obviously, for me a very interesting match, you know, in such an tournament in my life to be playing a player with a very low ranking in a very big pressure situation for me. I have nothing to win, only to lose.

It wasn't easy today. But I think Rafael, he did well. I think he played like a clay courter to me. You know, he kept the ball in play, played it with a lot of spins. Really, I felt like he believed in his chance, which I think was key in terms of mental approach in a match like tonight, where he could easily go into this match and hope, Okay, I hope I play a good match, a few games, and I'm happy, you know. But I think he wanted more.

I hope for him that he will be -- I'll see more in the future and he'll reach really the big men's tour.

Q. You're getting a fair bit into the tournament now. How do you assess the way you're playing, the form, before playing Tomas Berdych?

ROGER FEDERER: I thought my first round was very solid. You know, didn't have any lapses, served well, had a great second set, and then against a dangerous player. That was a good match.

Tonight, I can't really rate this match too much. It was all a matter of getting through, you know, hopefully not getting a fright or anything, which I didn't. So it was just an okay performance, you know. I had to play to win, not to please anyone. And it's kind of tricky to play this way.

But it was a good way to also maybe get used to center court at night in case I progress in the tournament. Tomorrow I think I play second from 4. So that might be under the lights again.

I think for this reason it was good. I'm pretty happy with my form. But I think tomorrow will be a bigger test. I can tell you again more tomorrow then.

Q. We see you week in, week out. We know what your achievements are. The same goes with Tiger Woods. The name Phelps being mentioned, where would you place him among the elite sportsmen like yourself and Woods? Would you put him up there on the same level even though his name will really come to the fore once in every four years?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, like you say, yeah, it's a bit more difficult to follow than maybe golf or tennis because maybe swimming doesn't have the world stage like we do or Formula One does or even Moto GP. It's a little bit maybe more difficult for them. But they shine really a lot during the Olympic Games, which is their big advantage.

It's hard for me even to really tell exactly what he did the last few years. I just know he's been very good. You know, he's been winning almost everything. But I don't even know how many races they swim a year. So I think that, like, in between sort of the most famous sports and the sports that just show up, you know, sort of once every four years.

But I think swimming is a beautiful sport. You know, I think it's definitely one of the big sports here at the Olympic Games, still considered bigger than tennis, which I agree with. You know, but I think if you have a solid Olympics like he has twice or three times, it's correct you're mentioned as one of the best athletes out there at the moment. I think he's achieving that right now and he's writing history maybe. I hope he does it because I always think it's exciting, you know, when you break records.

End of FastScripts

SUKTUEN
08-13-2008, 04:19 PM
:worship:

riddle05580
08-14-2008, 11:22 AM
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/08/14/2335374.htm?site=olympics/2008

Tennis schedule 'ridiculous,' fumes Federer

Posted 6 hours 49 minutes ago

Roger Federer has complained the Olympics tennis schedule is "ridiculous" after playing six matches in just four days.

The top seed won his singles match against Tomas Berdych and had just one hour and 40 minutes to recover before returning for the doubles.

"I find it a little bit ridiculous that we're playing maybe 11 matches in seven days, to be honest," Federer said.

"I know it rained the first day. But quite honestly, I don't understand why we don't play such a big tournament over 10 days maybe.

"That's the only regret I have at the moment because I think this is asking just a little bit too much and too much trouble."

The event is grand slam-size but played in almost half the time - eight days rather than a fortnight - and most of the first day was lost to rain.

Rafael Nadal started playing at 10:30am on Monday and did not finish until late that evening.

The same day, Sam Querrey played Igor Andreev - and then stayed on court to face him in the doubles.

Federer complained the format was "very hard" on the players, most of whom will compete in the US Open which starts a week on Monday.

"They've made it very hard on us players and I wish there were extra days for us to play," Federer said.

"But that's the way it is right now."

The Swiss has played two previous Olympics, finishing fourth in 2000 and losing in round two four years ago.

"I know the difficulty of trying to win a medal here," he said.

"It's a difficult forum, winning six matches in seven days plus five doubles matches if you want to win gold there as well."

The Olympics is known to throw up surprises with Marc Rosset winning in 1992 and Nicolas Massu taking both singles and doubles gold in Athens.

Several players have also voiced concern over the added physical demands of playing in the heat and humidity of a Beijing summer.

"Except in Dubai in practice, I never have to towel off basically after every point I play," Federer said.

"The racquet gets wet, grip gets wet, slippery. That makes it hard, just having the proper feeling on the grip.

"But just being wet all over, sweat in your eyes, makes it a bit tricky."

US number one James Blake earlier said the tournament would be a survival of the fittest.

"It's going to be a grind," Blake said.

"By the end of the week, whoever is left standing is going to have to be someone that's in great shape physically."

-AFP

SUKTUEN
08-14-2008, 01:08 PM
Come On Roger!!!!

Daniel
08-14-2008, 02:53 PM
http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/olympics/tennis/federer-olympic-dream-over-896849.html

Federer Olympic dream over

Roger Federer's bid for his first Olympic singles medal ended today when he lost to James Blake of the United States.


With the sort of lackluster performance once unthinkable for Federer, he was eliminated in the quarter-finals 6-4, 7-6 (2).


The upset was a stunner in that Blake had won only a single set in their previous eight matches. But the top-seeded Federer is battling a year long slump that has left him stalled at 12 Grand Slam titles, two shy of Pete Sampras' record.


Federer's latest defeat means no rematch in Sunday's final against Rafael Nadal, who won in epic fashion when they met for the Wimbledon title.


Federer is seeking his first Olympic medal after losing in the singles semi-finals in Sydney and in the second round in Athens. He was scheduled to play a quarter-final doubles match later today with Swiss partner Stanislas Wawrinka.


The upset was sweet for the eight-seeded Blake, a first-time Olympian at 28 and the lone U.S. male to survive the first round of singles.


In a tournament that had been upset-free through three rounds, the first surprise was a shock.


The match began after a rain delay of 3 hours, 35 minutes, and Federer seemed off his game from the start. His forehand — once the sport's most feared — was unreliable, and he repeatedly struggled to hold serve.


Blake earned the first break in the final game of the opening set. On set point, Federer left his feet for a spectacular backhand save that extended the rally, but with his next shot he floated an easy backhand into the net.


His shoulders sagging, he was broken again two games later and fell behind 3-0 in the second set.


Federer finally showed life by breaking back in the fifth game and holding the rest of the way to reach 6-all. But Blake played a flawless tiebreaker, while Federer made two unforced errors and popped up a volley.


When Federer sailed a return long on match point, Blake screamed "Yeah!" Federer ripped off his headband and walked head down to the net.


It just wasn't Federer's night: He even went 0-4 on replay challenges.

Daniel
08-14-2008, 02:55 PM
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/olympics_blog/2008/08/federer-lose-to.html

Top-seeded Roger Federer loses to James Blake

BEIJING -- Roger Federer's Olympic moment was, for the third time, a glum one.

The world's No. 1 player, currently going through a rocky streak, was upset in the quarterfinals of the Olympic tournament here Thursday night by American James Blake.

Blake won, 6-4, 7-6 (2), marking the first time he had ever beaten Federer, although he had always gone into the matches with an upbeat attitude.

"The results haven't been good," he said, "but I've always felt I could win."

Thursday night, while Federer struggled -- especially with a first serve -- Blake swung from the heels and, unlike previous matches with Federer, the shots went in more often than not.

They held serve until Federer got to 4-5 of the first set. Blake got the set point by wrong-footing Federer on a deep ground stroke and then keeping him off balance for the next swing, which he netted.

Blake then ran out to a 3-0 lead in the second set, but Federer got back on serve and they carried on into the tiebreaker at 6-6, when, uncharacteristically, Federer cracked. He missed an open passing shot at 1-3, hit a forehand long for 2-5, and that put the match on Blake's racket with two serves.

Blake hit a deep approach and Federer netted his answer. Then, on match point, Federer went meekly, returning Blake's serve long.

Federer, No. 1 in the world for most of the last four years and the owner of 12 Grand Slam titles, second only to Pete Sampras' 14, will lose his No. 1 ranking to Rafael Nadal next week. Federer has not won a major title this year and had looked on the Olympics as a steppingstone for saving his year here, and at the upcoming U.S. Open.

