The Present Generation of Men's Players: the Classiest in the History of the Sport [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

The Present Generation of Men's Players: the Classiest in the History of the Sport

sawan66278
01-18-2010, 12:52 AM
After last night's quickly organized affair, it struck how far the sport and its athletes have evolved from the standpoint of being real role models and heroes. No other major sport's athletes took the steps these colleagues did...and on the eve of one of their most important events.

The NFL...in their playoffs? Nothing. The NBA? Nothing.

The best of the best showed again the brotherhood and mutual respect they have not only for their sport, but for their fellow man.

Kudos to Roger...for his elder statesman-like effort. Rafa...for trying to bring joy, even with his limited language skills. Novak...with his ability to light up a room. Andy and even Lleyton...working to bring hope to others. Give props to the ladies too.

From the way these competitors congratulate each other after tough wins and losses. From the way they give up points they know they have not earned...and apologizing for let cords...the list goes on and on.

Connors, McEnroe, Lendl, Becker, Nastase...etc...all boorish, self consumed prima donnas. This crop in 2010? The classiest in all of sport. It makes me proud to be a tennis fan.

cocrcici
01-18-2010, 01:02 AM
:aparty:

MatchFederer
01-18-2010, 01:24 AM
Did Federer pay you personally?

kidding..

Yep, for sure it was a wonderful gesture.

The NBA deserves major kudos though for their relentless and ongoing efforts in helping the less fortunate. The advertisements come on all the time when watching NBA footage on the website and with NBA league pass under the slogan of 'NBA, where caring happens.'

They are very serious about their initiative and it is unlike any other initiative i can think of in any other sport in the manner in which it tries to unify the entire NBA under one overarching cause.

http://www.nba.com/allstar2008/nba_cares/

http://www.nba.com/nba_cares/

And endless others...

-Valhalla-
01-18-2010, 01:48 AM
The MLB, NBA, and NFL have all given more money than the ATP and are raising money and awareness. [MLB - $1M, NBA - $1M, NFL - $2.5M]

But yes, the current crop of top ten players are all classy role-models.

Cyrus_Paice
01-18-2010, 02:19 AM
I agree except for Federer. He often doesn't apologize for let cords and when he does you see he doesn't care in the least. The way he tried to break Roddick's rythm at Wimbledon 2009 by challenging a serve that was clearly in was disgraceful. He's the exact opposite of class. When was tennis most popular? In the 90s, when Sampras let the racket do all the talking. Sampras wrote in his book that he never played any mind games and being himself was intimidating enough for his opponents.

abraxas21
01-18-2010, 03:14 AM
I agree except for Federer. He often doesn't apologize for let cords and when he does you see he doesn't care in the least. The way he tried to break Roddick's rythm at Wimbledon 2009 by challenging a serve that was clearly in was disgraceful. He's the exact opposite of class. When was tennis most popular? In the 90s, when Sampras let the racket do all the talking. Sampras wrote in his book that he never played any mind games and being himself was intimidating enough for his opponents.

You need a hug from Federer :)

abraxas21
01-18-2010, 03:15 AM
the current crop of top ten players are all classy role-models.

i think we need more badasses though. those are funier to watch. macenroe should know...

gulzhan
01-18-2010, 04:33 AM
Murray was supposed to play McEnroe on court.

Arkulari
01-18-2010, 05:16 AM
After last night's quickly organized affair, it struck how far the sport and its athletes have evolved from the standpoint of being real role models and heroes. No other major sport's athletes took the steps these colleagues did...and on the eve of one of their most important events.

The NFL...in their playoffs? Nothing. The NBA? Nothing.

The best of the best showed again the brotherhood and mutual respect they have not only for their sport, but for their fellow man.

Kudos to Roger...for his elder statesman-like effort. Rafa...for trying to bring joy, even with his limited language skills. Novak...with his ability to light up a room. Andy and even Lleyton...working to bring hope to others. Give props to the ladies too.

From the way these competitors congratulate each other after tough wins and losses. From the way they give up points they know they have not earned...and apologizing for let cords...the list goes on and on.

