US Open Thread [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

US Open Thread

Crazy_Fool
08-25-2004, 05:01 PM
Even though Lleyton's playing in another tournament now, thought I would start this thread now!!

The draw comes out later today I believe.

I've got really good hopes about Lleyton for this tournament, I dunno why just think something big is gonna happen soon :D

Good luck to Lleyton!!

Angele
08-25-2004, 05:05 PM
This tournament has really just sort of come out of nowhere, at least for me :o Can't believe it's already close enough for the draw to be made today :eek:

Good luck Lleyton :kiss:

Billabong
08-25-2004, 05:11 PM
GO Lley:yeah:!

Knockers LaBroad
08-25-2004, 09:17 PM
Don't really like this draw, kind of tricky....:o
Lleyt's quarter:

David Nalbandian ARG (8)
v.
Dennis van Scheppingen NED

Albert Montanes ESP
v.
Mikhail Youzhny RUS





Jeff Morrison USA
v.
Qualifier

Tomas Berdych CZE
v.
Jonas Bjorkman SWE (32)



Juan Ignacio Chela ARG (17)
v.
Qualifier

Wayne Odesnik USA
v.
David Sanchez ESP





Tommy Haas GER
v.
Davide Sanguinetti ITA

Olivier Patience FRA
v.
Sebastien Grosjean FRA (12)



Fernando Gonzalez CHI (14)
v.
Robin Soderling SWE

Nikolay Davydenko RUS
v.
Mark Philippoussis AUS





Karol Beck SVK
v.
Thierry Ascione FRA

Kristian Pless DEN
v.
Gustavo Kuerten BRA (20)



Feliciano Lopez ESP (30)
v.
Arnaud Di Pasquale FRA

Qualifier
v.
Julien Benneteau FRA





Hicham Arazi MAR
v.
Kenneth Carlsen DEN

Wayne Ferreira RSA
v.
Lleyton Hewitt AUS (4)

ally_014
08-26-2004, 08:20 AM
Not the best draw one could of imagined, but we'll see. It just seems as if Lleyts is setting up for something big *no jinxing though!*

Bibi
08-26-2004, 10:38 PM
Just a stupid question, but since Lleyton is playing a tournament this week => and might be in the final of this tournament (which will be played on Sunday). Does he then start at the US Open on Tuesday, or is there still a possibility that he has to play on Monday???
:confused:
(Does this sentence make sence???)

Knockers LaBroad
08-30-2004, 11:33 AM
Hewitt admits 'another love' :eek::sad::bigcry:
30aug04



























SPECULATION had Lleyton Hewitt missing the Olympic Games to marry longtime sweetheart Kim Clijsters.







In reality Hewitt was eyeing another of his great loves – Flushing Meadows.

Many of Hewitt's fondest days and nights have come at the US Open and his unconditional commitment to the last Grand Slam of the year has already proven fruitful for the former world No.1.

Hewitt today claimed his second title in as many weeks and his fourth of the year when he tuned-up for the New York Major with an emphatic 6-3 6-1 win over outclassed Peruvian Luis Horna in the final of the TD Waterhouse Cup at Long Island.

Hewitt's 10th straight win and 15th from his last 16 matches sounded another warning to Flushing Meadows favourites Roger Federer and Andy Roddick.

Apart from another tremendous shot of confidence, Hewitt's latest success made him the inaugural US Open Series Bonus Challenge winner, further confirming the 23-year-old as the biggest threat to a repeat of Wimbledon's Federer-Roddick title decider.

Hewitt will be rewarded for his tour-best 17-2 record from the American hardcourt with a 50 per cent bonus on top of whatever he earns in prize money at the US Open.

It could be a big pay day as he already had high hopes of receiving the $US1 million ($1.43m) cheque on offer in two weeks.

So much so, the patriotic South Australian sacrificed a rare opportunity to represent his beloved country at the Athens Games in order to be in prime condition for Flushing Meadows.

Boasting an enviable 23-4 record in New York, which easily rates as his best of the four Slams, Hewitt said he didn't want to jeopardise his obvious affinity with the tournament by flying to Europe from Toronto, less than a fortnight after travelling from Australia, and then return the following week to the US.

"I've had viruses in the past, over the last few years, after long flights from Australia and I just didn't want to risk that before the US Open," he said after joining fellow Flushing Meadows champions Ivan Lendl, Stefan Edberg, Andre Agassi and "my good mate Pat Rafter" on the Long Island honour board.

"It's one of the Majors where I have a good shot at every year. I enjoy playing it and I just didn't want to jeopardise that.

"And that's why I opted to stay over here in America for a few extra weeks and really prepare in the same conditions and (with) the same balls and courts that I'm going to get at Flushing Meadows.

"So far it's paying off."

The demonstrative Hewitt said the New York crowd, which at worst is boisterous and parochial and at best noisy, tended to amplify his game to great heights, rather than work against him.

"There's no doubt the atmosphere there suits me. It gets pretty electrifying and there's a lot of emotion out there when you're playing and I enjoy playing in stadiums like that," he said, offering other reasons why he'd had so much success at the tournament.

"I enjoy the surface at Flushing Meadows and it was my breakthrough grand slam, when I made the semis there for the first time in 2000.

"Then obviously it was my breakthrough grand slam win in 2001. I won the doubles there in 2000 (with Max Mirnyi) as well.

"But then again, you've got to go out there and do it all again this week.

"It's not easy. It's tough conditions. It can be steamy and it's best-of-five sets and you've got to get the job done.

"So you've got to stay mentally focused for two weeks. You never know if you're going to have to back up matches some days, especially the semi and the final.

"You've got to be prepared for everything."

Hewitt wasn't due to play his first-round match against South African Wayne Ferreira until at least Wednesday (Australian time).

Alicia Molik is the only Australian scheduled for first-day action.

The women's 17th seed has an opening encounter with Stephanie Cohen-Aloro of France.

:p:kiss:

Socket
08-30-2004, 01:13 PM
Just a stupid question, but since Lleyton is playing a tournament this week => and might be in the final of this tournament (which will be played on Sunday). Does he then start at the US Open on Tuesday, or is there still a possibility that he has to play on Monday???
:confused:
(Does this sentence make sence???)

The US Open plays the first round over 3 days, so Lleyton will play no earlier than Tuesday, and probably will ask for a Wednesday time.

Knockers LaBroad
08-30-2004, 01:42 PM
Hewitt thirsts for another US title
By Bill Scott
New York
August 29, 2004

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Lleyton Hewitt takes a break before defeating Argentinian Juan Chela at the Long Island Cup in Commack, New York, on Friday.

Lleyton Hewitt and coach Roger Rasheed are starting to look like master strategists after concentrating on an American hardcourt build-up and avoiding what turned into an Athens Olympic debacle for the Australian's main rivals.

While highly touted gold medal favourites Roger Federer and Andy Roddick were crashing out early at the Olympic Games, Hewitt was kicking on last week in steamy Washington, with Andre Agassi joining him as a drawcard in a low-key field.

Hewitt had time to join fiancee Kim Clijsters for a private tour of the White House during a week that culminated in a third title of the season after a six-month trophy drought.

The hard slog on the cement in humid Washington was followed up by an appearance at last week's tune-up on Long Island near New York City. That's the sort of scheduling that should give the eager Hewitt a running start when the US Open begins tomorrow.

Rested and refreshed, 2001 US Open winner Hewitt has become a force in the game again, his steady performances over the northern summer earning him a fourth seeding at the final grand slam of the season.

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Hewitt could become the man who ends the grand slam career of South African Wayne Ferreira - who is planning to retire after the Davis Cup tie in September - when the pair meet in the first round of the Open.

Slumping Mark Philippoussis will aim to win his first match since Wimbledon. He plays Russian Nikolay Davydenko while Wayne Arthurs opens against Arnaud Clement of France.

With a record-low 13 tournaments played last season, Hewitt admits that a lack of play was responsible for his fall to 17th in the world last year, a ranking that was only just counter-balanced by December's Davis Cup triumph over Spain in Melbourne.

Now, the man who held the top ranking for 75 consecutive weeks between November 2001 and April 2003 has found renewed motivation, typified by a Masters series final against Agassi at Cincinnati this month and the Washington title. "I'm trying to continue the good form I've had over most of this year," said Hewitt, beaten at the other three majors this year.

"These last weeks, I've sharpened up everything. I just want to be 100 per cent ready to go next Monday or Tuesday.

"I'm confident at how I'm hitting the ball. I'm consistent again. I may have the fourth seeding, but you still have to win seven matches at a slam and that's not an easy job for anyone."

While Hewitt's focus is obvious, the same cannot be said for four-time Australian Open champion Agassi, although he remains a solid threat at age 34, with the New York grand slam again his top priority. On the women's side, Alicia Molik, seeded 17th, will ride the wave of an Olympic bronze medal into her first-round encounter with Stephanie Cohen-Aloro of France. Other Australians in the field are Samantha Stosur and Nicole Pratt.

Hewitt maintained his comeback mode against Argentinian Juan Chela at the Long Island Cup in Commack, hammering out a 6-7 (6-8), 6-1, 6-1 win and a place in the semi-finals of the event.

The Australian faces Russian Dmitry Tursunov, a 4-6, 7-6 (7-5), 6-4 winner over 10th seed Jurgen Melzer, of Austria.

In the US Open qualifying tournament, Melbourne teenager Chris Guccione dipped out on day four, beaten 7-6, 6-4 by Ricardo Mello of Brazil

Chesty Larue
08-30-2004, 04:09 PM
:lol: Elke..Hewitt admits another love :eek: Give Ange a heart attack why don't you :p

Angele
08-30-2004, 05:02 PM
:lol: Elke..Hewitt admits another love :eek: Give Ange a heart attack why don't you :p
Yeah, what she said, minus the :lol: ... :p I only freaked out for about half a second, no worries :angel:

edit: Ok so maybe it was like a full second but only because the first thing that sprang to mind was omg, Kim wasn't in the box yesterday :o

Murkofan
08-30-2004, 09:05 PM
Angele, Cappy is losing :p

Murkofan
08-30-2004, 09:06 PM
On a more superficial note, I think Chladkova's hair is worse than Myskina's.

Knockers LaBroad
08-30-2004, 09:30 PM
:crazy: Olliebollie!:D

Hewitt sets out his silver service
By Robert Lusetich
August 31, 2004

LLEYTON HEWITT is ready, perhaps as ready as he has ever been, to win a Grand Slam.

The 23-year-old South Australian completed a magical lead-up to the season's final major by claiming his fourth title of the year, the TD Waterhouse Cup, on Sunday. The location was about an hour's drive - or, in his case, a short helicopter ride - from Flushing Meadows, where he opens his campaign tonight against South African Wayne Ferreira.

Hewitt outclassed Peru's Luis Horna, 6-3 6-1, to win his second straight championship in his third consecutive finals appearance, the only blemish being a wrenching three-set loss to an irrepressible Andre Agassi in Cincinnati.

The former world No.1, whose breakthrough came in New York three years ago, has won 10 straight matches and taken 15 of his past 16, making him the hottest player in the sport. Beyond the results, he seems much more at peace and comfortable within his own skin.

"My game has come together well, and I'm ready for the Open," he said yesterday. "I know what it takes since I already won it. It's going to be incredible. Seven five-set matches. I am anxious to get going."

His remarkable run vindicates the decision not to compete in the Olympics and shows that he may not only be back to the player he was when he held the top ranking two years ago but, perhaps, an even better version.

In demolishing Horna, who had beaten Thailand's Paradorn Srichaphan - the two-time defending champion at the TD Waterhouse Cup - to get to the final, Hewitt once again revealed that his serve, for so long inconsistent and sometimes even a liability, has developed into a real weapon.

It will never be a Sampras-like missile, but, much like Agassi, Hewitt has evolved into a consistent and accurate server with surprising speed, which now guarantees him more cheap points than he enjoyed in the past. Yesterday, he won an astonishing 20 of 22 first-serve points.

As Horna will testify, Hewitt is a handful when he serves well and makes opponents play so many extra balls, getting to shots few even try to retrieve.

Many of Horna's 32 unforced errors yesterday were born out of the frustration of thinking he needed to smack a winner for fear that anything short of that would come right back at him.

Spain's Tommy Robredo, who has had success against the Australian, was blown away with Hewitt's serve while being beaten in Cincinnati. "He's serving unbelievable," Robredo said. "And I didn't (expect) that serve from him."

When Hewitt missed with the first serve, the Spaniard said he had no chance to make rallies with his second serve.

"I think that's sort of my game just developing over time," Hewitt said. "I came on the tour at a young age. Even when I was No.1 in the world, I still feel like there was a lot of areas in my game that I can improve on - obviously, you know, serve more consistently, trying to get more cheap points off it.

"I think I'm serving better at the moment than I've probably ever served."

And not coincidentally, the fourth seed at Flushing Meadows is a viable proposition to add a third Grand Slam title to his resume.

"Hewitt is always tough," said Marat Safin of why most players don't like seeing Hewitt across the net. He's always running, he's always fighting, and he's going to be there for as many hours as he needs to be there.

"I mean, against Hewitt it's a little bit difficult just because he's all the time fighting, and you have to be there for 100 per cent every game, every point, even though if you are winning he can come back from out of nowhere."

Agassi said that Hewitt was also an underestimated tactician who made opponents question their game plans.

"Against a guy like Lleyton, he's going to get his racquet on a lot of serves, he's going to get a lot of balls back in play," said the 34-year-old American, who is seeded sixth in what might be his last real chance to win a ninth major.

"If you play too aggressive, he uses your pace and counter-punches better than anybody.

"If you then lay off too much, he has the ability to step up. There's a lot more decision-making going on out there between the points."

Hewitt, who won the inaugural US Open series with his victory on Sunday - meaning a possible $US500,000 ($716,000) bonus if he wins the US Open - is in a section of the draw that would be daunting if this was a clay-court tournament in South America.

Assuming he gets past a quarter featuring Argentine's David Nalbandian and Juan Ignacio Chela, Chilean Fernando Gonzalez and Brazil's Gustavo Kuerten - and the unseeded Mark Philippoussis - Hewitt may face reigning champion Andy Roddick in a semi-final.

Hewitt has a 3-1 edge in their meetings, the most memorable of those being the 2001 US Open quarter-final which the Australian took in five dramatic sets, although Roddick won in straight sets on grass at Queen's Club this year.

But before such tantalising thoughts can be visited, Hewitt first needs to deal with Ferreira, who will be playing his last Grand Slam tournament before retiring.

"That makes the match even tougher," Hewitt said. "Wayne certainly doesn't want to end his career that early."

Jess
08-30-2004, 10:23 PM
Thanks for all the articles :bounce: :) Good luck Lleyts :)

He's playing really well at the moment - I just hope he hasn't 'overplayed' in the run up to it. He doesn't normally get tired that easily though...

Chesty Larue
08-30-2004, 10:27 PM
On a more superficial note, I think Chladkova's hair is worse than Myskina's.

You could pretty much say Chladkova's hair is worse than _______ (fill in the blank) :o :p

Cappy won anyway..she got pissed off..swore and got a warning then started playing well :rolleyes:

Jess
08-30-2004, 10:29 PM
*off to find a picture of Chladkova's hair to see if it really is that bad* :p

Angele
08-30-2004, 10:34 PM
Did y'all see Nick B. say that Lleyton was playing for his girlfriend :angel: And then he said or maybe fiance as if he had some kind of gossip that not everybody knew :p

Jess
08-30-2004, 10:38 PM
Did y'all see Nick B. say that Lleyton was playing for his girlfriend :angel: And then he said or maybe fiance as if he had some kind of gossip that not everybody knew :p

Playing for his girlfriend? Aw that's sweet :) I've given up hope of ever seeing a live tennis match on tv again so all vaguely gooberish stuff is greatly appreciated :)

Angele
08-30-2004, 10:40 PM
Don't worry, I'll relate any and all gooberish info that I come across :D

Well Nick Bolleteri (sp?) rarely comes off as sweet so when he said Lley was playing for his gf it sounded sort of weird :scratch: But I think he meant it in a sweet way :angel:

Chesty Larue
08-30-2004, 11:17 PM
*off to find a picture of Chladkova's hair to see if it really is that bad* :p

here ya go..save you the trouble :p

http://www.usopen.org/images/pics/large/b_chladkova_d01.jpg

Jess
08-30-2004, 11:31 PM
Why on earth would a person do that :rolleyes: She looks like a boy.

Socket
08-31-2004, 12:10 AM
Why on earth would a person do that :rolleyes: She looks like a boy.

*clears throat* You get three guesses. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Socket
08-31-2004, 12:11 AM
The Tuesday OOP has been posted, and Lleyton is playing on Wednesday.

Murkofan
08-31-2004, 12:29 AM
You could pretty much say Chladkova's hair is worse than _______ (fill in the blank) :o :p

:rolls:

Cappy won anyway..she got pissed off..swore and got a warning then started playing well :rolleyes:

It's just not a real Cappy match if she doesn't swear :p

Goonergal
08-31-2004, 08:18 PM
I think she looks like GI Jane :p

Anyway onto the real topic :p

GOOD LUCK TOMORROW LLEYTS! :bounce:

Socket
09-01-2004, 01:00 AM
Lleyton is playing the second day match on Ashe on Wednesday. Good luck, Lleyton!

Aussie_Kim
09-01-2004, 05:25 AM
Go Lleyton!!
He's gonna win & hopefully we'll get it on tv though I'll have to wait till 1am!! :rolleyes:

Lisbeth
09-01-2004, 05:30 AM
Good luck Lleyton!

I doubt I'll be able to stay awake for this one since, as the second match, it will probably be around 3am! So someone in a more friendly time zone give Lleyton a "C'mon" for me please :)

NOMAD
09-01-2004, 08:27 AM
there's a interview video of LL and Devenport in usopen website

http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2004-08-31/200408311093994895663.html

ally_014
09-01-2004, 11:17 AM
The VCR's gonna get a good workout over the next week! All the people who are awake at 3am Australian time cheer on Lleyts extra loud for us :)

Would someone be able to tell me what he says in the video? My stupid computer won't let me have Real Player :( Thanks :kiss: :)

Raquel
09-01-2004, 03:42 PM
Good Luck Lleyton! :bounce:

Gaga
09-01-2004, 04:31 PM
Good luck lleyton !! :bounce:

Angele
09-01-2004, 04:38 PM
Good luck Lley :kiss:

Gaga
09-01-2004, 08:33 PM
lley win 6-1 7-5 6-4 !!!
good job lley !! congratulations ! :kiss:
Good luck for the next round ! :hearts:

Port_Power
09-01-2004, 10:35 PM
Arazi wont be easy for lleyton, let me tell you that he chips his backhand a lot, and lleyton has a habit of dumping balls at the bottom of the net to slice backhands, the tactic that works very well against lleyton, they met once in the past ,the year lleyts won us open, and arazi won and 4 in TMS toronto! but lleyton is playing excellent tennis now! so it will be an interesting match

Socket
09-02-2004, 12:25 AM
Arazi wont be easy for lleyton, let me tell you that he chips his backhand a lot, and lleyton has a habit of dumping balls at the bottom of the net to slice backhands, the tactic that works very well against lleyton, they met once in the past ,the year lleyts won us open, and arazi won and 4 in TMS toronto! but lleyton is playing excellent tennis now! so it will be an interesting match

Yeah, this won't be a cakewalk by any means, but I think Lleyton is a better player now than when they met in Toronto 2001, and he's playing with confidence.

