At the department of forgotten players [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

At the department of forgotten players

jonas
05-06-2009, 11:17 PM
There are tons of players who deserve to be remembered for different reasons.
If they don't make GS final and/or top five ranking it can be hard to recall them all, though.
So. Do you have any players you want to bring back to the spotlight?

I begin with some countrymen:

http://www1.idrottonline.se/ImageVault/Images/height_2000/width_2000/conversionFormatType_WebSafe/id_94574/ImageVaultHandler.aspx
Jonas B Svensson, born 1966, ATP debut 1983, 5 singles titles, best ranking 10 (1991), retired 1995
Description: Jonas had a great feel for the game, pretty strong mentally - a baseliner with natural strokes. No significant weapons, but a nice allround game.
Highlights: FO SF 1988, where he beat Nystrom and Carlsson in five sets before demolishing Lendl in the quarters in straights, and SF in FO 1990 (losing to Agassi).

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2001/20010928/sp6.jpg
Magnus Larsson, born 1970, ATP debut 1988, 7 singles titles, best ranking 10 (1995), retired 2003
Description: Tall, slow guy, who came across as a bit lazy, perhaps (hello, Marc Rosset!). But my God did he have talent! When he was on he could beat any guy on any surface. Strong serve and powerful groundstrokes, and wasn't really scared by anyone. When he peaked in the mid 90s he broke his foot, and never reached top ten again.
Highlights: SF in FO 1994, Won Grand Slam Cup 1994, Won David Cup with Sweden 1994 and 1997.

Ilovetheblues_86
05-07-2009, 12:16 AM
Sweden always provided grat players, with great talent. Larsson was talented, even more than Norman, I think. He was a player who deserved a better ranking in his career, but opponents were very strong. I prefer him than ToJo, PimPim or Norman.

BaselineSmash
05-07-2009, 01:16 AM
Larsson is a good example of a player who deserves an "honorable mention" in an overview of Open Era tennis. I think it was 2003 when he went five sets with Hewitt at the AO, the same year that the guy retired.

Funnily enough, Francisco Clavet was another guy who retired in the same year in which he went the distance with Hewitt in the Australian's prime. Clavet was kind of like an ATP version of Conchita Martinez, who could really draw players into his way of playing, and frustrated players in a manner not unlike Santoro.

There are so many guys who might be forgotten but deserve not to be. Hicham Arazi, Jerome Golmard, Julien Boutter, Karol Kucera, Nicolas Escude...

fast_clay
05-07-2009, 01:23 AM
http://cache3.asset-cache.net/xc/1241255.jpg?v=1&c=NewsMaker&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF19390335F8FA9CA92A690B3B074AE8E58EF 90F55034CEB503EE
Jay Berger (USA)
Born: 1966 - Career High Rank: #7 (16-Apr-90) - Height: 5' 11" - Weight: 75kg
Singles Titles: 3 (Beonos Aires, Sao Paulo, Charleston)
Berger turned professional in 1985. He played on the tour from 1985–91.
Grand Slam Best: 1989 Australian Open and French Open Quarter Finalist

He won his first top-level singles title in 1986 at BA. In 1988, he captured both the singles and doubles titles at Sao Paulo. In March he upset world # 2 Mats Wilander, 6–0, 7–5, in Orlando, Florida. In March 1989 Berger upset world # 3 Boris Becker, 6–1, 6–1, in Indian Wells. In May he upset world # 3 Mats Wilander, 6–3, 6–4, in Rome In August Berger beat world # 3 Stefan Edberg, 6–4, 6–2, at Indianapolis.
The most unusual aspect of Berger's game was an awkward, no-wind-up service motion in which the racket was started behind his shoulder, with no backswing. This service motion was adopted after a shoulder injury during junior tennis which made a normal service motion painful.
Berger was famous for using the aluminum Prince Pro oversize racquet, despite the fact that virtually all professionals were using graphite (or graphite composite) racquets. He continued to play with the Prince Pro, despite not having any endorsements from Prince. He still plays with the Prince Pro to this day.
Berger's racquets were strung at very high tensions, using inexpensive Prince Synthetic Gut string. It was not unusual to see his racquets getting warped out of shape with any moderate impact, since the tensions were at least 90 lb on many occasions (normal tension for that racquet was from 65–80 lb). During a match he would go through 5–6 rackets on average.
He was known for fiercely contesting long points. He would also write notes to himself during changeovers.http://cache1.asset-cache.net/xc/1227487.jpg?v=1&c=NewsMaker&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF19390335F8FA9CA92A6FCE760CDB17062D8 90F55034CEB503EE
Derrick Rostagno (USA)
Born 1965 - Career High Rank: #13 (11-Nov-91) - Weight: 75kg - Height 6'1"
Singles Titles: 1 (New Haven)
Rostagno turned professional in 1986.
Grand Slam Best: 1988 US Open Quarter Finalist

Rostagno's best performance at a Grand Slam event came at the 1988 US Open, where he reached the quarterfinals before being defeated by Ivan Lendl. At several other Grand Slam events, he defeated or almost defeated several tennis hall of famers. At Wimbledon in 1988, Rostagno lost a five-set third round match to Jimmy Connors, who at the time was ranked fifth in the world. At the 1989 US Open, Rostagno had a match point in his second round encounter with Boris Becker, who won that point on a lucky net cord passing shot and eventually the match 1–6, 6–7, 6–3, 7–6, 6–3, en route to his lone US Open title. At Wimbledon in 1990, Rostagno defeated John McEnroe in straight sets in the first round. At Wimbledon in 1991, Rostagno defeated ninth ranked pete Sampras in four sets in the second round and Connors in straight sets in the third round.
Rostagno finished his career with a 3–2 win-loss record versus McEnroe, winning their last three matches, and a 2–3 record versus Connors, winning their last two matches. Against other top players, Rostagno was 2–1 versus Sampras, 1–0 versus Yannick Noah, 1–1 versus Mats Wilander, 2–3 versus Lendl, 1–2 versus Becker, 3–6 versus Jim Courier, 0–1 versus Michael Chang, 0–1 versus Todd Martin, 0–2 versus Andre Agassi, and 0–4 versus Stefan Edberg.
Rostagno's career-high singles ranking was thirteenth in 1991. His career prize-money earnings totaled US$1,621,535. He retired from the professional tour in 1996.Rostagno said one highlight of his career was at Wimbledon in 1990 when he knocked out three-time champion McEnroe in the first round. It was one of only two times in McEnroe’s career that he lost in the first round at Wimbledon.

“It was a funny story. He was so angry after that match he said to the press he would never lose to me again,’’ Rostagno recalled. “Then we had to play in the semifinals the following week in Washington and I beat him there. It was hilarious in the press. They showed the interview and they showed his words. Two weeks later we played for a third time in the same summer and we were in a tie-breaker in the third set and he got so angry at something I don’t recall that he threw his racket and was defaulted. I was his nightmare that summer.”
McEnroe did not respond to a request for comment.

CmonAussie
05-07-2009, 01:41 AM
Vijay Amritraj (IND)

Birthdate: 14-Dec-53
Birthplace: Madras, India
Height: 6'4'' (193 cm)
Weight: 190 lbs (86 kg)
Plays: Right-handed


SINGLES CAREER TITLES (16): 1973--Bretton Woods, New Delhi; 1974--Washington, Beckenham; 1975--Columbus, Calcutta; 1976--Memphis WCT, Newport; 1977--Auckland, Bombay; 1978--Mexico City; 1979--Bombay; 1980--Newport, Bangkok; 1984--Newport; 1986--Bristol
FINALIST (8): 1973--South Orange; 1974--Tempe; 1976--St. Louis WCT; 1978--Cologne; 1980--WCT Invitational, Milan, WCT Challenge Cup; 1983--Stowe

DOUBLES CAREER TITLES (13): 1974--Columbus, Bombay; 1975--Atlanta WCT, Los Angeles; 1976--Memphis WCT; 1977--London / Queen's Club, Masters Doubles WCT; 1978--Mexico City; 1980--Rotterdam, Frankfurt; 1982--Chicago-2 WCT; 1983--Newport; 1986--Newport
FINALIST (15): 1973--New Delhi; 1974--South Orange; 1975--Toronto Indoor WCT, Washington Indoor WCT, Louisville, Calcutta; 1977--St. Louis WCT, Rotterdam; 1979--Cairo, Sydney Indoor, Louisville; 1981--Columbus; 1982--Baltimore WCT; 1983--Columbus; 1984--Stockholm

fast_clay
05-07-2009, 01:53 AM
http://cache4.asset-cache.net/xt/3260939.jpg?v=1&g=ha&s=1 (http://www.****************/detail/3260939/Hulton-Archive)http://cache2.asset-cache.net/xt/3262921.jpg?v=1&g=ha&s=1 (http://www.****************/detail/3262921/Hulton-Archive)http://cache4.asset-cache.net/xt/52800061.jpg?v=1&g=editorial_na&s=1 (http://www.****************/detail/52800061/Getty-Images-Sport)http://cache2.asset-cache.net/xt/84775656.jpg?v=1&g=editorial16&s=1 (http://www.****************/detail/84775656/Sports-Illustrated)http://cache3.asset-cache.net/xt/1531054.jpg?v=1&g=editorial_emea&s=1 (http://www.****************/detail/1531054/Getty-Images-Sport)http://cache3.asset-cache.net/xt/84775646.jpg?v=1&g=editorial16&s=1 (http://www.****************/detail/84775646/Sports-Illustrated)
yep... vijay had the moves... :worship: ramesh krishnan was another gift to the game...

Ilovetheblues_86
05-07-2009, 03:16 AM
Jerome Golmard
Height: 6'2'' (187 cm)
Weight: 170 lbs (77 kg)
Best South African Airways ATP Ranking: 22 (26-Apr-99)
Career Review
Singles Record: 144 - 143
Singles Titles: 2

http://www.cnnsi.com/tennis/news/1999/02/14/dubai_open/lg_golmard_ap_01.jpg

Golmard was awesome, very fast shots with short stance. Against Agassi in 1995 he was very young in AO he was destroyed by a goofy Agassi 2-6 3-6 1-6. That year he beat a young Kuerten at Medellin CH.At indianapolis beat Courier. His best tennis was found in 1999, he won Dubai beating Kucera, Henman, Moya, Kiefer, reached SF at Monte Carlo, and won Chennai.
Lost on DC against Kuerten on clay. Beat Norman in 2000, beat Agassi at Cincy. Reached Umag final in 2001, and Auckland in 2002. Beat Ivanisevic in AO on 2002. Never did well on Grand Slams however (R32 best result). Has a 2-6 against Kuerten.

Jerome is on facebook: http://pt-pt.facebook.com/people/Jerome-Golmard/695346651

Action Jackson
05-07-2009, 06:30 AM
http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=8831&highlight=older

Plenty of them in here.

Juan Aguilera
Andrei Chesnokov
Kent Carlsson
Magnus Larsson
Mikael Pernfors
Horst Skoff
Henrik Sundstrom
Karel Novacek
Joakim Nystrom

Guy Haines
05-07-2009, 06:43 AM
Like Jens Lekman, Jonas? ;) Nice thread title.

Goldenoldie
05-07-2009, 08:25 AM
Slobodan Zivojinovic must get a mention

JolánGagó
05-07-2009, 09:07 AM
Clavet was kind of like an ATP version of Conchita Martinez, who could really draw players into his way of playing, and frustrated players in a manner not unlike Santoro...

You've got a point but Pato, unlike Conchita, didn't really have the potential to be a greatest. No Pato's coach ever said, like all Conchita's coaches did, that he'd be a n.1 if he'd only be arsed.

Action Jackson
05-07-2009, 09:16 AM
The 'German Gigolo" Bernd Karbacher, there was a man of the people.

JolánGagó
05-07-2009, 09:32 AM
Alberto Berasategui

http://img245.imageshack.us/img245/3261/berasategui.jpg

Country: Spain
Birth: 28 June 1973
Height: 1.72 m (5 ft 7+1⁄2 in)
Weight: 65 kg (140 lb; 10.2 st)
Pro: 1991 - 2001
Career prize money: US$4,676,187
Singles Career record: 278–199
Highest ranking: No. 7 (14 November 1994)
Career titles: 14 (all on clay)

True claycourt specialist, he played and won all the clay giants of his era (Bruguera, Muster, Courier, ...) Short and with no obvious gifts, he made a nice career out of his limited talents. His ultra-extreme-western grip allowed him hit BH and a very wicked FH with the same side of the racket. He broke havoc on RG 94. He lives in Barcelona, where he's got real estate interests and plays golf with Cruyff, and is Vice President of the Federación Vasca de Tenis.

Machiavelli
05-07-2009, 09:36 AM
Alberto Berasategui
His ultra-extreme-western grip allowed him hit BH and a very wicked FH with the same side of the racket.
Saw him play live, unreal grip, good old days...

Action Jackson
05-07-2009, 10:02 AM
There are going to be some big copy/paste jobs coming up.

Carsten Arriens

Here was a character this guy managed to lose 6-0 6-0 to Rusedski in 29 minutes at Sydney and Rusedski was very bemused by the result as well.

He also got disqualified from RG for throwing his racquet and hit an official.

Now he coaches Andy Beck.

Action Jackson
05-07-2009, 10:19 AM
Richard Fromberg

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/1019292.jpg

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/72319860.jpg

Fromberg is around 196cm tall. Why was Fromberg so cool then? The man had a fro when it wasn't cool to have afros, so he wasn't a style junkie and he wore the visor as well in the 90s and never followed fashion trends.

He was an Aussie that could play on clay and 3 out of the 4 titles he won were on clay. He won in Båstad, Bologna, Wellington and Bucharest (still hasn't been paid for that).

Fromberg wasn't always that tall, but he had a huge growth spurt in his late teens and that is why his backhand was so crap for someone of that height, as he developed his game, he wasn't able to make he changes to the backhand. He had quite a good serve and a big forehand though the movement wasn't his best key.

He had enough chances to take Agassi in the 1990 DC final, but blew it. He made a 4R at the AO twice and made the 3R at the others at least once.

Known as Frommy or Schlongberg. He coaches at a club in Melbourne, after coaching the Gooch for a while in his role with Tennis Australia.

FairWeatherFan
05-07-2009, 11:03 AM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/olmedia/370000/images/_374788_stolt150.jpg

Jason Stoltenberg

Born 1970, ATP debut 1987, 4 singles titles, best ranking 19 (1994), retired 2001

Description: This guy was the very definition of natural talent. He started playing tennis when he was 10 on a home-built court on his family's farm in the Australian outback, and only 7 years later was good enough to be the no 1 junior in the world and win the junior Australian Open Championship. He had some of the most fluent strokes on tour, and was a true all-court player, having career successes on clay and grass. He never had the mentality or the big go-to weapon to become a true great. However, he was truly the embodiment of a natural, classic style. After retirement he went on to coach Lleyton Hewitt and become involved in Australian junior development.

Highlights: Wimbledon semi-final in 1996, 1993 Davis Cup final

miura
05-07-2009, 11:16 AM
J. Stoltenberg is also the name of our Prime Minister :lol:

prima donna
05-07-2009, 05:57 PM
Great thread, Jonas.

rocketassist
05-07-2009, 06:00 PM
Marc Rosset. He smokes and likes a drink apparently but because of Federer's glory in Switzerland people forget Marc achieved Olympic gold in the Barcelona Olympics, which was a great achievement.

Beating Arrese in front of the Spanish crowd over five sets as well, true Spartan form from the original Swiss master.

StanisKing
05-07-2009, 06:07 PM
The 'German Gigolo" Bernd Karbacher, there was a man of the people.

The worst haircut on the tour ever :worship:
I remember once he had small mustaches , that was :haha::haha::haha::haha:
Bavarian porn star is suiting him much more than German Gigolo.
I remember RG some year it was, he has beaten in form Ivanisevic and went to the quarter finals.

As for Berasategui- he played the racket with extremely "closed" grip- almost the same for BH and FH. Prone to knee injury exactly for the grip style.

rocketassist
05-07-2009, 06:15 PM
Another Swiss I remember.. Michel Kratochvil. Didn't win an awful lot but he had some talent and a nice game, he outplayed Henman for two sets in the 4th round of Wimbledon 2002, really dominated long periods of that match.

Action Jackson
05-07-2009, 06:16 PM
These are all copies from the other thread, well I wrote them.

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/mancinimontecarlo89.jpg

Alberto Mancini

The big strong Argentine baseliner of Italian descent, the Italians tried to get him to represent them, but he didn't.

He had a great one hand backhand, used the forehand to open the court up and great strength.

He won 3 titles all on clay but two of them were TMS Monte Carlo and Rome in 1989. He was the best player on clay in 89 while Muster was out injured, and was favoured to win the French that year and lost to Edberg. He beat Wilander (3x) and Becker that year.

He got injured in 1990 with knee problems, and he enjoyed the parties too much and ended up putting on a lot of weight. He had glimpses of making TMS finals in Rome losing to slicing Sanchez and in Miami losing to Chang.

He retired in 1994, coached Coria and was the Argie DC captain.

Action Jackson
05-07-2009, 06:26 PM
Bernd Karbacher

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/berndk.jpg

Karbacher, aka The German gigolo Bernd Karbacher he had the women swooning with great physique and studly appearance.

He definitely had his moments in the game, he was at his best on clay and had a big but unique serve and a big forehand were his true weapons. He made the RG quarter finals in 1986 , though he didn't have great endurance as was shown by losing to Rosset and to a kid in 99 called Gaudio from leading 2 sets to love.