Connors, McEnroe, Lendl, Becker, Nastase...etc...all boorish, self consumed prima donnas. This crop in 2010? The classiest in all of sport. It makes me proud to be a tennis fan.

Excellent post and thread :bigclap:

the organizations might have done something but not a single one of the top athletes in other sports have done what tennis players did to help, on the eve of one of the most important sporting events of the season for them; Clijsters, Duck were playing today but still showed up yesterday to give support to the cause and that's very very good

Roger took the lead he should being #1 player and president of the ATP players council and used his power to make something good and that can actually make a huge difference

bluefork
01-18-2010, 05:21 AM
I agree except for Federer. He often doesn't apologize for let cords and when he does you see he doesn't care in the least. The way he tried to break Roddick's rythm at Wimbledon 2009 by challenging a serve that was clearly in was disgraceful. He's the exact opposite of class. When was tennis most popular? In the 90s, when Sampras let the racket do all the talking. Sampras wrote in his book that he never played any mind games and being himself was intimidating enough for his opponents.

:haha: You think Federer is unclassy because he doesn't apologize for let cords? Do you think anyone is being sincere when they hold their hands up? Of all the things you might find to pick on Federer for, this one is just silly.

But I agree with the OP. We talk about the egos and arrogance of a some players, but all the players in yesterday's event proved that they're willing to give of themselves when it's important.

Stensland
01-18-2010, 05:53 AM
come on, let's not overdramatise the whole thing. apart from roddick they're all pretty much off today - and andy quit after 30 minutes. he'd have been around anyways since he wanted to hit the courts to get into the groove.

sure it's been a nice initiative but and most players in the upper echelon are fairly nice guys but i doubt the ones you mentioned faired worse. i don't believe roger and his folks care more about haiti than other sportsmen either. maybe they have a slight advantage due to the atp being such a cosmopolitan sports organisation but that's about it.

sawan66278
01-18-2010, 12:55 PM
come on, let's not overdramatise the whole thing. apart from roddick they're all pretty much off today - and andy quit after 30 minutes. he'd have been around anyways since he wanted to hit the courts to get into the groove.

sure it's been a nice initiative but and most players in the upper echelon are fairly nice guys but i doubt the ones you mentioned faired worse. i don't believe roger and his folks care more about haiti than other sportsmen either. maybe they have a slight advantage due to the atp being such a cosmopolitan sports organisation but that's about it.

My point: even if its 30-minutes, one can still get hurt. As for the NBA and other leagues, these are initiatives by the powers that be (David Stern, etc.) primarily to save face with the public. When you have your top athletes carrying guns and threatening their colleagues in the locker room, you have to do something. And the players themselves? Simply following the marching orders of their leagues...here, it was a players' group effort with ATP help or prompting.

MariaV
01-18-2010, 01:08 PM
I agree the guys are nice and all but please don't think it was all Fed's idea. It was the managers/marketing people who told him to do it. ;)

ossie
01-18-2010, 02:41 PM
After last night's quickly organized affair, it struck how far the sport and its athletes have evolved from the standpoint of being real role models and heroes. No other major sport's athletes took the steps these colleagues did...and on the eve of one of their most important events.

The NFL...in their playoffs? Nothing. The NBA? Nothing.

The best of the best showed again the brotherhood and mutual respect they have not only for their sport, but for their fellow man.

Kudos to Roger...for his elder statesman-like effort. Rafa...for trying to bring joy, even with his limited language skills. Novak...with his ability to light up a room. Andy and even Lleyton...working to bring hope to others. Give props to the ladies too.

From the way these competitors congratulate each other after tough wins and losses. From the way they give up points they know they have not earned...and apologizing for let cords...the list goes on and on.

Connors, McEnroe, Lendl, Becker, Nastase...etc...all boorish, self consumed prima donnas. This crop in 2010? The classiest in all of sport. It makes me proud to be a tennis fan.thats beautiful :sad:

Sunset of Age
01-18-2010, 02:49 PM
I agree the guys are nice and all but please don't think it was all Fed's idea. It was the managers/marketing people who told him to do it. ;)

I'm afraid you are mistaken. Some info:
On ESPN2 there was a clip where Mary Jo Fernandez talked about how it came together. Apparently Federer called Tony Godsick and said "Are you watching on TV what's happening in Haiti? There should be sth we could do about it."

as well as:

From AFP

"MELBOURNE: The top stars in tennis raised at least A$200,000 (RM600,000) for the Haiti earthquake victims yesterday in a hastily-arranged charity doubles match led by Roger Federer and Serena Williams.
Federer organised the event in Rod Laver Arena on the eve of the Australian Open after watching the tragic events in the Caribbean nation unfold on television.