Lisbeth
09-02-2004, 01:25 AM
Good luck Lleyton! Arazi is talented but inconsistent so let's hope Lleyton brings his "A" game :)

Clara Bow
09-02-2004, 05:59 AM
I was able to catch Lleyton's Tivoed match after work today and he really does look impressive. There were a couple of outstanding shots that he made. I really think he will be a factor at the top level again.

I also saw the interview that he had with Al Troutwig on the USA network and he was very nice and charming. He seems to be very mature and thoughtful now. He also appears to have a pretty good sense of humor. This makes me wonder whay the media kind of shies away from him. From what I've read it doesn't really seem like the Aussie media embraces him either.

The Blake incident was several years ago and the ATP issues finallys seem to be simmering down. I wonder if the media will begin to act more warmly towards him now because he is rather likeable at 23 and the press likes those come back stories (i.e. Agassi).

kim-fan
09-02-2004, 07:24 AM
i found this at lleytonland, so cute!

Later after the match, Lleyton was interviewed on USA, and at the end of the interview he was asked what has been his best moment in his career and he said "That would be getting engaged to my fiance" It was very sweet -- good interview. Good luck to Lleyton the rest of the Open. [R] - Amy, Sep/1/2004 22:52:30 [+02]

Lisbeth
09-02-2004, 08:49 AM
Hello Clara Bow, thanks for the analysis :)

Lleyton's issues with the Aussie media predate the Blake incident by a long way. To cut a long story short, certain people in the media vilified him from the beginning including making up blatant lies about him (such as one paper reporting that he abused an air hostess when in fact the 8 or so other Australian tennis people with him at the time maintain that he sat quietly through the whole flight and said nothing much to the attendants other than "thank you"). That's just an example, but as a result of the unfair treatment, Lleyton virtually stopped talking to the Aus media for a couple of years. I think they wanted another laid back, chatty, sweet Pat Rafter type and took it out on Lleyton that he was different. But as you say he is a lot more relaxed (thanks Kimmy ;) ) and mature now and he and the media seem to be warming to each other. He's always given lovely interviews to the few reporters he trusts - such as John Newcombe.

Good luck Lleyton!

Danni
09-02-2004, 09:43 AM
keep it up lleyton :D

Crazy_Fool
09-02-2004, 02:05 PM
Yay, lleyton looked good out there.

Good luck against Arazi, it won't be easy

tangerine_dream
09-02-2004, 07:33 PM
It's great to see that Lleyton is finally being cut some slack in the media. He was Public Enemy No. 1 in the USA after the Blake incident, and then he started that fight with the ATP; but all that seems to be water under the bridge now and it's great to see a happier, more relaxed Lleyton meeting the press and public. I'm sure Kimmy has a lot to do with it. :)

Here's an article on him from ESPN. Even though he's won two back-to-back hardcourt titles, he's still flying under the radar at USO and this will work to his advantage, I believe. Apologies if this has already been posted.


Wednesday, September 1, 2004
Hewitt back in top form

By Greg Garber
ESPN.com


NEW YORK -- Lleyton Hewitt finished as the No. 1-ranked player in the world in 2001 and 2002 by running down more balls and winning more matches than anybody. And then in 2003, he gave himself to a larger cause.

In mid-September, he led the Australian Davis Cup team into the finals with stirring victories over Roger Federer and Michel Kratochvil. Then, for the nine weeks between the semifinals and the championship against Spain, Hewitt did not play in a single tournament.

Australia won the title in December, and Hewitt played a big role, defeating French Open champion Juan Carlos Ferrero. His individual ranking, however, plummeted to No. 16; Hewitt won only 37 matches, compared to Andy Roddick's 72 and Federer's 78.

"I just was thinking about the Davis Cup final more than anything," Hewitt explained Wednesday. "For me it was all about putting my eggs in one basket and preparing as well as possible for that Davis Cup final. Obviously, it paid off for that."

And just as obviously, the layoff has helped to place Hewitt among a small group of serious contenders here at the U.S. Open.

"Yeah," Hewitt mused, "it's probably worked as a positive. In hindsight, it probably helped me this year. I feel strong now, towards the last third of the year."

Coming in to the Open, no one is hotter on the men's side than Hewitt. He's won 11 straight matches and 15 of his last 16. On Wednesday, he torched Wayne Ferreira 6-1, 7-5, 6-4 in a first-round match. Ferreira, after playing in a record 56 straight Grand Slam events, promptly announced his retirement after Davis Cup matches later this month.

This renaissance has not eluded the attention of Federer.

"I've been checking him out," Federer admitted after his first-round victory. "I know how tough he is, especially on American hardcourts. I definitely think he's one of the top four contenders for the title, next to me, Agassi and Roddick. I feel like once he gets going, he's very hard to stop."

A kindly draw leaves the No. 4-seeded Hewitt with some room to build momentum. The highest seed standing between Hewitt and the quarterfinals is No. 12 Sebastien Grosjean. No. 8 David Nalbandian, a semifinalist here a year ago, would oppose him in the quarters and Andy Roddick, the No. 2 seed, would await in the semifinals.

Hewitt, 23, has always won with speed and guile. Only Guillermo Coria can challenge his alley-to-alley speed, and few players can summon his intensity in the big moment. If there was a weakness in his run at the top, it was Hewitt's serve. After Wednesday's match, Ferreira said his offerings looked pretty good. "He went through a little bit of a bad patch there for awhile," Ferreira said. "He was serving a lot of doubles, probably lost a bit of confidence. But he seems like today he's got it all back. He served very, very well, which is something he's been struggling with for awhile. He's definitely getting in a lot more first serves, a little bit more penetrating."


That serve and a renewed enthusiasm has carried him to the No. 4 position in the ATP season-long race. Hewitt has lost three matches to Federer, most notably in the quarterfinals at the French Open and Wimbledon, but after losing to Andre Agassi in the final at Cincinnati, Hewitt won his last two tournaments, Washington and Long Island.

Hewitt has been so good this summer there are concerns that he's been too good. More matches, more wins creates a double-edged sword: confidence vs. fatigue.

"Well, when you're winning them it sort of comes back to the confidence sense," Hewitt said. "You walk out there knowing that you've won many matches going out there, beating a lot of worthy opponents."

"I hope for him he didn't play too much leading up to this," Federer said of Hewitt. "I think he hasn't been playing too much over the last, say, one and one-half years. So he's got a lot of energy left in his tank.

"He could just take the confidence with him from the last three tournaments he won and carry it through the whole U.S. Open. Let's keep an eye on him."

Hewitt didn't sound concerned.

"As long as you don't overdo it," he said. "It's been good for me. I don't feel physically down at the moment. I think when I won Wimbledon a couple of years ago I had a pretty good streak going through there.

"I've been able to put it together day in and day out the last few weeks, the last couple of months. That probably goes back to a couple of years ago when I was able to play that kind of tennis. There's definitely been matches over the last few weeks that I feel like I've played as well as I've probably ever played."

Socket
09-03-2004, 12:56 AM
Lleyton's second round match is the second match of the day session on Ashe (same time slot as Wednesday).

Good luck, Lleyton!!!

Angele
09-03-2004, 01:02 AM
Good luck Lley :kiss:

ally_014
09-03-2004, 01:17 AM
Go Lleyts :D :bounce: (and I hope channel 9 decide to show it early this time :o )

SomL.
09-03-2004, 10:37 AM
Good luck Lleyton to second round !!!!!!! You can do it !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

kim4eva
09-03-2004, 10:45 AM
Good luck Lleyton :bounce: :clap2:

Hagar
09-03-2004, 07:30 PM
Lleyton won in straight sets! Well done!

Angele
09-03-2004, 07:33 PM
Well done Lleyton :kiss:

Port_Power
09-03-2004, 07:46 PM
Lleyton won in straight sets, well done! but as i said earlier, the 1st set was whole different story... lleyton problems with the slice backhand was pretty obvious but i am glad he played the big points really well. Maybe the spirit is now back..and difference from lleyton now and lleyton from 3 months back is.. he can play the big points and big games really. But i am not convinced till i see him play the likes of duck and federer well.. cheers and COME ON!!

NOMAD
09-03-2004, 09:46 PM
L. HEWITT/H. Arazi

7-6, 6-1, 6-2

An interview with:

LLEYTON HEWITT

THE MODERATOR: First question, please.

Q. Lleyton, he's a dangerous opponent. How important was it to pull out that first set?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it was. It's always nice to get it, especially against a guy like him who's very flashy and capable of coming up with great shots. So it's a little bit awkward sometimes when you get in a tiebreak against a guy like that. But I just had to hang in there. I'd only played him once before and lost to him about three years ago in Montreal. Didn't play a great match. He's got a crafty kind of game. You know, you really got to try and dictate play out there. He doesn't give you too many cheap points out there. With the left-handed serve, it's always going to be a little bit more difficult.

Q. Nervous start or tentative?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I was holding serve quite well then I just lost my serve. One service game there, I just didn't play a great service game. Up one end was tougher today again than the other. But it was the opposite ends to what it was a couple of days ago when I played. So it was just getting used to conditions and that. I just didn't quite -- you know, wasn't as aggressive right at the start today as I was two days ago. But I felt like I really stepped it up early in the second set.

Q. You continue to sort of fly under the radar here. Is that okay by you and is it actually helpful?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know, mate. As long as you keep going, doesn't matter. Doesn't really bother me too much. Yeah, just see what happens.

Q. Well, would you prefer to be playing where not so much attention is paid to you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Oh, mate, doesn't bother me one way or another. I've been in both situations, and, you know, I think I've handled it pretty well in the past.

Q. You won the TD Waterhouse Cup last week. Can you talk about the situation. A lot of pros, name players, seem to lose in the first round there. Seems like they want to treat it as an exhibition, seems they don't want to go too far, don't want to tire themselves out before the US Open. Are you worried about exerting too much energy there, risking injury, before coming to this one?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, probably goes through your mind a little bit but purely because I'd won a tournament the week before, made a final just before that. But then again, I don't feel like I wasted too much energy in Washington. Just felt like I really wanted to keep my game going and clicking along. For me, the most matches I can win, the better off I'm going to be, I think. For me, it was just try to continue that confidence and self-belief coming into a Slam.

Q. Are you a better player now than when you won the championship?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I have some days when I'm maybe better. Other days, you know, it's pretty hard to be probably the way that I played in the semis and final here that year in 2001. There's definitely been matches throughout this year and the end of last year in Davis Cup where I played equally as well as when I won here a few years ago.

Q. Can you talk about your decision not to play the Olympics and given that a Chilean won it, is there any regret at all?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, not for me. You know, for me, it was all about, you know, trying to prepare for the US Open and give myself as best possible chance of, you know, trying to win here again. You know, I've always had good results at the US Open and I didn't want anything to jeopardize that. You know, in the past I've had some viruses and, you know, few health issues and whatever after long flights and that. I really didn't want -- there just wasn't enough break to fly back after Cincinnati to Greece and then come back here right before the US Open for me personally. So my choice was to stay and, you know, acclimatize to the same conditions that I was going to be playing here in New York and so far it's paying off.

Q. Just to follow up on that, was there any pressure from the Australian media, the people, to play in the Olympics? Here in America, we only had Mardy Fish as the hope.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, you had Andy Roddick there, so (smiling)...

Q. Even then, there wasn't an outcry.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. I think everyone knows how much I like playing for my country. You know, I think after I took eight weeks off last year to prepare for the Davis Cup match, one match, my ranking dropped ten spots, I don't think anyone questions my patriotism towards my country.

Q. Aside from the tennis, what do you like about being here in New York? How have you been spending your time off court?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Stuck in traffic (smiling). No, you know, it's great. It's a big city. It's a great place to visit. But I really haven't done a lot of sight-seeing that much. Last week I was going out to Long Island every day to play out there. And, you know, this week I've just been -- you come here on your off-day anyway. By the time you get out here, practice, stretch, watch a match or two, have some lunch, it's time to go back, have a massage, and get ready to play the next day. Yeah, so I've done very little sight-seeing.

Q. You haven't played Lopez. What are you expecting from him?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I've only practiced with him once, I think, in the past. He's a big left-hander again. I seem to be playing a lot of left-handers lately. He's got a big serve, big forehand. He chips his backhand a lot. He's a dangerous player again because he's going to be flashy on my service games and on his he's just going to try to hold his serve. I've just got to return well, move well, and make him play those extra shots.

Q. Do you find it more difficult playing left-handers?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not necessarily. I haven't really had too much of a problem. I've been fortunate. If you play one sort of out of the blue when you haven't played them for a while, it can be difficult with the serve and adjusting to that. It MIGHT take you a set or two. But I played a lot of them. I played three in a row at Wimbledon, first three rounds. Now I've played a lot here over the hard court summer as well.

Q. What about the German guy? Know much about him?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know anything about him. I'll be trying to find out something if he gets through.

Q. What do you think the main stumbling block has been for you in recent Slams?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Just a point here and there, I think. You know, at least at the Australian Open and Wimbledon against Federer in both matches, you know, I was up a break late in the fourth set against Federer. If I could have pushed it to five sets, you know, you never know, having the momentum. You know, it's just a few points here and there. In the Australian Open I was a point away from being up a set and a break. French Open, Gaudio was just too good.

Q. You almost seem a little wistful when you talk about how well you played here two years ago. Are you concerned you might not be able to get back to that level in a big event?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Oh, no, I did it at Wimbledon. Not to worry.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

Knockers LaBroad
09-03-2004, 11:03 PM
Hewitt Rocks the Moroccan
by Joe Checkler
Friday, September 3, 2004

When 2001 US Open champion Lleyton Hewitt finally opened the toolbox during his first-set tiebreak with Hicham Arazi on Friday, the box was filled to capacity, right down to the needle-nosed pliers and 3/16 drill bit. Hewitt staved off two set points, then later hit a charging winner to take the tiebreak, 9-7, closing out a 59-minute set. He turned to the crowd, yelled "c'mon!" and pounded Arazi from that point on, winning by 7-6 (9-7), 6-1, 6-2 to advance to the third round of the US Open.

Every shot was working for Hewitt, whether it be the basic, backspinning backhand or the charging forehand winner. Even when Hewitt was running the baseline, seemingly under duress, he hit low line-drive forehands with enough mustard that Arazi could barely handle them.

The players traded breaks in what turned out to be the pivotal first set, with Hewitt breaking Arazi to square the set up at 5-5. In the tiebreak, Arazi hit a winner from the net that put him up 6-5, and gave him his first set point chance.

But Arazi hit the net, making it 6-6. Then, with Hewitt still serving, the left-handed Arazi took control of a long volley by pounding a forehand that Hewitt could barely graze. It was set point chance No. 2, and Arazi was serving. He mishit to resquare the tiebreak at 7-7, and then hit long to give Hewitt the only chance he would need.

The last two sets took a combined 56 minutes, less than the first set alone. Hewitt went up 4-0 in the second, winning all eight points of Arazi's first two service games. He punctuated the first break, a winner from the net, with a clenched fist. Later, with Arazi serving to stay in the set at 30-40, Hewitt barely reached a drop shot and perfectly placed a looping underhand touch shot into the corner, with a helpless Arazi standing on the baseline, peeking over his shoulder in stunned disbelief.

A disillusioned Arazi, during the first point of the third set, saw Hewitt mishit a ball straight up in the air, almost as high as the mezzanine level of Arthur Ashe Stadium. When Arazi went to smash an easy winner he hit the ball long, and the crowd collectively cringed and sighed. Frustration set in on the next point, when Arazi hit one wide and screamed "ahh!" Three points later, Hewitt broke again.

In six sets during the 2004 Open, Hewitt has won all six. He committed just 27 unforced errors in the match to Arazi's 41, and broke serve seven times to two. His next opponent will be the winner of the Feliciano Lopez-Philipp Kohlschreiber match.

Socket
09-04-2004, 01:18 AM
Lopez is through in 5 sets. He choked when serving for the match in the third set, lost the TB (he was done 1-5 at one point), then lost the next set 6-1. Finally, came through in the fifth, 6-1. What a weird match. Hope he's nice and tired now.

Good luck to Lleyton against him, sounds like Lleyton thinks it'll be tough. He needs to start strong and stay there.

Chesty Larue
09-04-2004, 02:57 AM
Interesting to note that Lopez is the only seed remaining in Lleyton's quarter. Youzhny upset Nalbandian (8) and Haas upset Grosjean (12). However I would say Haas is just as dangerous as a seed and probably the toughest player left in that section along with Lleyton.

Socket
09-04-2004, 03:11 AM
Interesting to note that Lopez is the only seed remaining in Lleyton's quarter. Youzhny upset Nalbandian (8) and Haas upset Grosjean (12). However I would say Haas is just as dangerous as a seed and probably the toughest player left in that section along with Lleyton.

Agreed. A lot will depend on well Haas's shoulder holds up, and how match-tough he is.

But first, Lleyton has to get through Lopez.

kim4eva
09-04-2004, 03:49 AM
Good luck Lleyton :clap2:

pippimao
09-04-2004, 04:54 AM
Good luck for the next round !

SomL.
09-04-2004, 09:03 AM
Good luck Lleyton to third round !!!!!!!!!! You can do it !!!!!!!!!!!!

Crazy_Fool
09-04-2004, 11:41 AM
Congrats Lleyton :D

Good luck in the next round!!

Hagar
09-04-2004, 04:04 PM
Interesting to note that Lopez is the only seed remaining in Lleyton's quarter. Youzhny upset Nalbandian (8) and Haas upset Grosjean (12). However I would say Haas is just as dangerous as a seed and probably the toughest player left in that section along with Lleyton.

Yeah, Haas is tough but that does not take away that I am VERY pleased to see that Nalby and Seb are already out.

tangerine_dream
09-04-2004, 04:24 PM
Yeah, Haas is tough but that does not take away that I am VERY pleased to see that Nalby and Seb are already out.

Please don't say that! Some of the more paranoid Nalby fans will assume you mean that you want him DEAD and they'll dedicate threads to you calling for your banishment from MTF hell. ;)

Knockers LaBroad
09-04-2004, 04:41 PM
Hewitt into third round
From Darren Walton in New York
September 4, 2004

LLEYTON Hewitt extended his winning run to 12 matches to reach the third round of the US Open at Flushing Meadows today.

The fourth-seeded Australian overcame a first-set scare to wear down dangerous Moroccan Hicham Arazi 7-6 (9-7) 6-1 6-2 and book a meeting with either 30th-seeded Spaniard Feliciano Lopez or German qualifier Philipp Kohlschreiber.

