" Grand Slam" and "Major" [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

" Grand Slam" and "Major"

guy in sf
08-13-2010, 09:30 PM
Maybe this is nit picky to some of you but if we can't even use tennis terms correctly on a tennis board then what kind of example are we setting for the rest?
A grand slam is not a tournament, it's when someone wins all 4 majors in one calendar year.
A "grand slam" in the context that most of us have been using to mean one of the 4 big tournaments (Australian open, French open, Wimbledon, US open) is really called a "major."

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dombrfc
08-13-2010, 09:35 PM
ATP diasgree with you

Ad Wim
08-13-2010, 09:36 PM
No dufus, 'major' is just the word you clueless Americans use for all sports. Tennis is not American, for god's sake. Grand Slam is the usual term for one of the four Grand Slam tournaments. Very strange, huh?

HKz
08-13-2010, 09:36 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Slam_(tennis)

The four Grand Slam tournaments, also called the Majors, are the most important tennis events of the year in terms of world ranking points, tradition, prize-money awarded, and public attention. They are the Australian Open, the French Open, Wimbledon, and the US Open.

dombrfc
08-13-2010, 09:37 PM
No dufus, 'major' is just the word you clueless Americans use for all sports. Tennis is not American, for god's sake. Grand Slam is the usual term for one of the four Grand Slam tournaments. Very strange, huh?

This

guy in sf
08-13-2010, 09:39 PM
ATP diasgree with you

Well maybe that's because the ATP itself has bastardized the term as well to comply with the wrongful consensus. Or maybe the ATP had to redefine it because they realized that everyone was misusing it. I just saw something on the Tennis channel where Bud Collins reiterates that a grand slam only means winning the 4 big ones in a calendar year and each of those 4 big ones is called a major.

Choreos
08-13-2010, 09:43 PM
Does it really matter at this point? The meaning of words can change, and at the moment, the genereal consensus is that grand slam and major can both refer to the four big tournaments of the tennis year. I have no idea why people try and correct something like this when it's use is so rampant besides feeling smug and know-it-all. This is is pointless to debate, but if you have nothing else to do...

MIMIC
08-13-2010, 09:44 PM
I use "slam" and "major" interchangeably. Why can't more people be like me? :cool:

guy in sf
08-13-2010, 09:46 PM
Well then is Bud Collins wrong then? I would think what he says has some validity.

HKz
08-13-2010, 09:47 PM
Well then is Bud Collins wrong then? I would think what he says has some validity.

Bud Collins is an idiot that still thinks Sampras/Agassi are still playing on the ATP tour.

Choreos
08-13-2010, 09:49 PM
Well then is Bud Collins wrong then? I would think what he says has some validity.

I don't know how much validity he has, but even if he has some validity, that doesn't prevent him from ever being wrong.

guy in sf
08-13-2010, 09:50 PM
Bud Collins is an idiot that still thinks Sampras/Agassi are still playing on the ATP tour.

So the Tennis Channel is also idiotic for producing and showing that clip of Bud Collins saying that?

dombrfc
08-13-2010, 09:53 PM
He might be....wrong?

HKz
08-13-2010, 09:54 PM
So the Tennis Channel is also idiotic for producing and showing that clip of Bud Collins saying that?

Yes. No one sane listens to Bud Collins for many years now.

straitup
08-13-2010, 09:56 PM
Clearly Bud Collins and his outrageous outfits make him the authority on the grand slam vs. major debate.

Seriously it's nothing to be arguing about, we all know what people are referring to if they say either term

Roddickominator
08-13-2010, 09:59 PM
A Grand Slam is indeed winning all 4 "majors". But I prefer to call each "major" a Grand Slam tournament...or in short, a "Slam". But seriously, who cares? We all know what each other mean.

MacTheKnife
08-13-2010, 10:48 PM
Maybe this is nit picky

Maybe ?? :lol:

decrepitude
08-13-2010, 11:09 PM
Does it really matter at this point? The meaning of words can change, and at the moment, the genereal consensus is that grand slam and major can both refer to the four big tournaments of the tennis year. I have no idea why people try and correct something like this when it's use is so rampant besides feeling smug and know-it-all. This is is pointless to debate, but if you have nothing else to do...