The Gigolo won 3 titles and one of them he beat Muster in the semis in Germany and he beat Skoff in Båstad, when I thought the fat Austrian would win, but the Swedish ladies loved the German gigolo.

jonas
05-07-2009, 06:50 PM
Like Jens Lekman, Jonas? ;) Nice thread title.

But of course! ;) You too?

rocketassist
05-07-2009, 06:51 PM
Jiri Novak. Baseliner with nice passing shots and very consistent.

Action Jackson
05-07-2009, 06:57 PM
Andrei Chesnokov

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z266/exposbabe/chesnokov.jpg

Andrei Chesnokov he was the first Russian player to win a TMS title in Monte Carlo 1990. He also won the Canadian Open as well and could get some good results on hardcourts.

He was at his best from 1986-91, a very fast, fit and tactically very good player, his backhand was his best shot. He was at his best on clay and had his big chance of winning the French Open in 1989, and he lost to Chang in 4 sets, he lost the first one easily, and had plenty of chances to win the next three, but he bottled it when it came down to the crunch.

Andrei managed to beat Wilander twice at the French Open, only guys besides Lendl to do that, he also made the quarter finals of the Aus Open and made the quarters and semis at the French.

He was very funny in his interviews and treated the press as a joke, a bit like Medvedev and Safin, unlike those two he made the most of his abilities.

The injury he had was shocking. The injury he suffered in 1997 in a match against Woodbridge as he was off balance, and went to turn and chase this happened. Chesnokov had the bone of this ankle break straight through the skin.

He was shot with rubber bullets in the Ukraine during a dispute. He is back in Moscow doing some coaching, he was on the road with Safin for a while.

Ilovetheblues_86
05-07-2009, 07:00 PM
JAIME ONCINS
Birthdate: 16-Jun-70
Height: 6'5'' (195 cm)
Weight: 180 lbs (82 kg)
Best South African Airways ATP Ranking: 34 (3-May-93)
Best ATP Doubles Ranking: 22 (10-Jul-00)
Singles titles: 2 (Bologna, Buzios-1992) Doubles titles:5 (Sao Paulo-1991, Mexico-1993, Merano, Casablanco, Stuttgart Outdoor -1999)

http://static.hsw.com.br/gif/jaime-oncins-2.jpg

This guy was the first tennis player I remember cheering of, since he was a brazilian.
Jaime or Jaiminho was an interesting case, he was just a talented boy who started doing well on challengers as he made 20 years old, then he reached top 100 at 1991 reaching R32 at Australian Open, and R64 at Rg.In 1992 however he had an absolute stunning year, he won Bologna GP beating Gomez, Furlan and Roig, then he reached RG R16 beating Lendl 8-6 at the fifth set and losing to Korda, reached QF at Barcelona Olympics beating Chang and losing to Cherkasov on fifth. Also he helped Brazil reach SF at Dc beating Germany and Italy. Then at 1994 he slipped out of top 100, and never managed to came back, struggling on Challenger level. He then became a doubles specialist, doubles specialist, winning 5 titles and reaching SF at RG at 2000 (w/Orsanic) helping Brazil on Davis Cup doubles ties till 2001. Very top doubles player and decent singles player.
some nice DC matches partnering Kuerten:

1996 1st round - W MUSTER / PLAMBERGER partnering KUERTEN 7-6(2) 4-6 6-3 3-6 2-0 DEF
1998 1st round - W CORRETJA / SANCHEZ partnering KUERTEN 6-1 7-5 3-6 6-2
1999 1st round - W CORRETJA / COSTA partnering KUERTEN 6-2 5-7 4-6 6-4 6-3
2000 1st round - W ESCUDE / PIOLINE partnering KUERTEN 6-4 6-4 6-4
2000 QF - W HRBATY / KUCERA partnering KUERTEN 6-3 2-6 6-2 6-3
2000 SF - L STOLLE / WOODFORDE partnering KUERTEN 7-6(3) 4-6 6-3 3-6 4-6

zoparrat
05-07-2009, 07:10 PM
http://snag.bituhaf.com/360346.jpg

Jaime Yzaga Tori (born October 23, 1967 in Lima, Peru) is a former professional tennis player from Peru.

Yzaga played on the professional tour from 1984 to 1996. He reached career-high rankings of World No. 18 in singles and World No. 54 in doubles (both in 1989). He was a quarter-finalist at the Australian Open in 1991, and at the US Open in 1994, reaching the final eight by defeating a dominant (but ill) Pete Sampras in the previous round (grueling 5-setter). He had also beaten Pete in the 1988 US Open. Since retiring as a player, Yzaga has served as captain of Peru's Davis Cup team.

jonas
05-07-2009, 07:38 PM
Great mentions guys!
Some of the players I had totally forgot about.
I sometimes wonder why Norway and Denmark never can produce any players.
I can only recall Christian Ruud and Kenneth Carlsson.
Can you help me out, scandinavian neighbours?

Action Jackson
05-07-2009, 07:51 PM
Christian Ruud

http://www.nrksport.no/contentfile/file/1.2797462!img2797416.jpg

Christian Ruud was Norway's best ever player not that it says much. He never won a title, but made 2 finals on the tour. He was a gutsy baseliner in a way like Mantilla, but not as much topspin.

He had an average serve, fast around the court, forehand was better than his backhand. He should have beaten Becker at the Barcelona Olympics, but he choked as he did so often in 5 setters. He lost to Goran in a 5 setter at the AO.

Very persistent player, but just quite didn't have enough weight with this shots, he was at his best on clay, but played ok on the hardcourts and he beat Corretja at the Aus Open.

He had shoulder problems and had to retire and is now the Norwegian distributor for Global Caps the company that Wilander/Pernfors and Parnevik own.

propi
05-07-2009, 07:55 PM
I was lucky enough to see Magnus Larsson win the Zaragoza tournament, which oddly was played in february and on indoor carpet, he beat a German guy whose name I cannot remember (this sounds sooo Cervantian :p) but was a break down in both sets to end up winning 6-4.6-4 I think, the fact he won on my home town made me a fan of his; he was really unlucky during his peak years, especially on clay, losing Godó final vs. super Muster and on Roland Garros vs. Bruguera :hearts: but you could see he might not be orthodox but his game was effective.

I remember Golmard brilliant clay season; he had a bizarre but effective forehand and it was funny to see him always wearing that militia bandana :p

Some favourites of mine... Wayne Ferreira, Jacon Hlasek, Sargis Sargsian and the Italian who could have done much more than he did, Andrea Gaudenzi and Kucera :hearts:

OOps I forgot about MK Goelner brilliant clay season on Spain doing great in both Marbella and Mallorca :lol: his strokes there seemed extremely strong and almost impossible to catch (OK maybe I put some drama, but I was pretty young then :p)

Action Jackson
05-07-2009, 07:56 PM
Veli Paloheimo

http://www.tampereopen.fi/images/historia/paloheimo1988.jpg

http://www.berlinerbaeren.de/Teams/herren1-Dateien/image011.jpg

The best Finnish player before Jarkko Nieminen was on tour. He reached #48 in the world and made the 4th round of the Aus Open, where he lost to Wilander. He went over on his ankle and couldn't run in the last set, but refused to quit and got a great ovation.

He is now the tournament director of the Tampere Challenger.

kulikuli
05-07-2009, 07:57 PM
Andrei Chesnokov

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/Chessie.jpg

Andrei Chesnokov he was the first Russian player to win a TMS title in Monte Carlo 1990. He also won the Canadian Open as well and could get some good results on hardcourts.

He was at his best from 1986-91, a very fast, fit and tactically very good player, his backhand was his best shot. He was at his best on clay and had his big chance of winning the French Open in 1989, and he lost to Chang in 4 sets, he lost the first one easily, and had plenty of chances to win the next three, but he bottled it when it came down to the crunch.

Andrei managed to beat Wilander twice at the French Open, only guys besides Lendl to do that, he also made the quarter finals of the Aus Open and made the quarters and semis at the French.

He was very funny in his interviews and treated the press as a joke, a bit like Medvedev and Safin, unlike those two he made the most of his abilities.

The injury he had was shocking. The injury he suffered in 1997 in a match against Woodbridge as he was off balance, and went to turn and chase this happened. Chesnokov had the bone of this ankle break straight through the skin.

He was shot with rubber bullets in the Ukraine during a dispute. He is back in Moscow doing some coaching, he was on the road with Safin for a while.

Chesnokov was interviewed on Dutch television two years ago, because of a benefit match for the victims of a soccer tragedy in Moscow in 1982.

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/wire?section=soccer&id=2775800

jonas
05-07-2009, 08:03 PM
Christian Ruud

He had shoulder problems and had to retire and is now the Norwegian distributor for Global Caps the company that Wilander/Pernfors and Parnevik own.

Come on Action Jackson, give me your sources now! ;)
No, seriously, how can you know so much? Are you involved with the ATP? :p

Action Jackson
05-07-2009, 08:04 PM
Filip Dewulf

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/dew.jpg

Dewulf was a very talented player and played his best on clay. He had a very good forehand, moved around the court very well and had some excellent touch, but he didn't really achieve as much as he could have, due to a love of the party life and an aversion to training. He was very good friends with Arazi and they do share certain similarities between them.

He managed the feat in 1997 of winning more matches than the champion at Roland Garros as he came through the qualies and made the semi finals and lost to the eventual champion Guga in 4 sets. He defeated Corretja in the 4th round in very windy conditions and previously he beat Meligieni and Portas in 5 setters.

He loved playing in Austria as he won both his titles. He won the Vienna indoor as a qualie beating Muster in the final. The other in Kitzi, must have liked the nightlife. He retired with a lot of injury problems and writes a blog at the Graveyard.

miura
05-07-2009, 08:07 PM
Christian Ruud

http://www.nrksport.no/contentfile/file/1.2797462!img2797416.jpg

Christian Ruud was Norway's best ever player not that it says much. He never won a title, but made 2 finals on the tour. He was a gutsy baseliner in a way like Mantilla, but not as much topspin.

He had an average serve, fast around the court, forehand was better than his backhand. He should have beaten Becker at the Barcelona Olympics, but he choked as he did so often in 5 setters. He lost to Goran in a 5 setter at the AO.

Very persistent player, but just quite didn't have enough weight with this shots, he was at his best on clay, but played ok on the hardcourts and he beat Corretja at the Aus Open.

He had shoulder problems and had to retire and is now the Norwegian distributor for Global Caps the company that Wilander/Pernfors and Parnevik own.
Christian :worship:

Action Jackson
05-07-2009, 08:17 PM
Roberto Carretero

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/BetoC.jpg

The ultimate bolter, he won 1996 Hamburg as a qualifier and didn't win an event after that or many other matches.

He was short and stocky, had a very quick service motion and loved the kicker to the backhand on the ad side and dominate from there.

Carretero used to play juniors with Corretja and Costa and had a lot of talent, but he had knee problems and the first one held him up when he played on the circuit.

A former RG junior winner. He almost got into a fight with the Poo in Rome. After he won Hamburg, what it meant to him, he said something along the lines of "more wine and women"

His run in Hamburg.

R1: def. Jordi Arrese, 6-3,5-7,7-6(2)
R2: def. MaliVai Washington (10), 6-1,6-0
R3: def. Arnaud Boetsch (7), 6-4,6-1
QF def. Gilbert Schaller (16), 4-6,6-4,6-4
SF: def. Yevgeny Kafelnikov (3), 7-5,6-2
F: def. Alex Corretja, 2-6,6-4,6-4,6-4

After that he jumped up 85 places and only won one match that year which was a default from Jordi Burillo in 1R US Open.

Action Jackson
05-07-2009, 08:47 PM
Carlos Costa

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/CCstoppboll.jpg


Carlos Costa well he was a guy at his best on clay, but he also managed some big wins on hardcourts against the top players for example Ivanisevic at the US Open, Sampras in Stockholm on carpet and Becker in Indian Wells.

1992 was his year though, he came out and won Estoril and Barcelona in a row, then managed to beat Agassi later that year before losing to Edberg in Hamburg. He ended up winning 6 titles all on clay, and was a very good mover with an excellent one hand backhand, who when in the mood could play some very good shots off both sides. Had a strange looking serve and very western forehand grip.

He gave up his spot in the Spanish Olympic team in 1992 for his friend Arrese.

Carles now works for IMG and manages Nalbandian and Nadal.

Ilovetheblues_86
05-07-2009, 09:21 PM
DAVID PRINOSIL
http://www.geocities.com/david_prinosil_fanpage/start.jpg
Height: 6'1'' (185 cm)
Weight: 180 lbs (82 kg)
Best South African Airways ATP Ranking: 28 (23-Apr-01)
Best ATP Doubles Ranking:12 (20-Aug-01)
SINGLES CAREER TITLES (3): 1995--Newport; 1996--Ostrava; 2000--Halle DOUBLES CAREER TITLES (10): 1992--Rotterdam, Umag; 1993--Long Island; 1997--Long Island; 1998--Ostrava; 1999--Vienna; 2000--Moscow, Copenhagen; 2001--Washington; 2002--Halle

I never thought Prinosil as a good player in my idiotic youth thougts, however reading his bio I see Germany had a very good player but who usually did better in doubles than singles. Prinosil definely liked fast courts, but he was an all-round player, that could play o.k. on clay too. However, he is underrated because he never reached past R16 in GS (once, at Wimbledon, 2001)
He has a bronze medal in doubles playing with Goelnner(Atlanta).
Maybe he was too all-round in a specialized decade like the 90´s, he would probably do better on this new era, but he could beat guys like Berasategui on Clay and Safin and Hard Courts
His most memorable matches are:

L R32 RG92 Oncins, Jaime (BRA) 72 3-6 2-6 2-6 Too young.
L R64 RG94 Agenor, Ronald (USA) 31 7-6(4) 7-6(2) 3-6 4-6 12-14
L R32 A095 McEnroe, Patrick (USA)65 3-6 2-6 4-6 Oh no.
W W Newport95 Wheaton, David (USA) 28 7-6(3) 5-7 6-2 First title
W QF Dubai95 Enqvist, Thomas (SWE) 7 6-2 6-3 Prinosil on his firstpeak
W W Ostrava96 Korda, Petr (CZE) 49 6-1 6-2 He beat Krajicek, Martin and Henman
L R128 AO 97 Meligeni, Fernando 94 7-5 6-1 1-6 5-7 7-9 Bad on GS
W R64 Rome 99 Rios, Marcelo (CHI) 6 6-2 5-7 6-3 Good display!
W W Halle 00 Krajicek, Richard (NED)32 6-3 6-2 His rkg was 130,beat Kafelnikov
L R16 Wimby 00 Agassi, Andre (USA) 1 4-6 3-6 3-6 Best GS result
W SF Moscow 00 Safin, Marat (RUS) 2 6-7(4) 6-3 6-3 Then lost on final.

Slipped away from top 100 in 2001. Very competitive player, managed to have a good singles/doubles career at the same time! :worship::worship: Also very dangerous, could definetely beat a top10.

PiggyGotRoasted
05-07-2009, 09:41 PM
Oscar Hernandez

The king was forgotten about lost in time ages ago when he was disguised as Rod Laver... As he felt he was way too good for everyone else as he proved back then he decided to reincarnate himself as the true self... Oscar Hernandez. This is why Rod Laver seems to of dissapeared, and why he tanks so many matches, however unfortuently for other players if he decides not to tank he is unbeatable.

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/TheRegalone.jpg

out_here_grindin
05-07-2009, 09:45 PM
Jay Berger played college tennis at Clemson. :worship:

fast_clay
05-07-2009, 11:25 PM
stoltenberg's game was developed on fast clay... not far from where i grew up... this crushed antbed surface had the qualities to produce the complete player, similar to what was common in 60's australia... it would go something like: a heavy schedule on fast clay ---> score enough wins there ----> then adapt your skill on grass in city invitational events...

so good was stoltz that when Courier was at his peak he still believed that stoltz was the most talented player getting around... memories still fresh from the first crop of the bolletieri crew getting pasted fairly handily... but still, as fairweather fan said, the lack of a big stroke prevented him from entering the top 10, yet... more damaging was the constant string of injuries that hindered him sustaining a 100% level of form for longer than 6 months at a time...

a classic nonetheless...

fast_clay
05-07-2009, 11:45 PM
I also remember Jaime Yzaga's run at the now defunct Australian Indoors in 1993... he was in irresistable form... no matter what people were throwing at him, he just kept waltzing right through the punishment... especially that thumping topspin backhand...

RD1: def Brad Gilbert 6/2 6/2
RD2: def Richard Fromberg 6/4 6/3
QF: def Jim Courier 6/4 2/6 6/4
SF: def Goran Ivanisevic 6/3 6/4
F: def Petr Korda 6/4 4/6 7/6(4) 7/6(7)

2nd seed Becker lost in round 1 to Champion Aussie Battler Neil Borwick... :spit: p!ss funny...

I miss that tourney...

Action Jackson
05-08-2009, 07:59 AM
Jason Stoltenberg that was a quality find and fast_clay and Fairweather fan summed him up very well. The lack of a big shot cost him. He married a former Czech WTA player and another great mind that Aussie tennis isn't using.

d3ck
05-08-2009, 09:55 AM
Action Jackson could you post about Juan Aguilera, I watched his final against Becker in Hamburg... impressive, he was 7# ATP in 1984, I remember he was quite a talent but not liked discipline or training.

Thanks

Action Jackson
05-08-2009, 10:13 AM
Juan Aguilera

Juan Aguilera was a very talented player, he had great touch from both sides and a fine backhand, he won 5 titles, one of them was Hamburg as a qualifier. He used to play at the same club as a kid as the one Alex Corretja came through.