Hewitt, 23, had to draw on all his famed fighting qualities to pull out the first set after trailing the flashy left-hander throughout.

Hewitt making a tentative start inside New York's Arthur Ashe Stadium, lost his serve in the seventh game, broke back to level at 5-5 only to fall behind again in the tiebreaker.

The 2001 champion was forced to save two set points, including one on Arazi's serve, before roaring with a mixture of relief and pleasure after striking a forehand winner to finally take the set.

It was a vital set to win against an opponent who'd beaten him in straight sets in their only previous encounter, also on a north American hardcourt.

Arazi had survived a tough five-setter in the first round to confirm a date with Hewitt and it was clear his energy and confidence had been sapped after losing the tense first set.

Australia's world No.5 ran away with the second set after twice breaking Arazi for a 4-0 lead and eventually finished off the job in one hour and 55 minutes.

It was an impressive performance from Hewitt, who would have been well aware Arazi had haunted his Australian countrymen in the past.

Arazi, 30, led Patrick Rafter two sets to love on the very same court in the first round of the 1998 US Open before the defending champion fought back to win in five and then go on to claim his second title at Flushing Meadows.

And the skillful Moroccan helped spoil this year's Australia Day celebrations at Melbourne Park when he thrashed Mark Philippoussis in front of his hometown fans in the fourth round.

Arazi and Hewitt are certain to cross swords again later this month when Australia hosts Morocco in a Davis Cup promotion-relegation battle in Perth.

Knockers LaBroad
09-04-2004, 04:43 PM
Hewitt in danger zone

September 5, 2004
FOURTH seed Lleyton Hewitt fired through the second round of the US Open yesterday with a straight sets victory over Moroccan Hicham Arazi, saving two set points during a first-set tie-break before running away with the match.


Lleyton Hewitt wins his first round match
The 7-6 6-1 6-2 triumph over a player who had beaten him in their one previous meeting puts the in-form Australian on a 12-game winning streak and into a third-round match against powerful lefthander Feliciano Lopez of Spain.

Lopez, 22, the tournament's 30th seed, survived a tough 7-5 7-5 6-7 1-6 6-2 battle with German Philipp Kohlschreiber yesterday to get through.

"He's a dangerous player," said Hewitt, the Adelaide 23-year-old who won at Flushing Meadows in 2001.

"He's a big lefthander – I seem to be playing a lot of lefthanders lately – and he has a big serve, big forehand.

"He's going to be flashy on my service games and on his he's just going to try and hold his serve.

"I just have to return well, move well, and make him play those extra shots."

Lopez said he would approach the match with a "nothing to lose" mentality.

"I have a good chance," said Lopez, noting Hewitt "has had a good summer, playing well and he has won a few tournaments".

Hewitt's decision to skip the Olympics to concentrate on the US Open appears to be paying dividends. Missing Athens "was all about trying to prepare for the US Open and give myself the best possible chance of trying to win here again.

"I've always had good results at the US Open and I don't want anything to jeopardise that."

That preparation included tournament wins in Washington and Long Island last month and a runner-up trophy in Cincinnati.

The former world No 1 has been cited by top seed Roger Federer as a serious threat for this year's championship.

"My choice was to stay (in the US) and acclimatise to the same conditions that I was going to be playing here in New York. So far it's paying off," Hewitt said.

While his fiancee Kim Clijsters was the runner-up to Justine Henin-Hardenne in last year's women's final, this year an injury means she is playing a supporting role in cheering on her feisty husband-to-be.

It was a particularly punchy Hewitt who spoke at yesterday's post-match press conference, where he took exception to a persistent suggestion from the American media that he is "flying under the radar" and could find that lower profile helpful.

"I don't know, mate. As long as you keep going, doesn't matter," he said. "Doesn't bother me one way or the other. I've been in both situations and I think I've handled it pretty well in the past."

He said his heavy schedule in the lead-up to this year's Open was working in his favour, and he "just felt like I really wanted to keep my game going and clicking along".

"For me, the most matches I can win, the better off I'm going to be."

As the winner of the inaugural US Open Series, a series of tournaments that led up to the main event, Hewitt qualified for a $US500,000 bonus on top of the $US1 million winner's prize should he recapture the championship title.

With Mark Philippoussis, Wayne Arthurs, Alicia Molik, Samantha Stosur and Nicole Pratt all making early exits from the singles draws, Hewitt is now flying the Australian flag solo.

Seeded players knocked out from the men's second-round draw yesterday included Frenchman Sebastien Grosjean, American Vincent Spadea, eighth-seeded Argentine David Nalbandian and last year's runner-up, Spaniard Juan Carlos Ferrero.


The Sunday Telegraph

SomL.
09-05-2004, 07:42 AM
Good luck Lleyton to third round !!!!!!!!!!! Go Lleyton against Lopez %%%%%%%%%

Danni
09-05-2004, 08:20 AM
go lleyts :bounce: :bounce:

Angele
09-05-2004, 12:06 PM
Lleyton has a night match :ras: :ras: His other matches have been on during the day when I was at school but I figured yay, finally on sunday I'll be able to watch him play but nope :(

Bibi
09-05-2004, 02:52 PM
Lleyton has a night match :ras: :ras: His other matches have been on during the day when I was at school but I figured yay, finally on sunday I'll be able to watch him play but nope :(
Yeah, I wanted to watch the game too. I've been able to watch the other games (because of the timing difference, I'm home from work by the time his game starts) => but now I'll be the middle of the night (here in Belgium) when he plays :ras:

Angele
09-05-2004, 03:14 PM
Middle of the night coverage is the worst thing :( For me it'll be late night ( around 10 probably ) which is fine but I don't have live coverage :( Out of 13 nights of USO I have about 10 nights of coverage but tonight I don't because of some football game :( :ras:

Crazy_Fool
09-05-2004, 11:56 PM
Good luck to Lleyton tonight :D

I'm gonna try and stay up and watch him, but it really depends on how i feel and how long Mauresmo's match takes.

sol
09-05-2004, 11:59 PM
C'mon Lleyton:D.. I'm glad of see you winning tonight :bounce:

Hewittfan11387
09-06-2004, 04:36 AM
Hewitt beat Lopez in straight sets tonight, it wasn't that great of a match but i'll take a Hewitt win anyday! I liked the shirt he was wearing

kim-fan
09-06-2004, 07:03 AM
Hewitt beat Lopez in straight sets tonight, it wasn't that great of a match but i'll take a Hewitt win anyday! I liked the shirt he was wearing

it wasn't that great of a match? in that first set, lopez didn't win a point on lleytons serve! that's pretty impressive

ally_014
09-06-2004, 07:14 AM
Well done Lleyts! :D Sounds impressive from what I've heard so far!

SomL.
09-06-2004, 11:02 AM
Good luck Lleyton to fourth round !!!!!! You can do it !!!!!!!!

Angele
09-06-2004, 05:54 PM
L. HEWITT/F. Lopez

6-1, 6-4, 6-2

An interview with:

LLEYTON HEWITT

THE MODERATOR: Questions for Lleyton, please.

Q. Pretty impressive stuff. Must be pretty happy with that?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it was good. You know, obviously, when you never played a guy before, I knew he was gonna be dangerous out there. Just had to try and weather the storm and get on his serve as quickly as possible. Yeah, I really felt like I was on it right from the start.

Q. He said just now that even when he felt he was playing his best, the ball kept coming back. Is that part of the plan, keep grinding away?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I was going to make him play a lot of shots out there tonight. He's a dangerous player if you give him enough opportunities. He's obviously got a big left-handed serve if he gets his first serve in. He's got a big forehand there. I just had to try and move him around the court and not just play to his backhand, even though it was his weaker side, obviously. Not just play into that corner of the court. Really wanted to make him move and open up his backhand by going to his forehand.

Q. You probably hit it more to his forehand than he's used to seeing. He was even cheating over to his backhand, kept thinking you were going over there. Got some real easy points hitting to forehand because he was leaning the other way. You obviously thought that through?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I felt like I was hitting the ball well enough at the start not to worry about what his strengths were. I was just going to play my game. I knew he was going to be hanging over there, looking, I was going to be going to his backhand. I just felt like I was hitting the ball well enough, my forehand down the line, my backhand crosscourt, that I was going to take him on even if it was his strength. Early on I felt like I was winning a lot of points off his forehand as well.

Q. 12 straight points. I mean, 3-Love up. Pretty dream start.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it was a good start, especially against a guy like that who you've never played before. As I said, he's a dangerous opponent, if you give him a sniff. He's beaten a lot of good players. He beat Safin at Athens, I think, in the second round. He also, you know -- I know that he beat Flip in Madrid last year. So I was very, very wary of him going into the match.

Q. You looked like you were having some fun out there, a few smiles we saw. Is that the case?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It was business as usual.

Q. You haven't dropped a set yet. This time last year you had a pretty poor first week in terms of scheduling and stuff. Is it fair to say you're in a much better place to make a real strong challenge in the second week this year?

LLEYTON HEWITT: You know, I don't -- the scheduling was the same for everyone last year. And, you know, playing back-to-back days, sure, it's not the ideal preparation, but physically I felt like it wasn't the biggest problem for me compared to a lot of other guys last year. So, you know, I felt like I was hitting the ball well last year. Obviously, you don't want to waste too much energy and I don't think I've had to so far - which is a good thing.

Q. Pretty much a perfect week.

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's been good enough so far.

Q. Are you one of those blokes that worries about not having been challenged a lot, or are you just happy to get through in three and keep going?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I'm not too worried. I think, you know, I've come through, I guess, you know, Wimbledon. I got through most of my matches fairly convincingly. US Open, when I won there, I had to really, you know, dig deep a couple of times. Five-setters. So, yeah, I think at the end of the day, just want to find a way to get through those matches. And I think I've had enough tough matches over the last few months, anyway, not to really worry about getting through in four or five sets.

Q. Do you know much about Karol Beck?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I know a little bit. I've seen him play a little bit. He played well on the grass this year. He's a very compact player. He doesn't make a lot of mistakes. You know, I've got to go out there, play aggressive and play my game.

Q. He seems to be a guy that gets a lot of balls back and runs around a lot, doesn't make too many mistakes, like you. Bit different from the guys that you've been playing?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, well, it will be a different match compared to today's match, that's for sure. And probably even, you know, the Wayne Ferreira match. Arazi sort of got a lot of balls back, really didn't go for that many winners out there. Will be a little bit more similar to that. He's steady off both sides.

Q. What about your serve? Just keeps getting better?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I served well tonight. You know, I served well when I had to. And, you know, I mostly got a high percentage in out there I felt like tonight. I moved it around well. I don't think I was too predictable on my serve at all.

Q. You say a lot of times you've been working on your serve hard with your coach. What exactly have you been doing?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Just, you know, ball toss, you know getting in the mind frame of using my legs a bit more out there, pushing up through the serve. Just, you know, small reminders more than anything. But, you know, just trying to focus on that and get in a routine, I guess, so when you go out there in the match it's second nature.

Q. How important is it for you to regain that No. 1 ranking? Sort of how far along do you think you are on that mission?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, it's not something I'm chasing. I'm not going to go out and play - as I've said the last year or so - I'm not going to go out and play every week just to try and get my ranking a little bit higher. I'm not that kind of guy. I think once I've been No. 1 in the world, doesn't interest me to go out and play every single tournament week in and week out to try to get my ranking there. If you win Slams, you're going to put yourself in a position to be in the Top 2 or 3 in the world regardless.

Q. This little streak of 13 straight now, I know I heard McEnroe ask you a similar sort of question, is this as good as you've played since maybe you were No. 1 or since 2001, 2002?

LLEYTON HEWITT: There's been patches over the last year and a half that I've played as well as I have. It's just at the moment I've been able to keep it together and play day in, day out like that. You know, as I said, the Davis Cup matches, I seem to be able to play some of my best tennis every time I step on the court. Yeah, there's been periods this year. Sydney, I played extremely well. Rotterdam I played exceptional tennis the whole week. You know, some matches on the clay and even on the grass where I've played extremely well. But, you know, the period on the American hard courts has just been -- I've been able to do it day in and day out, I think, which I've been able to keep that roll going somewhat.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

Knockers LaBroad
09-06-2004, 07:17 PM
TENNIS: I can be No.1 again: Hewitt
By ANNA COCK in New York
07sep04
A SEEMINGLY unstoppable Lleyton Hewitt has the No.1 ranking back in his sights after wiping Spaniard Feliciano Lopez from the court yesterday in the third round of the US Open.

"I got to No.1 and hopefully sometime I can get it back," the aggressive Australian said after the 6-1, 6-4, 6-2 victory that took him into the fourth round against unseeded Slovak Karol Beck.

Hewitt, who held top spot on the ATP rankings for 80 weeks from November 2001 to June 2003, is on a 13-match winning streak and will not meet a seeded player at Flushing Meadow until the semi-finals, most likely to be defending champion Andy Roddick.

While he has maintained he is not chasing the top ranking, he said winning Grand Slams is what he wanted to do. "And if you win Slams, you're going to put yourself in a position to be in the top two or three regardless," he said.

Starting the first set 3-0 up put the 2001 US Open champion in charge, with Hewitt acknowledging he got off to a strong start knowing Lopez "is a dangerous opponent – if you give him a sniff."









"I felt like I was right on it from the start," said the No.4 seed who has not dropped a set during the first three rounds and finished off the match convincingly with two aces. Lopez, a left-hander with a powerful forehand, said even when he felt he was playing his best tennis "the ball kept coming back".

Like Lopez, Hewitt's next opponent, Beck, goes into the match tomorrow morning (Australian time) having never played Hewitt. But "I saw him many times on TV so I know how he plays," said the 22-year-old world No.72.

Asked whether his form was back to that which kept him in the No.1 position during 2001-02, Hewitt said: "There have been patches over the last year and a half that I've played as well as I have."

"It's just at the moment I've been able to keep it together and play day-in, day-out like that," he said.

Second seed Roddick won in straight sets over Guillermo Canas

Knockers LaBroad
09-06-2004, 07:20 PM
Hewitt saves strength for home stretchRobert Lusetich
September 07, 2004
The Australian

THE temperature dropped markedly in New York yesterday but not enough to cool off Lleyton Hewitt, whose roll toward a third Grand Slam continues to gather momentum.

The 23-year-old Australian was flawless in contemptuously discarding 30th-seeded Feliciano Lopez 6-1 6-4 6-2 in just 91 minutes to set up a fourth-round encounter with unseeded Slovak Karol Beck.

"That's as well as he can play against a difficult opponent," Davis Cup coach Wally Masur said of Hewitt's 13th consecutive win on American hard courts.

"He played a very tactically aware match. I'm just impressed with his ball-striking here this evening."

Hewitt, who has yet to drop a set, would not go so far as to characterise his first week at Flushing Meadows as perfect, but with a grin noted that it has been good enough so far.

"Obviously, you don't want to waste too much energy and I don't think I've had to so far, which is a good thing," he said.

The form guide says he might not have too much worrying to do until perhaps the quarter-finals, as no seeds remain in his quadrant of the draw.

However, the dangerous player looming is former world No.2, German Tommy Haas, who seems to have rebounded from debilitating shoulder surgeries that have sidelined him for almost two years. He obliterated Brazilian qualifier Ricardo Mello yesterday 6-2 6-3 7-5.

"Tommy is obviously a top-five, top-10 player regardless of what his ranking is," Hewitt said.

"It was obviously going to take him a little while to get back to where he was after shoulder surgery.

"He's a big-match player and he's got a great all-court game. For me, it's not surprising to see him winning matches again at this level."

Firstly, though, Hewitt will need to deal with the slightly built Beck -- he is one of the few players on tour who are Hewitt's height and weigh less -- who he has never played.

The Slovak is ranked 72 in the world and has a reputation for getting a lot of balls back in play. He will need to.

"He's a very compact player," Hewitt said. "He doesn't make a lot of mistakes.

"It will be a different match compared to today's match, that's for sure.

"(Second-round victim Hicham) Arazi sort of got a lot of balls back, really didn't go for that many winners out there. Will be a little bit more similar to that."

Hewitt, whose game is at least as well-rounded as it was when he was world No.1 for 18 months, began imperiously against the Spaniard Lopez yesterday.

So much so that he did not even bother to exploit -- as others do -- the 22-year-old's obviously inferior backhand.

"I felt like I was hitting the ball well enough at the start not to worry about what his strengths were," Hewitt said .

"I was just going to play my game."

Hewitt, who improved to 26-4 at the US Open, was a different player than the tentative, nervous man who opened against the Moroccan Arazi in the second round.

He set the tone immediately, winning the opening 12 points. He led 3-0 after barely five minutes.

When Hewitt hit a backhand wide on the 13th point of the match, the crowd gave an ironic cheer. Lopez held, but it hardly mattered as Hewitt won the set in a canter.

The final two sets were more competitive but the result was never in doubt

Knockers LaBroad
09-06-2004, 07:21 PM
Roddick, Hewitt breeze into round of 16 in Flushing

Flushing Meadows, NY (Sports Network) - Defending champion Andy Roddick and fourth-seeded Lleyton Hewitt each posted easy three-set wins on Sunday to reach the fourth round at the U.S. Open.

The second-seeded Roddick earned a routine 6-1, 6-3, 6-3 victory against the 29th-seeded Guillermo Canas, who had won his last 13 matches before running into the impressive American.

Roddick used a lethal serve to tee up 21 aces and failed to commit a double fault in his rout over the Argentine, who had won his previous two tournaments.

The 22-year-old Roddick improved to 63-12 this year, including four titles.

Roddick closed out his Argentine counterpart with a 135-mph ace after 1 hour, 37 minutes of dominating tennis. The superstar broke Canas' serve five times and compiled 49 winners, compared to 23 for the loser. Roddick held in all 13 of his service games.

The former world No. 1 Roddick captured the 2003 U.S. Open by beating Spaniard Juan Carlos Ferrero in the final.

Up next for Roddick will be 18th-seeded Spaniard Tommy Robredo, an easy 6-3, 6-3, 6-2 winner against Austrian Alexander Peya at the USTA National Tennis Center.

The Australian Hewitt had no trouble with 30th-seeded Spaniard Feliciano Lopez as he breezed to a 6-1, 6-4, 6-2 win in only 91 minutes.

Hewitt, who won here in 2001, came out to a flying start as he won the first 12 points of the match. He lost only eight points the entire first set and did not drop one on his serve.

Things did not get any better for Lopez over the final two sets and Hewitt closed the match out with his 11th ace.

The 23-year-old Hewitt had 29 winners and only 18 unforced errors, while Lopez committed 41 mistakes and had just 19 winners. Hewitt also broke his opponent's serve in five of the eight service games, while saving all seven break chances he faced.

Hewitt has won 13 straight and 18 of his last 19 matches on the tour, including a runner-up finish to Andre Agassi in Cincinnati last month and back-to-back hardcourt titles over the past two weeks. The 13-match winning streak is the longest active streak on the ATP Tour.

The former world No. 1 Hewitt now boasts a stellar 26-4 lifetime record at the U.S. Open.

