Why people said that Nadal will burnout in a few years? [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Why people said that Nadal will burnout in a few years?

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jonathancrane
04-24-2009, 04:27 PM
I don't understand why a lot of people said that Nadal will be burnout in a few years (I'm talking here about not biased people). He hasn't been seriously injured since 2005, and right now he is playing without the protection for his knees, and winning without major complications, so no physical problems are bothering him.

Connors played a lot of tough matches in his career and had a very physical game too, he never gave up and fought every point, and won GS in his 30's and even reached SF of US Open at 39.
So why this burnout argument with Nadal?

Discuss.

Lleyton_
04-24-2009, 04:30 PM
You'll understand it in 2-3 years.

dusk
04-24-2009, 04:35 PM
Because what you keep hearing over and over, tends to creep into your mind.
The media has been going on about it constantly for several years now.
They had to find something that would take him down, so they came up with the burnout argument.

brent-o
04-24-2009, 04:38 PM
Those people were also desperately off with their calculations.

Sapeod
04-24-2009, 04:42 PM
It's because of the way he plays. I personally don't think he will burnout completely but he definately won't be as good as now. In 2/3 years he's going to drop from the top.

jonathancrane
04-24-2009, 04:44 PM
You'll understand it in 2-3 years.

Really? I've been hearing / reading the same thing since the end of 2005, and look now 3 years after what's happening

JimmyV
04-24-2009, 04:44 PM
It's a well known fact that every year since 06' Nadal's career has been in dire jeopardy due to his playing style/non-existant injuries/coaching/ etc. You'll hear the same thing every single year, it's just expert MTF tennis analysts doing their thing.

All these one-sided, 2 set clay matches are gonna come back to haunt him........

scarecrows
04-24-2009, 04:47 PM
it's all Uncle Toni's fault when he said that would retire at the end of last season

Lleyton_
04-24-2009, 05:03 PM
Really? I've been hearing / reading the same thing since the end of 2005, and look now 3 years after what's happening

If it does not happen until the end of 2012, ask me again.

vamosinator
04-24-2009, 05:05 PM
Djokovic, Murray and Federer are all going to retire younger than Nadal will. They are all very inferior physically. Nadal has tendinitis in his knees but Michael Jordan had knee tendinitis from age 28-40, and at age 40 he was the only player in the Washington Wizards to play all 82 games (and 37 minutes per game). Tendinitis doesn't send you into retirement, it just requires rest every now and then. Venus and Serena Williams know this, they've had wrist tendinitis all their careers, and they've wisely played light schedules. Whereas guys like Federer, Djokovic, Murray you can bet they'll retire from back and hip ailments, they've already had these complaints this year.

PiggyGotRoasted
04-24-2009, 05:06 PM
Nadal will not burn out in a few years.

He will just start losing very soon as soon as he loses his confidence and starts playing ala r1 uso 07 against that guy in the wimbledon film.

vamosinator
04-24-2009, 05:09 PM
The main illusion of Nadal getting injured is created by the emotion of those who have run out of answers. People that now realise Nadal will sail past all before him in history are desperate and scared, so they turn to sweeping statements about Nadal retiring in 2 years (because thats how long it will take for him to pass Sampras' record). The cruel reality is Nadal is here to stay and play in his 30s.

vamosinator
04-24-2009, 05:12 PM
Nadal will not burn out in a few years.

He will just start losing very soon as soon as he loses his confidence and starts playing ala r1 uso 07 against that guy in the wimbledon film.

That "confidence problem" is more of a Federer thing, its why he needs those flashy cardigans, because his confidence is dependent on his surroundings rather than it being inborn confidence. Nadal's confidence is inborn and irreversible.

jonathancrane
04-24-2009, 05:19 PM
The main illusion of Nadal getting injured is created by the emotion of those who have run out of answers. People that now realise Nadal will sail past all before him in history are desperate and scared, so they turn to sweeping statements about Nadal retiring in 2 years (because thats how long it will take for him to pass Sampras' record). The cruel reality is Nadal is here to stay and play in his 30s.

My dearest double account: to surpass Pete's record Nadal needs 9 more GS. It's impossible to win 9 GS in 2 years :)

vamosinator
04-24-2009, 05:22 PM
Yeah I know I was speaking in general terms (as to say the exact years and months is a bit silly) from the perspective of those who are saying Nadal will retire in 2 years, they are thinking about the Sampras record and thinking "how long shall I say he has left before retirement, ah 2 years so he can't get that Sampras record" or better yet they're probably thinking about the danger of him equaling Federer's 13 slams. Either way, 2 years seems to be the wheelchair estimate.

dusk
04-24-2009, 05:24 PM
My dearest double account: to surpass Pete's record Nadal needs 9 more GS. It's impossible to win 9 GS in 2 years :)

Chinese Open 2011:lol:

Roddickominator
04-24-2009, 05:31 PM
If Nadal lasts another 5+ years with his playing style....that is VERY impressive. Unfortunately he WILL break down at some point, and the moronic haters will finally say "I told you so!" even though they had been saying that he'd break down before the age of 20.

Clay Death
04-24-2009, 05:31 PM
You'll understand it in 2-3 years.

bullshit of the highest order. did you forget that the Clay Monster has been at the top of the game for nearly 6 years now? 10 years of domination is more than enough.

everybody slows down a step at 27 or so.

next.

Guy Haines
04-24-2009, 05:50 PM
Haters forget everything when it comes to Nadal. They only remember yesterday and today so they can bitch about it.

The original post is excellent, especially the Connors comparison.

After that: woodwork squeaks and out come from the freaks.

You'd think naysayers would have learned after 3-4 years that they are incorrect that Nadal is injury-prone. You'd think wrong.

J. Crane's thread is so-well-timed because of the old thread Tangy revived yesterday that was full of most of the 2005-06 Fed loving or Nadal-hating reasons why Rafa was supposed to be retired or ranked #28 by now. Funny reading.

Glenn, it's curious how people associated with ;) tend not to have long careers. Their career peaks tend to be shorter -- in span (usually Olympics bursts or one season of a year) and overall duration (once, or a few years) -- than Nadal's already. Strange indeed.

finishingmove
04-24-2009, 05:54 PM
all those matches with rochus will be the death of him.

Clay Death
04-24-2009, 05:58 PM
all those matches with rochus will be the death of him.

too funny. all those unremitting topspin cyclones of death will haunt his adversaries forever long after he has retired.

he will play until he is about 29 or 30. the guy loves to play the game. he just has to cut down on the hard court acitivity some down the road and basically get a little smarter about managing his schedule.