1984 was his breakthrough year, then he lost a bit of motivation and also quite a lot of injury problems with his knee and he was out from Aug 86- Apr 87 with injury and didn't play more than once a month until September of that year.

In 89 he won a tournament and he was a bit of a resurgence for him and then he came back stronger and better than ever in 90 by winning Nice and Hamburg. He also made the 3rd round of Wimbledon on his 1st attempt at playing on grass.

StanisKing
05-08-2009, 10:52 AM
http://i.a.cnn.net/si/2006/writers/franz_lidz/11/30/enqvist/p1_enqvist_1130.jpg
THOMAS ENQVIST

I almost forgot one of my favourites in the 90's.
Thomas Enqvist retired few years ago. Great style, as a junior won Wimbledon and AO.

Won 18 titles, runner up in 1999 AO final where was defeated by Kafelnikov 3:1 after taking the first set.
Great flat hitter from both wings.
Won 3 Masters Series titles Paris, Stuttgard and Cincy.

fast_clay
05-08-2009, 04:15 PM
Jason Stoltenberg that was a quality find and fast_clay and Fairweather fan summed him up very well. The lack of a big shot cost him. He married a former Czech WTA player and another great mind that Aussie tennis isn't using.

its the rare gems like stoltenberg and cahill that give me hope that we haven't lost our way completely just yet... that breed was the one that were meant to be the next wave but for them being plagued by injury... yet, is it the fact that neither fulfilled their own potential that gives them the desire that allows them to considered the best coaches in the world today... like any pursuit, there lives a double edged sword, and with the records as coaches that they both own, i am sure they wouldn't have it any other way than what they have now...

yes mate... sadly under utilised... yet... they connect the current, to the classics...

Myrre
05-08-2009, 04:58 PM
Roberto Carretero

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/BetoC.jpg

The ultimate bolter, he won 1996 Hamburg as a qualifier and didn't win an event after that or many other matches.

He was short and stocky, had a very quick service motion and loved the kicker to the backhand on the ad side and dominate from there.

Carretero used to play juniors with Corretja and Costa and had a lot of talent, but he had knee problems and the first one held him up when he played on the circuit.

A former RG junior winner. He almost got into a fight with the Poo in Rome. After he won Hamburg, what it meant to him, he said something along the lines of "more wine and women"

His run in Hamburg.

R1: def. Jordi Arrese, 6-3,5-7,7-6(2)
R2: def. MaliVai Washington (10), 6-1,6-0
R3: def. Arnaud Boetsch (7), 6-4,6-1
QF def. Gilbert Schaller (16), 4-6,6-4,6-4
SF: def. Yevgeny Kafelnikov (3), 7-5,6-2
F: def. Alex Corretja, 2-6,6-4,6-4,6-4

After that he jumped up 85 places and only won one match that year which was a default from Jordi Burillo in 1R US Open.

What is a bolter?

Action Jackson
05-08-2009, 05:07 PM
What is a bolter?

Hugest surprise, you know like when Greece winning EM 2004 in the football, that is a bolter, cause no one at all except the most biased Greek fan would have expected that.

fast_clay
05-08-2009, 05:12 PM
Bolter: Robert Smeets - French Open 2009 Champion...

a bolter is beyond underdog... he is unseen... in the shadows... he lay in the darkness... and, usually returns there when he is done...

Action Jackson
05-08-2009, 05:19 PM
Joakim Nyström

Mats Wilander's best friend Joakim Nyström. Nyström and Mats were friends from childhood. They won the Wimbledon doubles together which was a good effort considering both of them at the time had average serves, though excellent from the baseline.

Nyström's best surface was clay, but could play well on hardcourt and indoors. 1986 was his hot period where he won 5 titles before RG and was expected to do well, but he burned out in the 1st round against McNamee. Of those 5 tournaments 2 were Super 9s, La Quinta which was the venue one year before Indian Wells and Monte Carlo.

He was a clever and crafty player hitting with very good angles, depth, though not as much as topspin as say Wilander who he nearly always lost to when they played. He was a top 10 player for 2 years, then suffered a lot of injuries and then retired.

He is Wilander's assistant to the Davis Cup team and he was Fed Cup captain for a while. He and Wilander used to own a brewery and he coached on tour for a while.

He is still in good condition. He was coaching Nieminen and Melzer, now he solely works with Melzer.

http://www.tennisserver.com/turbo/images/citibank99/JOAKIM~1.JPG

Priam
05-08-2009, 05:21 PM
Petr Korda maybe?

StanisKing
05-08-2009, 05:25 PM
This is really great thread, I am impressed.
Does anyone has maybe a idea about thread for former players but what they are doing at the moment, where they live and so on.....
I would love so start that kind of thread, but unfortunately do not have enough info for more than 4-5 players :(

fast_clay
05-08-2009, 05:26 PM
nystrom was technically supreme and mentally built for clay and the long haul GS play imo- for this alone he is a wonderful study... however, lacked what musicians would term 'vibrato', to seperate him from his swedish contemperaries wilander and edberg, and that is no criticism...

Action Jackson
05-08-2009, 05:28 PM
This is really great thread, I am impressed.
Does anyone has maybe a idea about thread for former players but what they are doing at the moment, where they live and so on.....
I would love so start that kind of thread, but unfortunately do not have enough info for more than 4-5 players :(

There is a thread here called "Where are they Now".

rocketassist
05-08-2009, 07:05 PM
I didn't get to see the games of:

Aaron Krickstein
Slava Dosedel
Tomas Carbonell
Horacio de la Pena
Jan Siemerink
Karim Alami
Daniel Orsanic
Gianluca Pozzi
Shuzo Matsuoka
Jared Palmer (took a set off Sampras during Wimbledon domination)

Any info about these would be appreciated :)

Action Jackson
05-08-2009, 07:11 PM
I will do Krickstein and De La Peña before I go to sleep.

Action Jackson
05-08-2009, 07:19 PM
Aaron Krickstein

http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w50/vsbabolat/AaronKrickstein.jpg

He along with Jimmy Arias, where the first of the Nick "forehand factory" Bollietieri academy products and made a big impact on tour.

He defeated Edberg and Gerulaitas at the US Open and is still the youngest man to win an ATP title at 16yrs old in the religious homeland of Israel. He won 9 titles, biggest shot was the forehand, had a solid but not spectacular backhand.

Had the best record of coming back from 2 sets to 0 down, doing it 10 times, but is remembered for the match he lost at the US Open against Connors.

Hardcourts were his best surface, but was solid on clay.

He suffered a lot of injuries, stress fractures in both feet, wrist and knee problems put him out of the game for lengthy periods of time.

After tennis, he went into the cleaning business, sold that at a profit and is now director of St. Andrew's Country Club in Boca Raton. He is the uncle of golfer Morgan Pressel.

Action Jackson
05-08-2009, 07:36 PM
Horacio de la Peña

http://www.generaenlinea.cl/intranet/foto_poder/Horacio-de-la-Pena-1.jpg

The little Argie left hander with the voice that sounds like Speedy Gonzalez. He was a crafty player, who played with a lot of topspin especially on the forehand, he didn't have the power of his peers.

I remember when he won Kitzi his biggest title against Novacek, where he just ran him ragged with the angles and the big Czech just wanted to rip the ball, but it was either below the knees or above the head.

A claycourt specialist, never won a match on grass, won 4 titles all on clay.

Coached Gaudio, Acasuso, Squillari, Gonzo as well. Lives in Chile and has an academy there I think.

LeChuck
05-08-2009, 08:23 PM
http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/1999/453/sports1.jpg

Karim 'the dream' Alami was regarded as something of a gem and unique player on the tour. He was breathtaking to watch when he was on song. Even though clay was his favourite surface, he primarily liked to serve-volley and play agressively. He admitted that he became bored staying at the baseline for too long. He was reliant on his serve and would struggle when it wasn't firing on all cyclinders. Like his notable compatriots Arazi and El Ayanoui, he was regarded as a clever, wily player, and a showman who could frequently mix things up and entertain. His forehand was a pretty good shot. His chop shot was something of a speciality. His weakness was his backhand which many of his opponents could expose, and it was a shot that he had trouble sustaining during longer rallies. He worked hard to try to improve it during the latter years of his career, becoming better at counterattacking and sending his BH back higher from the baseline. He enjoyed varying his style of play and attempting different shots. He didn't really a have a strict, rigid approach so to speak. Apparently in 1991 he was training on Florida and decided to working on switching to a one handed backhand.
He speaks 6 languages fluently, French, Arabic, Spanish, English, Italian and Portuguese. He was a very athletic player with good fitness levels. Many people compared him to Yannick Noah, who along with Lendl, was one of his favourite players to watch as a kid.
He won 2 ATP titles, both in 1996, at Atlanta on green clay and Palermo on red clay, and was a runner-up 4 times (all of those finals were also on clay).
Some of his notable results:
- Beating the the world no. 1 and peak Sampras at Doha in 1994, statistically the best year of Pete's career.
- Beating Bruguera at Rome in 1997, a few weeks before Sergi reached the RG final.
- Beating Corretja at Rome in 1998, who also went on to reach the RG final a few weeks later.
- Two of his wins over Al Costa, at Barcelona in 1999 en-route to the final where he lost to Mantilla, and at Monte-Carlo in 2000 en-route to the last 4 where was downed by Pioline. He led his h2h against big Al 3-1.

His best ever grand slam results were reaching the 3rd of the Aussie Open in 1998 and 2000, and also R3 at RG in 2001. He only won a grand total of 4 matches combined at Wimbledon and the US Open. His career high ranking was world no. 25 which he reached in February 2000.

He said that he enjoyed the challenge of facing Spanish players on clay, many of who he could bamboozle with his variety and constant switching of tactics.
He retired in 2003 after losing in the Dubai qualies. Since then he has done some commentary work for Al-Jazeera sports, coached some kids, and become the tournament director at Doha.

I would rank him as one of my 5 favourite players of all-time. I had the pleasure of watching him live against Sampras at Toronto in 2000, and speaking to him afterwards. He is a very nice guy.

prima donna
05-08-2009, 08:24 PM
http://www.whitehousemuseum.org/west-wing/tennis-courts-1923.jpg

Bill Tilden

Born into a wealthy Philadelphia family, Big Bill developed an appreciation of the finer things in life at an early age: writing and theater, two passions which would accompany him throughout his illustrious tennis career. In 1917 he dropped out of the prestigious University of Pennsylvania, deciding to devote himself to the sport of tennis.

In the winter of 1919-20 he retreated to Providence, Rhode Island where, on the indoor court of a close friend, he would hone his backhand, ultimately emerging with a topspin backhand. Big Bill also spent that frigid winter chopping wood in order to strengthen his frail physique of 140 pounds; his diet consisted primarily of steak and potatoes, as well as the odd lamb chop.

Big Bill was known for his flamboyance, self-absorbed personality, and all-court game which was the first of its kind in his era. Tilden's service motion was fluent, he had as part of his repertoire a cannon ball serve, American twist serve, and slice serve. He was primarily a baseliner, venturing to net only as a strategic ploy to keep his opponents guessing.

As an aspiring actor and writer, Big Bill was predisposed to melodramatic behavior. Amongst other things, he would unnecessarily prolong matches so as to capture the intrigue of spectators, throwing games and sets only to mount seemingly heroic comebacks.

Big Bill amassed 7 U.S. Championship titles and 3 Wimbledon titles. He also made the finals of Wembley four times, while winning the United States Professional Championship twice, and winning the French Championship once.

As a writer, one of his most inspirational works is entitled The Art of Lawn Tennis, which can be found at: http://www.nalanda.nitc.ac.in/resources/english/etext-project/sports/tennis/part-1chapter1.html.html

izEbU5u5J-I

cobalt60
05-08-2009, 08:25 PM
Horacio de la Peña

http://www.generaenlinea.cl/intranet/foto_poder/Horacio-de-la-Pena-1.jpg

The little Argie left hander with the voice that sounds like Speedy Gonzalez. He was a crafty player, who played with a lot of topspin especially on the forehand, he didn't have the power of his peers.

I remember when he won Kitzi his biggest title against Novacek, where he just ran him ragged with the angles and the big Czech just wanted to rip the ball, but it was either below the knees or above the head.

A claycourt specialist, never won a match on grass, won 4 titles all on clay.

Coached Gaudio, Acasuso, Squillari, Gonzo as well. Lives in Chile and has an academy there I think.

Total jerk if ever I saw/met one. Crafty is a nice word to describe him :p

Myrre
05-08-2009, 09:03 PM
Hicham Arazi next please. Great backhand!

FairWeatherFan
05-09-2009, 05:07 AM
http://www.atpworldtour.com/5/photos/headshots/main/I052_MS.jpg

Andrew Ilie

Born 1976, ATP debut 1994, 2 singles titles, best ranking 38 (1994), retired 2004

Description: This guy was something of a cult hero in Australia in the late 90s/early 00s with his dramatic and successful performances at the Australian Open. His game was kamikaze-style, and consisted of ripping shots with little margin from the baseline. Apart from the AO's slow harcourts, he was good on clay and both his titles came on that surface. His sense of humour and trademark celebration after winning matches (in which he ripped his shirt to shreds) endeared him to fans. The love that Melbourne shows for Baghdatis was similar to that for Ilie.
Unfortunately he had a disastrous falling out with Tennis Australia after an abysmal performance in Davis Cup against Argentina in 2002. His career also was ended by injury. A sad way to go out because Ilie was a nice story (fled Romania and was a refugee before coming to Aus).

Highlights: Definitely the highlight was the AO 4r in 2001, where he beat Ferrero and Youzhny before losing in four sets to Agassi, and he also reached another 4r in 1999. Atlanta and Coral Springs were his titles.

LeChuck
05-09-2009, 11:09 AM
HERNÁN GUMY

http://www.tennisserver.com/turbo/images/turbo_01_04/Gumy2.jpg

The Gumy Bear was probably more talented at scoring chicks on a night out than points on a tennis court, but he was still a good player. His main strengths were his incredible heart, strength and condition. He certainly was an impressive physical specimen and a fierce fighter. He played with a one handed backhand. It was a nice shot but wasn't overly flashy.
He won 1 ATP title, at Santiago in 1996, beating the home favourite Ríos in the final. That was his only victory over Ríos in 7 attempts, but it was funny that it came in the one match they contested that would have been of most importance to Ríos. He won the gold medal at the Pan-American Games in 1995 at Mar del Plata, beating Frana in the final.
Of course the most notable match that he featured in was his epic R3 clash against Corretja at RG 1998. It last 5 hours 31 minutes and took place over two days, with Corretja eventually winning 6-1 5-7 6-7(4) 7-5 9-7. I believed that it was the longest grand slam match of all-time until the Santoro-Clement 6 hour 35 minute bonanza at RG 2004 toppled it. On the first day play was actually suspended on set point to Corretja at 5-4 in the 4th set. Gumy fought back from 1-5 down in the final set, saving 4 match points, before eventually succumbing. Along with the 1996 Aussie Open, and 1996 and 1997 US Opens, that was the furthest that he progessed at a grand slam. He absolutely demolished the reigning RG champion Guga 6-1 6-3 at Kitzbühel in 1997. One match that I don't have fond memories of, was when he had a match-point against Calatrava at Orlando in 1998, but twisted his ankle and had to retire after losing the 2nd set.
He had quite a funny grunt that sounded like he was screaming 'wwoooopeeeee'. Like his most recent pupil Safin, he was very hot headed and was known to smash rackets all over the place, continually pissing off his managers.
His career high ranking was no. 39 in August 1996. There were times in the mid 90s when he was the only Argentinian player ranked in the top 100. This was before the generation of Cañas, Gaudio, Squillari, Zabaleta and Puerta etc really emerged.
He certainly had a sizeable female fanbase :lol:.
He speaks 5 languages fluently, Spanish, French, English, Italian and Portuguese.
Since retiring from tennis he has coached Cañas (with some success I thought), Kuerten, Calleri (very briefly), Coria and of course Safin.

CmonAussie
05-09-2009, 12:35 PM
Shuzo Matsuoka (松岡修造, born November 6, 1967, in Tokyo, Japan) is a former professional tennis player from Japan.
Matsuoka turned professional in 1986. In 1989, he finished runner-up in the top-level tournament at Wellington, and captured the doubles title in Auckland.

In 1992, Matsuoka became the first Japanese player to win a singles event on the ATP Tour when he captured the title in Seoul. He was also runner-up at the prestigious grass court tournament at Queen's Club that year.

Matsuoka's best performance at a Grand Slam event came at Wimbledon in 1995, where he reached the quarter-finals before being knocked out by Pete Sampras in four sets 7–6, 3–6, 4–6, 2–6. Matsuoka's serve gave Sampras fits in the first set and looked to be on his way to the semifinals until Pete solved the puzzle that was Matsuoka's serve. Matsuoka was unable to subdue the defending champion in the next 3 sets.

At the US Open in 1995, Matsuoka was left writhing in pain on court after being stricken by cramps during his first round match against Petr Korda. The rules at the time meant that Matsuoka would have forfeited the match if he had gotten medical attention, so he was left to suffer until he defaulted for delaying the match. The incident led to a change in the rules of professional tennis to allow players to receive medical treatment during matches.

Matsuoka's career-high world rankings were World No. 46 in singles (in 1992) and World No. 95 in doubles (in 1989). His career prize-money earnings totalled US$1,117,112. He retired from the professional tour in April 1998.