Another seeded winner on Day 7 was No. 28 Swede Joachim Johansson, a 6-7 (2-7), 7-6 (7-1), 6-1, 6-3 victor over gritty Austrian Stefan Koubek, who ousted Ferrero in the second round of this '04 fortnight. The 6-foot-6 Johansson launched 19 aces, bringing his tournament-high total to 66.

In other third-round action, German Tommy Haas handled Brazilian Ricardo Mello 6-2, 6-3, 7-5; Tomas Berdych of the Czech Republic defeated Russian Mikhail Youzhny 2-6, 6-1, 6-3, 4-6, 6-1; Frenchman Michael Llodra leveled Austrian Jurgen Melzer 6-3, 6-2, 7-5 and Slovakian Karol Beck outlasted Russian Nikolay Davydenko 6-3, 4-6, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4. Austrian performers went 0-3 Sunday.

09/05 23:02:12 ET


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Hewitt smashes Spaniard
September 6, 2004

LLEYTON HEWITT has produced a near-flawless performance to charge into the fourth round of the US Open at Flushing Meadows.

The fourth-seeded Australian, featuring in the marquee night match in New York's Arthur Ashe Stadium for the first time since his 2002 semi-final loss to Andre Agassi, didn't disappoint in a dazzling 6-1 6-4 6-2 dismissal of Spanish left-hander Feliciano Lopez.

Hewitt, 23, will head into his next match against unseeded Slovak Karol Beck brimming with confidence after cruising through the first three rounds without dropping a set.

The 2001 champion made a lightning start against Lopez, winning the first 12 points of the match to race to a 3-0 lead before running away with the set in just 17 minutes.

He didn't drop a point in four service games and made just one unforced error to completely overwhelm the world No.32.

Lopez, 22, managed to hold his first two service games in the second set before Hewitt struck to go ahead 3-2 and then save three break points the next game to consolidate for a 4-2 lead.

There was no coming back for the Spaniard, who was simply unable to compete against an opponent exhibiting his full range of shots and incredible speed around the court.

After finishing off the second set, Hewitt broke Lopez twice more in the third and closed out the match with his 10th and 11th aces after just 91 minutes.

The commanding win was Hewitt's 13th in a row after he collected back-to-back titles at Washington and Long Island before arriving at Flushing Meadows as one of the favourites to take out the last grand slam of the year.

AAP


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Hewitt keen to return to top
September 6, 2004 - 3:29PM
The Age

Lleyton Hewitt spoke about his desire to return to the top of the world tennis rankings after demolishing big-serving Spaniard Feliciano Lopez to reach the fourth round of the US Open.

Hewitt was keen to stress he wasn't hunting down world No.1 Roger Federer, but a return to the summit where he resided for 80 weeks in 2001-03 was in his plans after blowing away Lopez 6-1 6-4 6-2 in just 91 minutes.

Publicly at least, the top ranking hadn't been in his sights since the dual grand slam champion plummeted to No.18 last year after a shock first-round loss at Wimbledon and a reduction in his schedule aimed at bringing the Davis Cup back to Australia.

He said Australia's four Cup final appearances in five years, each at the end of his hectic ATP schedule, had left him too physically and mentally fatigued to challenge for the No.1 position.

"It took a lot out of me. I wasn't finishing my seasons until mid-December and then I had to start getting ready for (the Australian Open)," Hewitt said.

"I got to No.1 and hopefully some time I can get it back.

"It's not something I'm chasing. I'm not going to go out and play every week just to try and get my ranking a little bit higher. I'm not that kind of guy.

"If you win slams, you're going to put yourself in a position to be in the top two or three in the world regardless."

On his present form, a third grand slam to go with his 2001 US Open and 2002 Wimbledon crowns may well come Hewitt's way on Sunday.

The 23-year-old world No.5, along with defending champion Andy Roddick and 19th-seeded German Nicolas Kiefer, are the only three players among the 16 survivors not to have conceded a set in their first three matches in New York.

Hewitt has now won 13 matches on the trot after he warmed up for Flushing Meadows with back-to-back tournament successes at Washington and Long Island.

And he seems to be getting better.

He was out of Lopez's league, producing his full array of shots to win the first 12 points of the match before running away with the set in 17 minutes.

He didn't drop a point in four service games while making just one unforced error to completely overwhelm the world No.32.

While Lopez managed to hold his first two service games in the second set, Hewitt put the foot down again to break the Spaniard three more times and then signed off in commanding fashion with his 10th and 11th aces of the match.

"He's starting to become the same player he used to be," Lopez said.

Hewitt said it was his intention from the outset to impose himself on the left-handed Lopez.

"He's a dangerous player if you give him a sniff," the fourth seed said.

"He's beaten a lot of good players. He beat Safin in Athens, he beat Flip (Philippoussis) in Madrid last year.

"So I was very, very aware of him going into the match."

While Hewitt has had a comfortable ride through to the fourth round, the 23-year-old now also has the luxury of playing an opponent coming off a tough five-setter for the third straight time in the tournament.

Hewitt's elimination of Lopez cleared a seed-free path to a potential semi-final showdown with Roddick and the South Australian can edge a step closer to that enticing scenario with a victory over world No. 72 Karol Beck on Tuesday after the Slovak squeezed past Russian Nikolay Davydenko 6-3 4-6 3-6 6-1 6-4.

Hewitt knew what to expect from Beck when they met for the first time.

"He played well on the grass this year. He's a very compact player. He doesn't make a lot of mistakes," he said.

"I've got to go out there, play aggressive and play my game."

© 2004 AAP


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Light workout for Hewitt

Former champion Lleyton Hewitt kept things short and sweet at the U.S. Open on Sunday as he cruised past 30th seed Feliciano Lopez of Spain 6-1 6-4 6-2 to reach the fourth round, setting up a match against Slovakian Karol Beck.

The fourth seed, champion in 2001, won the first 12 points of the match and maintained his momentum to win in one hour, 31 minutes.

"I got off to a great start and tried to put pressure on his game," Hewitt said.

"I felt like I was on his serve from the start and I served well. I'm not the biggest guy out there, I'm not going to be hitting 152 (mph), so if I can get a few cheap points that makes it easier for me."

The way he played against Lopez on Sunday, the Australian will be optimistic of repeating his 2001 triumph.

Spaniard Lopez looked to be struggling with an ankle injury and won just eight points in the opening set.

Hewitt broke in the fifth game of the second to take complete control and then repeated the feat in the opening game of the third set.

The Australian made just 18 unforced errors to ease through the remaining games and reach the last 16 without losing a set.

Reuters - 06/09/2004

Socket
09-06-2004, 08:04 PM
Federer just got a walkover in his match against Pavel. I had to laugh when I read this, because all the Hewitt haters constantly denigrate Lleyton's Wimbledon win on the grounds that he didn't play any tough opponents, but at least he played all seven matches. I wonder if the same people will denigrate Federer's victory, if he should win this event, because he only played six matches. Somehow, I doubt it. :mad: :mad:

Gaga
09-06-2004, 08:28 PM
good job lley and good luck for the next round !

Bibi
09-06-2004, 09:35 PM
:woohoo: Great win Lleyton!!! :woohoo:
Good luck in the next round!!!

Crazy_Fool
09-07-2004, 12:28 AM
Federer just got a walkover in his match against Pavel. I had to laugh when I read this, because all the Hewitt haters constantly denigrate Lleyton's Wimbledon win on the grounds that he didn't play any tough opponents, but at least he played all seven matches. I wonder if the same people will denigrate Federer's victory, if he should win this event, because he only played six matches. Somehow, I doubt it. :mad: :mad:
LOL, not likely because Lleyton has no talent and the only reason he won was because of his cakewalk draw :lol: I wouldn't mention Federer's cakewalk draw in this tournament so far, because he's sooooo talented. :D

Socket
09-07-2004, 12:59 AM
'I never wanted to be a spaceman'
September 7, 2004
Page Tools

Lleyton Hewitt has never pondered a life as an astronaut.

How do we know? Because he was asked that very question during a bizarre end to his post-match press conference at the US Open on Sunday night.

"What's your favourite movie about outer space and why is it your favourite?," an American reporter asked, prompting a bemused Hewitt to briefly turn interviewer. "What do you write about?" he asked. "I think you're at the wrong press conference."

"It's for Nickelodeon magazine. It's for their celebrity page. It's the space issue for February," the reporter responded.

"Yeah, I don't watch too many space movies," said Hewitt.

"Have you ever thought about being an astronaut?" she asked.

Hewitt replied: "No."

AAP

ally_014
09-07-2004, 01:58 AM
:lol: That last article was in our paper this morning - I almost choked on my cornflakes! :)

Socket
09-07-2004, 02:10 AM
I just loved when he told the journalist that she was at the wrong press conference. That's too funny.

kim4eva
09-07-2004, 03:17 AM
Cool article :lol:

Hagar
09-07-2004, 08:22 AM
Up to the quarters, Lleyton!

Lisbeth
09-07-2004, 08:36 AM
Great tennis so far! Good luck in the 4th round!

Jess
09-07-2004, 10:14 AM
:haha: @ that journalist - would have loved to have seen his face when he was asked that!

SomL.
09-07-2004, 11:03 AM
GGood luck Lleyton to fourth round !!!!!!!! Go Lleyton against Beck !!!!!!!

Angele
09-07-2004, 11:38 AM
Good luck today Lleyton :kiss:

Knockers LaBroad
09-07-2004, 02:12 PM
Agassi 'learning' from Lleyton
From Darren Walton in New York
September 7, 2004

ANDRE Agassi has joined a chorus of praise for Lleyton Hewitt at the US Open.


All the aces ... Lleyton Hewitt / AFP

The 34-year-old winner of eight grand slam titles today singled out the 23-year-old Australian as a player he'd learned most from.

Speaking after setting up a quarter-final blockbuster with top seed Roger Federer, Agassi said it was the prime reason why he snapped up Darren Cahill as his coach in early 2002.

Cahill guided fellow South Australian Hewitt to the top of the world rankings before being dispensed with in late 2001.

Asked which player he'd learned most from in his 19-year pro career, Agassi's answer indicated Hewitt had done a lot more for him than just beat him four times in their eight career meetings.

"I learned a lot from guys who make great decisions out there. I think Lleyton Hewitt is a great example," Agassi said.

"It's why I'm working with Darren now. It's the respect that I have for what Darren has taught him since he's been a little boy, which is how to make good decisions out there."

Hewitt's form leading up to the US Open - which included back-to-back titles at Washington and Long Island and a loss to Agassi in the Cincinnati final before that, had world No.1 and top seed Federer admitting last week he was keeping an eye on the 2001 champion.

In further evidence that Hewitt is regaining the powerful aura he projected when he held the No.1 ranking, former US Open champion Marat Safin said the Australian made "the impossible possible" on a tennis court, while retiring American Todd Martin nominated the Australian's backhand pass as the best shot he'd ever encountered.

"He's starting to become the same player her used to be," Spaniard Feliciano Lopez said of Hewitt after becoming his third straight-sets victim in a row at Flushing Meadows at the weekend.

No.4 seed Hewitt is due to play Slovakia's world No.72 tomorrow (1am Wednesday AEST) for a place in the quarter-finals for the fifth year in a row.

Nice compliments from DH!:yeah:

Socket
09-07-2004, 06:41 PM
Congratulations to Lleyton on his fourth straight straight-sets win at the US Open! Good luck in the QFs, mate!

Gaga
09-07-2004, 07:28 PM
Good job lley congratulations et good luck in the quarters ! :kiss:

Clara Bow
09-07-2004, 07:38 PM
Another great job Lleyton. Was able to catch his (3rd!) interview with Al On USA during lunch and once again he showed thoughtfulness and maturity. IMO- he has really become an asset to tennis- he has just really grown up into a nice young man. (I sound a little like a grandma there).

Socket
09-07-2004, 08:00 PM
Another great job Lleyton. Was able to catch his (3rd!) interview with Al On USA during lunch and once again he showed thoughtfulness and maturity. IMO- he has really become an asset to tennis- he has just really grown up into a nice young man. (I sound a little like a grandma there).

Did they do another studio interview (like after his first round match) or the on-court quickie (like after his third round)? And yes, I agree he's really grown up, and well!

Murkofan
09-07-2004, 08:16 PM
It was a studio interview, and another lovely one. Ll gave very thoughtful, in-depth answers to Al's questions. And he looked hot doing it :p

Socket
09-07-2004, 08:30 PM
It was a studio interview, and another lovely one. Ll gave very thoughtful, in-depth answers to Al's questions. And he looked hot doing it :p

Can't wait to see it! :wavey:

Knockers LaBroad
09-07-2004, 09:13 PM
L. HEWITT/K. Beck

6-4, 6-2, 6-2

An interview with:

LLEYTON HEWITT

THE MODERATOR: First question, please.

Q. I suppose you can only play who's put in front of you. It's very -- are you happy with the fact that you just haven't really been pushed that much so far?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, well, the first set today the guy played pretty good tennis, I think. Didn't make a lot of mistakes out there. You know, I tried to step it up at 4-All, played a good game to break. After that he sort of went away a little bit. I put a lot of pressure on his service games. From the first game out there today. I had two breakpoints and wasn't able to take it. And, you know, I'm happy to get through in straight sets rather than going four or five.

Q. (Inaudible question regarding his form.)

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. You know, there are definitely matches where your form probably doesn't keep up sometimes at the start of the match. You know, especially this is probably the first time he's been in a Round of 16 in a Slam as well. He's obviously going to be a bit anxious out there. Came out of a five-set match against Davydenko. So, you know, all those put aside, he probably really wanted to get off to a good start today as well.

Q. How much did it help you for being in the area for about a week before the tournament starting playing?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I would have been playing there or practicing here. You know, I got to get away I guess from Flushing Meadows for a little while and forget about that you got a Grand Slam and just work on little areas of my game and match conditions at Long Island, which is a huge positive, I think, for that tournament.

Q. I know you've spoken a little bit about the Olympics before. Have you noticed Mauresmo is the only one of the eight Olympic finalists who are still here? What does that say about having a big tournament right before a Slam?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I don't know. Maybe it speaks for itself a little bit. But, you know, it's always going to be tough, I think, coming off such a high for some of those, especially Gonzalez and Massu, you know, doing something -- you know, their country really never had gold medalists like that before. For them, being on Cloud 9, having to come out mentally. We all know how much tennis both guys played, especially Massu, to come back and win there, mentally it's got to be draining as well. It's not overly surprising, I don't think, for those guys to have struggled here in singles at least. For me to prepare for the US Open, as I've said all the time, is to try and get the same conditions that I've been playing in and not flying back and forth.

Q. Could you compare how you're playing at this stage to the way you were playing in 2001, Round 4, same round.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, I'll answer it for the 15th time this week. There's times when I'm playing as well as then. Yeah, at the moment, I'm playing pretty solid tennis day in, day out. You know, back then, you know, in the semis or final when I played here, I played pretty faultless tennis both those matches. If I can keep doing that in the next three matches, then I'll be close.

Q. What areas of your game do you need to step up? You need to improve in the last week to another level. Are you not satisfied with any aspect?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I don't know. Obviously I'm playing big points and stuff like that. But a lot depends on the spur of the moment when you're out there as well against the best players in the world. At the moment I'm happy with where my game's at. I'm ready for the challenge to try and step it up a notch. More than anything, you just got to do it when you're out there, you know, playing against those better players.

Q. There's a lot of times today where it seemed like with him you just were keeping the ball in play and waiting for him to make a mistake, which he was doing a lot of. Is that something that maybe against a Haas or a Roddick or an Agassi or Federer, that might need to change.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, in some ways. You can only play against who you go play against, look at each match differently. If I got to play Tommy next, be the favorite going into the next match, but from what I hear about the young Czech guy, he's a hell of a prospect as well. But, you know, Tommy is a class player. I've played him a lot in the past. You know, I've got to do small things maybe a little bit different, you know, against Tommy than you do against guys ranked 50 or something in the world. He's a class player who's been in the Top 5 players in the world before.

Q. Have you seen played Berdych? Have you seen him play?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I actually haven't seen him play. Obviously, he beat Federer at the Olympics. He's young, I think, and, you know, got a big serve. You know, he'll probably give Tommy, you know, a little bit of trouble out there today. Whether he wins or not, I don't know. But he's got very little to lose out there. You know, he played a couple of tough five-setters to get to the Round of 16.

Q. What memories do you have from here from a year ago, and the injury? Was that something that just happened at the time or were you carrying it for a bit?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, it just happened at the time. I felt it a little bit in Los Angeles when I made the final there a few weeks beforehand. You know, I was just trying to -- at the time I was playing pretty good tennis, I felt. The match against Ferrero was one of my best matches last year, I think, ball-striking wise. He went on to beat Agassi in four sets the next day and ended up losing to Roddick in the final. It was a little bit disappointing that the injury came back, you know, halfway through the third set there when we were a set all. I kept fighting it out but he was too good in the end.

Q. How do you see tomorrow night, the Federer match with Agassi? Any feeling about it?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, it doesn't really worry me too much. One of them's gonna come through. Good on them. But it's obviously going to be a tough match. No doubt about that. Two guys, you know, Federer plays that more style that Sampras used to play, and Andre's played against that style a lot of times. But, you know, it's hard to say. I know Indian Wells this year, I think that's the only time they played, a tough three-set match. Federer won. But then again in the Masters Cup final last year, Federer dominated in straight sets. It's going to be interesting.

Q. Any advice for him?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No, I think Roger is in pretty good hands right at the moment.

Q. One of the two guys you're going to play are both having a very good summer. You're having a very good summer. Do you feel a player who's not necessarily the best player in the world but who's hot is a tougher opponent than somebody like Roger, who didn't do that well in the Olympics, etc.? Would you rather play a hot player or a very good player?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It doesn't matter. Everyone, you know, is going to be good on their day, especially when it gets this late into a tournament. But, you know, I don't think Roger's struggling. You know, he won Toronto and he's on a hell of a streak. For him to keep it up, he won tournaments on all three surfaces, three different surfaces after Toronto. You know, there's no doubt that he's had a bit of a letdown. That's probably helped him at this tournament, yeah

Hagar
09-07-2004, 09:30 PM
WTG, Lleyton. This is at least 4 US Quarterfinals in a row. Awesome but we want MORE!!!

Socket
09-07-2004, 09:35 PM
BTW, points from Lleyton's first three matches are in the Video Highlights section of the US Open website.

Danni
09-07-2004, 09:49 PM
It was a studio interview, and another lovely one. Ll gave very thoughtful, in-depth answers to Al's questions. And he looked hot doing it :p
anything interesting/worth sharing? :)

Well Done Lleyton btw :dance:

thalle
09-07-2004, 10:14 PM
damn, Lleyton has been good the recent weeks. and that hair is soo hot:)
im glad hes back to good old lleyton.. maybe even the form that once led him to number 1... no jinxing tho:angel:
go lley:kiss:

Goonergal
09-07-2004, 11:03 PM
'I never wanted to be a spaceman'
September 7, 2004

Lleyton Hewitt has never pondered a life as an astronaut.

