Berdych: I don't like academies [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Berdych: I don't like academies

MRUK
05-18-2009, 10:22 AM
Interviewed Tomas this week and although he splurted out a fair amount of cliches, he did slag off the culture of parents sending their kids to tennis academies rather than teaching them themselves. Personally, I don't agree with him. Whatif the parents aren't talented enough to teach their kids? and who's to say they know about nutrition and psychology etc?

Still, it is nice to have the quality time.

Views, everyone?

Forehander
05-18-2009, 10:37 AM
This can go both ways, but I agree with him totally. Academies can turn a talented children into a useless robot. Just look at American players nowaways makes me laugh hard, they all have the same technique in near every stroke. The coaches usually force the children to play what's "scientifically" correct, what they think is right. They do not let the children follow their own body language, allow them to discover their own true potential.

Action Jackson
05-18-2009, 10:42 AM
Forehander is right, look Nadal, Federer, Davydenko, didn't go to academies. It depends on the academy, there is no tried and true way to make it, both paths have their own advantages and weaknesses.

HattonWBA
05-18-2009, 11:38 AM
Theres always going to be different opinions on this and his judgement is fair enough and so are the acadamies, there are advanatges and disadvantages to both but i feel both are as good as one another given that parents may be better but academies are there for parents who are not well capable enough to use this method.

scoobs
05-18-2009, 11:41 AM
I find it somewhat ironic because to me Tomas has got one of the most mechanical games out there, that you'd think that he came from an academy cookie-cutter.

Bilbo
05-18-2009, 11:54 AM
I find it somewhat ironic because to me Tomas has got one of the most mechanical games out there, that you'd think that he came from an academy cookie-cutter.

good eye

it shows you why Tomas lacks massive brain cells

Forehander
05-18-2009, 11:57 AM
I find it somewhat ironic because to me Tomas has got one of the most mechanical games out there, that you'd think that he came from an academy cookie-cutter.

His tennis stroke especially his forehand is quite unique, something obviously you can only do by listening to your own body creating your own style.

Action Jackson
05-18-2009, 12:18 PM
I find it somewhat ironic because to me Tomas has got one of the most mechanical games out there, that you'd think that he came from an academy cookie-cutter.

Ginepri is the factory player.

its.like.that
05-18-2009, 12:25 PM
I find it somewhat ironic because to me Tomas has got one of the most mechanical games out there, that you'd think that he came from an academy cookie-cutter.

wtf? you blind or something? have you ever seen berdych play?

:cuckoo:

dl05
05-18-2009, 12:44 PM
American academies are the main antagonits for tennis stroke development. I mean every up and coming kid is 'nurtured' in the same robotic, mundane way. I'd rather have the unorthodox technique and the 'conventional'. Could you imagine Graf or Federer with 'standard' forehands?

Players like Ginepri, Reynolds, Isner, are examples of this.

Chip_s_m
05-18-2009, 04:19 PM
American academies are the main antagonits for tennis stroke development. I mean every up and coming kid is 'nurtured' in the same robotic, mundane way. I'd rather have the unorthodox technique and the 'conventional'. Could you imagine Graf or Federer with 'standard' forehands?

Players like Ginepri, Reynolds, Isner, are examples of this.

Isner did not learn to play from an academy. Regardless of where he learned to play, though, his game would most likely be similar to what he does now since he's limited by his size.

Incidentally, neither Blake nor Querrey grew up at academies. Roddick and Fish went to high school together (a traditional one) and spent time playing with other top young Americans in the Boca Raton area. To my knowledge, the group they played with only learned from one coach, but it was more like just a traditional tennis club than an academy.

Americans having similar games is more a product of similar courts (fast hardcourt) all over the country and most juniors growing up playing on these. This is changing, but it will take time. Young, for instance, does not have the "normal" American game. There's no need to develop beautiful backhands and volleys and how to construct points when you can just hit a big serve and forehand. This logic wasn't flawed until the courts began being slowed down over the past decade to make the game more interesting to watch. American tennis has to respond to that, and in my opinion it is. Patrick Mcenroe, who is now in charge of junior development at the USTA, actually just had a conference call with reporters outlining the changes he will be making to respond to this.

IMG/Bollettierri's academy has done a lot to popularize the aggressive baseliner game beginning with Agassi, but none of the top Americans, men or women, learned to play from him when they were teens. I don't know how his school compares to some of the major European ones.

fast_clay
05-18-2009, 04:52 PM
academies are necessary to a point... i mean, you need a certain amount of grooving... and can improve the comfort a player feels with a wide variety of peers/opponents...

the most important thing to cater to is a players personality, gifts, who/what style they admire, etc etc... acadmey or not, if enough time is given to discovering what it actually is about tennis that excites a player then the battle is won right there... merging the style a player likes or enjoys into what they can realistically perform becomes much easier this way - instead of fitting triangle and square blocks into countless round holes...

if approached this way, academies will actually serve to disarm the 'ballbasher'... as the thoughtful/creative will learn to live with them first, then fuse their style on top...