Federer failed to win an Olympic medal in both Sydney in 2000 and Athens in 2004. He remains in the running in doubles here, but said Wednesday night that he expected, were he to win a medal, to have it be in singles.

"If I were to bet my house, it would be singles," he said.

Blake was seeded No. 8 here and became the top U.S. player in the men's draw when Andy Roddick chose not to play.

Daniel
08-14-2008, 02:58 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/olympics/2558349/2008-Beijing-Olympics-Roger-Federer-stunned-by-James-Blake---Olympics.html

2008 Beijing Olympics: Roger Federer stunned by James Blake

By Richard Morgan
Last Updated: 3:15PM BST 14 Aug 2008

You cannot be serious: Federer and Blake shake hands after the top seed's shock loss to the American Photo: Reuters
The Swiss produced an error-strewn display and was comfortably outplayed by Blake, who beat the outgoing world No 1 for the first time in eight previous meetings.

Blake will now face either Frenchman Paul-Henri Mathieu or Chile's Fernando Gonzalez in the last four.

The start of the match at the Olympic Green Tennis Centre had been delayed by over three hours due to a series of heavy downpours in Beijing, but when the contest did finally get under way, it was Blake who dominated proceedings.

There was a hushed silence around the arena when the No 6 seed secured the opening set after finally breaking Federer's serve in the tenth game.

And, the American wrapped up one of the biggest wins of his career to date by keeping his cool in the second-set tie-break, which he breezed through 7-2.

This defeat caps off a miserable year for Federer, who has lost in the finals of both Wimbledon and the French Open to the soon-to-be crowned world No 1 Rafael Nadal, although he will now be able to concentrate all his efforts on a successful defence of his US Open title at Flushing Meadows.

SUKTUEN
08-14-2008, 02:58 PM
Olympic dream over?

Who knows what will happen in 2012? > 0 <

riddle05580
08-14-2008, 03:15 PM
Press Conference after the Third Round

http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=51573

August 13, 2008

Roger Federer
Stanislas Wawrinka

BEIJING, CHINA

FEDERER-WAWRINKA/Tursunov-Youzhny
6-4, 6-3

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Can you explain how you saw your singles match today? Seemed to be playing fantastic against Tomas today.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I thought I did play a good match. Wish I didn't have the break of serve where I served three double-faults. You know, that's quite unusual. Other than that, I thought it was a good performance. I moved well, played good from the baseline, was solid on the return. That's really what I could hope for.

Conditions were really, really humid out there again, so it made it tricky to play. But I think maybe Tomas helped a little bit in the second set, not serving very well on his first serve. But I was able to break his serve down a little bit by returning it really well. So I'm very happy with this win because I think this was the first true test in this tournament.

Q. I know you have a nice winning streak going against Tomas the last few years. But how much was the 2004 match on your mind going into this, if at all?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, we've played plenty of times in between, obviously. But, of course, you have memories of such a big tournament and losing. I got it out of my system I guess the first time I beat him again. You know, I think it was Hamburg I beat him 1-2. But it was clay obviously.

I mean, it was nice to get him back I guess on the Olympic level. But I think it must have been maybe a little bit hard for him as well, right? He beat me four years ago, and after he's the guy who beat Roger Federer at the Olympics for a year. Sort of what happened to me after I beat Sampras at Wimbledon.

You know, it can play on your mind a little bit. But I guess he followed up pretty good. But I think he's still got some potential left. He's a good player. That's why I'm quite relieved I got through this tough third round.

Q. If we talk on Monday, looking back, you've won an Olympic medal, do you think it's going to be more in singles or doubles?

ROGER FEDERER: Look, I don't know. Chances are -- am I in the quarterfinals in singles, as well? Both quarters. Yeah, I mean, we've been playing well in doubles. Obviously now our opponents are getting more difficult in singles and doubles. In doubles, obviously we've got some very experienced players in the next round. In singles, James is always extremely dangerous to play against, even though I have a great streak against him.

If I would have to bet my house on it, I probably would bet on the singles, but you never know. Doubles, everything is possible, especially at the moment.

Q. Do you feel still fresh, playing singles and doubles?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I'm pulling out tomorrow, singles and doubles. I'm leaving (laughter).

No, I feel fine. Matches haven't been that tough. I've been only playing straight sets. Of course, it's hot. We finished late. But we can sleep in. Matches don't start till 4. That's the only positive side.

I find it a little bit ridiculous that we're playing maybe 13 matches in seven days, to be honest. You know, I know it rained the first day. But quite honestly, I don't understand why we don't play such a big tournament over 10 days maybe. That's the only regret I have at the moment because I think this is asking just a little bit too much and too much trouble.

Q. You play singles and doubles. You might get yourself exhausted. What about US Open? What is your plan on the US Open?

ROGER FEDERER: My plan? To win.

I don't know. I mean, have a good time in New York, party, Broadway shows, good restaurants, hang out with some friends I haven't seen for a year. Yeah, I mean that's the plan.

No, I mean, I'm at the Olympic Games right now. I'm trying to win medals here, then we'll see how the US Open goes. But the thing I know is as soon as this is over, I'm going to the US Open to prepare as good as I can. So I'm ready to win the last Grand Slam of the year.

Q. Stan, what is it like for you? You're the second guy alongside the great star here. How are you enjoying the experience of going for a realistic medal with Roger?

STANISLAS WAWRINKA: Of course, for me it's my first Olympics, so it's a great experience to be in the village and have the chance to play with Roger. So honestly I just enjoy to be there and to play the doubles with him.

Q. Besides having to towel off all the time and wear wristbands, you said something about the humidity made it tricky to play. How does it do that other than you're wet all the time?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, the racquet gets wet, grip gets wet, slippery. I mean, except in Dubai in practice, I never have to towel off basically after every point I play. We're talking maybe, you know, rallies are pretty short here considering. That makes it hard, just having the proper feeling on the grip. Thank God I change my racquet very often so the grip gets fresh again.

But, you know, just being I guess wet all over, sweat in your eyes, it's just a bit tricky. But I've gotten used to it over the years, whereas in the beginning this would have been unbearable for me. I really struggled in the humidity when I was younger.

End of FastScripts

SUKTUEN
08-14-2008, 03:21 PM
it is very late tonight, the interview still goes on?

riddle05580
08-15-2008, 01:02 AM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/olympics/2008/writers/selena_roberts/08/14/federer/index.html

What's eating Roger Federer?

BEIJING -- The cinematic Roger Federer played the part of No. 1 like no other for four years, with the forehand of Zorro and lyrical moves, as a metro man confident enough to wear crested blazers and monogram cardigans courtside. His elite ranking was a perfect fit.

Now, nothing seems comfortable for Federer, as he goes squirming and twisting into his new life as No. 2 behind No. 1 Rafael Nadal when the ATP Tour rankings are released next week. It was another irritating night for Federer on Thursday, another what's-wrong-with-Fed? moment when he lost for the first time to American James Blake, 6-4, 7-6 (2), in the quarterfinals of Olympic competition.

It was a life-affirming win for Blake, who kissed the American flag sewn into his shirt after the last point. It was devastating for Federer, who hurried off the court, slipping by tennis officials with red eyes. He wanted a gold medal, and he wanted that yellow brick road to go through Nadal in the Beijing Games final.

With an Olympic title, Federer could find closure on the pain of losing an episodic Wimbledon final to Nadal. With a gold medal, Federer could reclaim his champion's gait after a season of jarring vulnerability. That dream scenario was getting way ahead of things, as Blake would prove with one driving forehand after another, leaving Federer visibly discombobulated. He talked to himself, challenged calls he was obviously wrong about and seemed mad at his suddenly slow feet.

Who was this cranky man? Federer hasn't been himself all year, left sluggish after a case of mononucleosis early in the season. But something else -- something less obvious -- has been amiss. Certainly, Nadal has played superior tennis, but Federer has also been beaten by the undercard talents. More and more, Federer appears winded by his greatness, worn out by the pressure to be perfect. "I honestly don't know how he's dealt with for so long," Blake said.