How do we know? Because he was asked that very question during a bizarre end to his post-match press conference at the US Open on Sunday night.

"What's your favourite movie about outer space and why is it your favourite?," an American reporter asked, prompting a bemused Hewitt to briefly turn interviewer. "What do you write about?" he asked. "I think you're at the wrong press conference."

"It's for Nickelodeon magazine. It's for their celebrity page. It's the space issue for February," the reporter responded.

"Yeah, I don't watch too many space movies," said Hewitt.

"Have you ever thought about being an astronaut?" she asked.

Hewitt replied: "No."

AAP

Good grief :spit: I can imagine the look on Lley's face :D

Zoecrick
09-07-2004, 11:50 PM
Has J Mac been doing on court interviews after every match? Does anyone not what else he said to Lleyton?

Lisbeth
09-08-2004, 12:48 AM
:woohoo: Lleyton - first 4 rounds without dropping a set :)

Good luck against Haas :)

tangerine_dream
09-08-2004, 01:45 AM
Cool Hewitt shuffles straight to last eight

September 8, 2004
The Guardian

It might be viewed as a contradiction in terms to suggest that Australia's Lleyton Hewitt, the 2001 US Open champion, was moving quietly along. His stentorian cries of "come on" are enough to wake the dead but yesterday he pattered into the quarter-finals with something approaching a soft-shoe shuffle.

The 6-4, 6-2, 6-2 win over Slovakia's Karol Beck was his fourth successive straight-sets victory and was achieved with the minimum of fuss or drama. The last time he was in such imperious form was when he won the Wimbledon title in 2002, defeating Tim Henman in the semi-finals.

Since those days the 23-year-old Australian, and former world No 1, has been eclipsed by the rise of Switzerland's Roger Federer and Andy Roddick of the US. This left many to wonder if, rather like Martina Hingis, his days at the top had been due to a temporary power vacuum.

Last year Hewitt made his priority the winning of the Davis Cup for Australia, which he duly achieved. Now he is gradually re-building his own career. "I don't care too much about being No 1 again. I've been there and done that. But obviously I want to put myself in the position to add to the two grand slam titles I have won."

It was clear to everyone that his serve was the weakest part of his game and Hewitt has been working hard on increasing its venom. Certainly it took Beck by surprise. "I was thinking before the match that it wasn't that big but he served very well," he said.

Hewitt remains cautious about the immediate future. Since winning the Wimbledon title he has reached only one grand slam semi-final, and that was also in 2002 when he lost to Andre Agassi here.

Belgium's Justine Henin-Hardenne, the reigning women's champion, failed to reach the last eight, losing 6-3, 6-2 to Nadia Petrova of Russia, and with it went her No1 status. Her exit was the earliest for a No1 seed at the US Open since Billie Jean King in 1973, although it hardly constituted a genuine shock.

Henin, who won the Australian Open this year, her third grand slam title, was struck down with glandular fever during the spring. She returned to form in Athens, winning the Olympic gold medal, but has clearly not recovered her strength fully.

France's Amélie Mauresmo, the No2 seed, failed again when the pressure was on, losing 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 to Elena Dementieva in the first quarter-final, despite the Russian serving 15 double faults and needing two time-outs for thigh and stomach problems.

-------

Congrats to Lleyton on making the USO quarters for the fifth(?) time in a row. :bigclap:

SomL.
09-08-2004, 02:03 PM
Good luck Lleyton to quarter final round !!!!!!!! Go Lleyton against Hass !!!!!!!!!

Socket
09-08-2004, 02:24 PM
Has J Mac been doing on court interviews after every match? Does anyone not what else he said to Lleyton?

I only heard that one interview with J-Mac after the Sunday match (I think).

NOMAD
09-09-2004, 05:22 AM
Hewitt aims for last four
Date: 09/09/04
By Darren Walton



Family division or heavyweight contest, either way the gloves will be off at the US Open if Lleyton Hewitt survives his quarterfinal bout with Tommy Haas on Thursday (4am Friday morning AEST).

Awaiting Hewitt in the semifinal will be either Andy Roddick or towering Swede Joachim Johansson, the longtime boyfriend of Hewitt's sister Jaslyn.

Either way, Hewitt knows he'll require a knockout punch to keep his title hopes alive.

On the one hand, he could face the enemy within.

But if he meets Roddick it would be a rematch of their epic quarterfinal from three years ago.

As his sparring partner over the last two Christmases at the Hewitt family home in Adelaide, Johansson has had ample time to learn to deal with the South Australian's trademark counter-punching.

The 198cm Swede has risen a staggering 180 places up the rankings to world No.30 since his first summer in Adelaide and said he was thankful for Hewitt's generosity, which has helped the 22-year-old reach his first grand slam quarter-final.

"Lleyton's a great player and when I get to practice with him, it helps me a lot," Johansson said after firing down his tournament-best 78th ace in his fourth-round victory over Michael Llodra.

"The way he plays, he gets a lot of balls back and that makes the rallies longer and that helps my game.

"And if we're practising and I do something wrong, he will point it out, and that's great. :angel:

"He was always No.1 when I met him so every opportunity I get, I have to take it."

But there's been no hitting together over the past fortnight as the two eyed off a possible semifinal confrontation in New York.

"He's been practising with (coach) Roger (Rasheed) and I've been practising with my coach, and I think it's going to stay like that for the rest of the week," Johansson said, claiming he was certain to have a close Hewitt ally in his corner if the two met on court in Saturday's semi-finals.

"It would be nice if we played. I'm not sure if my girlfriend would say so - actually, she chose me, she didn't choose the brother, so ..." :o

Whether Hewitt makes it or not, Johansson was confident he'd have the firepower to match Roddick and reach the last four.

Roddick and Johansson have met just once on the ATP tour, with the American earning a tight 6-3 7-6 (9-7) result in San Jose in February, but the Swede said he was familiar with his opponent from their junior days together.

"I'm not scared of him," Johansson said.

"He's got a great serve but when I get into a rally, I think I'm at least as good as him and I know when I played him in San Jose I was dictating the points more than he was.

"And I was winning more points from the baseline than he did. It's just that I had one bad service game.

"If I can get his returns back, I will have a good chance to win."

Hagar
09-09-2004, 09:29 AM
Go LLeyton! See you in the SF!

Crazy_Fool
09-09-2004, 01:33 PM
Good luck against Haas, can't wait for this match.

Go Lleyton!!

Raquel
09-09-2004, 06:33 PM
Good Luck today Lleyton :bounce:

Great to see him playing so well again! :yeah:

Angele
09-09-2004, 07:08 PM
Good luck Lleyton :kiss:

Aussie_Kim
09-09-2004, 10:41 PM
Well done Lleyton 6-2 6-2 6-2 (Yasmine got her harmonised score). :lol:
A great match by LLeyton, he really is in great form.
I'm feeling confident for the roddick match! :D

fifiricci
09-09-2004, 11:01 PM
Way to go Lleyts! Poor Tommy is a Haas been :o

puerta1099
09-09-2004, 11:03 PM
yay for lley!!

i was at the us open last weekend.... and i watched lleyton play on sunday night against lopez!! i had an awesome time, and i even cheered with some australian fanatics! of course he won... but it was so fun cheering with the aussies!

Crazy_Fool
09-09-2004, 11:15 PM
Well done Lleyton 6-2 6-2 6-2 (Yasmine got her harmonised score). :lol:
A great match by LLeyton, he really is in great form.
I'm feeling confident for the roddick match! :D
Yes well done Lleyton :worship: I thought it would be a tough match, but lleyton played amazing tennis pretty much the whole time :D

I am very confident too about Roddick, should be some match

ally_014
09-10-2004, 12:26 AM
:woohoo: Well done Lleyts! It was worth getting up at 4:30 AM for him :D

Good luck in the semis!

NOMAD
09-10-2004, 05:13 AM
The sister of Lleyton Hewitt and girlfriend of Joachim Johansson of Sweden gestures when asked who she will cheer for in the semifinals after Joachim defeated Andy Roddick of the US in their men's singles quarter-final match, 09 September 2004 :o :lol:

NOMAD
09-10-2004, 05:29 AM
and video link of Pimpim being asked who Jaslyn will support in semi(real player)
http://s95438916.onlinehome.us/tennis/Johansson.mpg

possie
09-10-2004, 06:33 AM
Cute! :kiss: Tara.

<em>
09-10-2004, 08:35 AM
Well done Lleyton 6-2 6-2 6-2 (Yasmine got her harmonised score). :lol: :D

well done lleyton... :worship:
and yes indeed good thing yasmine got her harmonised score cause i think she could't have lived with all the stress we were bringing her a minut longer!!! ;)

go lleyton...
:wavey: to everyone(this was my first post! :) )

Knockers LaBroad
09-10-2004, 09:41 AM
Swede wins date with other Hewitt
September 10, 2004

LLEYTON HEWITT was supposed to be playing defending champion Andy Roddick in the US Open semi-finals at Flushing Meadows, not the longtime boyfriend of his little sister.


Hewitt ... best performance of the tournament /AP

Ever since Roddick arrived as the pre-tournament favourite last year, the brash American has referred to the arena's main stadium as "My House".

But when Joachim Johansson stunned the titleholder 6-4 6-4 3-6 2-6 6-4 with his awesome power game today, Roddick suddenly found himself evicted from his home as Team Hewitt moved in.

Hewitt made his deposit earlier in the day with a resounding 6-2 6-2 6-2 quarterfinal win over talented German Tommy Haas.

Hewitt and Johansson know each other pretty well but tomorrow (Sunday morning AEST) the two good friends will clash for the first time in their careers.

Johansson has been dating Jaslyn Hewitt for four-and-a-half years and has spent the past two Christmases staying at the Hewitt family home in Adelaide and practising and playing golf with Australia's former world No.1 and his coach, Roger Rasheed.

Like they were for their son's quarter-final, Hewitt's parents Glynn and Cherilyn, along with Jaslyn, were courtside when Johansson shut the door on Roddick.

Not surprisingly, Hewitt said it would be "strange" playing Johansson in a Grand Slam semi-final, although he believed it was a situation that had to come up eventually, given Johansson's rapid improvement.

Johansson has risen a staggering 73 places up the rankings this year to world No.30 and has the genes of a father who played Davis Cup with all-time great Bjorn Borg.

"I've practised with him a lot. He's got a lot of firepower, as much as Roddick," said Hewitt.

"He's never been in this situation before (but) it was really just a matter of time. He can play. He plays well, obviously, on quicker courts.

"This suits his game well. I think he looks forward to big matches."

Based on their countless hours of hitting together, Hewitt said had no idea who held the advantage heading into the semi-final.

"It's hard to say. We both know probably each other's games pretty well," he said.

"I'm sure that Roger and I doing some training with him over Christmas and stuff the last few years has helped his confidence, helped his ranking the last couple of years.

"That's good for him. His last six months have been pretty impressive."

Until today, Johansson was probably most impressive in winning the St Jude Classic at Memphis, Tennessee, in February - his first title in the US coming on the same day as Hewitt won in Rotterdam and Hewitt's fiancee, Kim Clijsters, lifted a trophy in Antwerp.

The big-serving Swede, who delivered 30 aces against Roddick to take his tally to a tournament-best 109, said he owes a lot to Hewitt.

"I've learned a lot of things. I mean, he's a great player. He gives 100 per cent and, for me, I developed my game when I practise with him," he said.

"I have to work the ball a little more. It's been good for me."

Johansson's improved groundstrokes and ability to rally helped the 22-year-old capitalise on three of his five break points he held against Roddick, whose own conversion rate was just three from 15.

"That's pretty much the whole match," said Roddick

But one thing that Johansson hasn't been able to fully convert is Jaslyn, who was likely to sit in a neutral box for the "family" semi-final.

Johansson did at least challenge the theory that blood is thicker than water when asked who Jaslyn would be hoping would win.

"She can pick the boyfriend, but she can't pick the brother, so she's going to be going for me for sure," he said courtside after his quarter-final victory, without prompting a response from his girlfriend.

Regardless of where the support lies, Hewitt is the deserved favourite.

His clinical dismissal of Haas extended his winning run to 15 matches and the 23-year-old has yet to drop a set in the tournament.

Further underlining his brilliant form was the fact he committed just 10 unforced errors in windy conditions he, Haas and fellow quarter-finalists Roger Federer and Andre Agassi described as close to, if not the worst, they had ever endured.

"You had to go out there with the right mindset, you had to be very patient, mentally tough out there and not let it affect you and realise it that it was going to be the same situation for both players," said Hewitt.

"I tried to stay as positive as I could out there. I reckon I did that extremely well today.

"I really didn't let it worry me at all. I took my time when I needed to and played percentage tennis.

"It's satisfying getting through with a scoreline like that against a class player and that I've got a lot of respect for."

In another ominous sign for Johansson, Hewitt said he feels as physically strong as he's ever been heading into the last two rounds of a Grand Slam. Defying terrible playing conditions on a blustery day in New York, Hewitt produced some impeccable tennis to blitz Haas 6-2 6-2 6-2 in his most impressive performance of the tournament.

Hewitt, 23, has now won 15 straight matches and is still to lose a set in this campaign.

Australia's 2001 champion will meet the winner of tonight's last remaining quarter-final between American titleholder Andy Roddick and powerful Swede Joachim Johansson for a spot in the final.

World No.1 Roger Federer and British fifth seed Tim Henman will contest the other semi-final after returning to Flushing Meadows today to complete their rain-interrupted quarter-finals.

Federer turned a two-sets-to-one lead overnight into a hard-fought 6-3 2-6 7-5 3-6 6-3 win over two-champion Andre Agassi, while Henman accounted for Slovakian 22nd seed Dominik Hrbaty 6-1 7-5 5-7 6-2 to reach his first semi-final in New York.

Swirling winds made conditions extremely difficult today but, after fending off a break point in his opening service game, Hewitt was untroubled in taking the first set in 31 minutes.

Hewitt's incredible ability to keep the ball in play point after point frustrated the life out of Haas, who received a code violation for thrashing a ball into the crowd after being broken in the fourth game.

When Hewitt saved another break point with a brilliant forehand pass before holding for a 1-0 lead in the second set, Haas cut loose with verbal obscenities in his native German tongue and then threw his towel into his chair in disgust at the changeover.

Already walking a fine line with the umpire, the German had to pull back from smashing his racquet into the court as Hewitt seemed headed for another routine win.

But Haas regained his composure to get back on level terms at 2-2, breaking Hewitt for the first time in 10 sets.

His fightback was shortlived, though, as the world No.5 upped the ante once more to reel off nine straight games to leave Haas on the brink at two sets to love and 5-0 down in the third.

Haas added a smidgen of respectability to the scoreline, winning two more games, before Hewitt closed out the match in one hour and 38 minutes.

"It was a lot tougher than the scoreline showed. It was some of the toughest conditions I've ever played in," said Hewitt.

"You've got to play percentage tennis and it makes it a big ugly. You've just got to stay positive and I reckon I did that great today."
__________________

Hagar
09-10-2004, 10:07 AM
Way to go Lleyts! Poor Tommy is a Haas been :o

HAHAHAHAHAHA!!! Fi, you're cracking me up. HAAS been, LMAO!

NOMAD
09-10-2004, 10:10 AM
Roddick tips Hewitt over Johansson
September 10, 2004 - 6:44PM

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Vanquished champion Andy Roddick couldn't wait to get out of New York after towering Swede Joachim Johansson destroyed his hopes of back-to-back US Open titles.

"If there was a flight at La Guardia (airport) leaving in 20 minutes, I'd go," the American said after succumbing 6-4 6-4 3-6 2-6 6-4 in a match-up of the tournament's two biggest and fastest servers.

"I don't feel good. But, at the same time, I fought til the end and gave it everything I had.

"I thought I was pretty well prepared. It's disheartening, it's disappointing, but I'll recover. I'll be fine."

After recovering from a two-set deficit, Roddick levelled the match and looked to be headed for a semi-final showdown with Australia's 2001 champion Lleyton Hewitt until dropping his serve in the ninth game of the deciding set.

Johansson, also 22, coolly closed out the match the following game.

The 198cm Swede, who has risen from 113 to 30th in the world rankings this year, served 30 aces to take his tally to 109 from his five matches, easily the most of anyone in the Big Apple for the last grand slam of the year.

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Roddick served 34, but only converted three of 15 break-point chances, compared to Johansson's three from five.

"That's the stat. You don't really need to analyse the match any further," the American second seed said after having his 11-match winning streak at Flushing Meadows snapped in spectacular fashion.

"Let's give him some credit. The guy serves out of a tree. He serves huge."

Roddick said he expected to see much more of Johansson, a rival he tipped as a future top-10 player.

"I expected to see more of him out of juniors. He had that serve out of juniors," Roddick said of a player formerly ranked second in the world behind him in the junior ranks.

"The guy's got weapons. He's still developing. He can still get better in a lot of areas."

But Roddick didn't believe Johansson would be the man to succeed him as champion at Flushing Meadows, saying Hewitt should have his measure in their semi-final on Saturday, and that world No.1 Roger Federer deserved slight title favouritism.

"You don't get to the semi-finals of a grand slam and not have a chance against someone, but I don't know if it (Hewitt) is the best match-up for him," the world No.2 said.

"Lleyton passes well - he's going to make a lot of returns. I definitely have to say Lleyton is the favourite in that one.

"But, you know, I just want to see where everyone's going to sit, what box," Roddick joked, in reference to Hewitt playing the longtime boyfriend of his younger sister Jaslyn.(:lol: :lol: :lol: not a Roddick fan but that's funny and also what I want to know)

© 2004 AAP

Jess
09-10-2004, 10:23 AM
:lol: I can't believe Roddick referring to the centre court as "My House" Could he possibly sound any more arrogant!

I can't wait for this semi now :bounce: Wouldn't like to be Jaslyn atm though!

Knockers LaBroad
09-10-2004, 10:24 AM
Thanks for the article!
Nice one andy!:p

Are thhere any interviews yet??

SomL.
09-10-2004, 11:44 AM
Good luck Lleyton to sami final round !!!!!!! Go Lleyton against Pim-Pim !!!!!!!!!

NOMAD
09-10-2004, 03:10 PM
Transcribed Interview






L. HEWITT/T. Haas

6‑2, 6‑2, 6‑2

An interview with:



LLEYTON HEWITT

THE MODERATOR: First question, please.



Q. How tough was it out there, the conditions?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it was ‑‑ I would have said before the match they're the toughest probably conditions I ever played in were probably here when I made the semis against Enqvist at night. I don't know. I felt out there equally as bad as that night.

Q. What was that like?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It was windy. It was like a hurricane had come up, I think, as well. Similar conditions. It's always ‑‑ the present's always going to feel worse, I guess, at the time. But it was tough conditions.

Q. He was expected to be your toughest opponent so far. Is it getting to a point now where you're just playing so well?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I don't know. I think the wind today, obviously, you had to go out there with the right mindset, you had to be very patient, mentally tough out there and not let it affect you and realize that it was going to be the same situation for both players.