"I followed it on the TV and saw the devastation," said the Swiss superstar.

"On Saturday morning I thought we should do something, I called up Tennis Australia chief Craig Tiley and said 'is it possible? He said probably not'.
"I called up a few players just in case and they were like, 'we should do it straight away.' In 24 hours we were able to pull this thing off."

Federer managed to rustle up fellow World No 1 Serena, Rafael Nadal, Kim Clijsters, Novak Djokovic, Andy Roddick and Australian favourites Lleyton Hewitt and Samantha Stosur...."

It shouldn't be too hard to give him the credits he deserves for this.

miura
01-18-2010, 02:51 PM
Sawan with a good thread? Wooooooot :eek:

Har-Tru
01-18-2010, 04:15 PM
Don't know if the classiest but certainly the most boring.

Goldenoldie
01-18-2010, 04:30 PM
Classiest in the open era, quite possibly, but not in the history of the sport.

Don't forget the amateurs of the 50s playing purely because they loved the game - in cricket they were actually called "gentlemen", don't you know, old chap?

Depends how you define "classy".

Seriously it was a great idea, great initiative, and a great result.

fred perry
01-18-2010, 04:31 PM
this is true, if your concept of the trajectory of history goes back 7 years....

Noleta
01-18-2010, 05:02 PM
Greay thread Sawan66..:yeah:

out_here_grindin
01-18-2010, 05:07 PM
Don't know if the classiest but certainly the most boring.

Brad Gilbert would disagree. "We have more depth now than we have had ever"

DrJules
01-18-2010, 08:00 PM
Sawan with a good thread? Wooooooot :eek:

There is a first time for everything.

mark73
01-18-2010, 08:24 PM
Have you ever pulled on the foreskin of your penus and then squezze on it. It makes a loud popping noise.

sawan66278
01-18-2010, 09:20 PM
Sawan with a good thread? Wooooooot :eek:

I know...its a miracle.;)

Classiest in the open era, quite possibly, but not in the history of the sport.

Don't forget the amateurs of the 50s playing purely because they loved the game - in cricket they were actually called "gentlemen", don't you know, old chap?

Depends how you define "classy".

Seriously it was a great idea, great initiative, and a great result.

Fair point. I'm mainly referring to era of the modern, ESPN athlete.

There is a first time for everything.

How about a win for Rafa at the U.S. Open then.;)

habibko
01-18-2010, 09:24 PM
great thread and I fully agree, nice to see you are able to give credit where credit is due Sawan and not get blinded by your personal bias like most of the haters around here (one of them posting here and suggesting it wasn't even his idea :haha: :retard:).

Bascule
01-18-2010, 09:27 PM
Fedtards praising sawan's thread? :spit:

Nice idea, but did they add a million or two to this humble amount? That would be even more classy.

barbadosan
01-18-2010, 11:04 PM
I agree the guys are nice and all but please don't think it was all Fed's idea. It was the managers/marketing people who told him to do it. ;)

Source please?

barbadosan
01-18-2010, 11:07 PM
Fedtards praising sawan's thread? :spit:

Nice idea, but did they add a million or two to this humble amount? That would be even more classy.

If they did it anonymously you wouldn't know, and if they told everyone they did, they'd be accused of trying to get the spotlight, etc. You guys are really good at putting the players in catch-22 situations, aren't you?

Bascule
01-18-2010, 11:33 PM
If they did it anonymously you wouldn't know, and if they told everyone they did, they'd be accused of trying to get the spotlight, etc. You guys are really good at putting the players in catch-22 situations, aren't you?