Renaud
05-09-2009, 01:12 PM
I would like to read (videos maybe ?) about Henrik Holm, Guillermo Perez Roldan and Stephane Simian. :)

Action Jackson
05-09-2009, 01:16 PM
I would like to read (videos maybe ?) about Henrik Holm, Guillermo Perez Roldan and Stephane Simian. :)

Holm and Perez Roldan are in the oldies thread, will do the copy and paste.

Action Jackson
05-09-2009, 01:54 PM
Guillermo Perez Roldan

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/PerezRoldan01-1.jpg

He was strong as a bull, as strong as Mancini if not stronger. He won the Roland Garros juniors twice in a row, probably because he was bigger than everyone else and he hit harder. Allegedly they said he could lift up a car and he had the tree trunk legs.

Perez Roldan won 9 titles all on the clay, he defended Munich, San Marino and Casachallenger. He had some famous matches, but was usually losing them. He took Becker to 5 sets at RG and lost. Lost to Lendl in the Rome final of 1988 in a 5 setter, where the Roman crowd where cheering him like a local.

At RG 1988 he and Agassi were slapping the crap out of the ball and broke the net. This was Perez Roldan's weakness, he'd hit hard, but not much thought behind it.

Playing Medvedev at RG and losing in 5 sets.

RVR0dbR7UfA

Renaud
05-09-2009, 02:31 PM
At RG 1988 he and Agassi were slapping the crap out of the ball and broke the net.


Probably the first match i watched from the beginning to the end. Both players was back then my favorite players ever. Probably for at least 2 or 3 days.

Action Jackson
05-09-2009, 03:23 PM
Hicham Arazi

http://i.cn.cz:8080/1075307940_arazi.jpg

The very small and slight Moroccan left hander who was a very talented player who relied on timing and angles instead of raw power. Classic single hand backhand, was the 3rd of the Moroccan trio Alami and El Ayanoui, both shotmakers as well.

He made 4 GS quarter finals twice at the AO and twice at RG. He had some big wins, defeating Rios at RG, it was a pleasure watching these two small and clever players trying to outdo each other with angles and changes of pace.

Arazi won only 1 title in Casablanca and lost to Guga in Monte Carlo. He wasn't the most dedicated when it came to physical training, spoke Spanish, Italian, French, English and Arabic. Liked to enjoy life away from the court, didn't mind the parties or the cigarettes.

Stop playing a few years ago, he lost the love of the game.

fast_clay
05-09-2009, 07:19 PM
ilie... only dude i know ready to pound a game full of backhand drive volleys off the baseline...

CooCooCachoo
05-09-2009, 10:38 PM
Hicham Arazi, now that was a player :worship:

CooCooCachoo
05-09-2009, 10:40 PM
Christian Ruud

http://www.nrksport.no/contentfile/file/1.2797462%21img2797416.jpg

Christian Ruud was Norway's best ever player not that it says much. He never won a title, but made 2 finals on the tour. He was a gutsy baseliner in a way like Mantilla, but not as much topspin.

He had an average serve, fast around the court, forehand was better than his backhand. He should have beaten Becker at the Barcelona Olympics, but he choked as he did so often in 5 setters. He lost to Goran in a 5 setter at the AO.

Very persistent player, but just quite didn't have enough weight with this shots, he was at his best on clay, but played ok on the hardcourts and he beat Corretja at the Aus Open.

He had shoulder problems and had to retire and is now the Norwegian distributor for Global Caps the company that Wilander/Pernfors and Parnevik own.

Legend on the Challenger level :worship:

CooCooCachoo
05-09-2009, 10:41 PM
Marcelo Filippini

Marcelo Filippini (born August 4 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_4), 1967 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1967), in Montevideo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montevideo)) is a former professional tennis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennis) player from Uruguay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uruguay).
Filippini began playing tennis at the age of five. He turned professional in 1987. In 1988, he won his first top-level singles title at Båstad (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_Open), and his first tour doubles title in Palermo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campionati_Internazionali_di_Sicilia).
Over the course of his career, Filippini won five ATP Tour (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Association_of_Tennis_Professionals) singles titles and three doubles titles. His career-high rankings were World No. 30 in singles (in 1990) and World No. 44 in doubles (in 1989).
In 1996, Filippini played what was longest known game in ATP Tour (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Association_of_Tennis_Professionals) history at Casablanca (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Prix_Hassan_II), going to deuce 28 times with Alberto Berasategui (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberto_Berasategui) in one game of a 6–2, 6–3 first round loss.
Filippini's best performance at a Grand Slam (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Slam_%28tennis%29) event came at the French Open (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Open) in 1999, where he reached the quarter-finals before being knocked-out by eventual champion Andre Agassi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andre_Agassi).
Filippini retired from the professional tour in 2000.


What a guy :worship:

Corswandt
05-10-2009, 12:17 AM
Andrei Chesnokov

He is back in Moscow doing some coaching, he was on the road with Safin for a while.

He's currently coaching Vesnina - with success, particularly considering Vesnina's limitations.

LeChuck
05-10-2009, 12:42 AM
FERNANDO MELIGENI

http://colunas.globoesporte.com/files/150/2008/04/meligeni_blog.jpg

Fininho was a leftie with a one handed backhand. His best shot was his forehand which he could generate wicked angles with and pound deep into the corners. His deft flicks and precise lobs were things of beauty. He was in good shape and looked like could keep on rallying all day long.
He was born in Argentina but moved to Brazil when he was 12 years old.
He is most remembered for semi-final run at RG in 1999, beating the no. 3 seed Rafter, and also Mantilla and Corretja (who unfortunately was sick an suffering from an allergic reaction) on the way, before losing to Medvedev in 4 sets. He actually won 2 more points than Medvedev that day, and lost the opening set from 4-0 up. He had 3 break points for a double break advantage in the 4th set, but couldn't convert any of them, eventually losing the set on a tiebreak, and with it the match. In October of that year he reached a career high ranking of world no. 25.
He won 3 ATP singles titles, at Båstad in 1995, Pinehurt in 1996 (beating Rafter in his QF, and Wilander in the final in Mats's final season on the tour) and Prague in 1998 (beating Kafelnikov in the 2nd round). He reaching the final in the inaugural edition of the Costa do Sauípe event in 2001, but unfortunately lost in 3 sets to Jan Vacek. He also won 7 doubles titles, 5 of them alongside his good friend Guga.
He finished 4th at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, losing to Bruguera in his SF, and to Paes in the bronze medal match. I remember when he toyed with Sampras at Roma in 1999, demolishing him and showing him how clay court tennis should be played.
He taught Roddick at lession at Washington in 2002, beating him 6-4 6-4. Deep in the 2nd set, he lunged to his forehand side to hit a superb reflex volley winner, and earned a high-five from Roddick.

He is the only played to ever get defaulted from Estoril, in 1999 during his QF against Todd Martin. Apparently he threw a racket against the wall and it bounced into a ball kid.
In a doubles match at RG 1998, he was played with Guga against Rafter/Bjorkman. After losing the first set tiebreak, an angry Guga threw his racket away. It narrowly missed the umpire Bruno Rebeuh (the guy who was involved in the whole Tarango saga at Wimbledon 1995) and hit a fan in the stands. They were disqualified.

His last ever tournament appearance came at the Pan Am games in Santo Domingo in 2003. He won the gold medal, beating Ríos in the final and saving 7 match points, before retiring.
He was Brazil's Davis Cup captain in 2005-2006, as they won 5 ties out of the 6 but lost their World Group Playoff against Sweden at Belo Horizonte in 2006. From what I gather he received a lot of criticism for his team selections and his loyality towards Saretta, and his poor treatment of Daniel who he didn't pick for the Sweden tie (I wonder how much that had to do with him not following the boycott led by Guga and Fino against Paraguay in 2004). He quit at the end of 2006 due to budgetary constraints and the low priority placed on the Davis Cup by the CBT. Since then he has hosted a TV sports show and done some commentary work.
He was such a great personality. There was rarely a dull moment when he was on the court. He was a showman that was widely appreciated by fans at his matches. Both his game and his character could be very unpredictable at times. He had a wide array of hilarious facial expressions, liked to pump up the crowd and perform his handstands.
He was a tremendous competitors who wore his heart on his sleeve and would dive all over the court to retrieve shots. What's more, like Guga, he so often played the sport with a smile on the face and looked like he was having a whole lot of fun out there.

Action Jackson
05-10-2009, 08:41 AM
He's currently coaching Vesnina - with success, particularly considering Vesnina's limitations.

He doesn't travel that much, it must be a very recent hook up.

Action Jackson
05-10-2009, 08:55 AM
Julian Alonso

http://img.bleskovky.sk/original/889/122889.jpg

Here was one of the more fleeting players of the late 90s and played in the early part of this decade as well.

Alonso liked the clay like most Spaniards, but he liked to attack more than his contemporaries, based on a big serve and forehand. He won the best Newcomer of the Year for the season of 1997. Alonso started the year ranked at 228 and finished the year ranked at #36.

He defeated Rios in the final of Santiago, though I think the word thrashed would be more appropriate in this case winning 6-2 6-1. He only won 1 other title on the main tour in Bologna defeating Alami in 1998.

Alonso is more known for being one of the many ex-lovers of Martina Hingis. After this liason, he had back problems, lost motivation played some challengers and then retired in 2001. Alonso loved a party and is working at an academy as well.

bjurra
05-10-2009, 03:17 PM
Alonso is the biggest ball basher in Spanish history. A Spanish PimPim but with less brains.

Meligeni was one of my fav players. Great to watch,

LeChuck
05-10-2009, 03:33 PM
FRANCO SQUILLARI

http://www.lanacion.com.ar/archivo/anexos/fotos/44/13844.jpg

Toto (he was given that nickname in honor of the Italian footballer and top scorer at Italia 90 Schillaci) was a leftie, and an explosive hitter of the ball. His best shot was his absolutely massive forehand, which he was overly reliant on. His technique on his backhand was weird. It was a liability that his opponents looked to expose. Unsurprisingly he tried to use it as little as possible, and preferred to rely on his hammer of an inside-out forehand. He played 5m behind the baseline and it was fun to watch him running down all those shots and unleashing his heavy topspin. I quite liked his exaggerated grunt.
His hero growing up of course was Vilas and he watched plenty of videos of him in action.
Big Franco turned pro in 1994, and surprise suprise, received no aid or help from the AAT.
He became the first Argentinian player for 18 years to reach the last 4 at Roland Garros in 2000, putting in a excellent display during his convincing QF victory over Al Costa. He was in blistering form that day sending Costa scurrying from corner to corner. He was well beaten by Norman in their SF.
He won 3 ATP titles, being crowned the champion at Munich in back to back years in 1999-2000, brushing aside Pavel and Haas respectively in the 2 finals. His 3rd title also came on German soil at Stuttgart in 2000, where he beat his good friend Gaudio in 5 sets in the final, getting a nice Mercedes for his troubles. He reached his career high ranking of world no. 11 in September 2000. Away from clay he reached the last 8 at Cincy and beat Hrbaty indoors at Stuttgart that year. Apparently with him close to breaking into the top 10, he sacked Horacio de la Peña as his coach who had done an excellent job, and hired his brother to take his place. That clearly wasn't the wisest of moves. Before he starting work with de la Peña he was very lazy, but under his tutelage he took things more seriously, training properly and working on his serve.
Franco can boast commanding 2-0 h2h in his favour against Federer, schooling him in straight sets at Hamburg 2001, and again at Sydney 2003 as a lucky loser when Roger was the defending champion.
In 2001 he reached the 4th round at Roland Garros, losing to Agassi in 5 sets. He went for broke in that match, at times playing some simply spectacular tennis, and at others missing everything. Agassi compared his game to Muster's in his presser afterwards. Another match that I remember was when he outclassed the reigning RG champion Moyà at Roma in 1999.
Outside of Roland Garros his best grand slam performance was reaching R3 at the Aussie Open in 2000. His victory over Puerta at Wimbledon in 1998 must surely have been an exhibition of grass court wizardry from both players.
At Monte-Carlo 2002, he was the losing opponent when Gasquet became the youngest player to win a tour level main draw match for 14 years at the age of 15 years 10 months.
Even though he won the match and it was at Houston, I doubt he would have enjoyed getting bagelled on clay by Dent in 2004.
At the Ettlingen Challenger in 2005, he auctioned a place as his doubles partner on Ebay :lol:. The german student Tobi Och who played as an amateur successfully bid 1324 € for that privilege. However Franco had to withdraw due to his involvement in the RG qualies, so Och had to play alongside the low ranked German doubles player Frank Moser instead.
He retired later that year having gradually lost his passion for the sport. He had been struggling for form in challenger events and ATP qualie draws for quite a while.
In the Davis Cup, he helped Argentina climb back into the World Group in 2001.
Since his retirement he has coached Puerta for a bit, and more recently Gaudio and Zabaleta together exclusively in BA without travelling with them.
Franco is very passionate about football and supports San Lorenzo.
He was the pioneer and first player to emerge from the Argentinian generation of players born in the late 70s (Gaudio, Calleri, Zabaleta, Chela, Puerta, Cañas). He liked his partying and his steaks that's for sure.

Action Jackson
05-10-2009, 03:35 PM
Vamos Tanko Squillari, he loved playing Germany and I bet he ate steak 3 times a day when he was growing up, he was a beast of a man.

Action Jackson
05-10-2009, 04:30 PM
Magnus Gustafsson

http://www.stureplan.se/articles/4433/images/article_image_0a0a04245e7518cc.jpg

Magnus "Gusten" Gustafsson, one of the most likable players of the day. He was liked by his peers and fans alike for his personality.

Good player in the day who made the most out of his talents. He won 14 titles on tour, he was at his best on the clay, but could play well on the carpet and his best GS performance was at the AO, where many Swedes have done well in the past.

The cornerstone of his game was the huge forehand, which had a massive swing and generated a lot of power from his strong frame. They asked him about doing weights, he said he had to watch not to do too much, because he'd end up like Robocop.

He was the King of Båstad winning it 4 times. One of the more memorable matches of his, is when I saw him play in Melbourne against Brett Steven, he was struggling. A group of 15 Swedish fans were there and another 10 showed up made a lot of noise, then after he won, he dived into the group of fans and they passed him around.

Gusten had a lot of problems with shoulder and also had an elbow problem, as well as having knee surgery.

He keeps himself fairly busy these days, playing some other sports.

Raquel
05-10-2009, 04:48 PM
These are all copies from the other thread, well I wrote them.

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/mancinimontecarlo89.jpg

Alberto Mancini

The big strong Argentine baseliner of Italian descent, the Italians tried to get him to represent them, but he didn't.

He had a great one hand backhand, used the forehand to open the court up and great strength.

He won 3 titles all on clay but two of them were TMS Monte Carlo and Rome in 1989. He was the best player on clay in 89 while Muster was out injured, and was favoured to win the French that year and lost to Edberg. He beat Wilander (3x) and Becker that year.

He got injured in 1990 with knee problems, and he enjoyed the parties too much and ended up putting on a lot of weight. He had glimpses of making TMS finals in Rome losing to slicing Sanchez and in Miami losing to Chang.

He retired in 1994, coached Coria and was the Argie DC captain.

Alberto :hearts:

Seeing Carretero's run in Hamburg again, I think Gilbert Schaller is often forgotten. He was pretty dangerous on clay for a few years.

fast_clay
05-10-2009, 06:08 PM
i think everyone needs a bit of ronald agenor...

Action Jackson
05-10-2009, 06:12 PM
Go ahead Justin, you can talk about the Haitian Sensation.

Corswandt
05-10-2009, 09:29 PM
He doesn't travel that much, it must be a very recent hook up.

First heard of it in January, but the way Vesnina played in NZ and Australia I'd say a lot of work had been done during the off season. I know that he was with Vesnina in Dubai (February), but I'm not sure if he travels with her all the time.

I remember a lot of these journeymen from the mid to late 1990s, probably from the Estoril Open and the first week of RG. Can someone write about Andrea Gaudenzi?

Out of the members of the "department of forgotten players", Wayne Ferreira is probably one of those with the most accomplishments.

jonas
05-10-2009, 09:48 PM
Out of the members of the "department of forgotten players", Wayne Ferreira is probably one of those with the most accomplishments.

He sure did play alot of GS tournaments. :lol:
He managed 2 QF and 2 SF I reckon.
Ferreira had a kind of weird playing style – very straight back, am I wrong?

Marty Dane
05-13-2009, 05:22 PM
I sometimes wonder why Norway and Denmark never can produce any players.
I can only recall Christian Ruud and Kenneth Carlsson.
Can you help me out, scandinavian neighbours?

Kenneth Carlsen is Denmark's best male tennis player ever. During his career (1992 to 2007) he won 3 ATP titles: Hong Kong (1999), Tokyo (2002) and Memphis (2005).

He was a left-handed serve and volleyer and thus faired best on faster surfaces. At the Australian Open in 1993 he achived his best performance at a Grand Slam, losing in the 4th round to Michael Stich. Later that year he reached a career-high ranking of 41. In 1994 he defeated Stefan Edberg at Wimbledon in what must be considered as the biggest win of his career.

He holds the record for losing most times in the 1st round of a Grand Slam. 30 first round-exists in 46 Grand Slams.

In 2008 he released his biography "Alene på banen" (Alone on the court) which revealed he suffered from OCD during his career. Routines and rituals had to be performed before each match and eventually bacame an obsession.

Today he's the captain of the Danish Davis Cup team.

Besides Kenneth Carlsen, Kristian Pless is the only other noticeable Danish player in recent time. Pless, a former junior world number one, has struggled with injuries throughout his career and is now playing challengers.

Johnny Groove
05-13-2009, 05:46 PM
i think everyone needs a bit of ronald agenor...