I tried to stay as positive as I could out there. I reckon I did that extremely well today. I really didn't let it worry me at all. I took my time when I needed to and played percentage tennis.

Q. You had very few unforced errors.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I was happy with the way I played. It's tough to go from playing one end compared to the other end with so different margins for error out there, going for your shots and choosing the right ones to go for. Knowing that Tommy is a real shot‑maker out there, I was just trying to put pressure on him, make him come up with that extra shot all the time.

Q. When did you sense he was getting frustrated? Seemed like when you broke him at the end of the first set he seemed to lose quite a bit.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, when I broke him in the first set. I think it was to go up 3‑1. Yeah, I could sense that he wasn't enjoying playing in the wind. He couldn't play his free flying game. And, you know, as I said, he's a real shot‑maker out there. He started chip charging, coming in to serve‑volleying, mixing up his game a lot more, which he doesn't feel comfortable doing all the time. It's not his A game.

For me, that was a good sign that I was playing my game, getting on top of him. As the match turned around, he had patches where he tried to have little bursts here and there. I just really had to keep on top of those situations.

Q. It's been a while since you got into a semifinal?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it's always nice being, you know, in the last two or three days of a Grand Slam. And, you know, I've always played well here in New York. You know, I felt good coming in. It's not going to get any easier, I know that, and especially going back‑to‑back Saturday, Sunday, if I can go through.

But I haven't put a foot wrong just yet.

Q. Where do you think you can improve your game? Let's say you face Roddick next. How would you improve?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I don't know. Today was ‑‑ you know, depending on the conditions, if you get a day like today again, it's going to be awkward. You've got to play percentage tennis. But if we get a calmer day, you can go for your shots a little bit more, obviously getting his serve back and trying to make him play as many balls as possible.

He's playing extremely well and very confident at the moment, so he should be ‑ defending champion here, going through the draw quite nicely. It's going to be a tough match and, you know, I just got to counterpunch extremely well and move extremely well.

Q. Do you think it will be an advantage for you that you've played mainly during the day, he's played all night matches. Does that work one way or another?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't think so. You know, I don't think it will make a huge difference. You know, I think he enjoys playing the night matches. Last year when it came to semifinals and finals, he had to play during the day and he handled it pretty well. I think he's played one day match this tournament and he came through that pretty comfortably.

Q. In addition to the wind you were battling out there, it seemed to be a stream of planes. Does that bother you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, not really. This week there's been a lot more, I think, than there's been in the past straight over center court, but there's not a lot you can do about it. Just block it out. Just one of those things.

Q. How much more satisfying is that win for you when you consider the conditions that you had to keep so strong mentally, to be so difficult controlling those returns and serves and all that?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's satisfying getting through, you know, with a score line like that against a class player that I've got a lot of respect for.

You know, I knew it was going to be a tough match going in. Obviously, the conditions, only this morning did I know that it was going to be those conditions, and make it that little bit more mentally draining, I guess, or mentally tougher out there.

Yeah, it's satisfying to come through, but, you know, in the past I think one huge positive I've always had is my mental toughness out there and again today it didn't let me down.

Q. Could you talk about the prospect of possibly playing Johansson. You're obviously close to him.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it would be strange playing him in a semifinals of a Slam. I've practiced with him a lot. He's got a lot of fire power, as much as Roddick. It's going to be an interesting match for him tonight purely because he's never been in this situation before. It was really just a matter of time. He can play. He plays well obviously on quicker courts. This suits his game well. I think he looks forward to big matches.

Q. Would you advantage yourself or him, the fact that you do practice together so often, or you have in the past over Christmas and stuff?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's hard to say. We both know probably each other's games pretty well. I'm sure that me doing some training, Roger and I doing training with him over Christmas and stuff the last few years has helped his confidence, helped his ranking, I think, the last couple of years. That's good for him.

His last six months have been pretty impressive.

Q. Is blood thicker than water? Who will your sister root for?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. We'll have to wait and see.

Q. You have an excellent record against Andy. Do you think he's a different player, say, from this time last year than when you were beating him fairly regularly?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, there's no doubt he's a better player now than he was then. Andy has a Slam under his belt. He's been No. 1 in the world.

So, you know, he's got a lot more confidence and self‑belief, I think, in himself from when he first came on the tour. He was probably a little bit more hit‑and‑miss. Whereas these days, week in and week out, he's reaching the semis and finals of most tournaments.

So he's going to be tough in these conditions. He's going to be tougher than probably I've ever played him in the past.

Q. He used to get quite frustrated, especially against a guy like you who keeps getting it back. Have you noticed a maturity in him, he stays in the point longer than he used to?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I haven't watched that many of his matches against guys that play similar to me. I've only played him once in the last couple of years and that was Queen's. Grass is a little bit different circumstances.

I had my chances in that match. Was up an early break, served for the first set. Wasn't quite able to come through. And lost a first set tie‑break. He's going to be a tough opponent purely because he's got a lot of fire power out there.

Q. Can you talk about the crowd. You've played Davis Cup ties away, you know what it's like. In a sense, do you actually like the crowd being so for the other guy? Does it fire you up?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't think it fires me up any more but I've had to play in those situations a lot through Davis Cup ties. Obviously, when you play Andy and Pete and Andre here at the US Open, in the years past, so it's something you really just have to block out and focus on your game and, yeah, it's good to have a lot of emotion out there anyway.

Q. Do you see the level of emotion approaching what it was three years ago when you guys faced here, when you were younger players, the intensity level?>

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, maybe I guess. He's improved a lotsince then, I think. You know, at the moment I'm playing as well as I did, especially the semiand final, if not maybe a little bit better.

It's building into a good match. But his results have really picked up the last couple years.

Q. Do you feel like you can still read his serve pretty well even though he continues to serve huge?>

LLEYTON HEWITT: Oh...

Q. You've had success against it in the past.

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know if I can read his serve, but, you know, Federer obviously handles it pretty well. There's not that many guys, especially over the last week and a half, that have handled it very well at all.

He's obviously got a great serve and it's something I think he's improved as well in the last couple of years.

Q. Is this the freshest, I mean, I know at Wimbledon when you won, you lost a couple of sets in the quarters, but is this the freshest you've ever been going into the end of a Grand Slam?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It will be up there, I think. I haven't played too many draining matches. It's probably more mentally draining, I guess, than physically at the moment. My body feels good and you've got to feel good if you want to compete, you know, two days in a row, best‑of‑five sets against ‑‑ you know, look at the guys left in the field, they're some of the best guys playing, going around at the moment. If you're going to back it up two days in a row, you've got to be feeling very mentally and physically fresh.

Q. Do you spend any time with Joachim this week, family dinners?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not a lot, no (smiling).

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

Gaga
09-10-2004, 04:42 PM
thnaks thanks !!! this fun !! :kiss: good luck lleyton ! :hearts:

NOMAD
09-11-2004, 04:02 AM
The Loyalties, and Love, Will Surely Cross the Net
By LIZ ROBBINS

Published: September 11, 2004


Joachim Johansson planned to have dinner with his opponent's sister last night before playing her brother this morning in the semifinals of the United States Open. There were no plans for insider trading.

"I already know everything about him," Johansson said with a grin about Lleyton Hewitt, the fourth-seeded player here and the most dominant player on Tour this summer.

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Johansson did not need his girlfriend, Jaslyn Hewitt, to tell him any strategy. Johansson, the 22-year-old from Sweden, did have something to tell his girlfriend of four years, however, to break the tension.

"She's going to be in his box," Johansson said yesterday afternoon after a light 2o-minute practice. "She's going to watch it better from there. I'm the one who's going to tell her to sit there." :eek: :angel:

When the 28th-seeded Johansson upset No. 2 Andy Roddick in a five-set quarterfinal match Thursday night, Jaslyn Hewitt was in Johansson's box with her mother, Cherilyn. That just testified to the closeness of the two young men who will play today.

Hewitt turned professional in 1997, three years ahead of Johansson. "He took the step much earlier than I did, so we didn't see each other for a few years," Johansson said.

Now their paths are converging again, with a little bit of help from Jaslyn. Johansson has practiced with Hewitt in Australia, even stayed in his family's house in Adelaide.

The two practiced just a month ago in Toronto. But they have never played each other in a match.

Johansson owns the most aces (106) in this tournament. But he knows he has met his match. '"He's the best returner in the game," Johansson said of Hewitt, who won the Open in 2001. "Obviously, he's won a lot of tournaments."

Hewitt has won 15 straight matches after winning back-to-back tournaments in Washington and Long Island. He has not lost a set during the Open and has lost only two sets since his winning streak started.

Johansson, on the other hand, has already overcome expectations by defeating Roddick.

"I don't have any pressure on me," he said. "I just go out and have fun. It's my first semifinal. I didn't expect to be there. I want to win, but there's nothing I could do about it."

And there is nothing Jaslyn Hewitt can do, either.

Johansson met Jaslyn, 21, when they each won a junior tournament in 2000 in Australia. Jaslyn had reached the No. 1 ranking in junior women's, while Johansson was ranked third in junior men's at the time.

Jaslyn is now on the circuit tour, last month winning a $10,000 tournament in London. She declined to be interviewed for this article. "She wants it to be about the match, not about her," Johansson said.

Nonetheless, she is in a unique position. Who will she root for?

"Probably no one," Johansson said. "She's going to be happy and sad, no matter what." :angel: poor Jas

kim4eva
09-11-2004, 07:36 AM
Aw that's such a sweet article :angel:
Ta :kiss:

SomL.
09-11-2004, 11:59 AM
Good luck Lleyton !!!!!! Go Lleyton against Johansson !@!@!@!@!@!@!@!@!@!@!@!

Angele
09-11-2004, 12:25 PM
Good luck Lleyton :kiss:

Ashie_87
09-11-2004, 12:44 PM
Thanks Tara thats a cute article:kiss:
Go Lleyton:bounce:

kim4eva
09-11-2004, 04:14 PM
Good luck Lleyton :clap2: :clap2:

Jess
09-11-2004, 11:19 PM
The interview :bounce:

L. HEWITT/J. Johansson

6‑4, 7‑5, 6‑3

An interview with:



LLEYTON HEWITT

THE MODERATOR: First question, please.

Q. Were you surprised a little bit at how you were able to get yourself so pumped up?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I've had to play against other Aussie guys in the past. It's something that, you know, you just got to really put your competitive hat on out there and just worry about trying to get the job done and not worrying about who's on the other side of the net.

Q. Were you actually more comfortable playing him?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not necessarily. It's awkward. Obviously, I know his game, but he knows mine as well. It's awkward on, you know, knowing someone that you've practiced with a lot and going out there and actually have to play him. That's his biggest match and one of my biggest matches as well, in a semi of a Grand Slam. So it's a little bit awkward.

Q. Have you seen your sister yet?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not yet, no. No.

Q. Were you worried about her feelings of being torn at all?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, she was going to be happy for someone and disappointed for someone no matter what. It's an awkward situation, but I'm sure in the years to come we'll probably have it a lot more than just this first time today.

Q. One of the things that Joachim said the other day was he had dinner with your mom and dad, Jaslyn. At some point were you thinking, "We might hook up at some point"?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really, I wasn't, you know, looking much past the guys that I had to play and just taking it one match at a time. You know, obviously once I got through my match and he had to play Roddick, then there was always going to be a chance in a two‑horse race.

But until then I wasn't really worrying about it too much.

Q. Were you feeling physically fresher out there than when you went to the Wimbledon finals?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, probably. I feel good at the moment. I haven't spent a lot of energy out there. I feel confident where my game's at at the moment as well.

Q. What are you taking from the fact that you haven't dropped a set this year? Is that a big confidence booster?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not a lot. Whether I went through in five sets or whatever, just to get through to the final more than anything.

So I won't be focusing on, you know, the fact that I haven't dropped a set going into tomorrow's match at all.

Q. Has something this summer changed for you, that you picked up and are really at the top again? Can you pinpoint something in your game or mentally that has turned things around for you so dramatically?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. I feel like I've played pretty well this whole year. You know, in most tournaments, obviously clay is not my strongest surface, but I feel like I had a good clay court season. Grass court, I felt like I played well. The two guys I lost to is Roddick and Federer in my two grass court tournaments.

But I feel like, you know, this whole year I've played pretty consistently. I enjoy playing on the American hard courts here, and, you know, obviously, picking up confidence, you know, winning some matches as well, that's always going to help.

Q. At Wimbledon there was a lot of talk about a so‑called Roddick‑Federer rivalry. How did that make you feel, that people had forgotten you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. Those two guys were making ‑‑ obviously Roddick won one here and Federer had won a fair few Grand Slams. They're playing No. 1 and 2 in the world. Didn't really worry me too much. You've got to get the runs on the board and go out there and make semis and finals of Grand Slams and really challenge the best guys out there.

Q. Did you feel it would be just a matter of time before you would be back in a Slam final or did you know you had to step up your level a bit to get here?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Felt like this whole year I've been playing pretty well. The guys that I lost to in the Slams, I lost to both Roger in the Aussie and Wimbledon. Those two matches I felt like I played extremely well. Was probably a little unlucky that I drew him in the earlier rounds, Round of 16 and a quarter.

I knew I was not far off the mark. As I said, I like playing in the US Open. I think the conditions, the atmosphere here really suits. I think the court surface suits my game. I felt confident, obviously, coming in, winning a lot of matches.

Q. Still, as your ranking fell a little bit and you had some losses, did you ever have any, within yourself, within your own mind, you might have doubts coming back to the very top, elite level to these Slam finals?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not when you beat Ferrero and Federer in two Davis Cup matches at the end of last year.

So, you know, they were the No. 1 and 2 players in the world at the time. Didn't really enter my mind too much.

Q. You've spoken a lot over the last couple of weeks ‑‑

LLEYTON HEWITT: Who's that, sorry?

Q. I know you've spoken in the last couple of weeks about where your game is compared to 2001. Do you think things started to click for you, this turnaround, from last year's US Open?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I think so. I think this time last year I played extremely well at the US Open here. There was no shame in losing to Juan Carlos Ferrero in the quarters. It was an extremely tough match that could have gone either way. Then he went on to beat Andre in four sets and lose to Roddick in the final.

Since then, I've played extremely well. Obviously had a big break between the Federer Davis Cup match and the Ferrero one. But I was able to do a lot of fitness work and I guess just freshen up as well for the whole 2004 season. I think that's been one huge positive going through this whole year.

Q. Were you surprised by how well Johansson played in this tournament, reaching the semifinals?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, little bit surprised but not overly surprised. He's got a great game and he's got a lot of talent. He's obviously a little bit raw at the moment, you know. He just hasn't been in this position of playing in big matches.

But, yeah, with this week he's going to go well and truly into the Top 20 in the rankings. That's where he deserves to be with his game.

Q. You won here 2001, just two days before 9/11. Today is 9/11. What does that mean for you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's a weird feeling. Obviously, I was on a flight straight after I had just won my first major when it happened. I didn't know until I touched down in Sydney anything about it. So it's ‑‑ it was a real weird feeling back then purely because we'd just been in New York and, you know, nothing had happened. Then you hop on a plane and, you know, the whole world's changed in a lot of ways.

All the memories of that, I guess. That was two days after I won my first major, obviously, as well.

Q. Would you relish the opportunity to play Roger Federer in the final here, big stage?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I look forward to playing a final against anyone in a major. Obviously, playing Roger, No. 1 player in the world, I'm going to have to play some great tennis to get on top of him. But I feel like I'm playing well at the moment and I give myself a good chance.

Q. Couple of people have asked you to compare your form to 2001. Does that make you want to prove a point at all, or does it annoy you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. I feel like I'm wasting my breath, but that's about it.

Q. To get back to 9/11, the police and firemen were honored between the second and third sets of your match today. As much as you try to not think about anything but tennis, how hard is that today, to turn on the TV, you're seeing all kinds of tributes?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, it's an awkward day, but, you know, we can't do much about it either. You got to play a semi of a Grand Slam on the same day. It's obviously awkward, TV in the locker room and everything are going through tributes at Ground Zero, stuff like that. Makes you think a lot about tennis as a sport and there's a lot more to life than just winning a couple of tennis matches as well.

Q. If it's Federer, is there an advantage, since you've won here and he has not?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not really. You know, Roger's such a good player and, yeah, if I've got to play him, he's obviously come through and beaten Agassi and Henman and won big matches here in the past.

So I don't, you know, I don't think that's a huge advantage.

Q. What weaknesses in his game do you think you can exploit if you do play him?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know. There's not a lot of them (smiling).

Q. If you have a good day tomorrow and end up lifting the trophy, what would that mean to you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Oh, it would be great, you know, obviously, to win another Grand Slam. And, you know, that's where my priorities are ‑ the four majors and Davis Cup. The last major of the year. Yeah, it's a great opportunity for me to go out there and actually play for the title here again.

Q. How do you manage to maintain the same hunger level year after year?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I'm not sure. I'm obviously very competitive and love getting out there and, you know, trying to improve my game as well. I think Roger has obviously tried to take the game to another level. You've got to keep working and work on your weaknesses and try and improve those to stay with the best guys and stay at the top of the game.

Q. Can you talk about the possibility of playing Henman.

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, you know, I've obviously got a good record against Tim. We've had a lot of tight matches in the past. He's going to mix his game up a lot. He serve‑volleys, he stays back, he chip charges. You know, he does a lot of different stuff against me out there. It would be a tough match.

It would be Tim's first Grand Slam final. You know, who would have thought it would be the US Open before Wimbledon. But, you know, it's still not as much pressure on him here, I guess, as there is at Wimbledon.

Q. More confident playing him than Federer?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, with records maybe, but they're both class players. I mean, in a big situation, I don't think records are going to account for a lot out there tomorrow. You've got one match and you've got to go out there and compete and handle the pressure and the expectation. And, you know, obviously Roger has been able to do that extremely well in Grand Slam finals.

Q. In terms of relishing the idea, not so much Roger, but the idea that you've got yourself on the stage, is this what you build it all for, is to play the No. 1 guy in one of the biggest stages in the game?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, but, you know, final's a final. If it's Tim, it's still going to be a massive day for me tomorrow.

You know, obviously playing Roger, with the way his ranking is, his form at the moment, going for his third Slam of the year, it makes it into a huge match.

But playing Tim as well, in a Grand Slam final just to try to win the US Open, Tim will be going for his first major. Obviously, he's pretty hungry to get that one under his belt as well.

So for me it's just a matter of trying to block out all the outside pressures and influences, I guess, and just concentrating on my game tomorrow no matter who I'm up against.

Q. During your two Slam runs and your years at No. 1, you were playing the big points great. Is it fair to say in your two losses to Roger at the Slams, he was playing the big points better than you?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, there's no doubt there were only a couple points here and there. I could have been up a set and a break at Melbourne. Wimbledon, I was broken the end of the fourth set and wasn't able to consolidate that break and take it to a fifth set.

That's what you have to do against the best guys in the world ‑ whether it's Roger, Andre, Andy, whoever. You've got to be able to do that.