***best thread in GM at the moment.

alfonsojose
04-24-2009, 06:04 PM
He's young, fresh blood :angel:

~*BGT*~
04-24-2009, 06:24 PM
Because they want him to.

Clay Death
04-24-2009, 06:38 PM
Because they want him to.


affirmative. he is in the business of ending people`s dreams and they (the people) are getting tired of it.

l_mac
04-24-2009, 06:47 PM
Because that's what happens to "normal" players. ;)

Normal players? You mean players who aren't as good as Nadal I assume.

Examples please.

We all know why Nadull hasn't burnt out yet.

Yes, his constantly improving game :worship:

kingfederer
04-24-2009, 06:51 PM
Because that's what happens to "normal" players. ;)

We all know why Nadull hasn't burnt out yet.

why might that be dear glenny? are u falsely accusing him of taking drugs? u are a bitter bitter person arent u? nadal just keeps defying ur predictions everytime.

Clay Death
04-24-2009, 06:53 PM
Normal players? You mean players who aren't as good as Nadal I assume.

Examples please.



Yes, his constantly improving game :worship:

that avatar has to go. its lame. put something there that shows his essence and his exhuberance and his endless energy.

and force people to take you more seriously.

FedFan_2007
04-24-2009, 06:54 PM
I don't understand why a lot of people said that Nadal will be burnout in a few years (I'm talking here about not biased people). He hasn't been seriously injured since 2005, and right now he is playing without the protection for his knees, and winning without major complications, so no physical problems are bothering him.

Connors played a lot of tough matches in his career and had a very physical game too, he never gave up and fought every point, and won GS in his 30's and even reached SF of US Open at 39.
So why this burnout argument with Nadal?

Discuss.

Because they're full of envy/hate/bitterness/jealousy. Rafa will have another 3-4 years at the top before the inevitable decline happens.

kingfederer
04-24-2009, 06:55 PM
the haters clearly hoping rafa gets injured esp. patrick mcenroe, luke jensen, bud 'old man' collins, fred stolle, wilander, guy forget, the british commentators, gimelslob, etc!

Henry Chinaski
04-24-2009, 06:57 PM
because every time he gets a minor injury Uncle Toni hints that he may need to have both legs amputated.

Clay Death
04-24-2009, 06:58 PM
Because they're full of envy/hate/bitterness/jealousy. Rafa will have another 3-4 years at the top before the inevitable decline happens.

be careful with the truth. dole it out only in very small/minute amounts.

the truth is likely to kill 1/2 the hapless termites on GM. we need them for our amusement.

kingfederer
04-24-2009, 06:59 PM
if rafa's deline happens around age 27 then he has had a very good career longevity wise, because u rarely win slams after 27 yrs. he has 5 good yrs ahead of time to get many slams as possible.

ORGASMATRON
04-24-2009, 07:01 PM
Because of the way he plays. He goes through a grind every match that he plays. He also plays a lot. If he is not playing a tournamnet he is practicing for 5 hours. He has to do that cos he is not a natural talent like Fed and others. Therefor even though he has surprised me i think its just a question of time before he burns out.

Yashirobai
04-24-2009, 07:10 PM
That "confidence problem" is more of a Federer thing, its why he needs those flashy cardigans, because his confidence is dependent on his surroundings rather than it being inborn confidence. Nadal's confidence is inborn and irreversible.

That's just so well said. Let me use it for my signature.

Commander Data
04-24-2009, 07:12 PM
Because it seemed like a rather logical thing to assume a while ago.

He has a very physical game and showed signs early on, e.g knees, oncle tonys comments etc. So, people thought he would burn out rather quickly. It is not uncommon that players burn out, you know.

But as it seems he has a very strong body and may not burn out like predicted. It is always a sad sight when players burn out so, I hope he doesn't burn out.

kingfederer
04-24-2009, 07:13 PM
Because of the way he plays. He goes through a grind every match that he plays. He also plays a lot. If he is not playing a tournamnet he is practicing for 5 hours. He has to do that cos he is not a natural talent like Fed and others. Therefor even though he has surprised me i think its just a question of time before he burns out.

if he burns out having 10+ slams then it doesnt matter if he burns out. his legend would already be establish with double digit slams. depends how many slams he has before he burns out.

Commander Data
04-24-2009, 07:18 PM
Because they're full of envy/hate/bitterness/jealousy. Rafa will have another 3-4 years at the top before the inevitable decline happens.

You right on, throw in some insulting generalizations. the world is very hard to understand otherwise isn't it?

ORGASMATRON
04-24-2009, 07:23 PM
if he burns out having 10+ slams then it doesnt matter if he burns out. his legend would already be establish with double digit slams. depends how many slams he has before he burns out.

I agree, but doesnt the Rafafans want him to be the GOAT?

dusk
04-24-2009, 07:41 PM
I agree, but doesnt the Rafafans want him to be the GOAT?

I consider myself a Rafafan, amongst others, and I couldn't care less who the GOAT is. There's one for you.:cool:

habibko
04-24-2009, 07:44 PM
yeah I never digested that argument, Nadal has been an exceptional player since his rise to the top of the game, I don't see how he would "burn out" at the age of 25 or so, he isn't exactly a LEGO model that will crumble down all over the place, mentally he is insatiable and physically he is very gifted, I can see him playing at the highest levels for as long as Federer.

now as for WHY people said it, it is very clear no? not many people are fans of his game really, a game like Federer or Edberg is more likely to attract admirers than a game of power and consistency, not to mention all the haters etc...

be careful with the truth. dole it out only in very small/minute amounts.

the truth is likely to kill 1/2 the hapless termites on GM. we need them for our amusement.

:haha: :yeah:

Arkulari
04-24-2009, 07:47 PM
I think that as time goes by, he'll start going out of HC tournaments and will focus in clay and grass ones, for his knees, the physical impact of his game will take its toll sooner or later, I don't honestly think he'll be playing by the time he's 30 :shrug:

General Suburbia
04-24-2009, 07:50 PM
I agree, but doesnt the Rafafans want him to be the GOAT?
They originally just wanted him to be Clay GOAT, which he's pretty much done (next to Borg and no one else). Now that he's dominating on all surfaces, they want a bigger bite of the pie. I have no problem with that.

http://images.starcraftmazter.net/4chan/inside_jokes/courage_wolf/bite_off_more_than_you_can_chew.gif

Henry Kaspar
04-24-2009, 07:51 PM
I don't understand why a lot of people said that Nadal will be burnout in a few years (I'm talking here about not biased people). He hasn't been seriously injured since 2005, and right now he is playing without the protection for his knees, and winning without major complications, so no physical problems are bothering him.