Go ahead Justin, you can talk about the Haitian Sensation.

He wasn't Haitian, per se, more of a transplanted Moroccan. My mom knew a few Haitian players back in the day that used to train with Agenor, but they never made it nearly as far as Ronald did. Injuries and the political climate of Haiti during both Duvalier reigns didn't help.

He played plenty of Davis Cup for Haiti, though, but lives in Beverly Hills now :lol:

rocketassist
05-13-2009, 06:34 PM
Sjeng Schalken. Great guy, great game.

Action Jackson
05-13-2009, 07:11 PM
Adrian Voinea

http://nickbrebenel.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/adrian1.jpg

Adrian Voinea, the thoughtful and talented Romanian who had his career cut short by shoulder problems. He was definitely a stick man, there was not much of him physically.

His best run came at the 1995 RG where he made the quarter finals as a qualifier defeating Boris Becker in 4 sets, this was his biggest career win. He defeated Chesnokov in the next round and then lost to Chang in the quarters.

Voinea said this about Becker. "Before the match, I thought Becker was the best, as a person and as a tennis player, but now I feel shame for him," Voinea said after defeating the three-times Wimbledon champion, 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5.

Voinea, aged 20 and ranked No 128 in the world, charged the third-seeded Becker with glaring at him, speaking to him nastily in German, and making a spitting gesture during the concluding two sets of their match, which had carried over from the previous night.

He reached his career high of 36 and won 1 title in sunny Bournemouth and yes it was an English tournament played on clay.

He hadn't played on tour between 2004-06 because of the shoulder problems. In 2007 he came down to Australia to play in the qualies. He played Pashanski won the first set 6-1, then retired and hardly played after that, ironically he did some work with Pashanski, but it didn't last that long.

Last matches were against Younes in the Napoli Challenger and Pashanski at RG qualies, the place where he had his best GS result.

Voinea's big wins were against Muster (#1) in Indian Wells, A. Costa (#16), Boetsch (#12), Rios (#12), Moya (#11), Ferrero (#3), Henman (#6). These were on a mix of clay, carpet and hardcourt, but clay was his best surface.

He went to Italy as a 16yr old and still lives there doing some coaching.

Action Jackson
05-14-2009, 05:42 PM
Karel Novacek

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z266/exposbabe/Miami%202009/Picture5-3-2.png?t=1242319111

The big Czech Karel Novacek, his name came up recently and he was an interesting one for sure.

He was involved in failing the test for cocaine with Wilander and he used to stay at his house when he was living in Greenwich for the US Open.

Novacek would play virtually every week and that would include singles and doubles. He got to the 4th round at least once in every Slam, that included twice QF at RG, yet his best performance was a SF at the US Open in 94, when he lost to Stich.

He won 14 titles on clay, hard and carpet and clay was his favourite surface and he won Hamburg in 91. He hit hard from the baseline and was mostly flat from both sides and he was a big guy. A total angry guy on court, he'd scream at everything, linespeople, the lot, but the times I saw him off court he was always good with the fans and not like his grumpy persona on court.

He and Rostagno had an argument at RG. Rostagno won the match and was pissed off with his antics, at the handshake he told him and then Novacek shoved him in the chest.

He is living in Florida and is an investment banker.

marquez
05-14-2009, 07:40 PM
meligenis forehnad :worship:

Action Jackson
05-15-2009, 09:33 AM
Derrick Rostagno (USA)
Born 1965 - Career High Rank: #13 (11-Nov-91) - Weight: 75kg - Height 6'1"
Singles Titles: 1 (New Haven)
Rostagno turned professional in 1986.
Grand Slam Best: 1988 US Open Quarter Finalist

Rostagno's best performance at a Grand Slam event came at the 1988 US Open, where he reached the quarterfinals before being defeated by Ivan Lendl. At several other Grand Slam events, he defeated or almost defeated several tennis hall of famers. At Wimbledon in 1988, Rostagno lost a five-set third round match to Jimmy Connors, who at the time was ranked fifth in the world. At the 1989 US Open, Rostagno had a match point in his second round encounter with Boris Becker, who won that point on a lucky net cord passing shot and eventually the match 1–6, 6–7, 6–3, 7–6, 6–3, en route to his lone US Open title. At Wimbledon in 1990, Rostagno defeated John McEnroe in straight sets in the first round. At Wimbledon in 1991, Rostagno defeated ninth ranked pete Sampras in four sets in the second round and Connors in straight sets in the third round.
Rostagno finished his career with a 3–2 win-loss record versus McEnroe, winning their last three matches, and a 2–3 record versus Connors, winning their last two matches. Against other top players, Rostagno was 2–1 versus Sampras, 1–0 versus Yannick Noah, 1–1 versus Mats Wilander, 2–3 versus Lendl, 1–2 versus Becker, 3–6 versus Jim Courier, 0–1 versus Michael Chang, 0–1 versus Todd Martin, 0–2 versus Andre Agassi, and 0–4 versus Stefan Edberg.
Rostagno's career-high singles ranking was thirteenth in 1991. His career prize-money earnings totaled US$1,621,535. He retired from the professional tour in 1996.[FONT=Times New Roman][FONT=Arial][SIZE=2]

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/Rostag.jpg

He was a very interesting man this Rostagno. His dad is Argentine and mother German, speaks Spanish. When he was in the US, he travelled to the events in a van and only moved to a hotel when it was wet. He cheated death by deciding at the last second to stay over in Mexico City after winning a Challenger and the plane crashed.

FairWeatherFan
05-15-2009, 10:17 AM
http://stevenanapol.com/Sports/ATP/VOLKOV2.jpg

Alexander Volkov

Born 1967, ATP debut 1988, 3 singles titles, best ranking 14 (1993), retired 1998

Description: This guy is most remembered for two matches: one, beating the no 1. seed Edberg in the first round of US Open in 1990, and two losing to eventual champion Stich in Wimbledon 1991 in five sets. Stich himself admits that he escaped that match through sheer luck.
In terms of style he was, like Nadal, a natural right-hander playing left-handed. He was a baseliner and had a nice forehand, smooth movement and good point construction.
He had quite a languid style on-court but in his interviews he was a character. Along with Ivanisevic and Safin, one of the great tennis-interviewees.
He is well-known for being a previous coach of Marat Safin.

Highlights: US Open semi-final 1993, 1994 Davis Cup Final

Action Jackson
05-25-2009, 03:20 AM
Volkov broke both wrists in his childhood.

I13vsCUWkC0

binkygirl
05-25-2009, 11:07 AM
HERNÁN GUMY

http://www.tennisserver.com/turbo/images/turbo_01_04/Gumy2.jpg

The Gumy Bear was probably more talented at scoring chicks on a night out than points on a tennis court, but he was still a good player. His main strengths were his incredible heart, strength and condition. He certainly was an impressive physical specimen and a fierce fighter. He played with a one handed backhand.

I saw him with Safin in LA a few years ago and he still looked very hot. And was nice too.

Action Jackson
06-02-2009, 09:05 PM
Voinea and Chesnokov

x7p45Hy1gxw

dorkino
06-02-2009, 09:52 PM
Nice thread.

zicofirol
06-03-2009, 12:47 AM
todd martin and his epic US open 5 setters...

Action Jackson
06-04-2009, 04:57 PM
I think Gilbert Schaller is often forgotten. He was pretty dangerous on clay for a few years.

Schaller was all work ethic, definitely not as gifted as some on the tour. He had some real problems on the forehand, which he took time off the tour and with the help of his wife remodelled his forehand. Once he came back he improved big time and won a tour title in Casablanca where he defeated Albert Costa.

http://diepresse.com/images/uploads/1/6/0/360800/tennis_p_Hans-Punz20080205200531.jpg

This is when he had some hair.

zaVDVN9vNSg

Polikarpov
06-04-2009, 05:45 PM
A couple of guys that comes to mind:

Vladimir Voltchkov
Sebastien Lareau
Arnaud Di Pasquale
Lee Hyung Taik
Karol Kucera
Andrea Gaudenzi
Paul Haarhuis
Jiri Novak
Nicolas Escude
Petr Korda

Henry Kaspar
06-04-2009, 06:50 PM
http://www.sporting-heroes.net/files_tennis/FORGET_Guy_1992_SF_T.jpg

Guy Forget

Multiple times quarterfinalist at Wimbledon and the Australian Open. Ranked as high as #3 in the world in 1986. Also a fine doubles player. Later France's Davis Cup captain.

One of the nicest guys on the tour in the late 80s/early 90s.

Henry Kaspar
06-04-2009, 07:05 PM
http://i42.tinypic.com/2928ls8.jpg

Tim Mayotte

Semifinalist at Wimbledon and the AO in the early 80s. Silver medal at the Seoul Olympics. Career-high #7. Known as "Gentleman Tim".

fast_clay
06-05-2009, 12:03 AM
i like that service action... Mayotte... :worship:

Bargearse
06-05-2009, 04:06 AM
I always liked Hicham Arazi. He didn't win a lot of titles, only 1 I think, but I enjoyed his flamboyant style of tennis.

Action Jackson
07-03-2009, 10:11 AM
Chesnokov has been doing well coaching Vesnina.

Bargearse
07-03-2009, 11:48 AM
Alberto Berasategui

http://img245.imageshack.us/img245/3261/berasategui.jpg



True claycourt specialist, he played and won all the clay giants of his era (Bruguera, Muster, Courier, ...) Short and with no obvious gifts, he made a nice career out of his limited talents. His ultra-extreme-western grip allowed him hit BH and a very wicked FH with the same side of the racket. He broke havoc on RG 94. He lives in Barcelona, where he's got real estate interests and plays golf with Cruyff, and is Vice President of the Federación Vasca de Tenis.

He frustrated Agassi from time to time I recall. Huge forehand/off forehand.

Ilovetheblues_86
07-04-2009, 04:17 AM
Can anyone tell me more about Jaroslav Drobný, RG champion in 51/52 and Wimbledon 54??

Zirconek
07-04-2009, 04:28 AM
Can anyone tell me more about Jaroslav Drobný, RG champion in 51/52 and Wimbledon 54??

check post#7 of Tennis Tipping Praha 2008, there's a hidden link there ;)

Ilovetheblues_86
07-04-2009, 04:37 AM
This guy is one of the hidden gems of tenis. Two sports! Dark glasses :eek:
Also you used to do better on TT awards Zircon. :lol:

Zirconek
07-04-2009, 04:59 AM
This guy is one of the hidden gems of tenis. Two sports! Dark glasses :eek:
Also you used to do better on TT awards Zircon. :lol:

Not surprising since ice hockey is very popular in Czech Republic and at that time sports were more "amateur"; some current Czech tennis pro had to choose in their early teen ages which sport to concentrate. Anyway, a great achievement of a great athlete.

about the awards, well, Adam is the precursor and when you're new to TT management you have more enthusiasm. :p

pray-for-palestine-and-israel
07-04-2009, 04:59 AM
Roger Federer

http://www.copacasablanca.com.mx/historia/r_federer.jpg

Results

1998
JUNIOR - THE JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIPS, WIMBLEDON (WIN)
JUNIOR - US OPEN JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIPS (FINAL- loss to Nalbandian)

This forgotten player is a relative unknown by the name of Roger Federer, in his junior days he was considered to have had the potential to have been as good as even Sampras, but he was mentally weak and by 2002 went out of Wimbledon in the 1st round... i haven't heard about what he did after that

In 1998 he won the Junior Wimbledon crown and came runner up to David Nalbandian (of Burger King fame)

turning pro he found the life hard but was always considered good enough to make it at the top

in 1999 he won the Brest challenger on hard, made a semi and a couple of QFs, then lost ihe first round to Pat rafter (serve and volleyer) at the french open, and Byron black at Queens. clearly Roger couldn't take all that potential and adapt to the big boy leagues, but Roger plugged away. A low point of 1999 must have been losing to Gimelstob in doubles!

2000 was a better year, he beat Haas and Hewitt along the way to a final at Basel (his home tourney) He made the semis of Vienna before falling to his nemesis Henman who would prove to be a thorn in his side. HE got to the QF of the Gerry Weber open before losing to Chang. he made R32 of the US OPEN before falling to ferrerro- he was making progress but the best was yet to come

2001 would be his break out year for more then 1 reason (petros)
he started off winning the prestigious ST.ANTON TELE.RING TENNIS TROPHY in Austria, He made the finals of Basel again, losing to his Nemesis Henman who had him in tears (not for the first t or last time)
At the US OPEN he made R16 before losing in straight sets to Agassi.
He won at milan indoors, but the real victories were at the french open and Wimbledon

At the FO he got all the way to the QFs! before losing in straight sets to correjta

at Wimbledon he beat the Grass GOAT Pete Sampras in 5 amazing sets, using the same raquet and both Serving and volleying, Roger managed to break the sampras strangle hold on wimbledon grass- expecting to go on and win the tourney he sadly met his nemesis Tim Henman in the QFs and lost

there aren't many records of his achievements posts Wimbledon 2002 where he lost in the first round to Ancic

Lillith
07-04-2009, 05:00 AM
Even among the forgotten, Mecir is rarely mentioned. One of my favorites of all time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miloslav_Me%C4%8D%C3%AD%C5%99

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1zkNyxSrzE

boughtmypoints
07-04-2009, 07:36 AM
http://stevenanapol.com/Sports/ATP/VOLKOV2.jpg

Alexander Volkov

Born 1967, ATP debut 1988, 3 singles titles, best ranking 14 (1993), retired 1998

Description: This guy is most remembered for two matches: one, beating the no 1. seed Edberg in the first round of US Open in 1990, and two losing to eventual champion Stich in Wimbledon 1991 in five sets. Stich himself admits that he escaped that match through sheer luck.
In terms of style he was, like Nadal, a natural right-hander playing left-handed. He was a baseliner and had a nice forehand, smooth movement and good point construction.
He had quite a languid style on-court but in his interviews he was a character. Along with Ivanisevic and Safin, one of the great tennis-interviewees.
He is well-known for being a previous coach of Marat Safin.

Highlights: US Open semi-final 1993, 1994 Davis Cup Final


Volkov had his eye more on his girlfriend in the stands than on his opponent!

He was a superbly talented player with the best looking girlfriend on tour that nobody, including Volkov himself,
could take their eyes off.

boughtmypoints
07-04-2009, 07:49 AM
Magnus Gustafsson

The cornerstone of his game was the huge forehand, which had a massive swing ... One of the more memorable matches of his, is when I saw him play in Melbourne against Brett Steven, he was struggling. A group of 15 Swedish fans were there and another 10 showed up made a lot of noise, then after he won, he dived into the group of fans and they passed him around.


His forehand was quite distinctive in that Magnus always prepared early and his arm "cocked" in a high position, as opposed to the
typical Spanish "low" forehand position.

Magnus always came through with free tickets for anyone who asked ... actually, he always offered. A great, great guy (kille)!

boughtmypoints
07-04-2009, 07:53 AM
We have had Gaudenzi ... but where is his bud Diego Nargiso, junior Wimbledon winner who never achieved his potential on the tour, though had some success in Davis Cup?

And Stefano Pescosolido, another prince of a guy.

Action Jackson
07-04-2009, 11:15 AM
Even among the forgotten, Mecir is rarely mentioned. One of my favorites of all time.



Use the search engine in there and type in Miloslav Mecir, he has some threads dedicated to him.

Volkov had his eye more on his girlfriend in the stands than on his opponent!

He was a superbly talented player with the best looking girlfriend on tour that nobody, including Volkov himself,
could take their eyes off.

She was definitely a good looker, up there with the late Horsti Skoff's former wife Ulla the Miss Universe.

Remember watching a match between Carlos Costa and Volkov, it was quite funny, they played some good points, then at other times really didn't look like they bothered too much.

His forehand was quite distinctive in that Magnus always prepared early and his arm "cocked" in a high position, as opposed to the
typical Spanish "low" forehand position.

Magnus always came through with free tickets for anyone who asked ... actually, he always offered. A great, great guy (kille)!

Yes, it was very distinctive and one that got parodied quite a bit. He loved the big off forehand, he did better at the AO, than he did at RG, though clay was a better surface for him.

fast_clay
07-04-2009, 03:00 PM
Christian Bergström
http://www.chb-promotion.se/img/tennis.jpg

from wiki: Christian Bergström (born 19 July 1967 in Gothenburg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothenburg)) is a former tennis player (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennis_player) from Sweden (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweden), who turned professional in 1985. He didn't win any titles (singles and/or doubles) during his career. The right-hander reached his highest individual ranking on the ATP Tour (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATP_Tour) on 27 January 1992, when he became the number 32 of the world.

This guy was such a little battler that if i was at passport control at Sydney i'd let him through on account of being an honorary aussie... a true battler in the same sense as the great Wally Masur, but probably a step down in class... still, he's just gotta get a run in this thread.

He just grinded away, low unforced errors... well... that's what i can remember of him anyways...

i remember him because of his run to the Quarter Finals of the Aussie Open in 1993 - en route def [8]Lendl RD1 64 64 26 64, def Holm RD2 75 26 64 16 64, Simian RD3 60 64 64then [10]Ferreira RD4 64 75 26 64... eventually being crushed by fellow swede and finalist this tourney, [2]Stefan Edberg QF 64 64 61...