There's only a couple points within a match. Whether that's going to be the same case tomorrow, whether it's only two or three points to change the outcome of the a match, but you've got to be able to step on those points and play the points well.

Q. You've probably played more than anyone going into the Open. Is that something you've learned from last season, you have to have a lot of matches under your belt to play well?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Not necessarily. I just felt like this year I just want to continue my run. I felt like I was starting to hit some pretty good form coming in. I enjoy playing on the hard court season. I just didn't feel like, you know, Cincinnati and Washington had taken a real heap out of me physically. That's why I wanted to keep going in Long Island. Yeah, I think this year it definitely paid off, though, coming into the US Open.

Q. Is the way you played the last two matches enough to win the title irrespective of who you face, or do you have to lift it another notch or is it a case of gauging it as the match goes on?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I think the way that I've played last couple of days, I'm definitely in with a shot; there's no doubt about that.

But, you know, I think I can still improve on some areas. If I can do that, then obviously I'm going to have a better chance.

But, you know, a lot depends on what your opponent does as well. There's only two guys out there. You know, playing Tommy Haas and also Johansson is a little bit different to maybe Roger Federer who's been out there and won Grand Slams.

So, you really ‑‑ sometimes you can only do as much as your opponent lets you do as well.

Q. Johansson mentioned he is going to Australia. Will you be practicing together?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Probably at some stage. I'll probably practice my golf against him (laughter).

Q. Will you remind him of this day a lot?

LLEYTON HEWITT: No. He's already ‑‑ he'll probably ‑‑ he's already made a few comments to me in the locker room. He's not gonna get me a Christmas present. He reckons that was mine today, so anyway (smiling)...

FastScripts by ASAP Sports...

Danni
09-11-2004, 11:37 PM
:lol: @ the last part..thats cute :angel:

Crazy_Fool
09-11-2004, 11:38 PM
I'm so happy for Lleyton :)

After being written off he's come back and made another slam final!!

He's played amazingly well all tournament, hope he can continue in the final :D

Go Lleyton!!

ally_014
09-12-2004, 03:42 AM
Nice interview :D

I really hope he can get his teeth into the final and continue his great play! :bounce:

Ashie_87
09-12-2004, 06:44 AM
Great interview thanks Jess:kiss:
Go Lleyton!:bounce:

NOMAD
09-12-2004, 07:46 AM
HEWITT WINS OVER SIS

By MARC BERMAN
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------




September 12, 2004 --

At least Jaslyn Hewitt knows whom to root for in today's final ?her brother.

Australian Lleyton Hewitt, the 2001 U.S. Open champion, is back in The Finals after dispatching his likely future brother-in-law, Sweden's Joachim Johansson, 6-4, 7-5, 6-3 in yesterday's semifinals. Hewitt will face No. 1 seed Roger Federer today, as the Swiss maestro wiped out Tim Hemman 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 in one hour and 46 minutes.

Johansson, the big-serving upstart Swede who eliminated Andy Roddick in the quarters, has dated Lleyton's sister, Jaslyn, for 41/2 years. That didn't stop Hewitt from showing no mercy in the straight-set blowout, as he dropped to his knees, clenched his fists and shouted "C'mon!" at the rout's conclusion.

The two shook hands quickly at the net, with Hewitt patting his opponent on the back. There was no hug. But afterward in the locker room, Johansson joked to Hewitt, "You're not gonna get a Christmas present. You received it today."

Hewitt said he figured his sister was rooting for him, but Jaslyn looked glum before the match's final game. Asked afterward if she had butterflies, Jaslyn said, "I guess a little, but either way I was going to be a winner and a loser."



Hewitt has not lost a set during the fortnight. No player in the open era, since 1968, has gone through the tournament without dropping a set. But now he's got Federer, looking to become the first player to win three Grand Slam events in a year since Mats Wilander in 1988.

"I feel like I'm playing well at the moment and I give myself a good chance," said Hewitt, who's 8-5 lifetime against Federer but 0-3 this year, including losses at the Australian and Wimbledon.

Jaslyn, ranked 324 on the WTA computer, was glad the match was over quickly. "I didn't want whoever to win to be out there all today and not be fresh for the final," she said. Jaslyn will stick around for the Final. Johansson, nicknamed "Pim-Pim," said he's bolting but will make his yearly visit to the Hewitts in Adelaide in December.

Before the match, Hewitt's sister told a Swedish newspaper, "If I root for Pim-Pim, I am a bad sister. If I root for my brother, I'm a bad girlfriend." :o :sad:

Jaslyn refused to sit with her family in Hewitt's box, spending the match in the Octagon suite, more neutral territory, even if the agency represents Lleyton.

"It definitely was a bit awkward for both of us," said Hewitt. "We have to put our professional caps on and play hard. I'm sure in the years to come we'll probably have it a lot more than just this first time today."

Jaslyn was a tangled web of emotions afterward. She spent several minutes typing a statement onto her Blackberry which she read aloud to reporters in the player's lounge. In a cracked voice, she said, "I'm very happy for my brother. It's great to see him back in a Grand Slam final, which he definitely deserved. I'm very proud of Pim-Pim. This was his breakthrough year, winning his first tournament and performing so well in this Grand Slam. I have no doubt this result will give him tremendous confidence going forward." Soon after, Octagon released the statement to the press corps.

The 28th-seeded Johansson had 17 aces, but 37 unforced errors to Hewitt's 14. Johansson's serve is mammoth, but he admits he could use a better volley game. Johansson hits so big, he's prone to wildness, once popping a backhand off the frame into a luxury suite, the ball being caught by a patron. Hewitt broke Johansson once in each set. Johansson had just one break point the whole match.

On serve at 5-4 in the first, Hewitt broke, rushing to a love-40 lead, triple-set point as Johansson lost his composure. Hewitt won 20 of 22 points on his serve in the third set, but her sister looked none too pleased.

kim4eva
09-12-2004, 09:08 AM
Thanks for the article :kiss:

SomL.
09-12-2004, 09:51 AM
Good luck Lleyton to Final round !!!!!!!!! Go Lleyton against Federer !!!!!! you can do it !@!@!@!@!@!@!@!@!

Danni
09-12-2004, 12:02 PM
goooooooooo lleyton!! :bounce: :kiss: best of luck 4 tomorrow...:)

Alisa
09-12-2004, 12:21 PM
c'mon lleyton!!!! the best of the best luck to you in the final!!!!! :bounce: love you! :kiss:

Angele
09-12-2004, 12:59 PM
Good luck today Lleyton :kiss:

Gaga
09-12-2004, 02:18 PM
GO LLEYTON !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Bibi
09-12-2004, 02:49 PM
:worship: :bounce: :bounce: Good luck in the final Lleyton :bounce: :bounce: :worship:

Knockers LaBroad
09-12-2004, 03:13 PM
From the Independent...:angel:

Still 6 hours to go!:scared::eek:
Lethal Hewitt goes straight into the finalGiant Swede has no answers as in-form Aussie marches on without dropping a set
By John Roberts at Flushing Meadows
12 September 2004


Lleyton Hewitt advanced to the US Open men's singles final yesterday without dropping a set in his six matches. The Australian fourth seed was too experienced and accomplished for his semi-final opponent, Joachim Johansson, defeating the 6ft 6in Swede, 6-4 7-5 6-3.

Hewitt worked patiently through the match, absorbing his opponent's big serve, anticipating the aggressive forehand and using his nifty footwork to stay out of trouble.

Hewitt put pressure on Johansson's serve in the second game, the Swede having to save a break point at 30-40 after hitting a forehand long. Johansson rescued himself with a service winner. Hewitt made errors from 40-0 in the fifth game, and, at deuce, Johansson drove a forehand down the line to create an opportunity to take the lead. This time Hewitt's serve came to the rescue.

Johansson was taken to deuce in the sixth game, but neither player prospered until the Swede served to stay in the set at 4-5. Hewitt took the opening three points of the game by virtue of the sharpness of his returns. The Australian netted a backhand on the first set-point. Johansson hit a smash wide on the second.

The second set went with serve until Johansson, serving at 5-6 to try and force a tie-break, was unsettled by a Hewitt volley, at 15-15, and was unable to make a steady response, missing a forehand at 15-40. Hewitt, fairly restrained until that point, let out a roar of "Come on!" and pumped an arm. His sister, Jaslyn, who is Johansson's girlfriend, contrived an air of circumspection as she watched from a neutral guest box.

The third set followed a similar pattern, Hewitt winning the concluding eight points. He broke to love for 5-3, and served out to love after an hour and 59 minutes.

After letting out another yell, Hewitt shook hands with his friend Johansson, whose 17 aces were not enough to turn the contest, and then left the court to be greeted by his fiancée, Kim Clijsters, whose injured wrist prevented her from entering the women's singles. "It was definitely a bit awkward, with my parents in one box and Jaslyn in another," Hewitt said. "I just put a professional cap on and went out there and played."

Knockers LaBroad
09-12-2004, 03:17 PM
encore un peu...

Lleyton Hewitt was younger than Murray is now when he won his first title in Adelaide six years ago, but then few players can match the Australian for precociousness. Yesterday, the 23-year-old moved through to the US Open final with a 6-4, 7-5, 6-3 win over Joachim Johansson, his little sister’s boyfriend.

Jaslyn Hewitt, who has been seeing Johansson for almost as long as her brother has been with his fiancee Kim Clijsters, sidestepped a family row by sitting in a neutral box to watch the match and might have consoled herself with being in what the Americans call a win-win situation.

In the end it was her brother who had the better day, chiefly because he was far more experienced than Johansson, who had never previously got past the fourth round of Grand Slam. The ferocious shots and ballistic serving which undid defending champion Andy Roddick in the quarter-finals – thus ensuring there were no Americans in the last four for the first time since 1986 – were often nullified by Hewitt’s clever counter-punching.

There were moments when even Hewitt’s quick legs could only get him to the ball in time to see it whistle off the line. The 22-year-old Swede is one of the more watchable players to make his breakthrough in recent times, a fire and brimstone hitter who makes even the terrifying aggression of Roddick seem conservative.

Unfortunately for him, Hewitt likes nothing better than an opponent who gives him the pace he is unable to generate for himself, and providing he could get a shot in Johansson was always on the back foot.

Today Hewitt has the chance to win his first grand slam title since Wimbledon 2002, in the days when he was by far the best player in the world. After two years at the top of the sport he chose to step down during 2003 and give himself more rest in the hope of adding longevity to his career. He may not regain the No 1 ranking – that seems to be Roger Federer’s as of right – but his performances over the summer have proved that he is back to his best.

After losing in Cincinnati to Andre Agassi at the beginning of August he has won back-to-back tournaments in Washington and Long Island and has been unquestionably the man of the summer. A repeat of his 2001 US Open title would be just reward for his efforts.

Knockers LaBroad
09-12-2004, 03:25 PM
Federer v Hewitt: something's got to give
By John Powers in New York
September 13, 2004

Until now, this hard-topped hunk of Queens had been a wasteland for Roger Federer. Wimbledon had been his private English garden and Melbourne a Down Under delight. Now, only an Australian retriever stands between the world's top player and his first US Open title.

"Nobody's ever won the first four grand slam finals they've played," noted the 23-year-old Swiss, who on Saturday beat Tim Henman 6-3, 6-4, 6-4 and who is bidding to become the first man since Mats Wilander (1988) to win three grand slams in the same year, and the first since Pete Sampras (1995) to win Wimbledon and the US Open in the same summer. "I have a chance for that."

On Sunday (6am today, Sydney time) the man in his way will be Australia's Lleyton Hewitt, whom Federer beat en route to his victories at the Australian Open and Wimbledon but who was a winner at Flushing Meadows in 2001.

"He knows how to win this tournament, so it's going to be difficult for me," said Federer, who will be the first Swiss male champion here if he prevails. "He's been in the US Open finals. Me, never."

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Hewitt, who beat Sampras in 2001, made brisk work of beating Swedish boomer Joachim Johansson in just under two hours, delivering three killer service breaks to prevail 6-4, 7-5, 6-3.

"He's obviously a little bit raw at the moment," said fourth-seeded Hewitt, who lost only three points on his serve in the final set. "He just hasn't been in this position of playing in big matches."

But Federer, who has a record of 3-0 in slam finals and hasn't lost to a top-10 player all year, poses a massive challenge to Hewitt, who is bidding to become the first man in 36 years of the open era to win the title without losing a set.

"I'm going to have to play some great tennis to get on top of him," said Hewitt, who has an 8-5 win record over Federer but has lost three in a row. "But I feel like I'm playing well at the moment and I give myself a good chance."

The luck of the draw clearly helped Hewitt get here. David Nalbandian, the top rival in his quadrant, went out in the second round and Johansson took care of defending champion Andy Roddick in the quarters. So Hewitt hasn't had to face anyone seeded higher than 28th.

Not that Johansson, the 188-centimetre bull whip with the 225kmh serve, was a hacker. He had enough to hang on to Hewitt throughout, smashing 17 aces (equalling Roddick's tournament record of 123) and 38 winners. But the Swede cracked when it came to the critical points - serving at 4-5 in the first, 5-6 in the second and 3-4 in the third.

"I missed a few easy shots," said Johansson, who made 37 unforced errors to Hewitt's 14. "I got broken three times from the same end. I didn't take care of the break point I had [at 2-2 in the first]. But it was like I thought it was going to be."

The Australian's effort to reach the final without dropping a set was last achieved 13 years ago by Jim Courier and no man has done it at any grand slam since Michael Chang in 1996 in Australia. "The way that I've played the last couple of days, I'm definitely in with a shot. There's no doubt about that," said Hewitt.

Although he and Johansson had not played before, they knew each other's games inside-out through being practice partners in Adelaide, where Johansson camps out when visiting his girlfriend, Hewitt's sister Jaslyn. The pair will be hitting together again soon. "But he's not going to get me a Christmas present," Hewitt said. "He reckons that was mine today."

Nor will there will be any gifts forthcoming from Federer, who had to survive a two-day, five-set marathon with two-time champion Andre Agassi to get out of the quarters.

He also had to put in a fine day's work to dispose of the fifth-seeded Henman, who had beaten him in six of their previous eight meetings. "The bad record against him is always in the back of my mind," Federer said.

Henman, the first British-born player to make the open semis since Mike Sangster in 1961, had his moments. He broke Federer's serve right after being broken to 2-4 in the first. Then he dodged a match point to break the Swiss at 2-5 in the third.

"I'd like to have played a bit longer today," said the 30-year-old Henman, who has never made a slam final after 38 tournaments. "But my Swiss friend had other ideas."

For most of the afternoon, whenever Federer needed to win a point or a game, he did so. He simply had too much pace, too much placement, too much variety and too much invention.

"I sometimes surprised myself today, what shots I pulled off," said Federer, who would be the first male top seed to lift the open trophy since Sampras in 1996. "Because some were at very important moments, and these are the ones that count the most."

Except for a bad day in Paris, when Gustavo Kuerten covered him up in clay, Federer has been the man of the year. "He's setting the standard for everyone right now," Henman admitted. "Lots of people [are] just trying to catch up."

Knockers LaBroad
09-12-2004, 03:34 PM
Terror overshadows tournament
From Darren Walton in New York
September 12, 2004

LLEYTON Hewitt's memories of September 11 were rekindled today when his US Open semi-final was briefly interrupted as policemen and firemen were honoured for their bravery during the terrorist attacks on America three years ago.

Hewitt won the 2001 US Open title in New York just two days before two planes crashed through the World Trade Centre's Twin Towers and another hit the Pentagon.

The tournament is held annually during the first two weeks in September and will continue to hold remembrance services.

Hewitt said he couldn't help but notice the tributes today, especially one that took place after he claimed the second set of his 6-4 7-5 6-3 win over Swede Joachim Johansson.

"It's an awkward day, but we can't do much about it either," he said.

"You've got to play a semi of a grand slam on the same day. It's obviously awkward, with the TV in the locker room and everything are going through tributes at Ground Zero, stuff like that.

"It makes you think a lot about tennis as a sport and there's a lot more to life than just winning a couple of tennis matches as well."

Hewitt was on a flight back home to Adelaide when the terrorists attacked.

"I didn't know until I touched down in Sydney anything about it. So it was a real weird feeling back then purely because we'd just been in New York and nothing had happened," the 23-year-old said.

"Then you hop on a plane and the whole world's changed in a lot of ways."

Women's champion Svetlana Kuznetsova today dedicated her victory to the victims of the attacks and also to those suffering in the wake of the Beslan school siege in Russia.

It was a sentiment shared by her countrywoman and beaten finalist Elena Dementieva, with both Russians calling for the world to unite in the fight against terrorism.

Socket
09-12-2004, 04:30 PM
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/sports/tennis/sfl-openmen12sep12,0,330217.story?coll=sfla-sports-tennis
Hewitt vs. Federer
By Charles Bricker
Staff Writer

September 12, 2004

NEW YORK · On a splendid Saturday that unfolded with all the predictability of a Swiss timepiece, Mr. Fidgety and Mr. Federer swept through a couple of valiant but vulnerable opponents to reach the final of the U.S. Open.

Maybe it wasn't the match-up made in CBS's personal heaven after Andy Roddick, the star attraction here, was bounced out in the quarterfinals, but for those who believe finesse and style is as engaging as a 140 mph blast of yellow fuzz, this is a great championship matchup this afternoon.

Roger Federer, the No. 1 player in the world and trying to become the first man to win three majors in a season since Mats Wilander in 1988, arrived at this final day by defeating Britain's Tim Henman 6-3, 6-4, 6-4.

Earlier, fourth-seeded Lleyton Hewitt, a ball of tightly wound nervous energy who has fought his way back to elite status this year, defeated Joachim Johansson, the 6-foot-6 inch Swede who might one day be his brother-in-law, by 6-4, 7-5, 6-3.

"There's a lot on the line for me," Federer reflected, as he often does after a big match. "My final record, which is very good. Then, obviously, it's another Grand Slam. For me to move to four Slams, that would be fantastic, and three in one year."

Federer is nothing if not revealing of himself, and he uncovered his feelings yet again when he added, "You know, I hope I can cope with all those things."

Few would doubt his emotional strength after the way he has charged through a very demanding draw, fighting off the always confusing game of clever Frenchman Fabrice Santoro, beating Andre Agassi in a match that was played over two days and concluded amid horrendous winds, and now the triumph over an old nemesis, Henman.

Meanwhile, Hewitt, who has had a dream draw, easily eliminated the big-serving Johansson, constantly frustrating him with his ability to speed into the corners and return shots that would be points against 95 percent of the other players on tour.

There was nothing byzantine about the way these two matches played out. Hewitt was never broken as he dispatched Johansson in one hour and 59 minutes.

Federer was only slightly more bothered, giving up a break in the first and third sets. But by the time Henman got back to 3-5 in that last set, Federer had the match well under control.

This is the fourth time Federer and Hewitt have played this season, and the third time in a Grand Slam, with the brilliant Swiss No. 1 winning all of them. But Hewitt would prefer to conjure up memories of his win in the Davis Cup semifinal of 2003, where he triumphed after going down by two sets.