Yes :)

General Suburbia
08-14-2010, 12:05 AM
Well then is Bud Collins wrong then? I would think what he says has some validity.
Well.

When you get old...

out_here_grindin
08-14-2010, 01:24 AM
No dufus, 'major' is just the word you clueless Americans use for all sports. Tennis is not American, for god's sake. Grand Slam is the usual term for one of the four Grand Slam tournaments. Very strange, huh?

And where did the term "grand slam" come from? Baseball because when you hit a homerun with the bases loaded 4 runs score. 4 majors so winning all would be like a grand slam.

Have no idea when each started to individually be called grand slams

bluefork
08-14-2010, 01:44 AM
Originally, yeah, Grand Slam meant all four "majors" (AO, FO, W, USO). But as others have said, the term has been bastardized to mean each individual tournament.

It's not like the etymology police are going to come take you away while you're sleeping if you say "Grand Slam" when you mean "major." But I think it's preferable to say "major," "Grand Slam tournament" or maybe even "Slam" (I'm curious to know what others think about that one).

careergrandslam
08-14-2010, 03:16 AM
its called a slam.
use that.

who gives a damn about what that old fossil bud collins thinks or says.

philosophicalarf
08-14-2010, 03:36 AM
This appears to matter not a jot. Call them what you want. Call them Margaret. It doesn't matter.

a_boy
08-14-2010, 03:47 AM
We're talking about sport jargon here, which is very informal anyway. "Major", "grand slam" and things like that are nothing more than nicknames. There's little point in trying too hard to stop the evolution of formal English, because it's going to happen anway, but this isn't even formal English, so there are no rules.

@ the poster above, calling them Margaret would be very fitting. She did win the most. :P

The Magician
08-14-2010, 03:50 AM
And where did the term "grand slam" come from? Baseball because when you hit a homerun with the bases loaded 4 runs score. 4 majors so winning all would be like a grand slam.

Have no idea when each started to individually be called grand slams

Wow never realized that. Mind = Blown :eek::lol:

Ariel
08-14-2010, 04:25 AM
Originally, yeah, Grand Slam meant all four "majors" (AO, FO, W, USO). But as others have said, the term has been bastardized to mean each individual tournament.

It's not like the etymology police are going to come take you away while you're sleeping if you say "Grand Slam" when you mean "major." But I think it's preferable to say "major," "Grand Slam tournament" or maybe even "Slam" (I'm curious to know what others think about that one).

No, you won't be carted off but you may get mercilessly put down by people who think they've got the etymology straight. :p Its an interesting thread because it's something I've wondered about, given how interchangeable terms have become. I use Grand Slam to mean winning all four and slam for one of the big four. I never use "major".

alfonsojose
08-14-2010, 04:40 AM
The Grand Slam means the four tournaments. If u won "a slam" you just got one of these. It u get the four, the slam is your. A "grand slam" tournament means any of the four big boys. And majors .. i dont' mind calling them like that.

Voo de Mar
08-14-2010, 08:22 AM
"Grand Slam tournament" is ok.
"Major" is ok.

If we use the term "Grand Slam", referring to someone's triumph I think it's good to add "tournament". Sentences like:

Ivan Lendl won the first Grand Slam tournament in the year 1990.
or
Rod Laver won Grand Slam in 1969.

make sense.

Orka_n
08-14-2010, 08:55 AM
"Grand Slam tournament" is ok.
"Major" is ok.

If we use the term "Grand Slam", referring to someone's triumph I think it's good to add "tournament". Sentences like:

Ivan Lendl won the first Grand Slam tournament in the year 1990.
or
Rod Laver won Grand Slam in 1969.

make sense.This,

and
its called a slam.
use that.this.

Acer
08-14-2010, 09:08 AM
No dufus, 'major' is just the word you clueless Americans use for all sports. Tennis is not American, for god's sake. Grand Slam is the usual term for one of the four Grand Slam tournaments. Very strange, huh?

This

paseo
08-14-2010, 09:50 AM
:d

Nidhogg
08-14-2010, 11:07 AM
A Slam is a Slam. A Grand Slam is the whole shebang with every four of them. Who the hell says "Majors"?

n8
08-14-2010, 11:11 AM
Forgive me if this had already been said, but I think if someone wins a Grand Slam it means one of the big four, but if someone wins the Grand Slam it means all four in one year.