Federer handled it well when he had no handlers. During his first year at the top, he was underexposed as a superstar, with no agent next to him in the player's box, with few magazine shoots on his to-do list. Then, he signed with IMG in the summer of 2005 to boost his profile, and agent Tony Godsick did his job well.

He capitalized on Federer's accessible persona, style and skills to place his client's clean image in the American conscious. He monetized Federer's magnetism. By '07, Federer's visibility was exploding. He was seen in the company of chic celebrities like Vogue editor Anna Wintour, and slipped in front of the camera on the set of commercials for Gillette. This year, he went globe-trotting to play exhibitions with Pete Sampras.

All the while, Federer has fancied his red-carpet existence and dug his debonair duds without ever turning into a diva, keeping his commitments to Tour tournament directors. Until this season, he looked like he could pull off the impossible: be all things to all people. Now he knows better.

[B]"It's a lack of practice; I haven't had time to practice whatsoever since February," Federer conceded after losing to Blake for the first time in their nine matches. "I blame myself the most."

He didn't blame his agent or needy sponsors, fans or an insatiable media. But you could hear it in his voice: Multi-tasking has grown exhausting for Federer, particularly with the indefatigable Nadal having chased him down, especially with younger players less awed by his stature.

"It's been OK this year, but I agree that I'm not happy with it, with this tournament," Federer said. "I wish I would have done much more."

The U.S. Open is ahead of Federer, who said a good finish would "save my season." So far, he is without a title in all three of this year's Grand Slams tournaments and has fallen into beatable status, though his slip will not induce sympathy from his peers.

"I still have a ton of praise for him," said Blake. "I still have a ton of respect for him as a man. And as a player, he's still one of the best in the world, for sure. As far as if I feel sorry for him, I'm sure he's flying home on his private jet and he's doing OK for himself, seems to have his family happy and healthy around him. So I don't feel too sorry for him. And I think he's still gonna probably go down as the greatest of all time. I can't cry myself to sleep over Roger Federer."

Blake smiled as he talked, thinking it odd to be asked if he felt bad for a player who has enjoyed the top for so long. And to be sure, Federer may start dominating again if he can discover more time for his game, with less devotion to expanding his brand name appearance by appearance.

In November, Federer is scheduled to play an exhibition with Björn Borg in what could be yet another drain. He needs his energy to find the answers to Nadal, to regain his confidence, to rediscover what it's like at No. 1. After all, he can't wear a crested blazer as a No. 2. It's not a good look.

riddle05580
08-15-2008, 05:49 AM
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=51607

August 14, 2008

Roger Federer

BEIJING, CHINA

J. BLAKE/R. Federer
6-4, 7-6

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Talk about the singles match and then just about the craziness that we're still here at 1:40 in the morning.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, big disappointment obviously. You know, it was one of the goals of the season for me to do well here. So obviously the quarterfinals is not going to do it for me.

I think James played well. I can only, you know, really say how well he played. I mean, he went full out and hit everything he needed I thought tonight. And I've played him on many occasions, but I think this was the best I've seen him. I'm happy for him. He's a good guy. I hope he can go all the way now.

Q. Did you feel like your forehand in particular let you down tonight? How would you assess your game?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, maybe an occasional shots here and there. It was okay. I mean, James plays very aggressive. We know that. So you only get a handful of chances sometimes to attack.

But I didn't serve my best today. But conditions were quick. James was keeping me on the back foot. So it made it hard.

Probably maybe wasn't my best night out there, but it wasn't bad. It's a tough loss.

Q. You're very dignified in defeat, as always. I know it's not a bad year. By your own high standards, is there something wrong? Is there a problem in your game, in your approach, anything that needs addressing?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, lack of practice. I haven't had time to practice whatsoever since February. I mean, I can maybe blame myself for not, you know, taking time off, maybe skipping Toronto, Cincinnati. But that's all the preparation I need to get ready for the hard court is the Olympic Games, so I never really got an opportunity to get that practice in.

I think that's maybe what I feel most this year. You know, just losing too many matches, which I maybe should have won - maybe Wimbledon, maybe some other matches, as well, now in North America.

But, you know, it's been okay this year. But I agree, I'm not happy with this tournament. You know, I wish I could have done much more. But I've still got to look forward. I look forward to the US Open. I still have really this and then the Masters Cup in Shanghai to really do well now. Try to save my season.

You know, but this obviously is a big blow because I expected more. But at the same time I know the danger of best-of-three set matches. They're over in a hurry. You could feel that today. You know, I was down 6-4, 3-Love in no time. I guess that's a danger in these kind of competitions.

Q. You're starting to lose against guys you always won against, like Karlovic and Blake. Do you feel something in your confidence now when you go onto the court?

ROGER FEDERER: Sure. When you lose maybe five matches a year, I mean, it's a different type of, you know, confidence you have.

But at the same time I think it's always been difficult to beat all these guys. You know, I've beaten Karlovic in the past 7-6 in the third, but nobody knows where that was and when it was, you know. But today I can't hide under the radar any more. You know, No. 1's in the world, when they lose, it's always in the headlines. That's maybe why it also looks a little more extreme.

But I've had tough matches against many of the players. Even though my records might be 5-0, 10-0, whatever it is. It's just not so easy to keep it up all the time. Eventually sometimes they get you, like Andy got me this year or James got me this year, and Fernando at the end of last year. These guys all play good tennis. So when it all doesn't comes together, and maybe I just don't play my very, very best, it's obviously not enough.

Q. At some point does it become difficult for you guys to be playing at such an hour or is this just something you're used to?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, we're not used to practicing at 2 in the morning. But it happens, you know. We, the players, have to be ready for those things. I mean, we're used to waiting, you know, and going to the next day, coming back the next day, maybe it's raining the next day, coming back the next day again. It's obviously not the ideal preparation much, but at the same time it's the same for both.

I mean, I don't think it really comes down to who handles it better. It's just a matter of coming out there and trying to do well. Sometimes, you know, you come out there and you play incredible tennis, and sometimes you're just maybe not as good, you know. And sometimes that has -- maybe the weather had an effect, sometimes not.

But I think we try our best, you know. That's all you can do really. But I don't know, I mentioned it I think yesterday, I think it's why we're still here, it's also brutal because we're playing this tournament in one week. It really doesn't make it a whole lot easier to us as players. That's why they almost have to keep us here. We're almost happy to finish tonight in case we win so we don't have to play again tomorrow, so we don't have to double up. I think that's a bit of a shame. But I don't have that problem any more, so I don't care (smiling).

End of FastScripts

Daniel
08-15-2008, 09:18 AM
http://www.suntimes.com/sports/couch/1109116,gregtennis081508.article

The end of Federer?

BY GREG COUCH Sun-Times Columnist

BEIJING -- He shook James Blake’s hand after losing to him for the first time, having beaten him for years, and it was over Roger Federer. His Olympic hopes, his No. 1 ranking.

Rafael Nadal will finally, officially, pass Federer in the world rankings Monday.

Rafael Nadal will finally, officially, pass Federer in the world rankings Monday.

"I’m disappointed,” Federer said.


Blake beat Federer 6-4, 7-6 (7-2) in the Olympics quarterfinal, Federer’s fourth loss in his past eight matches.

It’s over for Roger Federer? Did I just say that? A few weeks ago he was in the Wimbledon final, losing a classic match to Nadal that gave the game a signature moment resonating beyond the tennis world. It set up maybe the best rivalry in sports.

Now, Federer is questioning his practice schedule, his tournament schedule. I remember when the TV people, so desperate to find an imperfection, would point out if he had a hair out of place.

"When you lose maybe five matches (in) a year," he said, "it’s a different type of confidence you have."

It has been an amazing unraveling. Just 11 months ago, he was dominating the sport like no one before him. And this wasn’t a major, but all the best players came, and it was always set up for another classic Nadal-Federer final.

Earlier in the week, Federer held a press conference for the world’s media, and the place was packed and buzzing. He said he wasn’t staying in the Olympic Village because he had enjoyed the experience four years ago, but was too overwhelmed by autograph and photo requests from other athletes.

And he said this:"It’s the one tournament I based my year around."