What weaknesses will he exploit? Hewitt seemed surprised by the question, as if someone was asking him to identify Mother Teresa's worst sin. "I don't know," he replied, grinning. "There's not a lot of them."

This match will not move at a rapid pace -- not with Hewitt going through his usual ritual when Federer is serving.

Meandering about behind the baseline, he'll pull at the left sleeve of his shirt, then the right sleeve. He will reach behind himself and pull down his shirt tail, then wipe his forehead with both wrist bands. Next, he'll adjust his cap, slide a couple of wayward blond hairs back in place, take three steps forward, then three back, without turning around while he fingers his strings back in place.

Finally, he'll lean forward in his pronounced crouch and wipe his left hand on his shorts. One final hand to his face, a tug at the neck of his shirt and he's ready.

Johansson has seen this nervous procedure many times, having practiced with Hewitt in Adelaide, Australia, while visiting his girlfriend, Jaslyn Hewitt. No familiarity with Hewitt, however, would help him this day.

His only significant opportunity came in the fifth game of the opening set, when he wiped out a 40-0 lead with four straight points to come within one swat of breaking his friend. Hewitt then scorched a service winner and two aces to save the game and went on a 21-2 run of points off his serves.

His sister, rather than sit in one players box or the other, watched the match from the suite rented by Octogon, which is the agency that represents the two players. For Henman this was his fifth loss without a win in a semifinal, and at age 30, his chances for a Slam title diminish every year.

Federer and Hewitt, both 23, have five Slams between them and neither has lost a Grand Slam final. Federer has one other piece of history in his sights. He could become the first man in the Open Era (1968) to win his first four Grand Slam finals.

Copyright © 2004, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

Neely
09-12-2004, 07:56 PM
BEST OF LUCK TODAY, LLEYTON!!!!!!!!! :bounce: :bounce:

beat Roger! :devil: :smoke: ... you deserve it!

tangerine_dream
09-12-2004, 09:24 PM
Good luck in the final, Lleyton! :bounce: I'm rooting for the Swiss Mister to take his third slam this year but if Lleyton won, I wouldn't be terribly disappointed. ;) He's worked hard, played great this year, and deserves to win his first slam in two years. Even if he loses, he's already proven that he's back in the game and can compete with the top players.

It's gonna be a great final! :banana:

Hagar
09-13-2004, 12:04 AM
Roger was just unbelievable today. I'm a bit disappointed because I hoped for a close 5-setter. Thought Lleyton was a bit less sharp than before. Then again Roger simply did not let him get into rallies.
Lleyton was very sporty.
At least, he did the Grand Slam of losing against the winner of each Grand Slam in 2004. :-)

ally_014
09-13-2004, 01:40 AM
Bad luck Lleyton, I wish he'd been able to at least get that second set but you just have to :hatoff: to Roger, he was just brilliant

Here's the interview:

R. FEDERER/L. Hewitt

6-0, 7-6, 6-0

An interview with:

LLEYTON HEWITT

THE MODERATOR: First question, please.

Q. Can you talk about Roger's ability to go out and do three in one year. Can you just talk about his ability.

LLEYTON HEWITT: He's playing incredible tennis, on all surfaces as well. You know, he had an incredible run, you know, leading up to Wimbledon and then straight after Wimbledon through to Toronto, then a little bit of a lapse which probably helped him here. But, you know, when he's, you know, playing like he did in especially the first set there today, there's very little you can do out there. He returned extremely well. It was hard to get any cheap points off him as well.

Q. Are you proud of your tournament?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I'm happy. It's obviously disappointing, you know. Any time -- this is my first loss in a Grand Slam final. Any final is hard to lose. But, you know, I'm happy with the way I'm playing. You know, when I look back on the last, you know, five weeks probably especially, it's been great tennis for me the whole time. You know, when you put yourself in a position to play in Grand Slam finals, you know, that's what you play tennis for. So, you know, it's been a good two weeks.

Q. When you were up 6-5 in the second, did you sense that that could have been the turning point right there? Obviously a little shaky on his serve. Wasn't getting first serves in. Did you think to yourself, "This could be one-set-all"?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, you know, it was only tough because the wind started picking up a little bit and he was playing with the breeze at that end, at 6-5. Then he started with the breeze in the tiebreak. It was hard to dictate play at the start of the tiebreak. He served extremely well. He made nearly all his first serves, especially at the start, when you're serving with the breeze there. I sort of just got behind the eight ball there in the tiebreak. I had to really try and get that first point, especially on my serve, then try and dictate play. He didn't give me too many free points out there. He had a little lapse there, you know, halfway through the second set, right till it was 6-5. Every game, I was nearly having breakpoints. You know, I was hustling and scrambling a lot of balls back. He came up with some big aces and stuff on the breakpoints there. But, you know, 6-Love, 2-Love, he was playing incredible tennis.

Q. Can you just describe what it was like to be dominated like that in that first set? I know you had two double-faults, but what was it like to have that happen?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, he -- you know, I felt like there was games in there where I had 15-30 on his serve once, I had 30-15 on my serves, 30-Alls, I just didn't take advantage of those. He's the kind of guy, played extremely well when I played him in Hamburg this year on clay for the first set. Played incredible tennis, very similar to today. When he's on fire with his forehand, it's very hard to get it to his backhand too often as well. He was obviously serving extremely well.

Q. He has so much going for him, dominant No. 1, great on really all surfaces, no real weaknesses. You're such a tremendous student of the game right now. Can you talk in terms of him with the other great players of the Open era. Does he have a chance, really, of becoming the best of all time?

LLEYTON HEWITT: He's definitely got a chance, there's no doubt about it. Especially the way that he's had this year as well, and, you know, he's, you know, always going to have a chance going into every major, even the French Open. You know, he lost in the third round this year to Guga, but it's going to take a guy like Guga or someone like that to beat him at every Slam. So, you know, you like your chances of him trying to pick up at least one out of the four every year for a few years.

Q. Slow hard court, who would you pick, Pete or Roger?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Oh, mate, it's hard to say. You know, we're fortunate that Roger could take, you know, after Pete's left, then Roger comes in. You know, that could help tennis in the big picture. You know, there's still a lot of guys. Obviously, Andy is going to be pushing. You know, a lot depends on the day as well. Pete had an awesome serve, you know. It's very hard for anyone to break his serve. Whether Roger could do that at the best, it's hard to say.

Q. Do you feel like anyone today, with him playing like that, could have done much better than you did?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, I don't think anyone in the -- anyone in the actual tournament (laughter). I don't know. Maybe. Maybe Pete Sampras, you know. As I said, it's very hard to, you know, obviously with their serve and whatever... But, you know, I just couldn't get enough cheap points off my service games to be able to put pressure on his. If I was able to hold my service games a little bit easier, then I would have been able to take a few more chances on his service games. So when he's up a break, especially, and he's a great frontrunner, he really gets confident.

Q. What's it going to take to get to his level? Can you get to his level?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Keep working. You know, that's why tennis is so tough. I think every year it gets tougher and tougher. Yeah, it's something, you know, you've got to work on your weaknesses, small areas of your game that can make that small difference. Could be just one match, like a Grand Slam final here. So, you know, that's why you stay motivated to try and keep improving, keep up with the best players in the world.

Q. Do you think it's a fair reflection now that you're just behind Andy and Roger in the rankings, back to 3?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I'm playing well enough, I think, to definitely be in the Top 5. You know, I've had a pretty consistent year this year. The guys that I've lost to, I've lost to Roger in three out of the four majors. You know, who knows? If I could have met him a little bit later in the Aussie and at Wimbledon, then I could have maybe gone a little bit higher in the rankings. He's obviously the stand-out this year.

Q. What's next for you? Home? Marriage?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Is that a good question (laughter)? I've got a Davis Cup tie.

Q. Can you talk a little bit about that. Morocco going to be quite dangerous, aren't they?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, really depends who they field in their team. I assume Arazi is coming. I don't know if El Aynaoui is, after he had to withdraw here. I haven't really been thinking about it too much the last couple of weeks, but obviously on grass in Perth, it's an awkward few days because, you know, you know you can't win the Davis Cup this year but you've got to go out there and put everything on the line just to make sure you don't get relegated.

Q. Any contact, wouldn't have been, but do you know much about whether Mark will be fully fit?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I'm not sure. I really don't know. As I said, I haven't really been worrying about the Davis Cup tie until now.

Q. Obviously some sort of speculation, he's had such an average year, would you give him your backing to continue playing this year?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, if he's fully fit, you know. Mark Philippoussis is dangerous any time. He's obviously had to pull out here, so there's something wrong, whether he had a small tear or whatever, I'm not sure. There's obviously something wrong there. You know, if he's not 100 percent fit, then there's no point putting yourself through a whole week and a half of practice leading up to a Davis Cup tie.

Q. Do you think Roger can or will eventually win more than 14 Grand Slams?

LLEYTON HEWITT: As I say, he's got a chance. Three in one year is always going to -- he's got a chance, especially the way his style is as well. He can play on all surfaces.

Q. Does he have a weakness?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Today he didn't have too many, but, you know, there's obviously, you know, a couple of games there where I had a window of opportunity where he started missing a little bit. If I could have held my serve easier at the start of the match, and, as I said, put some pressure on his service games, it could have been a little bit different. But that's why he's such a good player. He can come out and play a real flashy game on your service games, then free hitting on his so...

Q. If you were trying to describe to someone what it's like to face his forehand when he's hitting it the way he was at times today, how would you describe it?

LLEYTON HEWITT: It's hard to predict, you know, where he's going on it. He moves into the forehand so well. He can -- there's not too many players who can actually hit the ball on the rise like he does. He takes it so early and hits it so clean. You know, he can hit with -- you know, there's a breakpoint in there where he came up with a short forehand crosscourt angle. It held up in the breeze and I couldn't get to it. Shots like that, you know, he makes them look a lot easier. They're not that easy to hit.

Q. When you had breakpoints against him, he seems to be so calm and comes up really with great shots.

LLEYTON HEWITT: He's got a great serve to back him up as well. It's not a huge first serve but he hits the corners very well. I think in a lot of these matches in tight situations, his serve gets him out of a lot of trouble.

Q. The way Andy is playing, the way Roger is playing, do you still see a Grand Slam title in the future for yourself?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I think so. I played extremely well the last couple of weeks. You know, obviously, for me, you know, the French Open's probably the least highest chance, I guess, of winning it. But, you know, I'll keep working towards that and try to get better and better on clay. But the other three majors, you know, I give myself a chance every time I step on the court in those. You know, at Wimbledon I think there's only probably a handful of guys that are capable of winning that tournament. You know, the Australian Open and US Open, there's probably a few more. But, you know, then again, you get someone -- Andre went very close to beating Roger here. The draw opens up, matchups open up, you know. It just depends who you play in different matches and how the draws open up.

Q. What did you say to Roger when you shook hands?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I said, "Right on, mate. Incredible year."

Q. Up until the beginning of this year, you pretty much had his number. Now he's beaten you four straight times. Is his progress this year basically due to mental toughness, or is it just mental toughness and then the shots just happen to go along with it?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I think his confidence, especially with his style of game, if he didn't have the confidence with his style of game, such -- he goes for so many shots out there, you know, then you'd miss a lot more than he's missing. He's just so confident this whole year. He believes in his ability - and so he should, you know. But that's what's probably making it even tougher, I think, now, because he actually believes -- probably after Wimbledon, he won Wimbledon the first time last year. And then, you know, dominated the Masters Cup at the end of the year. I think since then he's just sort of picked it up another notch.

Q. Is the mental toughness the aspect that changed most about his game?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Yeah, I think so. Probably. Yeah, he just doesn't give you too many easy points. I think in the past he probably gave you a few more cheaper points. Probably especially on your service games. Where today, the first set, he gave me nothing.

Q. Down a set and 2-Love, were you thinking, "This guy has to cool off at some point," or were you just trying to hold on for dear life a little bit?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I was just trying to hang in there more than anything. If I could -- at least in the second set I was just trying to keep within at least one service break and keep trying to put pressure on his serve. I felt there's going to be an opportunity where I'll get a breakpoint or two and I've got to try to take them. In the end I had quite a few breakpoints, three or four games in a row on his service games. I was only able to take that one at 5-4. But, you know, I was just really trying to hang in there, keep pressuring him, make him at least serve out the set.

Q. What do you make of the fact that Roger is doing all this without a coach?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, I don't know (smiling). You know, maybe he doesn't need one. I know he's got a close mate with him, he comes to all the major tournaments with him.

Q. Who is that?

LLEYTON HEWITT: I don't know who the guy is. I think it's a Swiss guy. But he's a pretty quiet guy, I think, hits up with him. Obviously knows Roger extremely well. You know, I think as a tennis player, you need people around you that you get along with extremely well, so...

Q. He has so much going for him, the way he constructs points, his creativity is incredible, the confidence and mental toughness. What aspect do you think is his very strongest? What impresses you, what one quality impresses you the most?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Probably his shot-making I think. You know, his shot-making is second to none at the moment especially. He can, wherever he is on the court, he moves extremely well for a bigger guy as well. So, you know, he comes up with, you know -- it's hard to get him out of position.

Q. Can you think of any other player that you've ever played who even approaches that shot-making ability?

LLEYTON HEWITT: You know Andre is obviously a great shot-maker as well. They're a different kind of shot-maker. Roger plays with probably a little bit more flair than Andre. He can come to the net, has a little bit more of an all-court game and uses his serve, bigger serve, more than Andre. Apart from that, there's no one that's probably close to Roger, I don't think.

Q. You came onto the scene at a young age and you were successful at a young age. Is it tough to -- I can't imagine that you've been double bageled before. Is it difficult to swallow?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Well, I'm -- not really, it's obviously disappointing just to lose the match. You know, at the end of the day I go out there, give 100 percent, and, you know, there's not a lot I could do out there. Especially in the first set, I didn't even have that many real opportunities to get my teeth into the match.

Ashie_87
09-13-2004, 10:13 AM
:kiss: thanks Ally:hug:

possie
09-13-2004, 11:32 AM
Mark Philippoussis is not playing the upcoming DC tie against Morocco. Some Aussie (I wasn't really listening to who it was coming from :o ) commentator disclosed that just after Lley's match.

Mihret
09-13-2004, 12:52 PM
Roger Federer now totally owns Lleyton Hewitt. They've met four times this year and on all occasions, he's won a set to love!!! I mean, Federer lost a set to Marcos Baghdatis!!!
Lleyton can say whatever he wants about missed oppotunities and close games,etc but the fact of the matter is Federer is playing in another league!!! He'beaten a lot of other players this year but not the way he's handled Hewitt!!!

Knockers LaBroad
09-13-2004, 01:18 PM
Sweetie, what the hell are you doing here??
This isn't q thread for gloating!:kiss:

fifiricci
09-13-2004, 01:23 PM
Well I don't bloody care that Lleyton got double bageled by Roger and lost in straight sets, Lleyton still has the best pants in the business and I love him and if I didnt love Kim too, I'd bloody fight her for him! :devil:

star
09-13-2004, 01:24 PM
:rolleyes:

Crazy_Fool
09-13-2004, 01:42 PM
Haven't actually seen trolls around this forum before :rolleyes:

Go Lleyton!!

Mihret
09-13-2004, 01:56 PM
OK... how does what I've said can be taken as gloating...sweetie?

kim4eva
09-13-2004, 01:58 PM
:worship: Awesome tennis, effort and heart in this tourney Lleyton! :worship:
Keep up the good work :bounce:

star
09-13-2004, 02:05 PM
I was thrilled about Lleyton's performance at this U.S. Open. He seems to be establishing himself as a force in the men's game once again, and that makes me really happy. It's been a long time since we've seen Lleyton during the final weekend of a slam. It's good to have him back. :)

And personally, I love the positive feeling all the Lleyki fans have established here on this forum. :worship: to all you terrific Leyki fans. I've enjoyed you so much this past year. :)

Knockers LaBroad
09-13-2004, 02:09 PM
OK... how does what I've said can be taken as gloating...sweetie?

here, we cheer for Lleyton

In GM, there are threads enough to not cheer for him. A Tip for you: the potato Peelers Cheering thread.

Auscon
09-13-2004, 02:59 PM
Mark Philippoussis is not playing the upcoming DC tie against Morocco. Some Aussie (I wasn't really listening to who it was coming from :o ) commentator disclosed that just after Lley's match.

bugger!

Never seen Mark play and living here this was probably my only chance to do so

NOMAD
09-13-2004, 03:12 PM
Thanks to all the Lleykis :worship: ,you are :angel: .
I am proud of Lley and will always love you ,LL :kiss: .
Gread tournament :bigclap: and great performence the whole summer. :yippee: .(four finals in a row :woohoo: )
I know he will keep fighting and improving homself. :angel: :bounce:

FanOfHewitt
09-13-2004, 06:02 PM
A great month for Lleyton, he really played well in the matches leading up to the final, especially against Haas and Johansson. Both would have probably beaten all but a handful of players out there.

A disappointing final though by Lleyton. I was shattered watching him get embarassed by Roger. Although he tried his best, he didn't produce his best tennis on the day. Having said that Roger was awesome. Just too good.

I think Lleyton can do better against Federer in the future if he is capable of adapting his game a little to counter Roger.

One thing I'd like to see Lleyton do is stand closer to the baseline when he is recieving Roger's serve. Roger doesn't have the fastest serve but he has a really well placed serve. As such, when Lleyton stands too far behind the baseline it is too easy for Roger to exploit the angles and have Hewitt way off court. If Lleyton closes the distance he will be able to close the angle and even though he'll have to be blocking the ball more when he returns it (he does this now most of the time anyway) at least he will be better placed to get the next ball in play in the rally. it also puts Federer under pressure thinking that he must better his serve to try and get it past Lleyton and he'll put more pressure on himself and make more mistakes. Tim Henman and Andre Agassi use this tactic well agaisnt Roger.

Another thing Lleyton should really practice in my opinion is his backhand slice. Sometimes he gets himself out of position by trying to hit his backhand with top spin when he is being dragged out wide. A better option would be to spear the ball either down the line to Federer's forehand or slice it back to his backhand and get a step closer inside the court, instead of having to come over the ball all the time and having to have his body totally out of position to hit the next ball.

A third thing I feel Lleyton must really practice is his approach shots. He has good volleys and he should try and make more use of them. This can only happen if he learns how to hit the ball whilst coming forward.

Murkofan
09-13-2004, 06:17 PM
Q. Slow hard court, who would you pick, Pete or Roger?

LLEYTON HEWITT: Oh, mate, it's hard to say. You know, we're fortunate that Roger could take, you know, after Pete's left, then Roger comes in. You know, that could help tennis in the big picture. You know, there's still a lot of guys. Obviously, Andy is going to be pushing. You know, a lot depends on the day as well. Pete had an awesome serve, you know. It's very hard for anyone to break his serve. Whether Roger could do that at the best, it's hard to say.



That's a nice answer.