Dougie
05-18-2009, 05:01 PM
Personally I donīt understand why it should be a choice between going to academies or being coached by parents. Parents are rarely the best coaches, but itīs possible to get quality coaching without sending the kids to a boot camp. Every major city has quality clubs with good coaching.

What worries me most with these academies is not their effect on the style of play, but the effect on the kids themselves. Itīs usually the parents who see potential in their children and decide to send them away. For every Agassi or Haas that come from the Bollettieri academy there are at least 1000 kids who work their asses off away from their friends and family, and still donīt make it. Itīs just cruel to put young children through something like that.

gulzhan
05-18-2009, 05:31 PM
Sending to an academy or getting a coach in the city club, parents should not leave children alone, should watch them practice and play and try to learn as much as possible about tennis as they can. Tennis is a "parent sport". It's 100% true. Or, as an alternative, you need to have a talented uncle ;)

Ilovetheblues_86
05-18-2009, 05:33 PM
Berdych is not a robot. He has one of the most variable tennis abilities out there together with Murray.

TennisViewer531
05-18-2009, 05:44 PM
That's Berdych's preference. Academies have produced top players. and that's a fact.

Certinfy
05-18-2009, 05:47 PM
Hmmm... Very interesting

Schu
05-18-2009, 06:05 PM
. Tennis is a "parent sport". It's 100% true. Or, as an alternative, you need to have a talented uncle ;)

I completely disagree. Parents are important for support but it takes a VERY rare relationship between a parent and child to have a successful player/coach relationship on a long term basis. I've been around junior tennis players and tennis parents for years and it is the rare parent that can also be a successful coach to their child - maybe an uncle will work.

Academies can serve a purpose for those that are headed to the pros but in the US every kid (or should I say parent) who has moderate success thinks they are professional tennis material and head off to some sort of academy IF they can afford it. The kid ends up being a very good tennis player, but 99.9% of the time, not pro caliber but good enough to get on a good college team. Only problem, the kid spent all their time playing tennis and is now socially and academically unskilled and when they get to college they are faced with a completely different ballgame than at their prima donna academy. I admire Roddick and Querry who went to "regular" high schools and while they didn't lead the life of a "normal" teenager they were not the academy type either and that's a very tough way to make it into the pros.

Dougie
05-18-2009, 06:06 PM
Sending to an academy or getting a coach in the city club, parents should not leave children alone, should watch them practice and play and try to learn as much as possible about tennis as they can. Tennis is a "parent sport". It's 100% true. Or, as an alternative, you need to have a talented uncle ;)

Quite the opposite. Parents should be close to their children beacuse they need to be parents. But coaching should be left to professionals, and let them do their job without parents meddling into things. No sport should be a parent sport, unless itīs for social purposes only. Just ask Capriati, Dokic and Pierce how great it is to have your parents involved.

gulzhan
05-18-2009, 06:13 PM
Quite the opposite. Parents should be close to their children beacuse they need to be parents. But coaching should be left to professionals, and let them do their job without parents meddling into things. No sport should be a parent sport, unless itīs for social purposes only. Just ask Capriati, Dokic and Pierce how great it is to have your parents involved.

they made it to the tour :shrug: ask million times more talented girls who did not make it there-- why? and they'll tell you, their parents did not want or could not dedicate their lives to tennis.

of course, there are always exemptions. i am talking about a rule.

Dougie
05-18-2009, 06:16 PM
they made it to the tour :shrug: ask million times more talented girls who did not make it there-- why? and they'll tell you, their parents did not want or could not dedicate their lives to tennis.

of course, there are always exemptions. i am talking about a rule.

Do you honestly think all that matters is making it to the tour? Those million times more talented girls are probably mentally far more stable nowadays and have healthy relationships with their parents. I`d say thatīs far more important than making it to the tour.
There is a reason why some parents donīt want to dedicate their lives to their childrenīs careers. They might actually want whatīs best for their kids lives, not jus for their tennis.

FedFan_2007
05-18-2009, 06:22 PM
Rafa is the ultimate example of what can be done outside tennis academies. He's a unique specimen, analogous to a species developed in isolation like in the Galapogas Islands. He evolved to develop a unique type of doomsday stroking that makes the field PRAY FOR DEATH.

FedFan_2007
05-18-2009, 06:24 PM
Also who cares what Berdshit has to say about tennis? He should just shut up after his previous choking. *gag*