Suddenly, Roger Federer is losing to everyone, no offense to Blake, who miraculously is two victories from becoming the dominant force in American tennis. Andy Roddick has lost it entirely, staying home and losing to some nobody. Even the Williams sisters were eliminated from the Olympics Thursday.

"I’m speechless," Blake said. "This is unbelievable. It’s not very often you get to say you beat the No. 1 player in the world any time, but to do it at the Olympics with `USA’ on your chest. . ."

He talked about taking inspiration from Michael Phelps, Dara Torres and other Americans. He’s staying in the village to feel a part of this.

Meanwhile, it’s over for Roger Federer. No, I can’t believe that. But it’s not just that he’s No. 2 now. He isn’t even able to reach the final to play Nadal, the match that would draw everyone’s interest.

Suddenly, he’s not holding up his end of the bargain.

And I wonder if he’s about to pull a Bjorn Borg on tennis. Just fighting off the rival _ in Borg’s case, John McEnroe _ and then, when the rival inches past, validating the rivalry, just disappearing.

The difference is, though, Federer loves this. He said he is inclined to fight to get his No. 1 back.

Someone asked Blake if he feels bad for Federer.

"I’m sure he’s flying home on his private jet and he’s doing OK for himself," Blake said. "(He) seems to have his family happy and healthy around him. And I think he’s still going probably to go down as the greatest of all time. I can’t cry myself to sleep over Roger Federer."

Federer can get this back, but he’s going to have to loosen up on the court, take more chances. And it’s a test of what’s inside to see whether he can regain his confidence.

He has remained classy, but also shown cracks personally, grumbling at being treated like yesterday’s news when he was only a few points from winning Wimbledon.

He doesn’t think it’s over, anyway.

Daniel
08-15-2008, 09:20 AM
http://www.news24.com/News24/Sport/Olympics2008/0,,2-9-2370_2376499,00.html

Federer ponders latest blow

Beijing - Roger Federer was stoic in defeat but admitted his Olympic shock at the hands of James Blake was a "big blow" as he ponders his worst season in years.

Federer, who will hand over his number one crown on Monday, now has only the US Open left as he looks to salvage a year of 12 defeats and zero Grand Slam titles so far - his first since 2002.

"It's a big disappointment obviously. You know, it was one of the goals of the season for me to do well here," he said.

"So obviously the quarter-finals is not going to do it for me."

A strangely out-of-sorts Federer handed over the first set and succumbed meekly in the decisive tie-break to Blake, who ran out a 6-4 7-6 (7/2) winner for his first victory in nine attempts over the Swiss.

"I think James played well. I can only really say how well he played," Federer said.

"I mean, he went full-out and hit everything he needed I thought. I've played him on many occasions, but I think this was the best I've seen him.

"I'm happy for him. He's a good guy. I hope he can go all the way now."

The defeat will be tough for Federer who has made the Olympics one of his top targets all season and desperately needed a win to resurrect his season.

He refused to blame a "brutal" rain-hit schedule which forced him to play a doubles match with partner Stanislas Wawrinka immediately after the heart-breaking loss.

"It's also brutal because we're playing this tournament in one week. It really doesn't make it a whole lot easier to us as players," he said.

Federer said lack of hardcourt practice was more of a factor after defeats to Gilles Simon and Ivo Karlovic in Canada and Cincinnati meant he played only three matches on the surface prior to Beijing.

Such gripes have been the story of his season which started badly, with a debilitating bout of mononucleosis, and has lurched from crisis to crisis.

Despite reaching two Grand Slam finals, he was stopped each time by Rafael Nadal, who ends his record 235 weeks at the top in three days' time.

"I think that's maybe what I feel most this year. You know, just losing too many matches, which I maybe should have won -- maybe Wimbledon, maybe some other matches as well, now in North America," he said.

"It's been okay this year. But I agree, I'm not happy with this tournament. You know, I wish I could have done much more.

"But I've still got to look forward. I look forward to the US Open. I still have really this and then the Masters Cup in Shanghai to really do well now. Try to save my season."

The Olympics has special resonance for Federer, who as a 10-year-old boy watched countryman Marc Rosset claim gold at Barcelona 1992.

He finished fourth at Sydney 2000 and was knocked out in tears in round two four years ago in Athens, just six-and-a-half months into his reign as the world's top player.

Daniel
08-15-2008, 09:24 AM
http://uk.reuters.com/article/tennisNews/idUKLF58204320080815?sp=true

Fear factor no longer Federer's secret weapon

By Martyn Herman

BEIJING (Reuters) - Not long ago, when Roger Federer was collecting grand slam titles for fun, it seemed fear had most opponent's beaten before the warm-up had even finished.

Now, after another body blow at the Olympics on Thursday when he lost in the quarter-finals to James Blake, the cloak of invincibility looks tattered and torn and rivals are queuing up to take their chances against arguably the greatest player ever.

First it was Spain's Rafael Nadal, who will end Federer's 1,659-day stay as world number one on Monday, who dared to stand up to the king of tennis, beating him in three consecutive French Open finals and snatching his Wimbledon crown this year.

But when Federer starts losing to the likes of Mardy Fish, Ivo Karlovic and Radek Spepanek, solid enough players but the sort Federer once ate for breakfast, questions must be asked.

Whereas many top players have a small army of people to turn to when the going gets tough, Federer travels the Tour with a tiny support group led by girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec.

The former professional, who he met while playing at the Sydney Olympics eight years ago, is Federer's soulmate, media manager, business adviser. Now, more than ever, she will have to be his sport psychologist.

She looked ashen-faced and close to tears at Wimbledon this year when the Swiss lost an epic final to Nadal to end his five-year reign at the grand slam.

Near the end of his error-strewn defeat by Blake, a man Federer had beaten in all eight previous meetings, she held her head in her hands, seemingly unable to watch.

Federer, who hired Spanish coach Jose Higueras in April after sacking Tony Roche last year, played down talk of a crisis in the early hours of Friday, despite his 12th defeat of the season.

But behind the calm exterior and his polite demeanour, he knows something is wrong.

"I can't hide under the radar any more. When number ones in the world lose it's always in the headlines. It looks a little more extreme," he said. "It's just not so easy to keep it up all the time. Eventually, sometimes they get you."

After playing in the doubles in Beijing, Federer will fly off to New York as world number two, where he will try to cling on to the one major still in his possession.

The line of players waiting for a shot at the champ is already forming and Federer, as he said, will have no place to hide.

(Editing by Alex Richardson)

Daniel
08-15-2008, 09:33 AM
http://in.reuters.com/article/worldOfSport/idINIndia-35019620080815?sp=true

BLOG - Day six at the Games: Roger Federer's miserable year

By Kevin Fylan

Roger Federer came to Beijing hoping for a singles gold medal to ease the pain of losing the last two major finals and his number one ranking to Rafa Nadal.


Tennis at the Olympics may rank far below the Grand Slams but considering he has not won one of those this year a gold medal would still have served very nicely, thanks very much.


Sadly for the Swiss, he lost 6-4 7-6 to James Blake in the quarter-finals on Thursday, a miserable day all round given the rain that was falling.


The Williams sisters also went out, double Olympic champion Venus beaten 7-5 7-5 by China’s Li Na and Serena losing to Elena Dementieva.


Away from the tennis, Michael Phelps was for once not the story. Alain Bernard of France won the men’s 100m freestyle in the Water Cube, while there was a nasty incident when a Swedish wrestler tossed away his bronze medal in disgust at the refereeing that cost him a shot at gold.


Otherwise, it was a golden day for Asia, as Japanese swimmer Kosuke Kitajima completed a breaststroke double double and Chinese gymnast Yang Wei ended eight years of hurt in the men’s individual all-round event.

Daniel
08-15-2008, 09:36 AM
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/473a3840-6a2b-11dd-83e8-0000779fd18c.html?nclick_check=1

Federer exit adds to tournament woe
By Matthew Engel

Roger Federer, perhaps the most famous competitor in Beijing and probably the richest, crashed out of the Olympic singles tournament, losing his quarter-final to the American James Blake.

This was the latest in a succession of disasters that have befallen Federer in the 39 days since his defeat by Rafael Nadal in their epic Wimbledon final. It was also yet another disaster for the eternally benighted Olympic tennis tournament.