... beyond the battle, they shall not be forgotten...

fast_clay
07-04-2009, 03:34 PM
http://tbn3.google.com/images?q=tbn:DQMvqe1_nfJTNM:http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2047/2232005374_fa7812f12f.jpg%3Fv%3D0 (http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2047/2232005374_fa7812f12f.jpg%3Fv%3D0&imgrefurl=http://flickr.com/photos/43555660%40N00/2232005374&usg=__3xkLcZQJlX0RGeBiGTYyIGubzfk=&h=500&w=389&sz=151&hl=en&start=5&um=1&tbnid=DQMvqe1_nfJTNM:&tbnh=130&tbnw=101&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dwally%2Bmasur%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1T4DK UK_en-GBIE295IE295%26sa%3DX%26um%3D1)http://tbn2.google.com/images?q=tbn:so6SmZxObT_QZM:http://www.australianopen.com/images/pics/large/b_masur_28_01.jpg (http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://www.australianopen.com/images/pics/large/b_masur_28_01.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/articles/2009-01-29/200901281233086110015.html&usg=__bxf11SsDWp64HiVmPIqtep3bKGY=&h=400&w=280&sz=25&hl=en&start=6&um=1&tbnid=so6SmZxObT_QZM:&tbnh=124&tbnw=87&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dwally%2Bmasur%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1T4DK UK_en-GBIE295IE295%26sa%3DX%26um%3D1)http://tbn2.google.com/images?q=tbn:ArdKl68wGtv8yM:http://www001.upp.so-net.ne.jp/dhbvg87/encyclopedia/W_Masur.jpg (http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://www001.upp.so-net.ne.jp/dhbvg87/encyclopedia/W_Masur.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www001.upp.so-net.ne.jp/dhbvg87/Encyclopedia4.htm&usg=__SE_sU4fMJNcfdU1oZpPVXKpP6wc=&h=249&w=160&sz=15&hl=en&start=2&um=1&tbnid=ArdKl68wGtv8yM:&tbnh=111&tbnw=71&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dwally%2Bmasur%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1T4DK UK_en-GBIE295IE295%26sa%3DX%26um%3D1)http://tbn1.google.com/images?q=tbn:qQ0xfumrWjQq7M:http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_VzAnPuOAeuI/SXnsQ2UJqXI/AAAAAAAAARE/pK3CXhxXejs/s200/masur.jpg (http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_VzAnPuOAeuI/SXnsQ2UJqXI/AAAAAAAAARE/pK3CXhxXejs/s200/masur.jpg&imgrefurl=http://cwdeluxe.blogspot.com/&usg=__yTlE8hvXw5913USIZxnMZmaUDQs=&h=200&w=134&sz=9&hl=en&start=18&um=1&tbnid=qQ0xfumrWjQq7M:&tbnh=104&tbnw=70&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dwally%2Bmasur%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1T4DK UK_en-GBIE295IE295%26sa%3DX%26um%3D1)http://tbn2.google.com/images?q=tbn:aFeCg3dG2_RHZM:http://images.dailyradar.com/media/uploads/ballhype/story_preview/2009/05/12/tennis_australia_advertise_for_davis_cup_coach.jpg (http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://images.dailyradar.com/media/uploads/ballhype/story_preview/2009/05/12/tennis_australia_advertise_for_davis_cup_coach.jpg&imgrefurl=http://ballhype.com/story/tennis_australia_advertise_for_davis_cup_coach/&usg=__9pJ3aV37tOfYIsQvBrzCscF3URg=&h=140&w=140&sz=8&hl=en&start=27&um=1&tbnid=aFeCg3dG2_RHZM:&tbnh=93&tbnw=93&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dwally%2Bmasur%26ndsp%3D18%26hl%3Den%2 6rlz%3D1T4DKUK_en-GBIE295IE295%26sa%3DN%26start%3D18%26um%3D1)
fast_clay's 'Forgotten Giants' series: #1 Wally Masur
http://www.actsport.com.au/uploads/pics/WALLY_MASUR.jpg
Wally Masur was born in Southampton, England and began playing tennis at the young age of eight. In 1981, at age 18, Wally won the Australian Juniors Championships and one-year later turned professional with a world ranking for that year of 287. Early on in his career Wally won his first singles title at Hong Kong and his first doubles title at Taipei (w/Warwick) in 1983. He also reached the Quarter Final of the Australian Open taking his ranking to 66. Wally won his second title at Adelaide defeating Scanlon and upsetting Becker to reach the semi final at the Australian Open in 1987.

Everybody loved Wally... he was a warrior in the mould of many aussie all-court champions, though, just not as good as the breed a few generations before... still, it didn't matter, cos 'The Wal' tried f**king hard... and that's all that matters in the end... will most likely be considered Australia's best and most consistant of his generation behind Cash, and probably somewhere on a par with Ricardo 'The Schlong' Fromberg - another Davis Cup war hero champion of the common people's cause...

Wally was great... he could do anything...

Wally best year was without a doubt 1993... he was in the Rosemalen and Manchester finals due to his superior grasscourt prowess - along with five semi finals, including the U.S Open.... the semi-final run probably saw 'The Wal' in an uncharacteristic and fired up mode, where at one point i think in the fourth round, he got the sh!ts with the umpire, climbed the umpire's chair, ripped the microphone clean out of its home and then threw it into the stadium... very uncharacteristic for the typically mild mannered Masur... He won the Milan and Stuttgart-indoor doubles and also reached the semi finals of the Australian Open and Indian Wells to qualify for the World Doubles Championships... 1993 saw Wally hit a career high world ranking of 8 in the doubles and 21 in the singles... this was still in the days when no Australian tennis player was issued an Australian passort without first being able to demonstrate to the beaucrats that you could volley with supreior skill...

Wally has since retired from elite competition and now puts his energy into commentary and media... He is heavily involved in the commentary of the Australian Open and other international events as well as avidly involved in grass roots development of Tennis throughout Australia...

i miss Wal, he was everybody's mate and fought tooth and even if he didn't win, you'd enjoy his loss cos he was always more complete than his opposition and you'd tell yourself he should have probably won... so it was always a win-win...

here is a giant that should never be forgotten...

Action Jackson
07-04-2009, 03:40 PM
Wally is doing some coaching in Sydney, he is trying very hard to teach the girls how to hit a topspin serve. He is of Austrian descent and one of the best things to come out of Canberra.

He defeated Boris Becker and was very hard but fair competitor.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2047/2232005374_fa7812f12f.jpg?v=0

fast_clay
07-04-2009, 03:46 PM
yeah... wally preferred to use Emrik... the choice of champions... and yeah, for was the best thing to come out of Canberra since the double-chambered bong was perfected there in 1967...

juan77
07-04-2009, 06:25 PM
Anyone remember Jakob Hlasek?

Born in 1964. Turned pro in 1982.
A member of the Swiss Olympic Team in 1984 and '88 and member of the
Davis Cup team since 1984.
Helped Switzerland to the 1982 European Team Championships.
Born in Czechoslovakia and moved with his family to Switzerland in 1968
and has been a Swiss citizen since.
He excelled in hockey as a boy and competed on the Swiss national team
(juniors) at age 12. But after breaking his foot and arm, his father per-
suaded him to take up a "safer" sport which became tennis and began at 15.
Made an unbelievable run to qualify for the Nabisco Masters in 1988,
jumping from 29 to No. 9 (NGP rankings) in the last three weeks by winning at
Wembley, Johannesburg and finishing runner-up at Brussels. He then went 3-0
in round robin play in New York, defeating Lendl, Mayotte, and Agassi before
losing to Becker in the semifinals.

fast_clay
07-04-2009, 08:49 PM
yeah... i liked hlasek, and rarely gets a mention... accomplished dubs player too... i think he teamed up a fair bit with his surfin' buddy Guy Forget... i think they made the Doubles World Championship one time, and if i remember the urban myth correctly, both shaved their head when they got there... Hlasek's grew back fine, but, Forget's never grew back as thick as it was...

Action Jackson
07-04-2009, 08:59 PM
Hlasek fell out with both Rosset and Federer. He never did well in the Slams, but did play well against top players at the other events.

dorkino
07-04-2009, 10:23 PM
http://www.sporting-heroes.net/files_tennis/GOMEZ_Andres_1990_SF_L.jpg

Andrés Gómez (born February 27, 1960, in Ecuador) Gómez turned professional in 1979.

He won five doubles titles in 1980, and seven in 1981. His first top-level singles title came in 1981 in Bordeaux.

In 1986, Gómez attained the World No. 1 doubles ranking. He won seven doubles events that year, including the US Open men's doubles title (partnering Slobodan Živojinović).

Gómez won a second Grand Slam men's doubles title in 1988 at the French Open (partnering Emilio Sánchez).

The crowning achievement of Gómez's career came in 1990 when he reached his first (and only) Grand Slam singles final
at the French Open.

There he faced 19 year-old Andre Agassi who, like Gómez, was playing in his first Grand Slam singles final. The up-and-coming American star was considered the favourite, but Gómez seized the moment and claimed the title with a four-set win (6–3, 2–6, 6–4, 6–4). Gómez reached his career-high singles ranking of World No. 4 later that year.

His run at RG 1990 :
First Round def Fernando Luna 7–6, 6–1, 7–6

Second Round def.Marcelo Filippini 7–6, 6–2, 6–1

Third Round def. Alexander Volkov 6–2, 7–5, 4–6, 6–3

Fourth Round def. Magnus Gustafsson Walkover

Quarterfinals def. Thierry Champion 6–3, 6–3, 6–4

Semifinal def. Thomas Muster 7–5, 6–1, 7–5

Final def. Andre Agassi 6–3, 2–6, 6–4, 6–4

Caio_Brasil
07-06-2009, 04:00 AM
Great thread :yeah:

There are some guys I barely got to see but remember hearing their names when I started following tennis as a kid. It would be really appreciated if someone writes something about them:

Galo Blanco
Sargis Sargsian
Juan Antonio Marin
Alexander Popp
Ivo Heuberger
Petr Luxa
Chris Woodruff
Lorenzo Manta
Ronald Agenor
Jan Siemerink
Slava Dosedel

dlk1992
07-06-2009, 04:48 AM
Carl Uwe Steeb

Paul Haarhuis

Aaron Krickstein


...and although he won the FO in '95, I always felt Thomas Muster as one of the best clay courters I've ever seen. Such a grinder!

Arkulari
07-15-2009, 03:13 AM
Albert Portas

http://www.lavozdegalicia.es/foto_hemeroteca/2001/05/20/0012_490462/Foto/g21p45d1.jpg

http://www.rctb1899.es/godo/cast/noticias/fotos-s/fotos/Albert%20Portas.jpg

another "bolt" kind of player, his only title as a pro came on the 2001 Hamburg MS tournament, defeating Juan Carlos Ferrero 4–6, 6–2, 0–6, 7–6, 7–5

His only top-level singles title came at the Hamburg Masters in 2001, a tournament in which his mastery of the drop shot (key to his defeat of Juan Carlos Ferrero in the final) earned him the nickname "Drop Shot Dragon". According to the BBC, Lleyton Hewitt said of Portas that "He sure hits a lot of [drop shots] but he hits them so well, as well as anyone I have faced."

He currently coaches Daniela Hantuchova :yeah:

SERVivor
07-15-2009, 02:48 PM
Ronald Agenor:

Ronald Agenor turned pro in 1983 after finishing '82 as the #8 world junior. Agenor played at a time when there were very few players of African descent. His best surface was clay, and he reached the quarterfinals at Rolland Garos in 1989, where he lost a tight four setter to eventual champion Micheal Chang. He defeated a host of top 10 players like Kevin Curren, Mats Wilander, etc. but seemed to have a problem with consistency, and reached a high ranking of #22 in 1990. He won a few clay court titles, then retired briefly in 1996. In 1998, he came back and started from the bottom with only a few rankings points. He won several futures titles in '98, beating future top players such as Nicolas Massu and Juan Ignacio Chela. He won a few challenger titles in '99 and got his ranking back into the top 100. In 2001, he lost a very close match to then #1 Gustavo Kuerten at the Canadian Open. Finally, he was injured at the beginning of '02 and retired again at age 37. Agenor had tremendous groundstrokes and good court movement, along with a decent serve. He was overall a very flashy, talented player who was a joy to watch.

Burrow
07-15-2009, 03:02 PM
http://www.sporting-heroes.net/files_tennis/GOMEZ_Andres_1990_SF_L.jpg

Andrés Gómez (born February 27, 1960, in Ecuador) Gómez turned professional in 1979.

He won five doubles titles in 1980, and seven in 1981. His first top-level singles title came in 1981 in Bordeaux.

In 1986, Gómez attained the World No. 1 doubles ranking. He won seven doubles events that year, including the US Open men's doubles title (partnering Slobodan Živojinović).

Gómez won a second Grand Slam men's doubles title in 1988 at the French Open (partnering Emilio Sánchez).

The crowning achievement of Gómez's career came in 1990 when he reached his first (and only) Grand Slam singles final
at the French Open.

There he faced 19 year-old Andre Agassi who, like Gómez, was playing in his first Grand Slam singles final. The up-and-coming American star was considered the favourite, but Gómez seized the moment and claimed the title with a four-set win (6–3, 2–6, 6–4, 6–4). Gómez reached his career-high singles ranking of World No. 4 later that year.

His run at RG 1990 :
First Round def Fernando Luna 7–6, 6–1, 7–6

Second Round def.Marcelo Filippini 7–6, 6–2, 6–1

Third Round def. Alexander Volkov 6–2, 7–5, 4–6, 6–3

Fourth Round def. Magnus Gustafsson Walkover

Quarterfinals def. Thierry Champion 6–3, 6–3, 6–4

Semifinal def. Thomas Muster 7–5, 6–1, 7–5

Final def. Andre Agassi 6–3, 2–6, 6–4, 6–4

Agassi wasn't a teen then.

jmsx521
07-15-2009, 05:29 PM
Marcos Ondruska was Top 50 in the 90s. Three times ATP finalist.
http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/On/M/Marcos-Ondruska.aspx

Kolya
07-16-2009, 11:31 AM
Anyone got anything on Gene Mayer?

Collective
07-16-2009, 01:47 PM
Ronald Agenor:

Ronald Agenor turned pro in 1983 after finishing '82 as the #8 world junior. Agenor played at a time when there were very few players of African descent. His best surface was clay, and he reached the quarterfinals at Rolland Garos in 1989, where he lost a tight four setter to eventual champion Micheal Chang. He defeated a host of top 10 players like Kevin Curren, Mats Wilander, etc. but seemed to have a problem with consistency, and reached a high ranking of #22 in 1990. He won a few clay court titles, then retired briefly in 1996. In 1998, he came back and started from the bottom with only a few rankings points. He won several futures titles in '98, beating future top players such as Nicolas Massu and Juan Ignacio Chela. He won a few challenger titles in '99 and got his ranking back into the top 100. In 2001, he lost a very close match to then #1 Gustavo Kuerten at the Canadian Open. Finally, he was injured at the beginning of '02 and retired again at age 37. Agenor had tremendous groundstrokes and good court movement, along with a decent serve. He was overall a very flashy, talented player who was a joy to watch.


I watched him at the Mexican Open in 2000 (it was still played on Mexico City). Very talented guy and his wife was ridiculously attractive and cheered loudly in the stands, even if it was only 10 of us watching the match. Always present for years and years at clay tournaments all around the world :)

Action Jackson
07-24-2009, 01:26 PM
Some footage of Joakim Nyström.

hZ82wiDzijY

O9_Dp6uHRdE

allihies
07-29-2009, 04:49 PM
anyone knows what medvedev, schalken and ulihrach are doing now?

fast_clay
09-16-2009, 11:22 PM
Ronald Agenor:

Ronald Agenor turned pro in 1983 after finishing '82 as the #8 world junior. Agenor played at a time when there were very few players of African descent. His best surface was clay, and he reached the quarterfinals at Rolland Garos in 1989, where he lost a tight four setter to eventual champion Micheal Chang. He defeated a host of top 10 players like Kevin Curren, Mats Wilander, etc. but seemed to have a problem with consistency, and reached a high ranking of #22 in 1990. He won a few clay court titles, then retired briefly in 1996. In 1998, he came back and started from the bottom with only a few rankings points. He won several futures titles in '98, beating future top players such as Nicolas Massu and Juan Ignacio Chela. He won a few challenger titles in '99 and got his ranking back into the top 100. In 2001, he lost a very close match to then #1 Gustavo Kuerten at the Canadian Open. Finally, he was injured at the beginning of '02 and retired again at age 37. Agenor had tremendous groundstrokes and good court movement, along with a decent serve. He was overall a very flashy, talented player who was a joy to watch.

some of the hatian sensations gear...

chillen with the lads...
http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm182/patma2003/Messina-1984250.gif

http://www.atpworldtour.com/Players/Head-To-Head.aspx?pId=A006&oId=S351
http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm182/patma2003/AgenorStichMilan1994250.gif

the headwear...
http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm182/patma2003/BerlinWinner1990250.gif

Action Jackson
09-17-2009, 12:27 AM
Agenor is still playing the odd event.

fast_clay
09-17-2009, 01:01 AM
Agenor is still playing the odd event.

its all about the yamaha...
http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j162/leelord337/secret04os.jpg

Action Jackson
10-22-2009, 02:47 PM
Not sure if Agenor is still playing with that piece.

fast_clay
10-22-2009, 07:46 PM
yeah... its made of 95% beast, but yeah... probably has some cobwebs on it... that said, there's one particular 1982 model that still gets a workout by the the best...