I just wanted to put how defying what's "classy" can be very variable and ungrateful.:)

Good to know you watched some good movies. :yeah:

Corey Feldman
01-19-2010, 02:05 AM
Sawan in praise of someone he once named Cryano De Bragerac :eek:

Arkulari
02-13-2010, 07:27 AM
Further proof of how champions of this era are and behave, I can't imagine a prime Becker or a prime Agassi doing these kind of things that Roger and Rafa do for example

http://www.livemint.com/2010/02/04221738/Roger-Federer8217s-perfect.html

Roger Federer’s perfect imperfections


Do not believe what you hear. Roger Federer is not perfect. Not perfect in shot selection. He played a high-risk drop shot at match point in the final and called it crazy. Not perfect in behaviour.

Stuttering against Nikolay Davydenko in the quarter-finals of the Australian Open, he strolled leisurely to the toilet, hoping that the distracting sun would disappear from view.

The slow walk earned him a mild rebuke for gamesmanship. His remark about Andy Murray’s burden of 150,000 years of history brought raised eyebrows. If any other player had done this the volume of disapproval would have been louder.

But Federer is forgiven. Even when he sounds gently immodest about why he wins, saying “there’s no secret behind it. I’m definitely a very talented player. I always knew I had something special”, the audience just titters.

Federer is given immunity because he has built a reservoir of goodwill. He has done it through old-fashioned good manners and by taking his ambassadorship beyond tennis. He is from another time, and some players will insist, from another planet. But he is not perfect. He uttered a four-letter word at the US Open last year but at least will not descend into boorishness like Andy Roddick does.

His talent has brought fame and he has worn it well. He expressed his solidarity with Asian tennis by once flying to Shanghai just for a day to inaugurate the stadium used for the Masters Cup. He has spent Christmas with tsunami kids, raised funds for them, played soccer in the slums of South Africa, and uses his foundation to assist in the education of children in Tanzania, Mali, Ethiopia and Zimbabwe.

Two days before the Australian Open, he called organizers, summoned players for a charity match and raised funds for Haiti. This was power used constructively at a time when his focus understandably might have been on a tournament he lost painfully last year.

Federer is not perfect. He will cry on court and some think this sissy-ish. But be grateful. At least he does not slip on a mask like Tiger Woods but is penetrable, revealing of his humanity, at least he seems authentic, not some advertising-agency concoction. If smugness is his biggest sin, it is bearable.

Federer is important because he is a poster your child can safely put up on his wall. He is the anti-Woods, the non-John Terry, he is the tabloid nightmare, the non-scoop champion. He has a wife who does not look part of the blonde, blue-eyed collection that dots the sporting landscape. He seems a “real person”, which is the phrase Indian player Leander Paes used thrice in 2 minutes while describing him.

His player’s box has the odd singer in it, and he wears the occasional self-important jacket, but he is not surrounded by sycophancy. At one of his matches this year, invited by him, were the parents of his old coach Peter Carter, who died in a car accident. Otherwise his retinue is thin and those who work with him have a similarly civilized manner.

Paes was requested by Severin Luthi, the Swiss Davis Cup captain, to practise with the great man on the day before the final. Paes, preparing for his mixed doubles final, unfortunately did not have time and apologized.

Luthi wrote back, not to say that Paes was missing a fine opportunity, but to wish him good luck and noted they would love to practise with him some time down the road. It was simple, classy stuff.

Federer is not perfect. He is no saint, that is only a headband around his head, not a halo. But he is a reminder to us that despite magical flights of fantasy on court, a man can stay rooted to the earth. Asked, for instance, if the Grand Slam events were his only focus, he demurred: “I try to respect every tournament that invites me to go play there. There are the fans who pay for tickets.”

Champions are human and thus creatures of faults and failings. But they are also, by virtue of position and privilege, expected to know better. Often they don’t, but we are becoming sadly immune to their indiscretions as if this is the norm in a rich, spoilt, fawning universe. So when Michael Phelps smokes a bong, Mike Tyson bites an ear, Marion Jones takes steroids, Thierry Henry handballs, John Daly drinks too much, basketballers bring guns to the locker room, we click our tongues and carry on.

In this particular universe, at this particular time, we need someone like Roger Federer. He is an imperfect man but in the most splendid way.