Since the sport was restored to the Olympics 20 years ago, the men’s singles gold has gone to a succession of ho-hum players (plus Andre Agassi), and the possibility of a Federer-Nadal rematch on Sunday looked like an unparalleled chance to give the event some credibility.

However, the monstrous size of the games is such that even a contest which enraptured the sporting world last month would have struggled for attention, especially on Sunday, the busiest day of all, when 33 other golds will be awarded. It will certainly struggle now.

On current form, it would probably have been a fearful anti-climax anyway. Blake is the world number eight, but he had only taken a solitary set off Federer in eight previous meetings: the score was 22-1.

This time, you would have guessed that Blake had the 22. Federer, wearing the red of Switzerland, blundered along, regularly missing regulation strokes on both sides: even his line-call challenges were off-beam, suggesting a man who had lost his iron grip on the geometry of tennis. In any case, he was certain to lose his number one ranking next Monday for the first time since January 2004, to Nadal.

Federer’s downfall was part of a night of general tennis mayhem. The Williams sisters, Venus and Serena, also both suffered startling defeats.

Federer is a man who thrives on the big occasion. To almost everyone else in Beijing, this IS the big occasion, but the tennis players are different. It’s a novelty, a distraction – to many of them a welcome one, although the US Open is just 10 days away. And the players might just be aware that the winner in New York gets $1.5m; the winner here gets ... a gold medal.

It also didn’t feel like a big occasion. After a day of positively Wimbledonian downpour, play began nearly four hours late, at 7.45 pm: Nadal did not get on court until midnight.

Centre Court was less than half-full, even with the presence of hundreds of Olympic volunteers, brought in to paper the house, as they say in the theatre. They weren’t exactly in disguise, though, wearing identical yellow rain capes.

Just occasionally there was a glimpse of the real Roger, rushing netwards, hair flopping, racket blazing. But only occasionally. Blake always had the edge before winning 6-4 7-6. He celebrated as though the gold were already his. “I can tell my kids I beat Federer this one time,” he said.

At 1.10 am, Nadal reached the semi-final by beating Jürgen Melzer of Austria. Meanwhile, Federer was still not wholly without a chance of Olympic gold: he was still on court playing in the men’s doubles.

At that time of night, he would probably rather be doing anything else. Next Monday, he will lose his status as world number one, after four and half years, to his nemesis Nadal. Not a happy time.

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2008

Daniel
08-15-2008, 09:38 AM
http://uk.reuters.com/article/tennisNews/idUKPEK17652720080814?sp=true

Olympics-Tennis-Federer classy even in defeat

By Martyn Herman

BEIJING, Aug 15 (Reuters) - Roger Federer was magnanimous in defeat on Friday after his hopes of a gold medal in the Olympic singles were extinguished by American James Blake.

The Swiss, who will officially cease to be the world's best tennis player when the new rankings are released on Monday, slid to a 6-4 7-6 defeat on Thursday night as his normally graceful game misfired again.

He had never lost to Blake in eight previous meetings, ceding just one set in that sequence, but he was outplayed on Centre Court as Blake's forehand caught fire.

"It's a big disappointment obviously," the 27-year-old Swiss flag-bearer told reporters in the early hours of Friday after his doubles quarter-final with Stanislas Wawrinka had been called off because of rain.

"The Olympics was one of the goals of the season for me. So obviously the quarter-finals is not going to do it," he said.

"I think James played well. I can only really say how well he played. I've played him on many occasions, but I think this was the best I've seen him.

"I'm happy for him. I hope he can go all the way now."

Federer's latest setback, following the morale-sapping defeats against Spain's Rafael Nadal in the Roland Garros and Wimbledon finals, will lead to inevitable gossip that his five-year domination of men's tennis is over for good.

The 12-times Grand Slam champion, who blames a lack of proper practising after an early season illness for his run of poor form, said he could still salvage his season.

"I'm not happy with this tournament. I wish I could have done much more," said Federer.

"But I've still got to look forward to the U.S. Open. I still have that and then the Masters Cup in Shanghai to really do well now and try and save my season," he said.

Blake, playing at his first Olympics, offered a generous take on the Federer debate.

"It's like Tiger Woods. When they don't win every single week, it's called a bad year," Blake told reporters.

"Roger's been in two finals of a slam, semi-finals of a slam. To consider that a bad year is just amazing.

"You never see him lose his cool. Never see him break a racket. Never see him berate an umpire. I still have a ton of praise for him. I still have a ton of respect for him as a man."

(Editing by Ralph Gowling)

Daniel
08-15-2008, 09:40 AM
August 14, 2008, 10:35 am Curse of the Gillette Ad Strikes Again?

By Robert Mackey (http://olympics.blogs.nytimes.com/author/rmackey/)

Now that America’s James Blake has knocked Switzerland’s Roger Federer out of the Olympic tennis competition (http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/sports/AP-AS-OLY-TEN-Tennis.html), is anyone else starting to think that Federer, along with Tiger Woods (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/w/tiger_woods/index.html?8qa&scp=1-spot&sq=tiger+woods&st=nyt) and Thierry Henry (http://goal.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/10/16/qa-barcelonas-thierry-henry/?scp=8&sq=%22thierry%20henry%22&st=cse), may somehow have offended the gods of sport by appearing together in this ad campaign for Gillette?

Before appearing in the ad campaign together all three of these athletes were in peak form, acknowledged as the best in the world in their respective sports.
Since the ad was made, here’s what’s happened: Henry came down with a career-damaging case of sciatica and now plays, infrequently, with just flashes of his former brilliance; Woods blew out his knee, came back from surgery on it too quickly and, while winning the U.S. Open, damaged it so badly that he is now out for the year; Federer’s invincibility cloak has gone missing and now he’s having trouble beating Rafa Nadal not just on clay, but also on grass, and he’s lost in straight sets to James Blake on a hard court in the run-up to the U.S. Open.
Rahul Dravid (http://karthik3685.wordpress.com/2007/12/15/rahul-dravid-in-the-gillette-advertisement/) must be giving serious thought to growing a beard.

http://olympics.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/08/14/curse-of-the-gilette-ad-strikes-again/

SUKTUEN
08-15-2008, 02:50 PM
Come On Roger!! Don't give up!!!

riddle05580
08-16-2008, 03:18 AM
:)

http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=51626

August 15, 2008

Roger Federer
Stanislas Wawrinka

BEIJING, CHINA

FEDERER-WAWRINKA/Bryan-Bryan
7-6, 6-4

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Roger, you finally won your Olympic medal, whether it's silver or gold you don't yet know. Can you describe how you feel about the achievement?

ROGER FEDERER: I think at the moment really the emotions winning the semifinals, sort of being excited being in the finals. Obviously the medal is an issue right now. You're like, you know, we've sort of made it, but you want more, right, if already you've got the opportunity.

Yeah, so just very excited. I think we played fantastic tennis. Yeah, we deserve to be in the finals.

Q. How do you think your game was so much shorter than the game before that your opponents played?

ROGER FEDERER: It's quite unusual to have such long matches obviously. You know, but that's what you get when you have long sets sometimes instead of tiebreakers. Makes it obviously very intriguing, you know, for fans to watch that type of matches. But it completely throws off the schedule.

I mean, it's an unbelievable effort by the Swedes to get through. Should be great finals.

Q. Can you make a difference between the gold medal in doubles or singles? Is it the same value for you to win in doubles as it would be in the singles?

ROGER FEDERER: I mean, I guess a medal is a medal. I don't know where you get it from, right? Same in swimming, you know, athletics, where you get it. It's a gold, silver, or bronze.

I'm already very, you know, proud of our achievements. I think it's almost more fun to win together on the court because you can celebrate it nicely and everything. But, yeah, I mean, singles would be awesome for my career. But the doubles, it just proves to myself, you know, what a great doubles player I am, even though I haven't played much lately. I think now having beaten the best in the world really and going for gold, it's an incredible scenario.

So this is a big moment in my career.

Q. You're one of the few people in the world who can sort of understand what Michael Phelps is going through in terms of chasing history. Have you paid attention to what he's doing? Can you explain what it's like to have the pressure that he's going under. It's a bigger thing than just trying to win a swim meet.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I follow it a little bit, as much as I could. They're usually in the pool in the morning. This is when I'm sleeping. We're having rough days here, you know. I haven't been able to really watch a whole lot of the Olympics. I've been quite disappointed with the scheduling actually this week. That's a different issue.