Action Jackson
10-23-2009, 02:56 AM
Tomas Behrend now has 2 kids and the academy is still going strong.

fast_clay
10-23-2009, 05:46 AM
Jamie Morgan


Jamie Morgan (born June 8 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_8), 1971 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1971), in Sydney, Australia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney,_Australia)), is a former professional tennis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennis) player from Australia. Morgan never won an ATP level singles title, but finished runner-up three times. He reached the fourth round of the 1996 U.S. Open (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1996_US_Open_(tennis)), his best performance at a Grand Slam event. He achieved a career-high singles ranking of World No. 52 in 1993.
Jamie attended Sydney Boys High School (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney_Boys_High_School) before winning a tennis scholarship at the Australian Institute of Sport (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Institute_of_Sport) in 1986.
Singles titles (1)

Legend (Singles)Grand Slam (0)Tennis Masters Cup (0)ATP Masters Series (0)ATP Tour (0)Challengers (1)No.DateTournamentSurfaceOpponent in the finalScore

1.1990http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/07/Flag_of_Guam.svg/22px-Flag_of_Guam.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guam) Guam (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guam)Hardhttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States) Chuck Adams (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chuck_Adams)6–2, 7–6

Runner-ups (8)

No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in the final Score

1.1990http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b9/Flag_of_Australia.svg/22px-Flag_of_Australia.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia) Tasmania (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tasmania)Grasshttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b9/Flag_of_Australia.svg/22px-Flag_of_Australia.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia) Simon Youl (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Youl)6–7, 6–7

2.1991http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fc/Flag_of_Mexico.svg/22px-Flag_of_Mexico.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexico) San Luis Potosi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Luis_Potosi)Clayhttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cf/Flag_of_Peru.svg/22px-Flag_of_Peru.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peru) Pablo Arraya (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pablo_Arraya)1–6, 7–5, 3–6

3.1991http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/07/Flag_of_Guam.svg/22px-Flag_of_Guam.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guam) Guam (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guam)Hardhttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States) Richard Matuszewski (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Matuszewski)4–6, RET.

4.1992http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/be/Flag_of_England.svg/22px-Flag_of_England.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/England) Bristol (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol)Grasshttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/ba/Flag_of_Germany.svg/22px-Flag_of_Germany.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germany) Patrick Baur (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Baur)6–4, 6–7, 1–6

5.1992http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States) Schenectady (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATP_Schenectady)Hardhttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/67/Flag_of_South_Africa_1928-1994.svg/22px-Flag_of_South_Africa_1928-1994.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Africa) Wayne Ferreira (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wayne_Ferreira)2–6, 7–6, 2–6

6.1992http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/72/Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_of_China) Taipei (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATP_Taipei)Carpethttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States) Jim Grabb (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Grabb)3–6, 3–6

7.1994http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States) Coral Springs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATP_Delray_Beach)Clayhttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/05/Flag_of_Brazil.svg/22px-Flag_of_Brazil.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazil) Luiz Mattar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luiz_Mattar)4–6, 6–3, 3–6

8.1995http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/22px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States) Binghamton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levene_Gouldin_%26_Thompson_Tennis_Challenger)Hard http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9e/Flag_of_Japan.svg/22px-Flag_of_Japan.svg.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan) Shuzo Matsuoka (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shuzo_Matsuoka)6–2, 6–7, 3–6

DrJules
10-23-2009, 07:39 PM
Richard Alonso Gonzalez "Pancho"

http://cache3.asset-cache.net/xc/81445038.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1934B869679A269F9CCB90A29C876A592D6 26FD13ED7B73D4BC

Born: May 09, 1928

Died: July 03, 1995

Hometown: Los Angeles, California, United States

Citizenship: United States

Handed: Right

Grand Slam Record

U.S. Singles 1948-49 (Played almost all his time on the professional tour in 50's and 60's - they were better than the amateurs)

Very much his own man, a loner and an acerbic competitor, Ricardo Alonso "Pancho" Gonzalez was probably as good as anyone who ever played the game, if not better. Most of his great tennis was played beyond wide public attention, on the nearly secret pro tour amid a small band of gypsies of whom he was the ticket-selling mainstay.

His rages against opponents, officials, photographers, newsmen and even spectators frequently spectacular--but they only served to intensify his own play, and didn't disturb his concentration, as fits of temper do most others. Pancho got mad and played better. "We hoped he wouldn't get upset; it just made him tougher," said Rod Laver. "Later when he got older he would get into arguments to stall for time and rest, and we had to be careful that it didn't put us off our games."

Gonzalez, a right-hander, born May 9, 1928, in Los Angeles, was always out of the tennis mainstream, a fact that seemed to goad him to play harder. Because he came from a Chicano family, he was never acceptable in the supposedly proper upper circles of his city's tennis establishment. And because he was a truant he wasn't permitted to play in Southern California junior tournaments. Once he got out of the Navy in 1946 there was no preventing him from mixing in the game, and beating everyone. He had a marvelously pure and effortless service action that delivered thunderbolts, and he grew up as an attacker on fast West Coast concrete.

Although not regarded as anything more than promising on his second trip East in 1948, he was at age 20 ready to win the big one, the U.S. Championship at Forest Hills. Ranked 17th nationally at the time, and seeded 8th, he served and volleyed his way to the final, where he beat South African Eric Sturgess with ease, 6-2, 6-3, 14-12. The following year Gonzalez met the favorite, a Southern California antagonist, top-seeded Ted Schroeder. It was one of the gripping finals. Schroeder won the first two sets as expected, but they were demanding and exhausting, 18-16, 6-2, and after that Gonzalez rolled up the next three, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4, for the title. In 1949 Pancho also helped the U.S. hold the Davis Cup against Australia, then went for the money, turning pro to tour against the monarch, Jack Kramer. Gonzalez was too green for Kramer, losing, 96-27, and he faded from view for several agonizing years.

When Kramer retired, Gonzalez won a tour over Don Budge, Pancho Segura and Frank Sedgman in 1954 to determine Jack's successor. He stood himself as Emperor Pancho, proud and imperious for a long while, through the challenges Tony Trabert, Ken Rosewall, Lew Hoad, Ashley Cooper, Mal Anderson, Alex Olmedo and Segura. For a decade Gonzalez and pro tennis were synonymous. A promoter couldn't hope to rally crowds unless Pancho was on the bill. The other names meant little. During his reign Pancho the U.S. Pro singles a record eight times.

By the time Rosewall and Laver were reaching their zeniths during the mid- and late-1960's, the aging Gonzalez hung on as a dangerous foe, still capable of defeating all. In 1964, his last serious bid for his ninth U.S. Pro title, he lost final to Laver in four hard sets. Yet there was much more glory ahead. In 1968, at 40, he beat second-seeded Tony Roche (Wimbledon finalist) to reach the quarters of the initial U.S. Open. A year later, this grandfather (literally) electrified Wimbledon by overcoming Charlie Pasarel in the tournament's longest match, 112 games, a first-rounder that consumed 5 hours, 12 minutes, a major tourney record that stood until 1992, eclipsed by 14 minutes by Michael Chang and Stefan Edberg at the U.S. Open.

The marathon with Pasarell began one afternoon and concluded on the next after darkness intervened. In winning, 22-24, 1-6, 16-14, 6-3, 11-9, Gonzalez saved seven match points in the fifth set.

Later that year, he beat John Newcombe, Rosewall, Stan Smith and Arthur Ashe, 6-0, 6-2, 6-4, in succession to win $12,500, second-highest prize of the year, and the title at a rich tournament at Las Vegas. Early in 1970, in the opener of a series of $10,000 winner-take-all challenge matches leading to a grand final, he toppled Laver. The Aussie, just off his second Grand Slam year (and the eventual winner of this tournament), was clearly No. 1 in the world, but Pancho warmed a crowd of 14,761 at New York's Madison Square Garden with a 7-5, 3-6, 2-6, 6-3, 6-2 victory.

Three months before his 44th birthday, in 1972, he was the oldest to record a tournament title in the open era, winning Des Moines (Iowa) over 24-year-old Georges Goven, 3-6, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2. That year he was No. 9 in the U.S., the oldest to rank so high, and equaled Vic Seixas' Top Ten longevity span of 24 years. Seixas was No. 9 in 1942 and, at 43, No. 9 in 1966. Gonzalez had been No. 1 in 1948. As for the World Top Ten, he is alone in that he was a member in 1948 and 1949 and again in 1968 and 1969, ranking No. 1 in 1949, No. 6 in 1969.

In 1968, though still active, he was named to the Hall of Fame and he was a consistent winner on the Grand Masters tour for the over-45 champs beginning in 1973. Although his high-speed serve, so effortlessly delivered, was a trademark, Gonzalez, a 6-foot-2, 180-pounder, was a splendid athlete and tactician who excelled at defense, too. "My legs, retrieving, lobs and change-of-pace service returns meant as much or more to me than my power," he once said, "but people overlooked that because of the reputation of my serve." He won $911,078 between 1950 and 1972, and crossed the million mark as a Grand Master. He was married six times, the last to a good player, Rita Agassi, sister of another all-timer, Andre Agassi, by whom he had a son. Not a bad tennis bloodline for the young man, Skylar Gonzalez. Gonzalez died July 3, 1995, of cancer in Las Vegas, where he had been a teaching pro for some time.

Pancho Gonzalez - The Original "Greatest Serve of All Time"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyhFo3hvGPI

jrm
10-23-2009, 08:33 PM
Didn't know Gomez was such accomplished doubles player :eek:

Kolya
10-24-2009, 01:44 PM
vyWLtpYsen8

Purple Rainbow
10-24-2009, 05:58 PM
anyone knows what medvedev, schalken and ulihrach are doing now?

Schalken recently pllayed an exhibition with Mansour Bahrami versus Haarhuis and Eltingh.
It was great seeing Sjeng play again, he had a big smile on his face for the whole match! :)

<object width="560" height="340"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/SX47wexkY_o&hl=nl&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/SX47wexkY_o&hl=nl&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="340"></embed></object>

Action Jackson
11-06-2009, 10:57 PM
Thanks for the Sjeng update, good he is having fun.

Gaudenzi is working for bet and win.

Kolya
11-06-2009, 11:41 PM
What is Eltingh and Haarhuis doing these days?

My favourite doubles team.

Action Jackson
12-06-2009, 01:12 PM
Karel Novacek

http://i195.photobucket.com/albums/z266/exposbabe/Miami%202009/Picture5-3-2.png?t=1242319111

The big Czech Karel Novacek, his name came up recently and he was an interesting one for sure.

He was involved in failing the test for cocaine with Wilander and he used to stay at his house when he was living in Greenwich for the US Open.

Novacek would play virtually every week and that would include singles and doubles. He got to the 4th round at least once in every Slam, that included twice QF at RG, yet his best performance was a SF at the US Open in 94, when he lost to Stich.

He won 14 titles on clay, hard and carpet and clay was his favourite surface and he won Hamburg in 91. He hit hard from the baseline and was mostly flat from both sides and he was a big guy. A total angry guy on court, he'd scream at everything, linespeople, the lot, but the times I saw him off court he was always good with the fans and not like his grumpy persona on court.

He and Rostagno had an argument at RG. Rostagno won the match and was pissed off with his antics, at the handshake he told him and then Novacek shoved him in the chest.

He is living in Florida and is an investment banker.

Novacek was being interviewed by DC radio at the final in Barcelona. He is still in the financial world, but still following the game.

fran70
12-06-2009, 04:49 PM
Volkov broke both wrists in his childhood.

I13vsCUWkC0

One of those great talented players who for some reason why he was unable to make it on the rankings and ATP titles aswell. :worship:

fran70
12-06-2009, 04:50 PM
Novacek was being interviewed by DC radio at the final in Barcelona. He is still in the financial world, but still following the game.

Guy with a strange personality. I saw him when I was a teenager. Amazing forehand and even better claycourt game. One of those to be remembered

Action Jackson
12-07-2009, 03:54 AM
Novacek was a bit mad, could be a total prick on the court, seemed like he had white line fever. He was a poor mans Lendl.

Taz Warrior
12-07-2009, 06:41 PM
Some who spring to mind from when I first became seriously interested in tennis:

- Slava Dosedel
- Renzo Furlan
- Arnaud Boetsch
- Filip Dewulf
- Nicklas Kulti
- Marzio Martelli
- Juan Albert Viloca
- Marcelo Filipini
- Markus Zoecke

Action Jackson
02-26-2010, 12:40 PM
Viloca still plays some tennis at the lower levels. Dewulf has already been spoken about in this thread.

Kulti works at a marketing firm in Stockholm, has 3 kids and is teaching at a club in Stockholm.

Zoecke works at an academy in Germany.

Boetsch was into Scientology and got out of that, he does some commentary for French TV.

Action Jackson
03-23-2010, 01:52 AM
Alberto :hearts:

Seeing Carretero's run in Hamburg again, I think Gilbert Schaller is often forgotten. He was pretty dangerous on clay for a few years.

I got my hands on the Carretero win over Hamburg, will upload it to youtube some time soon.

Action Jackson
03-31-2010, 01:44 AM
-DGk4FG_R5k

Action Jackson
03-31-2010, 01:49 AM
Rostagno, who had match point against Becker at the US Open and Boris got a lucky netcord and won the US Open this year.

jpvWdFxF9Xc

Action Jackson
03-31-2010, 01:53 AM
Alberto Mancini

oonY35T2t1Q

Ibracadabra
03-31-2010, 01:54 AM
Rostagno, who had match point against Becker at the US Open and Boris got a lucky netcord and won the US Open this year.

jpvWdFxF9Xc

lol gotta love these stories

Start da Game
04-04-2010, 12:29 PM
http://www.luethy-sport.de/images/Bilder/Popp_Aiufschlag.jpg



http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3520/3705365918_fb88c9a9d7.jpg



http://foto.terpe.lt/inkelti/20071221/gerulaitis1.jpg

Kolya
04-04-2010, 01:13 PM
Popp is a forgotten player. Loved him at Wimbledon.

Leconte isn't really forgotten.

Is that Vitas?

Action Jackson
04-04-2010, 01:31 PM
Yes, the last one was Vitas.

Getta
04-04-2010, 01:38 PM
Gerulaitis isn't forgotten.

Action Jackson
04-06-2010, 08:33 AM
Roberto Carretero

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/BetoC.jpg

The ultimate bolter, he won 1996 Hamburg as a qualifier and didn't win an event after that or many other matches.

He was short and stocky, had a very quick service motion and loved the kicker to the backhand on the ad side and dominate from there.

Carretero used to play juniors with Corretja and Costa and had a lot of talent, but he had knee problems and the first one held him up when he played on the circuit.

A former RG junior winner. He almost got into a fight with the Poo in Rome. After he won Hamburg, what it meant to him, he said something along the lines of "more wine and women"

His run in Hamburg.

R1: def. Jordi Arrese, 6-3,5-7,7-6(2)
R2: def. MaliVai Washington (10), 6-1,6-0
R3: def. Arnaud Boetsch (7), 6-4,6-1
QF def. Gilbert Schaller (16), 4-6,6-4,6-4
SF: def. Yevgeny Kafelnikov (3), 7-5,6-2
F: def. Alex Corretja, 2-6,6-4,6-4,6-4

After that he jumped up 85 places and only won one match that year which was a default from Jordi Burillo in 1R US Open.

Found this piece of art.

RYKn6hDY-Bw

Action Jackson
09-17-2010, 06:00 AM
lol gotta love these stories

Not when Becker won.

There was a plane that crashed in Mexico and Rostagno was meant to be on that plane, but he didn't get it on thankfully.

csm
09-20-2010, 11:58 AM
This is a great thread - thanks!

One of my favorites from the 80's - Anders Järryd.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3339/3425574123_6cd76a0e6f.jpg

Anders reached #5 in singles following his SF appearance against Becker at Wimbledon in 1985. He was, and still is, referred to as a "doubles specialist" which I've always found a bit insulting to him considering his respectible singles results which included three years in the top 10 and five or more in the top 20 (but he was usually only the 3rd or 4th best in Sweden while he was top 10 so it's easy to see why he was overlooked in singles). Biggest singles win was perhaps the WCT final in Dallas where he came in as a last minute replacement for an injured Ivan Lendl, then won all his matches up to the final without dropping a set. In the final, he beat Boris Becker in four sets, 6-7, 6-1, 6-1, 6-4.

Of course, he did have his best results in doubles where he was ranked #1 for 107 weeks which is second only to McEnroe from beginning of the Open era until the late 90's (when Woodbridge passed him, later to be passed by the Bryans who are true doubles specialists). He won 59 doubles titles, including 8 Grand Slam titles and a career Grand Slam in doubles (3 French, 2 Wimbledon, 2 US Open and 1 Australian Open), with 19 different partners, the most significant of whom were John Fitzgerald and Stefan Edberg.

His doubles results were impressive since they came during a time when many of the top singles players also played doubles, and there were some very accomplished doubles players and teams during that period. Despite his excellent career in both singles and doubles, he is most often referred to as "Stefan Edberg's doubles partner."

Järryd was perhaps also best known for being the tempermental Swede during a time when all Swede's were thought of as cool and collected, calm and level-headed. He could get mad, scream and shout and throw his racquet which led to a number of fines. I alwasy thought he had kind eyes and he seemed shy and soft-spoken in brief post-match interviews, so I like to think he was only angry on court.

Priam
09-20-2010, 12:04 PM
Eddo

http://www.independent.co.uk/multimedia/archive/00113/4_113474s.jpg

Action Jackson
11-22-2010, 04:12 AM
Tomas Carbonell vs Mancini

lztiRU0Rpco

Action Jackson
12-06-2010, 12:14 AM
This is a great thread - thanks!