Connors played a lot of tough matches in his career and had a very physical game too, he never gave up and fought every point, and won GS in his 30's and even reached SF of US Open at 39.
So why this burnout argument with Nadal?

Discuss.

Few slams are won beyond the age of 25. Connors was THE grand exception of the past 35 years, but even his career from 20-25 was significantly better than from 26-39.

GlennMirnyi
04-24-2009, 08:00 PM
Normal players? You mean players who aren't as good as Nadal I assume.

Examples please.

Yes, his constantly improving game :worship:

You know what I mean.

why might that be dear glenny? are u falsely accusing him of taking drugs? u are a bitter bitter person arent u? nadal just keeps defying ur predictions everytime.

YOU are saying that. I haven't said anything.

Interesting you jump to that conclusion. That's almost a confession of guilt.

Athletes who take drugs usually peak quickly and then patter out just as fast. Nadal's been pretty consistent the past 5 years.

So that begs the question: What kind of new miracle drug is he using now?

Again, you are the one talking about drugs.

l_mac
04-24-2009, 09:52 PM
You know what I mean.


No I don't or I wouldn't have asked.

I don't think even you know what you mean :hug:

duong
04-24-2009, 10:32 PM
I don't understand why a lot of people said that Nadal will be burnout in a few years (I'm talking here about not biased people). He hasn't been seriously injured since 2005, and right now he is playing without the protection for his knees, and winning without major complications, so no physical problems are bothering him.

Connors played a lot of tough matches in his career and had a very physical game too, he never gave up and fought every point, and won GS in his 30's and even reached SF of US Open at 39.
So why this burnout argument with Nadal?

Discuss.

Connors and Nadal were totally different.

Connors was not an hyper-nervous traumatising his body and brain all the time.

He traumatised his body in the end of his carreer but mentally he was quite an easy man.

Nadal is still very young, and nobody can speak about that point in the past form the way you do.

We still have time to see about that.

duong
04-24-2009, 10:40 PM
So why this burnout argument with Nadal?


Agassi, Noah, Becker have all said that considering the way he plays, he will not last long.

Saying "they all made a mistake" because he's still there at less than 23 years old is nonsense.

leng jai
04-24-2009, 11:10 PM
It BecAuSe He GoT bIg MuScLeS anD soMe sAy maYbE toO bIg foR TeNNis!

moon language
04-24-2009, 11:14 PM
Not to say it won't happen as it certainly could, but this burnout idea was put forth by jealous Federer fans.

FairWeatherFan
04-24-2009, 11:32 PM
Two reasons.
Firstly, Nadal's game is obviously hard on the body and he has already suffered from bad injuries.
Secondly, players like Nadal (who are, too, counterpunchers), who have great success at an early age, are commonly nowhere near as successful in the later half of their career.

christallh24
04-24-2009, 11:40 PM
Yes, isn't it funny the "He won't last long." crowd have been saying the same thing for the past 4-5 years. Yet, here Rafa is at No.1. And whatever does happen in the next 3-4 years, would still amount to a healthy run tennis careera, lol.

kingfederer
04-24-2009, 11:46 PM
YOU are saying that. I haven't said anything.

Interesting you jump to that conclusion. That's almost a confession of guilt.

he doesnt take drugs, its just not his style. his family is very down to earth and not the cheating type of people. his right arm and legs are like stick but his left arm is huge and i cant remember a drug does that and he has no abs, plus he gets tired by the end of the season and against murray at the us open he had hands on kneeds taking deep breaths. so he doesnt take any steroids or endurance drugs. plus they test them after every match so u cannot get away. rafa isnt that type of guy, u can just tell from family background and the type of life he lives in mallorca.

Clay Death
04-24-2009, 11:49 PM
Yes, isn't it funny the "He won't last long." crowd have been saying the same thing for the past 4-5 years. Yet, here Rafa is at No.1. And whatever does happen in the next 3-4 years, would still amount to a healthy run tennis careera, lol.


affirmative. i can see him dominating the sport for 3 more years but he has to continue to improve and stay healthy.

star
04-24-2009, 11:49 PM
but mentally he was quite an easy man.

y

I don't understand what you mean by this. He was a mentally easy man? You mean calm and relaxed? or what?

christallh24
04-25-2009, 12:00 AM
affirmative. i can see him dominating the sport for 3 more years but he has to continue to improve and stay healthy.

Dominating ala Federer, I don't see, but an average of 2 slams a year is all I'd dare to hope for. And DEFINATELY, he needs to improve. Especially, as we know, his serve. He was serving quite well at the beginning of the season, but something went funky there in Miami.

As for healthy, of course, we Rafa fans pray that he'll always be healthy. Man, if he can continue to improve and stay healthy, makes a Rafa fan shiver with what he could accomplish.

Clay Death
04-25-2009, 12:06 AM
Dominating ala Federer, I don't see, but an average of 2 slams a year is all I'd dare to hope for. And DEFINATELY, he needs to improve. Especially, as we know, his serve. He was serving quite well at the beginning of the season, but something went funky there in Miami.

As for healthy, of course, we Rafa fans pray that he'll always be healthy. Man, if he can continue to improve and stay healthy, makes a Rafa fan shiver with what he could accomplish.

affirmative.

GlennMirnyi
04-25-2009, 01:23 AM
No I don't or I wouldn't have asked.

I don't think even you know what you mean :hug:

Don't I? Don't you? Do I? Do you?

YOU are saying that. I haven't said anything.

Interesting you jump to that conclusion. That's almost a confession of guilt. QUOTE]

he doesnt take drugs, its just not his style. his family is very down to earth and not the cheating type of people. his right arm and legs are like stick but his left arm is huge and i cant remember a drug does that and he has no abs, plus he gets tired by the end of the season and against murray at the us open he had hands on kneeds taking deep breaths. so he doesnt take any steroids or endurance drugs. plus they test them after every match so u cannot get away. rafa isnt that type of guy, u can just tell from family background and the type of life he lives in mallorca.

No, he definitely isn't a cheater.