But what he's been doing is great. You know, no doubt he's been the best under pressure, but I have the feeling he's so much better than the rest. I don't know how much mentally it is. He's just better. I think then maybe it's not a whole lot mental. I think now when it comes down to the last couple, I guess one of them, he can't really control because it's relay. That makes it obviously very difficult. It's sort of for us doubles. You never know what's going to happen.

But no doubt he's writing history. I think it's great to follow it right at this moment because it's happening right now.

Q. Stan, when you're on court, people are asking Roger to marry them. They ask for his autograph when you leave the court. Do you feel like you're just the other guy? Is that pressure on you?

STANISLAS WAWRINKA: No, I don't care. It's normal, you know. Roger for me is the best player ever in the world. I am just the No. 10. That is good for me.

But, you know, it's normal all the people wants Roger and not me.

Q. You're not one of these regular doubles pairs. Are you surprised to be in the finals? Are you surprised that the Swedish players are in the final? They haven't played a lot together either.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, my guess would have been, you know, before the Olympics anything was possible for any team, you know, because we see unusual doubles teams. I think without a doubt the seeding helped us. I didn't expect to be seeded, but I think we took advantage of that. I think obviously Thomas and Simon coming through their section of the draw. They beat a very good team today. It shows they're in great shape, as well.

But I always believed in my chances, you know, especially having a fellow top 10 player next to me who's been playing so well this year. It's obvious that, you know, if we heat up a little bit and we play well that this is something that could happen. That's why in a way I'm positively surprised, but, I mean, I had high expectations in singles and doubles.

I'm really there, where I was hoping to be.

Q. I think you said last year of the Open, you knew you were playing for history, trying to go for that record. It's a completely different position than most players are dealing with, to deal with that. Is it a media thing or is it actually something you carry out on the court or have in your mind at any time? How do you deal with that, or do you not deal with it, you just let it flow?

ROGER FEDERER: The whole history thing?

Q. Yes.

ROGER FEDERER: No, it's something that sort of builds up, I guess. You've got to win a lot to get there and to be able to talk about it really.

I mean, I've enjoyed it, you know, talking about it, being compared to the greatest. Something, you know, I've worked really, really hard for. It didn't come overnight. It's something I had to work for basically in five years. So for this reason I'm very, very, you know, pleased with my career.

I think once then you get on court and, you know, you try to achieve maybe those things, I don't know, it gets pushed behind and you just focus on the moment itself. At times I guess there's flashes, you know, where you think, Okay, it is possible. But it's not disturbing in any way to me anyway.

It's a nice challenge, actually, trying to -- it's like beating the next generation, trying to play for a long time, trying to stay healthy, trying to beat records. They're all different parts and they all motivate you. That's why I cherish the challenge really.

Q. You are already an Olympic medallist. What is the main difference between this Olympic medal and another tournament, maybe a Grand Slam?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, this only comes around every four years. Big surprise. Nobody knew that (smiling).

Otherwise, I guess playing for your country changes. You know, it's just a different feeling out here. I mean, this is, I guess, the biggest sporting event in the world we have. It's so massive, the organization is so huge, that you feel special to be part of something so important.

Because there is only that many times you can play in the Olympic Games, it's only my third, you know. I played my first at 19. This is such a big moment that you don't want to miss the opportunity to play and do well, so you put a lot of pressure on yourself. That's sometimes why it's not so easy to play in the Olympic Games for us.

End of FastScripts

SUKTUEN
08-16-2008, 04:47 AM
Come On Roger!!!!!!

SUKTUEN
08-16-2008, 05:37 PM
ATP - ROGER WINS OLYMPIC GOLD MEDAL!


Roger made up for the disappointment of missing out in the singles by winning his first Olympic gold medal as he teamed up with Stanislas Wawrinka to claim the doubles title on Saturday. The Swiss pair beat Simon Aspelin and Thomas Johansson of Sweden 6-3, 6-4, 6-7, 6-3.

Against Johansson and Aspelin, Roger's thumping groundstrokes and Stan's impressive backhand gave the Swiss the early advantage. After winning the first set, they soon broke to lead 3-1 in the second before the Swedes responded. It took a tie-break, which Johansson and Aspelin won, to decide the third set. A brilliant reaction volley from Roger helped break Aspelin again at the start of the fourth set, our star eventually serving out the match.

"It is like a fantastic dream comes true, I feel really happy to win the gold medal. It is great, I enjoy that," said Roger in the mixed zone. "I have tried for several times to get a medal, and I came really close to the medal in Sydney where I finished fourth. Since then I can't stop thinking that If I am the best player in the world, I should do the same in the Olympics, and then finally I made it, it is really special also because it is for Switzerland, you know, our country can not get so many medals at one Olympics, maybe one or two, but this time I got a gold medal, it is for my country, I really feel different, as it is for my country, it is different from the Grand Sam where I did it for just myself."

At the medals ceremony, when they played the Swiss national anthem and Roger and Stan stood on the highest platform, both were clearly on the edge of tears.

riddle05580
08-17-2008, 01:30 AM
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/olympics/cs-080816-tennis-olympics-roger-federer,0,7788864.story

Federer wins his first gold medal...in doubles

By BILL DWYRE

4:59 PM CDT, August 16, 2008

BEIJING

He is the ultimate Swiss timepiece now. Gold, no less.

Roger Federer has been pursuing a spot on the top platform of an Olympic victory stand for eight years and three Olympics, and it didn't seem possible that he had yet to make the climb. He has been the best tennis player in the world for long enough to have your son or daughter start and finish college, but the Olympics have always been his banana peel.

Saturday night here, it finally came to pass that dreams do come true, even for icons who have realized almost all of theirs. Federer won a gold medal, stood on the top step, listened to his country's national anthem and fought back tears.

When the final shot missed off the racket of Sweden's Thomas Johansson, Federer, who just turned 27, bounced up and down three times like an 8-year-old, then hugged playing partner Stanislas Wawrinka while jumping up and down in synch with him. Before long, they were rolling around and celebrating on the court.

This was doubles, a game Federer usually recognizes only as he walks past matches on the back courts on his way home from a singles victory. By the nature of what he does, he is a loner -- in job description, not personality.

So, when he and Stanislas Wawrinka took the Olympic title, beating Johansson and partner Simon Aspelin, the former four-time All-American in the mid-1990s at Pepperdine, 6-3, 6-4, 6-7 (4), 6-3, the whole team celebration thing was new to Federer.

"I can't hug a stranger when I win in singles," he said.

Wawrinka, 23, who has worked his way up to No. 10 in singles, was no stranger.

"It is quite a special moment," Federer said, "being able to share this with somebody, somebody you like very much."

The scene was strange, mostly because Federer was out there with three other guys. Across the way, the best doubles team in the world, Bob and Mike Bryan of the United States and Camarillo, were winning their bronze medal on a secondary court. They had lost in the semifinals Friday night to the new Swiss sheriffs in town.

The Center Court Stadium was almost full. Red-and-white Swiss flags were everywhere. So were the ever-extroverted Swedes, many in silly hats with horns or fake blue hair. Hush hush Wimbledon, this was not.

No surprise, Federer was the best player on the court. For the most part, he was untouchable -- especially on his serve -- and Johansson and Aspelin are not chopped liver. Johansson won the Australian Open singles in 2002 and Aspelin won last year's U.S. Open doubles with Julian Knowle of Austria.

So it was both fitting and symbolic to have the match on Federer's racket at 5-3 of the fourth set.

"There is so much pressure," Federer said, "but it is exactly where you want to be."

At 40-15, the best second serve in the game kicked in heavily to Johansson's forehand side. Federer followed it toward the net and watched the return float wide, never taking his eyes off until it hit the court.

