Alex Corretja's role in Andy Murray's set up [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Alex Corretja's role in Andy Murray's set up

laurie-1
08-09-2010, 01:05 PM
See the BBC article here

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/8896042.stm

I just wonder about this because I remember well what type of player Alex Corrteja was. I remember the tactics Alex employed in the 2001 Roland Garros final where it was plain to see that he attempted to frustrate and bore Kuerten into submission knowing Gustavo was more talented. He almost pulled it off because he won the first set after what 90 minutes? But Kuerten got annoyed and gave Corretja a bit of a hammering in the next 3 sets to take the title in almost the same amount of time it took to the first set to complete.

I just wonder whether McLaghlan felt Corretja's ideas of how to approach the game was causing the problems. We know Andy has a counterpunching instinct anyway and traditionally British players like to take the game to the opponent because they grow up on grass and indoor surfaces.

Just speculation so what do you guys here think about it?

laurie-1
08-09-2010, 01:07 PM
Ex-coach Miles Maclagan hints at Andy Murray tensions
Andy Murray and Miles Maclagan

By Jonathan Overend
BBC tennis correspondent

Miles Maclagan has hinted that he split with Andy Murray after a disagreement over the role of Alex Corretja.

Murray parted with coach Maclagan last month. Spaniard Corretja remains in the Scot's team as a part-time consultant.

Speaking for the first time since his dismissal by the world number four, Maclagan told the BBC: "We needed to clear up who was doing what role.

"Andy employed me to give my opinions, and these ones he didn't quite agree with, so we are where we are now."

Maclagan stressed, however, that he parted with his fellow Scot after two-and-a-half years on good terms.

"We left on very amicable terms. I've heard from him a couple of times since, a couple of messages," he said.

"There's nothing to be angry about or disappointed in each other. We had a good relationship, we still have a good relationship.

"I was always aware that I'd been given a very good opportunity to work with someone like him," Maclagan added.

"I was grateful for that and appreciative for the chance to be a part of the things Andy was doing."

Maclagan's disagreement with Murray came to a head just before the start of the North American hardcourt season.

"I think in any organisation you need to be clear in the direction, so we knew if we didn't come to an agreement we could be where we are now," he said.

"I had a way that I thought it should run, who should take care of which area, and the other guys clearly weren't quite in agreement with that - which is fine.

"People have their opinions, they're not right or wrong, they're just different."

It all comes from the player. Any player has to decide whether he accepts the advice

Miles Maclagan

Maclagan teamed up with Murray in 2007 and helped him to reach two Grand Slam finals. He was sacked after a meeting in Florida two weeks ago.

The coach denied that Murray's style of play was a reason for their disagreement.

"No. It's very easy from the outside to say 'why don't you just do that'. It's a process you go through to get from A to B. It was a work in progress, I think he was improving and will continue to improve.

"Sometimes you have to have your opinion about how you're going to get there, and we've come to the stage that we don't quite agree on that."

Murray, who is not rushing to find a replacement coach, is currently in Toronto where he plays the Canada Masters 1000 event this week, part of the build-up to the US Open.

Maclagan, keen to get back into coaching as soon as possible, does not think his successor will necessarily have the magic formula to make Murray a Grand Slam champion.

"The player has to decide," he said. "It all comes from the player. Any player has to decide whether he accepts the advice.

"He has to decide whether he trusts that guy. At the end of the day, it's the player out there."

Action Jackson
08-09-2010, 01:09 PM
Actually not, Corretja was known for being very good tactically as a player and an excellent analyst after tennis.

Yes, I forgot Corretja moonballed his way to win the TMC on a very fast carpet surface and also winning TMS events on hardcourts.

laurie-1
08-09-2010, 01:19 PM
Actually not, Corretja was known for being very good tactically as a player and an excellent analyst after tennis.

Yes, I forgot Corretja moonballed his way to win the TMC on a very fast carpet surface and also winning TMS events on hardcourts.

Yes I'm sure Alex was a good tactical player, his style of play demanded that be the case. Corretja didn't have the power to be a contender at the non clay Grand Slam tournaments.

But can Murray win a major title he so craves without adding the necessary aggressive play and more power to go with his tactical acumen?

I would have thought McLaghan would have felt that was the way forward.

Action Jackson
08-09-2010, 01:29 PM
Yes I'm sure Alex was a good tactical player, his style of play demanded that be the case. Corretja didn't have the power to be a contender at the non clay Grand Slam tournaments.

But can Murray win a major title he so craves without adding the necessary aggressive play and more power to go with his tactical acumen?

I would have thought McLaghan would have felt that was the way forward.

His forehand wasn't good enough and the surfaces were too quick at that time. It's a myth that Corretja was only negative, he knew he had to get better on faster surfaces and he did within the limits of his game.

Just because an attacking player, doesn't mean they are going to be an attacking coach when their career is over. That is laziness.

Start da Game
08-09-2010, 06:30 PM
negative murray doesn't deserve to win a slam.......he will take a severe beating at the hands of the first big hitter he faces in his draw at the us open......

he can hire anyone, it will not change anything.......what has to change is his approach towards the game and his thinking.......he will not win a slam as long as he keeps wetting his shorts in crunch matches against big players.......

Sapeod
08-09-2010, 06:44 PM
Great analysis from you as always, SDG.
No Nadal in your post, so that's an improvement :yeah:.

angry1
08-09-2010, 06:56 PM
negative murray doesn't deserve to win a slam.......he will take a severe beating at the hands of the first big hitter he faces in his draw at the us open......

he can hire anyone, it will not change anything.......what has to change is his approach towards the game and his thinking.......he will not win a slam as long as he keeps wetting his shorts in crunch matches against big players.......

What is more likely to cause him to change than a coach who he believes in telling him how to do so?

I'm not saying he will change BTW,merely that if he does a coach will probably be responsible for it.

borracho
08-09-2010, 11:00 PM
The way Murray is playing is clearly related to the boring game Corretja used to play. Better he breaks with him soon/

Pea
08-09-2010, 11:31 PM
I remember the tactics Alex employed in the 2001 Roland Garros final where it was plain to see that he attempted to frustrate and bore Kuerten into submission knowing Gustavo was more talented. He almost pulled it off because he won the first set after what 90 minutes?

What the hell? And you're a journalist? Laughable. Go suck an egg.

ORGASMATRON
08-10-2010, 12:36 AM
i didnt like corretja as a player. too much of a pusher. cant see how he can be good for murray except help him to become a better player on clay by pushing more. seems like murray has made the wrong decision again.

straitup
08-10-2010, 12:51 AM
Corretja was a smart player who did like to rally and use a lot of spin...clearly why he was most effective on clay. But he knew how to pick on weaknesses and how to finish points off on all surfaces. Not sure what his role is with Andy because I always thought they had brought him in just for the clay season

Action Jackson
08-10-2010, 01:31 AM
Corretja was a smart player who did like to rally and use a lot of spin...clearly why he was most effective on clay. But he knew how to pick on weaknesses and how to finish points off on all surfaces. Not sure what his role is with Andy because I always thought they had brought him in just for the clay season

This.

ORGASMATRON
08-10-2010, 03:02 AM
reading what maclagan said, im actually really impressed by the guy. he seems very mature and wise. i think i know now why murray fired him ;)

laurie-1
08-10-2010, 12:06 PM
What the hell? And you're a journalist? Laughable. Go suck an egg.

A journalist? Don't take yourself so seriously man.

Pass those peas though :p