I guess he must be a hermaphrodite then to have a gynecologist as doctor... :confused: :scratch:

shotgun
04-25-2009, 01:31 AM
Players usually peak at 24-25, so we'll only know about two years from now if Nadal peaked early and burnt out, or if his career had a normal development. We'll see if he keeps improving (or stays at the top of his game) until 2011.

Black Adam
04-25-2009, 01:33 AM
To the one who said few plans are won after the age of 25 especially by counter punchers , you are wrong. Connors won after 25 as did Agassi who won 4 slams after 29 and was world number one at the age of 33.

CmonAussie
04-25-2009, 04:40 AM
To the one who said few plans are won after the age of 25 especially by counter punchers , you are wrong. Connors won after 25 as did Agassi who won 4 slams after 29 and was world number one at the age of 33.

>>>
NADAL isn`t a counter puncher~ he`s simply an unorthodox puncher:devil:
Agassi is an agressive baseliner..
Connors is half counter puncher & half agressive baseliner..
Hewitt is a true counter puncher!

Joao
04-25-2009, 05:56 AM
People keep saying that Nadal will burnout in a few years because of his style of play (or maybe they're just hoping he does so that their favourite player starts winning some).

Until he really does, I don't see that happenning. As a matter of fact, we've seen him adjust his game recently so that he doesn't have to stay as long on the court. So, he may just prove everybody wrong ...

kingfederer
04-25-2009, 06:19 AM
No, he definitely isn't a cheater.

I guess he must be a hermaphrodite then to have a gynecologist as doctor... :confused: :scratch:

ur just a hater, a jealous hater. i bet u would love to have a life like nadal's, the money, the trophies, the fame, the girls, the uniqueness of his game that destroys opponents!

ORGASMATRON
04-25-2009, 06:30 AM
They originally just wanted him to be Clay GOAT, which he's pretty much done (next to Borg and no one else). Now that he's dominating on all surfaces, they want a bigger bite of the pie. I have no problem with that.

http://images.starcraftmazter.net/4chan/inside_jokes/courage_wolf/bite_off_more_than_you_can_chew.gif

Me neither, i only have a problem when they start acting he is already the GOAT and say he will win 17-20 slams.

2003
04-25-2009, 06:47 AM
Because of the way he plays.He has to do that cos he is not a natural talent like Fed and others.

Come on man thats just spiteful, from one Fed fan to another.

Did you not see the wicked forehands he fired at Wimbeldon and Aus Open final? Fed could only just stand there and watch it go by..

It takes years of training and talent to fire shots like that.

Will he burn out? Who knows. Tennis is a unique sport its not like track and field where u have to train day in and day out running 100 miles a week, you can take breaks and adjust your game accordingly without losing too much. A lot of other sports you don't have the luxury of doing that.

bobbynorwich
04-25-2009, 06:48 AM
Just wishful thinking by the Nadal-haters.

*bunny*
04-25-2009, 07:06 AM
Miguel Angel Nadal played for the Spanish national team until he was almost 36, and retired from football when he was nearly 39.
Rafa has that in his genes.
(Not that I think he will play until 36 or 39!)

vamosinator
04-25-2009, 07:15 AM
IF Nadal had Federer's body and mind he'd be burntout by last year. Nadal's game is suited to him and there is no burnout, not now not in 10 years either.

duong
04-25-2009, 07:44 AM
To the one who said few plans are won after the age of 25 especially by counter punchers , you are wrong. Connors won after 25 as did Agassi who won 4 slams after 29 and was world number one at the age of 33.

because he played against very poor competition.

I think Henry Kaspar should say 27 rather than 25 (especially Lendl won older with a very good fitness regime ... but also lighter competition than several years before -not at all as light as Agassi though).

But on the whole, what Henry Kaspar says is very true.

duong
04-25-2009, 07:47 AM
IF Nadal had Federer's body and mind he'd be burntout by last year. Nadal's game is suited to him and there is no burnout, not now not in 10 years either.

just wishful thinking by Nadal-lovers :D

Just enjoy your time now, you have all time to see the future :)

vamosinator
04-25-2009, 07:53 AM
just wishful thinking by Nadal-lovers :D

Just enjoy your time now, you have all time to see the future :)

I'll enjoy it each year when the burnout predictions fail over and over for a decade :wavey:

duong
04-25-2009, 07:53 AM
Two reasons.
Firstly, Nadal's game is obviously hard on the body and he has already suffered from bad injuries.
Secondly, players like Nadal (who are, too, counterpunchers), who have great success at an early age, are commonly nowhere near as successful in the later half of their career.

yes that's the basic argument :shrug:

but some people here keep on saying "this is just gossiping by Nadal jealous haters" blablabla blablabla : just common MTF bullshit :lol:

duong
04-25-2009, 07:54 AM
I'll enjoy it each year when the burnout predictions fail over and over for a decade :wavey:


Great :yeah:

vamosinator
04-25-2009, 07:58 AM
yes that's the basic argument : shrug:

but some people here keep on saying "this is just gossiping by Nadal jealous haters" blablabla blablabla : just common MTF bullshit :lol:

And a make-believe burnout isn't jealous BS?

You really think Nadal has the same physical capacity as the relatively weak Courier and boyish Hewitt and Chang? You are kidding yourself, you would be better off comparing Federer to Hewitt since both have back problems and are likely to retire soon.

duong
04-25-2009, 07:59 AM
Tennis is a unique sport its not like track and field where u have to train day in and day out running 100 miles a week, you can take breaks and adjust your game accordingly without losing too much. A lot of other sports you don't have the luxury of doing that.

Actually Nadal would be very well inspired to listen to that advice : Borg didn't play so much in the year.

I hope he will ... sincerely for him :)

duong
04-25-2009, 08:01 AM
And a make-believe burnout isn't jealous BS?

You really think Nadal has the same physical capacity as the relatively weak Courier and boyish Hewitt and Chang? You are kidding yourself, you would be better off comparing Federer to Hewitt since both have back problems and are likely to retire soon.

no I think you are young, it's not a matter of weakness or something.

Btw just listen to Toni Nadal : he knows all this better than you :)

vamosinator
04-25-2009, 08:06 AM
no I think you are young, it's not a matter of weakness or something.

Btw just listen to Toni Nadal : he knows all this better than you :)

Toni Nadal will be talking down Nadal for as long as he plays, he knows it helps Federer think he's still the favorite, you should know this by now, Toni is a genius so advanced its probably gone over your head just like it went over Federer's head.