Then, one of the most poised, composed athletes in the world, somebody who handles opponents, media and the public with level-headed maturity at all times, released the little kid in him. :lol:

riddle05580
08-17-2008, 04:10 AM
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=51645

XXIX OLYMPIC GAMES

August 16, 2008

Roger Federer
Stanislas Wawrinka

BEIJING, CHINA

FEDERER-WAWRINKA/Aspelin-Johansson
6-3, 6-4, 6-7, 6-3

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You had the ball in your hands to serve for the gold medal, how is your heart beating? What are you thinking?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, it's not the first time this tournament or in my life I had to serve for a big match. But it definitely changed a little bit in doubles where sometimes you don't control that much yourself because guys usually go for huge returns. You know, when Stan held his serve easily, you know, going up 5-2, I knew it's basically all up to me if we don't break.

It's basically the moment you dream of being in, even though there is so much pressure to it. But it's exactly where you want to find yourself, facing the pressure and doing it. I had to go through quite a few second serves to win the game. That made it even harder. Played fantastic.

It's a dream come true. I mean, it's almost disbelief to some degree.

Q. I asked Michael Phelps what it was like to embrace the relays, where it's more than simply yourself. I wanted to ask you the same question. We know you as a singles player. It seemed like you were showing passion and emotion being a team player tonight. Can you talk about that.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I really grew up being a team player. Always have been. Love team competition: basketball, soccer. It's always something I've enjoyed doing. When I was in my first Davis Cup, I got my first Davis Cup nomination when I was maybe 16. It was for me the greatest thing.

What I tried to do today is, when I play Davis Cup is that atmosphere in the team is important. It's best, you know. It's really key to having a good atmosphere in the team. That's what we really have. That's why also we had such a good understanding of each other today on the court and throughout the whole week, two weeks. It's something we've been trying to build up for many years, and now especially the last month, talking a lot about how we would like to play doubles.

In the end, that it all comes together, it becomes such a sweet victory, you know, it's obviously fantastic. But, I mean, I've always enjoyed playing doubles. I haven't played it that much lately because obviously the focus was singles and Grand Slams and No. 1 in the world. But it's still something I enjoy doing, especially at the important stages. It's a great feeling, especially celebrating it together. It's way different to celebrating it alone in the pool. I guess Michael Phelps knows that, too. When he wins alone in the pool, it's not the same as when he wins it in relay. And I think you could see it when he won, I think, his third medal, how happy he was. When he wins the relay, it's just a different feeling.

Q. As we're constantly reminding you, this has been a rough year for you by your standards. In that context, in the moment when the last ball floats out, you've won the gold medal, what was that like for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, tough moment, second serve. I was just hoping the guy would miss the return. I told myself, you know, let me try for a big second serve because I know I have it in my game, otherwise I'll have Stanley at the net finishing it off himself.

I was just thrilled. Big moment. Sort of dream-come-true moment. You know, maybe comes around once in a lifetime. You know, after that, the celebration starts. It's crazy.

I think he did very well handling the situation, playing with me, because that's not always an easy thing. The way he played, he really played great. He really played the way I was hoping him to play. I think it's great for the future.

Q. Stan, all the questions are to Roger, but how is it for you? In particular, have you had to go through a process of going from being in admiration of this man to being his equal on the court?

STANISLAS WAWRINKA: Yeah, but since many year I know Roger. We practice together. Of course, for me, it's the best player ever in the world. When he told me we gonna play the doubles in the Olympic, it was a dream for me. Now we win the tournament. I tried to do my best all this weeks. Of course, now we won today. We was playing great tennis together. I'm very happy.

Q. Stan, what were your emotions like? What was your feeling as the match progressed?

STANISLAS WAWRINKA: During the match, I just tried to be focused on the game. You know, it's never easy to play the final. But we was playing very good. I tried to stay focused on my game, on his game, to stay in the game.

After the match, of course, for me, it's a dream come true to win the Olympic gold medal. It's unbelievable for me.

Q. After more than four years you on Monday won't be No. 1. What is your feeling about this?

ROGER FEDERER: This feels good (holding up the gold medal). That's my feeling right now (smiling).

I have known that for over a week now, you know, about No. 1 rankings. But it's fine. You know, Rafa played great to get it. That's what I expected and hoped for, you know, many years ago when I got to No. 1, that if ever somebody were to take it away for me, he would have to play an incredible tennis schedule, you know, win the biggest tournaments, dominate the game basically, and then like this he can take No. 1. I didn't want it to happen that I would play completely bad and somebody would pick up No. 1 in the world.

So I think Rafa totally deserves it.

Q. I'd like to know why normally in the slams you don't play doubles, and you wouldn't care that much to win doubles. Here it's more important. Is that true or not?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I guess Olympics is different. It's like Davis Cup for me. If I enter this event, I mean, it gives me two opportunities to win gold really. At the same time it's something you just do. When you have the chance to play an Olympic doubles, you do it. In the Grand Slams, the problem is if I were to lose at the Grand Slam in singles because of my doubles, people would take me down. You know, You're playing bad. They wouldn't understand that I maybe played the doubles the night before or whatever it is.

I just want to take any kind of disturbance out of the equation, you know, going into a Grand Slam. I used to play, you know, Grand Slam doubles. But it's just too much. I'd rather be in the city, take it easy, or go and practice nicely for singles, instead of maybe, you know, having it there as a disturbance to my singles.

Unfortunately, singles has become too important. The tour is too professional to make mistakes like that.

Q. Until now you didn't play so many times Davis Cup.

ROGER FEDERER: I've played every year since I was 17.

Q. I'd like to know now if you think Switzerland has a chance to win the Davis Cup and you would definitely play more consistently? You can win singles, you can win doubles. And Wawrinka is No. 10 in the world.

ROGER FEDERER: I agree with you. I think chances are better than ever. I think last time we had two such high-ranked players, we go way back, Rosset and Hlasek were both No. 10 in the world at one stage, but I don't know at the same time. It was not at my level, but I think we definitely have great chances because we cover all surface: clay, indoor, grass, hard court, you name it.

Doubles, we always knew that we had some options with Allegro or with Stan. You know, I think we just proved it this week that we can play very good doubles.

I never had to prove to myself, that I'm a good doubles player. I did that when I came on tour and dominated good doubles teams. I would beat them easily. It's just a matter of playing a little bit more doubles. You know, I haven't made up the plan exactly yet for next year, but I think I'm definitely going to play the first round next year, and that hopefully will be in the World Group after beating Belgium in the relegation round.

Q. How do you value this gold compared with all your other achievements in tennis?

ROGER FEDERER: It's quite different. It's quite unique. I mean, I guess since '92, you know, when Marc Rosset won Olympic gold in tennis for Switzerland, it's something I quite remember. Who knows, maybe a little bit deep down in myself I was hoping to equal that one day or be part of the Olympic Games, seeing the great athletes being part of the Olympics was always something I looked forward to.

Right now this is quite a surreal moment. The joy of sharing this victory with somebody else who I like very much, who we had a great two weeks with, we've mentally been preparing for hopefully this moment, it's quite different to anything I've ever gone through. I could only maybe compare it a little bit to some incredible Davis Cup victories I've ever had. Other than that, it doesn't really compare a whole lot to Grand Slam victories.

Q. How old were you in that moment when you were so happy on court, embracing him, kissing everybody, laughing? In my opinion you were coming back when you were very young. It was someone completely different. Do you agree with me or not?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, the thing is, I can't just hug a stranger when I win singles (smiling). I could, I guess, but it's just not something you do. The guy would go like, Are you crazy or something? I would just rather not do it.

I think that's the difficulties, you know, I guess in singles play, that you're all alone on the court. You win, you sit down. Going through the ceremony is quite different. I'm not the type of guy that's going to run up into the stands and start hugging my family and all my people who came. I never did that; I will never do it. It's a different approach to winning.

In Davis Cup we've had some crazy moments, you know. People who know me, they know I'm very open and outgoing. It showed today. That's usually how I really am.

