How does the game change between day and night on Rod Laver Arena ? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

How does the game change between day and night on Rod Laver Arena ?

duong
01-26-2010, 02:36 PM
I would like to have an expert's opinion about the changes of the game between day and night sessions on Rod Laver Arena.

Obviously it's very different, however I've not read any precise definition of the difference and I'm not expert enough to see that.

Davydenko insisted on the difficult conditions on Rod Laver Arena during the day, and the fact is that night session matches have always been much better than day matches since the new surface in Australia.

But Davydenko's comments were not very precise, and he has never played in the evening so far : he maybe spoke more about specific conditions on Rod Laver Arena, although he mentioned Tsonga's match as representative of the game being "quicker" during the day (which doesn't look obvious to me at all, esp on Rod Laver Arena) ... but Tsonga's match was not played on Rod Laver Arena : it was played on Hisense Arena.

I think the game looks different on Hisense Arena, easier and quicker, and many interesting day matches were played there, for instance Del-Potro-Cilic (and Blake), Tsonga, Baghdatis.

Three facts look quite obvious to me about the difference between day and night :

- it seems to me that the bounce is higher and more lively during the day on Rod Laver Arena.

- there is more wind during the day, which may of course change conditions

- of course it's also fresher during the night and then easier to play great.

But could you describe the differences more precisely ?

For instance the reaction to slice ?

Of course I'm esp interested in that, for Fed's match tomorrow, since so far Fed has played far far better during his night session matches (but Davydenko also had many problems last match, which is not encouraging for the quality of the match :rolleyes: , which is in my opinion a pity for such a match but well one match has to be played during the day in QF :shrug: )

... although you have to be careful as both his day matches opponents (Andreev and Montanes), and very especially Andreev, use spinned shots a lot, which may explain why Fed shanked so many shots during these day matches, with the fact that the bounce is probably more lively during the day.

Thanks in advance for your answers :worship:

PS : the TV broadcasters are in my opinion very stupid with their replays with a high camera : you can see nothing like that :mad: , the French TV had done it many years ago in Roland-Garros but they have stopped it fortunately :lol: : tennis is not a "lateral game", the height and effects of the shots are very important :rolleyes:

Sophocles
01-26-2010, 02:55 PM
PS : the TV broadcasters are in my opinion very stupid with their replays with a high camera : you can see nothing like that :mad: , the French TV had done it many years ago in Roland-Garros but they have stopped it fortunately :lol: : tennis is not a "lateral game", the height and effects of the shots are very important :rolleyes:

Don't know the answer to your question, but completely agree with this point.

alter ego
01-26-2010, 03:56 PM
I would like to have an expert's opinion about the changes of the game between day and night sessions on Rod Laver Arena.


You've come to the right place. MTF is full of exeperts. :lol:

I am no expert of course but I think I can be mr. obvious.
The ball is more fast during the day because the air density changes with variances in temperature or humidity. Lesser density means less friction between the ball and the air, thus the ball travels quicker.
Also I think the temperatures may influence the strings. But I don't know that for a fact. I guess you should google that.
L.E. found this on a forum
Colder temperatures means the strings feel tighter. When stringing for the tournaments, ATP stringers take this into account and string a few pounds lower. They probably also lose tension at a slower rate. This is why you sometimes see players put their rackets in the coolers of some of the hotter tournaments in matches. They don't want the tension to drop.
I think it makes sence.

duong
01-26-2010, 04:13 PM
You've come to the right place. MTF is full of exeperts. :lol:

I am no expert of course but I think I can be mr. obvious.
The ball is more fast during the day because the air density changes with variances in temperature or humidity. Lesser density means less friction between the ball and the air, thus the ball travels quicker.
Also I think the temperatures may influence the strings. But I don't know that for a fact. I guess you should google that.
L.E. found this on a forum

I think it makes sence.

Thanks for the answer about the strings :yeah: , I had heard about something like that but it's more precise than what I had read.

As for air density, it's not quite clear for me ; it also depends on the wind and there's more wind during the day :shrug:

Anyway, I thought more about the influence of day and night on the court surface in Melbourne, and esp about Rod Laver Arena : it seems that the surface itself changes :shrug:

PS : there are some people on MTF who are far more expert than me ;) , they are not the majority that's true :lol:

abraxas21
01-26-2010, 04:19 PM
The commentators on the tele were saying that the bounce is higher during the day. i wish I could be of more assistance.

HKz
01-26-2010, 04:19 PM
Thanks for the answer about the strings :yeah: , I had heard about something like that but it's more precise than what I had read.

As for air density, it's not quite clear for me ; it also depends on the wind and there's more wind during the day :shrug:

Anyway, I thought more about the influence of day and night on the court surface in Melbourne, and esp about Rod Laver Arena : it seems that the surface itself changes :shrug:

PS : there are some people on MTF who are far more expert than me ;) , they are not the majority that's true :lol:

Well the air density thing is all science, you should look into it.

You can always test it yourself. Here in Arizona, temperatures can soar up to 125 degrees in certain places. And when it does reach that kind of temperature, balls bounce a LOT higher than when I get up 8 AM in the morning during winter, where it is at around 70 degrees. Balls do seem a bit sluggish in the colder temperature, and the strings really do get affected by the coldness. Preferably for my game, the hotter the better ;) seems to create better bounces, and I can utilize topspin a little more effectively.

Although the slice during cold temperatures is quite phenomenal :eek: The ball stays very low and almost dies when it hits the court. During hotter weather, slices do spin a bit more, but in terms of how low it stays initially, the cold weather benefits that in this case.

duong
01-26-2010, 04:32 PM
Well the air density thing is all science, you should look into it.

You can always test it yourself. Here in Arizona, temperatures can soar up to 125 degrees in certain places. And when it does reach that kind of temperature, balls bounce a LOT higher than when I get up 8 AM in the morning during winter, where it is at around 70 degrees. Balls do seem a bit sluggish in the colder temperature, and the strings really do get affected by the coldness. Preferably for my game, the hotter the better ;) seems to create better bounces, and I can utilize topspin a little more effectively.

Although the slice during cold temperatures is quite phenomenal :eek: The ball stays very low and almost dies when it hits the court. During hotter weather, slices do spin a bit more, but in terms of how low it stays initially, the cold weather benefits that in this case.

Thanks a lot for "real experience" ;)

Then you think it's more a matter of temperature than about the surface ?

I'm not sure about that, as when I look at the temperatures in Melbourne recently, I don't find them so high actually :shrug:

Kolya
01-27-2010, 12:47 AM
Thanks a lot for "real experience" ;)

Then you think it's more a matter of temperature than about the surface ?

I'm not sure about that, as when I look at the temperatures in Melbourne recently, I don't find them so high actually :shrug:

Melbourne temps have been comfortable. Don't think there has been a day close to 40 degrees and the roof has to be closed.

Experimentee
01-27-2010, 12:57 AM
I am not really an expert but I often hear it commented that the ball is heavier during night matches as the conditions are cooler. The main difference between day and night is of course the temperature and the lights instead of natural sunlight.