I think you never saw Courier play if you compare Nadal's physical capacity to him, and you never saw any of the golden retrievers play who you seem to think mirror Nadal in bodyclock. I also don't think you understand tendinitis.

You'll mature though and see the error of your ways as the decade passes by without much change.

duong
04-25-2009, 08:07 AM
y

I don't understand what you mean by this. He was a mentally easy man? You mean calm and relaxed? or what?

yes, basically it's what I mean.

For instance he smiled very often when he was on the court. And his body expressed flexibility and a certain relaxation.

But to be honest I've only known him around 1980, which was not his youngest time.

duong
04-25-2009, 08:08 AM
I think you never saw Courier play if you compare Nadal's physical capacity to him, and you never saw any of the golden retrievers play who you seem to think mirror Nadal in bodyclock.

:haha:

ORGASMATRON
04-25-2009, 08:10 AM
Nadal will burn out in 2 years.

Next.

vamosinator
04-25-2009, 08:12 AM
^^ That "Nadal will burn out in 2 years." sig has served a lot of people very well already. I haven't bothered to use it though because I know it'll still be laughable in 8 years time:o

duong
04-25-2009, 08:21 AM
^^ That "Nadal will burn out in 2 years." sig has served a lot of people very well already. I haven't bothered to use it though because I know it'll still be laughable in 8 years time:o

Can't you just enjoy present time ?

When I read what you write, I'm a little bit worried for you that you will suffer in a few years'time the same way Federer-crazy fanatics do :shrug:

Life and time are always stronger than anybody.

vamosinator
04-25-2009, 08:26 AM
Can't you just enjoy present time ?

When I read what you write, I'm a little bit worried for you that you will suffer in a few years'time the same way Federer-crazy fanatics do :shrug:

Life and time are always stronger than anybody.

How does typing in a forum effect 'enjoying present time'? I see a lie(or lack of logic) and I correct it with a truth, nothing more nothing less.

Federer's fanatics only suffer because they chose to talk up a player as though he was God who we all knew was going to fade as soon as a great player arrived(better than Roddick/Hewitt/Nalbandian), whereas supporting Nadal is a safe journey because his level is a first with no rival in sight, because talent alone can't rival Nadal, a rival would need a lot more than talent.

morningglory
04-25-2009, 08:35 AM
Can't you just enjoy present time ?

When I read what you write, I'm a little bit worried for you that you will suffer in a few years'time the same way Federer-crazy fanatics do :shrug:

Life and time are always stronger than anybody.

probably not in "a few" years... Im gonna go with several years.

vamosinator
04-25-2009, 08:38 AM
This is what happens when there is nothing positive to say about Federer, the focus turns to anything negative (usually very hypothetical) that can be conjured about about Nadal:o

duong
04-25-2009, 08:40 AM
Federer's fanatics only suffer because they chose to talk up a player as though he was God who we all knew was going to fade as soon as a great player arrived(better than Roddick/Hewitt/Nalbandian), whereas supporting Nadal is a safe journey because his level is a first with no rival in sight, because talent alone can't rival Nadal, a rival would need a lot more than talent.

you consider him like a God the same way.

That's not a sane attitude.

Btw, please note that I warned and laughed at people who considered Federer as a God the same way.

vamosinator
04-25-2009, 08:49 AM
you consider him like a God the same way.

That's not a sane attitude.

Btw, please note that I warned and laughed at people who considered Federer as a God the same way.

Your argument fell apart on the first line. Why would I consider Nadal a 'God'? He is a hardworking athlete. I don't consider Michael Jordan or Ali a God either.

The one thing that Nadal does that Federer never did, and the difference between their careers is that Nadal only cares about improvement, not history. Jordan only cared about improvement, constantly adding new features to his game, Ali too. The records and accolades were bi-products of constant effort and innovation. I admire the method, not the person.

Winners take all
04-25-2009, 08:55 AM
Miguel Angel Nadal played for the Spanish national team until he was almost 36, and retired from football when he was nearly 39.
Rafa has that in his genes.
(Not that I think he will play until 36 or 39!)
I watched many of M.G. Nadal's games while he was still playing for Barca and Spain, the man was very strong physically, and Rafa imo is even stronger than his uncle.

oranges
04-25-2009, 08:59 AM
TheRafa's posts reek of bias and prejudice to such an extent I'm getting dizzy here. We are to take it Federer is not hard working athlete who worked extremely hard on improving his game. A fairy came down to grant him the wish and he suddenly progressed from a relatively unfulfilled talent to a guy that demonstrated unprecedented dominance for a couple of years. You're desperately in need of a grasp of the concept of time and change.

vamosinator
04-25-2009, 09:01 AM
TheRafa's posts reek of bias and prejudice to such an extent I'm getting dizzy here. We are to take it Federer is not hard working athlete who worked extremely hard on improving his game. A fairy came down to grant him the wish and he suddenly progressed from a relatively unfulfilled talent to a guy that demonstrated unprecedented dominance for a couple of years. You're desperately in need of a grasp of the concept of time and change.

So when Federer says he doesn't work on weaknesses (and prefers not to have a coach regardless of failings), that doesn't really mean anything to you does it? :rolleyes:

jonathancrane
04-25-2009, 09:08 AM
Connors and Nadal were totally different.

Connors was not an hyper-nervous traumatising his body and brain all the time.

He traumatised his body in the end of his carreer but mentally he was quite an easy man.

Nadal is still very young, and nobody can speak about that point in the past form the way you do.

We still have time to see about that.

My comparision with Conoors is about the way both players fight every point until the end and never gave up, and both are basically baseliners. Connors hit the ball mainly flat, and Nadal with topspin.

Connors an easy man? I think your are wrong. He was and still is a difficult man outside and inside the courts

My point is easy: there is nothing to suggest us right now that Nadal is gonna fade away soon. No evidence for that

Agassi, Noah, Becker have all said that considering the way he plays, he will not last long.

Saying "they all made a mistake" because he's still there at less than 23 years old is nonsense.

Well, the time has passed and they were wrong. Maybe this year or next year Nadal will be toast, but watching what has happened during the last 2 years you can't predict that

Miguel Angel Nadal played for the Spanish national team until he was almost 36, and retired from football when he was nearly 39.
Rafa has that in his genes.
(Not that I think he will play until 36 or 39!)