End of FastScripts

Rommella
08-17-2008, 06:08 AM
What's Wrong with Roger Federer? Nothing Really...
by Long John Silver
http://bleacherreport.com/articles/48039-whats-wrong-with-roger-federer-nothing-really

I don’t consider myself a tennis expert. Granted, I have studied the sport, both at a periphery level and the psychology, nuances and mechanics behind the game, for a long time…but I am neither an ESPN, ITV or Channel 9 anchor nor a tabloid journalist.
But what has surprised me the most is in the past two days, any webpage or news paper I check has exuded shock and almost disbelief that Federer has lost again. Made me think?
I mean, if even I know this, you should have some resemblance of inkling…I know you need to sensationalize to sell copies of your papers, but don’t you have at least an inkling of what has really transpired? (Can’t you add a footnote on what the truth is?)
So let's keep this short to 10 pointers and analyze ‘What’s Wrong with Roger Federer?’, given the fact that now he will not add to the medal count for Switzerland in Beijing:
Have you ever needed a beer at the end of a long day? Ever felt like getting away from the world for two days…just go sit on the shore with her (him or alone) for two days? Ever at work sitting in front of the computer screen thinking, I am so tired? If you answered ‘Yes’ to any of those questions…you already know what’s wrong with Roger Federer.
I am going to get this out of the way next; Federer’s losses and Rafa Nadal’s emergence as the next world No. 1 are neither independent nor mutually exclusive. Rafa is quite deservedly the best player going around at the moment…that said; let us just consider issues from exclusively Federer’s standpoint.
I guess three questions that people ask are most interesting to me, what’s wrong with Roger Federer? Why is Federer losing? He better win at the U.S. Open, right? It is almost like, they are oblivious to the fact that Federer is human, too.
Roger Federer is not an automated machine. You get that? Federer is a normal bloke like you and me, the difference being that he can hit a tennis ball much (OK…light years) better than 99 percent of people in the world … but he is prone to human vulnerabilities such as tiredness, boredom and indifference, just like you and me. He is human being first … and then he is a tennis player.
After four years at the top and a winning fraction of 90 percent the past three years, it is fairly reasonable and plausible to believe that he is running on fumes right now, threadbare fumes. You know how that feels like, there is not a lot you care about at some point of time. Indifference is such an integral part of a long process, sometimes for even survival in the long run. It is a passing phase.
It really would not hurt to take a couple of weeks off. I think this is the second time am reflecting on similar thoughts in the past two weeks…go ice-fishing, get away from the poker table, sit on a beach or the Swiss mountains, get a Guinness, mate…it all translates to... Take a Break, Rodge.
I would say I was surprised that he lost to Blake, but definitely surprised more than shocked. You had at least to have seen this coming, given what has transpired until now this year.
So yeah…that is precisely why Federer is losing, his opponents is a good reason to start with. A close second being fatigue and indifference. Probabilities are he will not hoist the trophy in NY. It would be ideal if he did win in NY; I would be thrilled. But I view Federer as a holistic person, not just as a tennis player. You have to take the good with the bad, the sheer number of times he has provided me with the unbridled joy of watching and appreciating the game is imperative. It does not matter to me if he does not win in NY this year. Tennis fans and the game need Federer for the long haul, undoubtedly.
The doomsday theorists claim that Federer will win in NY and announce his retirement. They are entitled to their own opinions, but I think Federer’s post-lunch session in his career starts in Melbourne, Australia 2009. He is too talented and too proud of an artist to walk away with unfinished business.
So, what is wrong with Roger Federer? The ups, downs and fluctuations that he is going through now are no different from what you and I experience in life. A whim of life is what is wrong with Federer. But for now…leave him alone…he will come back, he just needs to get a Guinness now…who amongst us all haven’t been there?

SUKTUEN
08-17-2008, 09:25 AM
Federer wins his first gold medal...in doubles

By BILL DWYRE

4:59 PM CDT, August 16, 2008

BEIJING

He is the ultimate Swiss timepiece now. Gold, no less.

Roger Federer has been pursuing a spot on the top platform of an Olympic victory stand for eight years and three Olympics, and it didn't seem possible that he had yet to make the climb. He has been the best tennis player in the world for long enough to have your son or daughter start and finish college, but the Olympics have always been his banana peel.

Saturday night here, it finally came to pass that dreams do come true, even for icons who have realized almost all of theirs. Federer won a gold medal, stood on the top step, listened to his country's national anthem and fought back tears.

When the final shot missed off the racket of Sweden's Thomas Johansson, Federer, who just turned 27, bounced up and down three times like an 8-year-old, then hugged playing partner Stanislas Wawrinka while jumping up and down in synch with him. Before long, they were rolling around and celebrating on the court.

This was doubles, a game Federer usually recognizes only as he walks past matches on the back courts on his way home from a singles victory. By the nature of what he does, he is a loner -- in job description, not personality.

So, when he and Stanislas Wawrinka took the Olympic title, beating Johansson and partner Simon Aspelin, the former four-time All-American in the mid-1990s at Pepperdine, 6-3, 6-4, 6-7 (4), 6-3, the whole team celebration thing was new to Federer.

"I can't hug a stranger when I win in singles," he said.

Wawrinka, 23, who has worked his way up to No. 10 in singles, was no stranger.

"It is quite a special moment," Federer said, "being able to share this with somebody, somebody you like very much."

The scene was strange, mostly because Federer was out there with three other guys. Across the way, the best doubles team in the world, Bob and Mike Bryan of the United States and Camarillo, were winning their bronze medal on a secondary court. They had lost in the semifinals Friday night to the new Swiss sheriffs in town.

The Center Court Stadium was almost full. Red-and-white Swiss flags were everywhere. So were the ever-extroverted Swedes, many in silly hats with horns or fake blue hair. Hush hush Wimbledon, this was not.

No surprise, Federer was the best player on the court. For the most part, he was untouchable -- especially on his serve -- and Johansson and Aspelin are not chopped liver. Johansson won the Australian Open singles in 2002 and Aspelin won last year's U.S. Open doubles with Julian Knowle of Austria.

So it was both fitting and symbolic to have the match on Federer's racket at 5-3 of the fourth set.

"There is so much pressure," Federer said, "but it is exactly where you want to be."

At 40-15, the best second serve in the game kicked in heavily to Johansson's forehand side. Federer followed it toward the net and watched the return float wide, never taking his eyes off until it hit the court.

Then, one of the most poised, composed athletes in the world, somebody who handles opponents, media and the public with level-headed maturity at all times, released the little kid in him.

soraya
08-17-2008, 09:29 AM
What's Wrong with Roger Federer? Nothing Really...
by Long John Silver
http://bleacherreport.com/articles/48039-whats-wrong-with-roger-federer-nothing-really (http://bleacherreport.com/articles/48039-whats-wrong-with-roger-federer-nothing-really)

Finally a positive article.

SUKTUEN
08-17-2008, 09:33 AM
DAVIS CUP - ROGER TO PLAY DAVIS CUP


Roger explained in Beijing today that he will not only be helping Switzerland in the World Group Play-offs of the Davis Cup against Belgium (September 19 - 21 in Lausanne, Switzerland) but also in the first round of 2009.

He has not quite made all his plans for the coming season but says that "In general next year will certainly be easier. I will certainly join the team for the first round."

In order to focus fully on his singles career Roger has had to skip the first round of the season since 2005. Up until 2007 the Swiss then went on to lose and had to play the relegation, where Roger then helped out.

Filipo
08-17-2008, 01:08 PM
he is focusing to his next milestone - Davis Cup :worship:

now with solid 2nd player, and amazing doubles, Swiss is going to rule :D

rofe
08-17-2008, 01:26 PM
DAVIS CUP - ROGER TO PLAY DAVIS CUP


Roger explained in Beijing today that he will not only be helping Switzerland in the World Group Play-offs of the Davis Cup against Belgium (September 19 - 21 in Lausanne, Switzerland) but also in the first round of 2009.

He has not quite made all his plans for the coming season but says that "In general next year will certainly be easier. I will certainly join the team for the first round."

In order to focus fully on his singles career Roger has had to skip the first round of the season since 2005. Up until 2007 the Swiss then went on to lose and had to play the relegation, where Roger then helped out.

Very interesting - I wonder if he is more motivated due to Wawa's performance or because he is more pessimistic about his career going forward? I sure hope it is the former.

ExpectedWinner
08-17-2008, 01:54 PM
Very interesting - I wonder if he is more motivated due to Wawa's performance or because he is more pessimistic about his career going forward?

Both. When the ranking is not a priority, it's easier to commit to extra travelling and pressure, associated with DC.