One of my favorites from the 80's - Anders Järryd.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3339/3425574123_6cd76a0e6f.jpg

Anders reached #5 in singles following his SF appearance against Becker at Wimbledon in 1985. He was, and still is, referred to as a "doubles specialist" which I've always found a bit insulting to him considering his respectible singles results which included three years in the top 10 and five or more in the top 20 (but he was usually only the 3rd or 4th best in Sweden while he was top 10 so it's easy to see why he was overlooked in singles). Biggest singles win was perhaps the WCT final in Dallas where he came in as a last minute replacement for an injured Ivan Lendl, then won all his matches up to the final without dropping a set. In the final, he beat Boris Becker in four sets, 6-7, 6-1, 6-1, 6-4.

Of course, he did have his best results in doubles where he was ranked #1 for 107 weeks which is second only to McEnroe from beginning of the Open era until the late 90's (when Woodbridge passed him, later to be passed by the Bryans who are true doubles specialists). He won 59 doubles titles, including 8 Grand Slam titles and a career Grand Slam in doubles (3 French, 2 Wimbledon, 2 US Open and 1 Australian Open), with 19 different partners, the most significant of whom were John Fitzgerald and Stefan Edberg.

His doubles results were impressive since they came during a time when many of the top singles players also played doubles, and there were some very accomplished doubles players and teams during that period. Despite his excellent career in both singles and doubles, he is most often referred to as "Stefan Edberg's doubles partner."

Järryd was perhaps also best known for being the tempermental Swede during a time when all Swede's were thought of as cool and collected, calm and level-headed. He could get mad, scream and shout and throw his racquet which led to a number of fines. I alwasy thought he had kind eyes and he seemed shy and soft-spoken in brief post-match interviews, so I like to think he was only angry on court.

Good call on Järryd and he was one of these guys that just had white line fever when it came to on court and off the court.

DartMarcus
12-06-2010, 03:13 AM
Slobodan Živojinović should work for this list.

Nathaliia
12-06-2010, 05:07 AM
Irakli Labadze these days. The voices in the background belong to scarecrows and me :tape: no laughing please

b_tpYI3hZXQ

Action Jackson
04-05-2011, 04:49 AM
Labadze what a Georgian gigolo.

Eden
04-28-2011, 07:18 PM
Bernd Karbacher

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g239/GeorgeWH/berndk.jpg

Karbacher, aka The German gigolo Bernd Karbacher he had the women swooning with great physique and studly appearance.

He definitely had his moments in the game, he was at his best on clay and had a big but unique serve and a big forehand were his true weapons. He made the RG quarter finals in 1986 , though he didn't have great endurance as was shown by losing to Rosset and to a kid in 99 called Gaudio from leading 2 sets to love.

The Gigolo won 3 titles and one of them he beat Muster in the semis in Germany and he beat Skoff in Båstad, when I thought the fat Austrian would win, but the Swedish ladies loved the German gigolo.

Someone uploaded a summary from Bernds 2R match against Lendl at the USO 1994. This was also Lendl's last ever GS match.

Link to part 1 (with German commentatory):

gwVIEUgUqjg

Clashcityrocker
04-28-2011, 07:52 PM
damn, i miss all these guys

out_here_grindin
04-28-2011, 07:55 PM
Francisco Clavet

http://www.tennisforafrica.org/Clavet_Francisco.jpg

Clashcityrocker
04-28-2011, 08:09 PM
Mark Koevermans

http://www.destentor.nl/multimedia/archive/01010/Koevermans_commerc_1010117b.jpg

Li Ching Yuen
04-28-2011, 08:35 PM
Irakli Labadze these days. The voices in the background belong to scarecrows and me :tape: no laughing please

b_tpYI3hZXQ

Man, forgot all about Labadze.

Question: It could be Labadze, it could be other: Overweight player, was on the tour around the mid 00's and had a really hard serve?

I'm thinking it's Irakli, but somehow I have some doubts. Belongs to the ex-USSR space of course.

Filo V.
04-28-2011, 10:26 PM
Andreas Seppi is never thought about or talked about by anyone on this forum even with he still being an active player. He's basically a forgotten player.

Ilovetheblues_86
04-29-2011, 12:30 AM
Juan Antonio Marin- Costa Rica

W-L 81-122 Best Rank: 55

Marin used to like to play a lot in Bastad, he was finalist in 1997 and won his sole title there in 1999.

1999-Enjoyed his best year, winning first career ATP title in Bastad (d. Vinciguerra)…As a result, became first Costa Rican to win an ATP title…Lost in 1st RD at Roland Garros 6-4 in fifth set to Sampras in one of most memorable matches of year…Reached SF in San Marino and QF in Mallorca and Bucharest
http://tennis66.com/Academia-profesional/Juan-Antonio-Marin.jpg

Trivia: PERSONAL
Played under Spanish nationality until March 1998, when he reverted to Costa Rican, his native country.
Xgu_CLm_Ut0

Marin talks about the project Sports for Nature Founder, production and organization of sports events to benefit the environment. Marin organizes clinic of tennis.

Anyone remembers him or that match against Sampras? Its fresh in my mind as a very entertainig match.

R128 Pete Sampras (USA) 2 L 7-6(5), 4-6, 5-7, 7-6(9), 4-6

Also he defeated Chino Rios in Santiago em 1998: :eek:

Q Marcelo Rios (CHI) 2 W 6-4, 6-7(5), 7-5

Very strong clay player, could have achieved more, very disapointing that he faded away very early.

Action Jackson
04-29-2011, 05:13 AM
Cheech Marin never won a match at GS level and he had 17 attempts at doing it. He played very well against Sampras that day and couldn't get it done.

Action Jackson
04-29-2011, 05:14 AM
Man, forgot all about Labadze.

Question: It could be Labadze, it could be other: Overweight player, was on the tour around the mid 00's and had a really hard serve?

I'm thinking it's Irakli, but somehow I have some doubts. Belongs to the ex-USSR space of course.

It was Labadze.

Snowwy
04-29-2011, 05:21 AM
Someday we will be talking about Sergiy Stakhovsky in this thread.

out_here_grindin
04-29-2011, 05:18 PM
I saw a few posts in the Department of Forgotten players thread that got me thinking. Which current players are presently forgettable and will not be remembered in the future? Players that we will look back on years from now and reminisce about(maybe a little more fondly than we do in the present).

players like

Thomaz Bellucci
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez
and Juan Monaco

Chris Kuerten
04-29-2011, 05:27 PM
Berdych, Melzer, Troicki, Wawrinka, Querrey, Cilic

Auscon
04-29-2011, 05:29 PM
Kei Nishikori, Donald Young, Somdev Devvarman Dustin Brown, Robert Farah, Clement Reix, Alexander Dolgopolov, Nathan Thompson

I kid :)

Depends how quickly senility hits...maybe all of them!

Action Jackson
09-27-2011, 10:50 AM
Adrian Voinea

http://nickbrebenel.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/adrian1.jpg

Adrian Voinea, the thoughtful and talented Romanian who had his career cut short by shoulder problems. He was definitely a stick man, there was not much of him physically.

His best run came at the 1995 RG where he made the quarter finals as a qualifier defeating Boris Becker in 4 sets, this was his biggest career win. He defeated Chesnokov in the next round and then lost to Chang in the quarters.

Voinea said this about Becker. "Before the match, I thought Becker was the best, as a person and as a tennis player, but now I feel shame for him," Voinea said after defeating the three-times Wimbledon champion, 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5.

Voinea, aged 20 and ranked No 128 in the world, charged the third-seeded Becker with glaring at him, speaking to him nastily in German, and making a spitting gesture during the concluding two sets of their match, which had carried over from the previous night.

He reached his career high of 36 and won 1 title in sunny Bournemouth and yes it was an English tournament played on clay.

He hadn't played on tour between 2004-06 because of the shoulder problems. In 2007 he came down to Australia to play in the qualies. He played Pashanski won the first set 6-1, then retired and hardly played after that, ironically he did some work with Pashanski, but it didn't last that long.

Last matches were against Younes in the Napoli Challenger and Pashanski at RG qualies, the place where he had his best GS result.

Voinea's big wins were against Muster (#1) in Indian Wells, A. Costa (#16), Boetsch (#12), Rios (#12), Moya (#11), Ferrero (#3), Henman (#6). These were on a mix of clay, carpet and hardcourt, but clay was his best surface.

He went to Italy as a 16yr old and still lives there doing some coaching.

The Becker match.

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Eden
10-03-2011, 05:20 PM
One of my favorite Swedish players

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AJ, do you know if he is involved in Swedish tennis these days?

Start da Game
10-03-2011, 08:04 PM
arazi is almost never talked......he was such a good talent.....shame on the blind breed......

Sapeod
10-03-2011, 10:11 PM
Francisco Clavet

http://www.tennisforafrica.org/Clavet_Francisco.jpg
Wasn't that guy in the top 100 for AAAAAAGGGGESSS?

Kolya
10-04-2011, 01:01 AM
Francisco Clavet

http://www.tennisforafrica.org/Clavet_Francisco.jpg

He had a good title win in Scottsdale.

Action Jackson
10-04-2011, 04:24 AM
He had a good title win in Scottsdale.

Jerry Seinfeld.

Action Jackson
10-04-2011, 04:29 AM
One of my favorite Swedish players

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AJ, do you know if he is involved in Swedish tennis these days?

Jonas Svensson is involved as for Gusten he's not involved in the official program.

Shinoj
10-04-2011, 06:11 AM
arazi is almost never talked......he was such a good talent.....shame on the blind breed......

Arazi had a terrific game at times.

MaxPower
10-04-2011, 07:30 AM
One of my favorite Swedish players

_ch9wwxJHm8



Saw Gustafsson play not long ago in a veteran tournament called Classics of Champions together with Wilander, Pernfors, Järryd, Larsson and Kucera. He actually won the tournament 2-1 in the finals over Kucera.

In Båstad Gusten will not be forgotten as he won 4 titles in 4 finals. Pretty cool considering Borg and Wilander only got 3 :)

Action Jackson
10-04-2011, 10:04 AM
arazi is almost never talked......he was such a good talent.....shame on the blind breed......

Arazi is in this thread, just do a search.

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=8544822&postcount=73

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Shinoj
10-04-2011, 10:22 AM
How Arazi kicked Rios Ass, the Most talent player ever,according to some:rolleyes:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vi5rA_bxQ08

Start da Game
10-04-2011, 12:08 PM
Arazi is in this thread, just do a search.

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showpost.php?p=8544822&postcount=73

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1disobQayQ8

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i always wanted to watch arazi - kuerten rome final in 2000......also arazi vs. fed french open first round 2002......haven't found those vids anywhere......

asmazif
10-04-2011, 07:21 PM
Jerome Haehnel - had a very successful 2004 for a few reasons - won his only GS MD match of his career at the French, beating... Agassi. :lol: Then went on to win the title in Metz out of practically nowhere. :cool: Career high of 78. Only a few shaky handheld videos of him playing on YouTube unfortunately.

fast_clay
10-04-2011, 09:48 PM
irish davis cup team hired gustaffson as a practice for the europe group II tie vs luxembourg earlier this year...

Action Jackson
10-07-2011, 03:57 AM
Saw Gustafsson play not long ago in a veteran tournament called Classics of Champions together with Wilander, Pernfors, Järryd, Larsson and Kucera. He actually won the tournament 2-1 in the finals over Kucera.

In Båstad Gusten will not be forgotten as he won 4 titles in 4 finals. Pretty cool considering Borg and Wilander only got 3 :)

Gusten the real king of Båstad, good to see he is still in shape.

njnetswill
10-07-2011, 04:33 AM
Haehnel's career was hampered by the fact that he was terrified of airplanes.

A few names that I recall:

Karol Kucera
Flavio Saretta
Werner Eschauer (Probably one of the most random top 60 players ever)
Sargis Sargsian
Cyril Saulnier

Kolya
10-07-2011, 04:33 AM
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One of my favourites of all time, Karol Kucera. I just loved the style he played. It was a shame a wrist injury in 1999 inhibited his career in the top 10.

I would really love to watch his match against Sampras at the AO in 1998!

boughtmypoints
10-07-2011, 02:15 PM
Found this piece of art.

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Robert Carretero

6 years later Carlos Moya asked me to look up his pal Carretero's result(s) that particular week from the Futures tournament at which he was attempting a comeback.

jonas
03-09-2012, 05:01 AM
So. Who can identify this guy?

http://i43.tinypic.com/501ric.jpg

Action Jackson
03-09-2012, 05:03 AM
What about Jan Gunnarsson.

jonas
03-09-2012, 05:07 AM
What about Jan Gunnarsson.

Easy, huh? He lives in my town and a bought a pro stock racket from him some time ago. :cool:
He's from Olofström, the same small town as Magnus Larsson.
SF in AO and DC-title for Gunnarsson wasn't too scabby.

tommyg6
03-09-2012, 05:12 AM
For me, one player who I thought was totally forgotten was Jeff Morrison. He made some noise for himself when he upset Juan Carlos Ferrero at Wimbledon 04, I think. At the time, commentators were making a big deal about him when he won like he was the next big American champ!

boughtmypoints
03-09-2012, 05:13 AM
I never saw him play without his backward facing cap on.

Memorable moment of Gunnarsson completely pwnd by Stefan Edberg at Indian Wells and Jan picked up the folding chair to use as a racquet for return of serve.

jonas
03-09-2012, 05:15 AM
For me, one player who I thought was totally forgotten was Jeff Morrison. He made some noise for himself when he upset Juan Carlos Ferrero at Wimbledon 04, I think. At the time, commentators were making a big deal about him when he won like he was the next big American champ!

Don't remember him at all...

tommyg6
03-09-2012, 05:16 AM
Don't remember him at all...

I guess I made my point. He is forgotten.

Action Jackson
03-09-2012, 05:19 AM
Easy, huh? He lives in my town and a bought a pro stock racket from him some time ago. :cool:
He's from Olofström, the same small town as Magnus Larsson.
SF in AO and DC-title for Gunnarsson wasn't too scabby.

Has he given up the commentating.

jonas
03-09-2012, 05:21 AM
Has he given up the commentating.

Nope. Unfortunately not, 'cause he's pretty awful at that.
He commentates for SVT (swedish television) at Båstad and Stockholm open and works at the local radio station in Växjö doing sports news and commentating.

Action Jackson
03-09-2012, 05:22 AM
Jeff Morrison best ever player to come out of West Virginia, the typical serve/volley and flat game.

boughtmypoints
03-09-2012, 05:23 AM
For me, one player who I thought was totally forgotten was Jeff Morrison. He made some noise for himself when he upset Juan Carlos Ferrero at Wimbledon 04, I think. At the time, commentators were making a big deal about him when he won like he was the next big American champ!

Beating a member of the Armada post Santana and ante Nadal at Wimbledon was hardly a feat. For most journeymen players it was found money.

I do remember Jeff. He was one American who hung around other (American) players. Very affable guy. He obviously peaked too soon, at the collegiate level. On a superficial level, he did not get "big and strong" and presumably felt overpowered in the top 100.

Hewitt =Legend
03-09-2012, 05:25 AM
I feel like Rogie, Rafito and Nole don't get enough recognition on these forums.

Ajde..???

Smoke944
03-09-2012, 05:30 AM
For me, one player who I thought was totally forgotten was Jeff Morrison. He made some noise for himself when he upset Juan Carlos Ferrero at Wimbledon 04, I think. At the time, commentators were making a big deal about him when he won like he was the next big American champ!

Good call :yeah:
Jeff was a solid player and the last American male left in the draw that Wimbledon.

jonas
03-09-2012, 05:32 AM
I feel like Rogie, Rafito and Nole don't get enough recognition on these forums.

Ajde..???

:haha:

tommyg6
03-09-2012, 05:35 AM
Other forgotten players, Taylor "Lazy" Dent, Sebastien "Doubles Specialist" Lareau, John "Top 100 in 99" van Lottum, Cecil "I changed from American to Filipino citizenship to play Davis Cup" Mamiit.

Smoke944
03-09-2012, 05:38 AM
Other forgotten players, Taylor "Lazy" Dent, Sebastien "Doubles Specialist" Lareau, John "Top 100 in 99" van Lottum, Cecil "I changed from American to Filipino citizenship to play Davis Cup" Mamiit.

Dent's not forgotten at all. I mean he just retired recently.

leng jai
03-09-2012, 09:05 AM
Xristos is falling into this category :sad:

Ajde

Action Jackson
03-09-2012, 02:34 PM
Adrian Voinea after a very successful stint coaching Blaž Kavčič who stupidly ended the agreement. He is now back in Italy coaching at a club in Livorno, a waste of an excellent tennis brain.

Sombrerero loco
03-09-2012, 03:05 PM
i d say vitas gerulaitis :hug:

gaitare
03-09-2012, 03:56 PM
i d say vitas gerulaitis :hug:

He's actually pretty well remembered :), maybe more for his flamboyant lifestyle and untimely death than his (good) results. but still.

Chip & Charge
09-26-2012, 02:02 PM
Was a fan of the Black twins but especially Wayne:

He won 2001 U.S Open and 2005 Australian Open Men's Doubles titles with Kevin Ullyett, in the 05 Aussie Open they won without dropping a set beating Woodbridge and Bhupathi in the Quarters and then the Bryan twins in the final. After that victory he reached his highest doubles ranking of 4 in the world. Also won 2002 French Open and 2004 Wimbledon Mixed Doubles with his sister Cara Black.

Singles wise he reached the Aussie Open 4th round in 1999 and peaked at 69 in the world, i got to see him live at Wimbledon one year though and thought he was a beast!

Burrow
09-26-2012, 02:34 PM
Anyone remember this guy?

http://www.atpworldtour.com/Tennis/Players/Ha/M/Markus-Hantschk.aspx

I can remember him having a dodgy service action or something.