Football / basket are completely different sports from tennis. Not a good comparision



Btw just listen to Toni Nadal : he knows all this better than you :)

Uncle Tony is a clown. Don't you remember what he said during the match against Feliciano in Madrid? "Nadal is injured and won't finish the match"

oranges
04-25-2009, 09:17 AM
So when Federer says he doesn't work on weaknesses (and prefers not to have a coach regardless of failings), that doesn't really mean anything to you does it? :rolleyes:

Like I said, his progress was magically granted. He didn't work on it. Conversely, age will not catch up with Rafito until he's in his forties because he's such a hard worker and he'll progress continuously until then. Altogether makes perfect sense and shows no trace of treating him like a supernatural being. :cuckoo:

vamosinator
04-25-2009, 09:20 AM
Like I said, his progress was magically granted. He didn't work on it. Conversely, age will not catch up with Rafito until he's in his forties because he's such a hard worker and he'll progress continuously until then. Altogether makes perfect sense and shows no trace of treating him like a supernatural being. :cuckoo:

Forties?

How about 30s? Will he suddenly become a slacker in his 30s yeah? You talk like its unheard of for a tennis player to work hard after their 20s. Maybe you've been living in Federer's world for too long.

2003
04-25-2009, 09:25 AM
Roddick/Hewitt/Nalbandian), whereas supporting Nadal is a safe journey because his level is a first with no rival in sight, because talent alone can't rival Nadal, a rival would need a lot more than talent.

Careful now, your coming close to becoming a "rafatard". Fedfans said similar things.

Don't be naieve. He came within a hairsbreath of being still stuck on 4 slams. He came 2 points from losing Wimbledon. If Federer had any backbone at all he would have finished your boy good at A/O. Not to mention Verdasco. He neally lost to him as well. If Murray or Tsonga or even Monfis had played any decent tennis Rafa would not have come through A/O me thinks. Dont talk about a weak draw and no competition.

If both had happened you would be looking at 15-4 in slams and Rafa with barely 1/4 of Feds slams. A few points here and there eh.

Doesn't sound so unbeatable now does he your Rafa :wavey:

FedFan
04-25-2009, 09:28 AM
You can not compare Nadal to Connors. The game has changed a lot since then. Connors was very light-weighted (only 70 kg)and moved easily on court.

Nadal must not burn out, but if in 2 or 3 years he drops physically and he is one or two step slower he will not nearly be as successfull as now.

It is a big disadvantage for him, that in general he can not win the points faster.

oranges
04-25-2009, 09:30 AM
Forties?

How about 30s? Will he suddenly become a slacker in his 30s yeah? You talk like its unheard of for a tennis player to work hard after their 20s. Maybe you've been living in Federer's world for too long.

I've not been living in the Federer world at all :lol: Sure, if it makes you happy, he'll be just as good in his 30s. Enjoy the delusion. Plenty of guys who've been that good at that age and literally all of them with a style that highly depends on the physical strengths that are bound to wane.
People actually discuss here whether the predictions that he'll last shorter than usual have any merit, but you're the only one who claims he'll last longer than usual. :worship:

duong
04-25-2009, 09:42 AM
My comparision with Conoors is about the way both players fight every point until the end and never gave up, and both are basically baseliners. Connors hit the ball mainly flat, and Nadal with topspin.

Connors an easy man? I think your are wrong. He was and still is a difficult man outside and inside the courts

Yes of course, and the same for Lendl, who also had a long carreer.

But he allowed for some relaxation.

And outside of court, they both praticed in a very disciplined way (the same for Agassi).

And Connors and Lendl didn't have so many physical problems when they were so young !

I may be wrong but Nadal is a really different kind of person, physically and mentally.

I see him as somebody full of obsessive-compulsive disorders, more like Seles.

He is afraid of darkness, outside of the court he likes eating cakes and ice-creams where Lendl had a very strict diet ...

I may be wrong but seeing him as a "similar-Connors" whereas they had so many dissimilarities, is really too simple imo.


My point is easy: there is nothing to suggest us right now that Nadal is gonna fade away soon. No evidence for that

Well, the time has passed and Agassi, Noah and Becker were wrong. Maybe this year or next year Nadal will be toast, but watching what has happened during the last 2 years you can't predict that

There's no evidence but it's not true that there's nothing to suggest,

and it's not true that you can say that "Agassi, Noah and Becker were wrong"

... when Nadal is not yet 23 years old !!

Uncle Tony is a clown. Don't you remember what he said during the match against Feliciano in Madrid? "Nadal is injured and won't finish the match"

Toni Nadal knows Rafa thousands times better than all of us.

star
04-25-2009, 01:48 PM
yes, basically it's what I mean.

For instance he smiled very often when he was on the court. And his body expressed flexibility and a certain relaxation.

But to be honest I've only known him around 1980, which was not his youngest time.

Thanks for responding.

Connors was an extremely intense competitor and arrogant in contempt for his opponents -- I speak of his younger days. It was him against the entire world. His opponent was his enemy. He did many obnoxious things on the court. He was fortunate that McEnroe who was even more obnoxious on the court came along to make him look better by comparison.

But to say that he was relaxed etc. No. He definitely was not. Take a look at the Wimbledon final against Ashe. I only point to that match because I believe it is easily available.

I see Connor's intensity on a level with Nadal's intensity, but obviously Nadal's game is much more advanced than Connor's. However, Nadal does not put the additional burden of seeing himself as the disadvantaged kid who has to fight the world. Connors definitely did.

Clay Death
04-25-2009, 01:53 PM
Thanks for responding.

Connors was an extremely intense competitor and arrogant in contempt for his opponents -- I speak of his younger days. It was him against the entire world. His opponent was his enemy. He did many obnoxious things on the court. He was fortunate that McEnroe who was even more obnoxious on the court came along to make him look better by comparison.

But to say that he was relaxed etc. No. He definitely was not. Take a look at the Wimbledon final against Ashe. I only point to that match because I believe it is easily available.

I see Connor's intensity on a level with Nadal's intensity, but obviously Nadal's game is much more advanced than Connor's. However, Nadal does not put the additional burden of seeing himself as the disadvantaged kid who has to fight the world. Connors definitely did.

he can make the game a little easier for himself if he continues to improve.

**best thread in da house.

star
04-25-2009, 01:55 PM
Nadal must not burn out, but if in 2 or 3 years he drops physically and he is one or two step slower he will not nearly be as successfull as now.


Any player who becomes one or two steps slower is not as successful. That's true for Federer as well. Agassi developed a game that controlled the center of the court so that he could limit his running and that helped him.

I don't know what will happen in Nadal's future. I can see why people looked at him and foresaw some problems. Heavily muscled people tend not to hold up well in tennis. Perhaps Becker was thinking of his own physical difficulties. Every player has physical strengths and weaknesses. Managing both is the key to success.

I'm more on the wait and see side rather than making predictions.

Chimayo
04-25-2009, 03:25 PM
Rafa has a good point of view on his career's longevity. Whenever he is asked the question about his physical style leading to a short career, he replies by saying one (or both) of two things: 1) that of course his career can end at any time, and that he must enjoy the moment while he has it; and 2) that he has already had a long career, since he has been on the pro tour since he was 15, and many tennis careers do not last 7 full years. This falls into his pattern of not burdening himself with grandiose expectations, which I think is one way he counters his natural mental intensity, i.e. his ridiculous drive to win every point, every game, every match, every tournament, etc. I think if he keeps his head on straight (and we have very little indication that he won't, given his history), that his mental burnout will be mainly apparent in short-term situations rather than career-shortening long-term situations. Rafa seems much more likely to become affected for a tournament or two when he has expended too much mental energy (such as what we saw this year in Miami, or in 2007 in Hamburg) than to let mental burnout shorten his career (such as what Borg went through, or what I feel Federer is being threatened by). He -- and Toni -- are very very good at the kind of psychological zen trickery that keeps Rafa in the moment.

Much as I love what duong has to say, I don't agree with the point that Connors was "easy". He was incredibly mentally intense and very focused. So was Ivan Lendl, who was probably the most OCD top tennis player ever. Neither of them had anywhere near Nadal's "be with calm" mentality, and yet they both had nice long careers.

As for Nadal's physical burnout, who can say? Michael Jordan and Serena Williams both dealt quite effectively with tendonitis for many years. Nadal has a bit of an advantage on other tennis players in that he grew up on clay and perhaps hasn't taken the concrete pounding for as many formative years as a Hewitt or an Agassi, for example. He can also eventually extend his career for a couple of years by concentrating on clay and grass when he winds down. As Vida said in another post, he comes from an athletic family, and knows how to deal with injury and fame (which can be the real killer, you know?).

Cool thread, definitely, but I wouldn't be overly concerned that he'll retire before he achieves whatever his goals might be: I don't think he'll let himself.

desigundah
04-25-2009, 03:28 PM
I don't understand why a lot of people said that Nadal will be burnout in a few years (I'm talking here about not biased people). He hasn't been seriously injured since 2005, and right now he is playing without the protection for his knees, and winning without major complications, so no physical problems are bothering him.

Connors played a lot of tough matches in his career and had a very physical game too, he never gave up and fought every point, and won GS in his 30's and even reached SF of US Open at 39.
So why this burnout argument with Nadal?

Discuss.

To me, last year was like Nadal's career in a nutshell. Was on absolute fire all year long but towards the end of the year brokedown en route to the loss to Simon and then because of injury he couldn't compete in the TMC or the Davis Cup. His style is grueling and he plays too many tournaments. Its as simple as that. The human body can only take so much wear and tear.

Guy Haines
04-25-2009, 04:37 PM
To me, last year was like Nadal's career in a nutshell. Was on absolute fire all year long but towards the end of the year brokedown en route to the loss to Simon and then because of injury he couldn't compete in the TMC or the Davis Cup. His style is grueling and he plays too many tournaments. Its as simple as that. The human body can only take so much wear and tear.

Sounds like smart scheduling, aside from the Davis Cup problem, and Nadal has already done a lot in Davis Cup. Masters Cup matters less than any of the majors. He might never win the Paris indoors, but otherwise he's been collecting Masters/1000s at a fast pace.

The funny thing about the Connors comparison is that it's being made. One way that some like to dismiss Nadal is by inferring that he'd be hopeless if forced to play with old racquets or older string techology. But if you look at Connors and Borg, Nadal resembles them -- not to mention Vilas -- more than Federer does. He has connections to Borg (and Vilas on the forehand side) in terms of new topspin for an era, and in early Borg's case, in terms of playing behind the baseline. When Borg took over there was a lot of talk about the intensity of his commitment to fitness -- sound familiar? Like Borg, Rafa has translated clay mastery into success on other surfaces, especially grass. And like Borg, the US Open is going to be his biggest test or nemesis. But Borg and Nadal have very different temperaments. In terms of temperament or attitude, Borg reminds me more of peak Federer.

With Connors, it's easy to make loose comparisons to Nadal because they are lefty baseliners (though Jimmy attacked a lot, especially against Borg), and both are street fighters, though in different ways. But as others have pointed out, Nadal is less volatile than Connors and more OCD. Though Connors sure loved blowing on his hands between points.

Federer has a lot of similarities to many players from the past, of course. He plays a modern version of the "classic" or "beautiful" game, complete with one-handed backhand, meaning he's more orthodox. (Borg, Connors, and Nadal were not orthodox.) He also was Greatest Ever at the peak -- a player that added baseline finesse and magic to Sampras's previously unmatched dominant style of play and dominance at modern majors. Though I've always thought the rocket Rod-Federer comparison is a matter of stats and hype and little more. Laver was short, and much more of a net-charger.

The irony of the last 12 months is that after years of people, many of them Federer fans, constantly saying Nadal would burn out quick, and burn out before Federer, Federer is struggling against decline, while Nadal continues to ascend. What comes around goes around.

If you like Nadal, you shouldn't take anything for granted. Counting future majors is a dangerous folly. One match at a time is smarter. You never know if any player will be competing one month from now.

Nadal does play too much, in my opinion. In future years he should scale back a bit, but 09 has tremendous potential. If his career had to end this year, it would devastate him, but he'd also probably deal with it and handle it. Since so much of his game has been built on overcoming adversity, right down to being #2 for a record span, he's probably going to be able to deal with and extend his declining later years if he keeps physically solid. He need only look to mentor Moya for an example of playing impressively when peers have long retired.

desigundah
04-25-2009, 04:53 PM
Sounds like smart scheduling, aside from the Davis Cup problem, and Nadal has already done a lot in Davis Cup. Masters Cup matters less than any of the majors. He might never win the Paris indoors, but otherwise he's been collecting Masters/1000s at a fast pace.

The funny thing about the Connors comparison is that it's being made. One way that some like to dismiss Nadal is by inferring that he'd be hopeless if forced to play with old racquets or older string techology. But if you look at Connors and Borg, Nadal resembles them -- not to mention Vilas -- more than Federer does. He has connections to Borg (and Vilas on the forehand side) in terms of new topspin for an era, and in early Borg's case, in terms of playing behind the baseline. When Borg took over there was a lot of talk about the intensity of his commitment to fitness -- sound familiar? Like Borg, Rafa has translated clay mastery into success on other surfaces, especially grass. And like Borg, the US Open is going to be his biggest test or nemesis. But Borg and Nadal have very different temperaments. In terms of temperament or attitude, Borg reminds me more of peak Federer.

With Connors, it's easy to make loose comparisons to Nadal because they are lefty baseliners (though Jimmy attacked a lot, especially against Borg), and both are street fighters, though in different ways. But as others have pointed out, Nadal is less volatile than Connors and more OCD. Though Connors sure loved blowing on his hands between points.

Federer has a lot of similarities to many players from the past, of course. He plays a modern version of the "classic" or "beautiful" game, complete with one-handed backhand, meaning he's more orthodox. (Borg, Connors, and Nadal were not orthodox.) He also was Greatest Ever at the peak -- a player that added baseline finesse and magic to Sampras's previously unmatched dominant style of play and dominance at modern majors. Though I've always thought the rocket Rod-Federer comparison is a matter of stats and hype and little more. Laver was short, and much more of a net-charger.

The irony of the last 12 months is that after years of people, many of them Federer fans, constantly saying Nadal would burn out quick, and burn out before Federer, Federer is struggling against decline, while Nadal continues to ascend. What comes around goes around.

If you like Nadal, you shouldn't take anything for granted. Counting future majors is a dangerous folly. One match at a time is smarter. You never know if any player will be competing one month from now.

Nadal does play too much, in my opinion. In future years he should scale back a bit, but 09 has tremendous potential. If his career had to end this year, it would devastate him, but he'd also probably deal with it and handle it. Since so much of his game has been built on overcoming adversity, right down to being #2 for a record span, he's probably going to be able to deal with and extend his declining later years if he keeps physically solid. He need only look to mentor Moya for an example of playing impressively when peers have long retired.

:worship:
Couldn't have said it any better myself. Will Nadal fade? Of course he will. He already has had instances in his career where the excessive play has taken its toll. Think about the 2007 US Open against Ferrer where his knees were hurt and his movement was suspect and he lost that match. Then, like I said earlier, look at the end of last year. I'm sure Rafa is beating himself up about missing the dramatic DC final along with the TMC (which may be less prestrigous than any Grand Slam, but is probably more valuable than any AMS event). Then look at how he had to withdraw out of Rotterdam earlier this year because of another injury problem. I love hearing people talk about how it hasn't already happened yet. Give me a break. He's 22 years old!

Of course he isn't going to start breaking down right now. He's an absolute fitness freak and aside from that he's obviously naturally a complete freak of nature but as long as you're human your body can only go so far. How long will Nadal be dominant? Probably enough to win atleast 8 championships at Roland Garros and seriously threaten the record of Sampras/Federer but after the age of 27 you have to wonder how long he can just continue to sweep through every clay court event and still hold his own at Wimbledon and the other Grand Slams.

With that being said, I dont think anyone is arguing that Rafa will probably play into his 30's just like how Agassi did. These fitness freaks/workout warriors last forever. Its just a question of how long he can play at this level where he's absolutely amazing. Of course Agassi wasn't nearly as dominant as Rafa was in the early stages of his career. It was only because the amount of work he decided to put in off the court that Andre lasted forever. Can Rafa do this? I think he will.

At the end of the day, I think Nadal will have a home in the top 10 of tennis for the next 10 years (if he wants). But top 3? Its almost impossible to play 15 years of grinding,physical tennis at that level.

star
04-25-2009, 05:12 PM
Re the scheduling talk: My opinion is that Nadal needs to find a way to drop a clay tournament out of his schedule. Clearly, he doesn't feel comfortable doing that right now. Perhaps he will next year.

But, for now, this is the point in his career where he should play a lot of tournaments. When he hits 25, he should cut back. He has an opportunity right now, and he should take it as long as he's healthy. Most players aren't at number one very long, so now is his time.

A_Skywalker
04-25-2009, 05:15 PM
I dont have time like some people here to write so many, but in short I think he will last another 4 years, maybe not all of them at number 1 but he will be in top 3 for a long time winning GSs and masters. I expect him to win around 12-14 GSs. 15 will be great.

heya
04-25-2009, 05:26 PM
Federer demands the #1 rank even if his eyes tear up. No need to hurt Federer by succeeding.

GlennMirnyi
04-25-2009, 05:29 PM
This is what happens when there is nothing positive to say about Federer, the focus turns to anything negative (usually very hypothetical) that can be conjured about about Nadal:o

No. You and your other friends at the Nadull fangirling committee are the ignoramuses bringing Nadull to every freaking conversation.

mkakascik
04-25-2009, 08:12 PM
News Olympic games 2024 Somewhere
Winner:Rafael Nadal
Defeated: 1st round big Dick Norman, 2nd round Kei Nishikori, Quaterfinal Roger Federer jr., Semifinal Rafael Nadal jr., final Jaden Gil Graff-Agassi

christallh24
04-25-2009, 10:52 PM
he can make the game a little easier for himself if he continues to improve.

I agree. I hope Rafa keeps improving enough to win points shorter than he does now. It would be such less stress. But, you know what, I think the rallies are where his high comes from.His self-motivation. I hope he chooses the longevity of his career over the high he get from rallying and winning that point.

robiht
04-26-2009, 01:22 AM
He will burnout in several years(3-4),thats for sure.Which means he will play less tournaments and he can't win every matches.His performance will be lower on hardcourt,because of his physical condition.(Slower running,worse reflex,more injuries,less training)
The next 3 years will be his best chance to win the US Open.And for him that's the only big tournament,which missing...

But on clay he can win after that very easily,so his ranking will drop some places.But he will still remain the king of the clay.:wavey:(and don't forget Wimbledon,easy finalist in every year).

I think he can play tennis on high(not the highest) level until the age of 29-30.Probably until 2016 Olympics...

The point is that we can enjoy his tennis for several years(just remember Nadal-Djoko final in MC:worship:),and that's what really matters :)

Clay Death
04-26-2009, 01:39 AM
i think General JonathanCrane is right. there is no evidence what so ever to suggest that he is going to burn out.

in fact, the evidence points to the other way. he seems to be getting smarter, better, and stronger which could lead to greater longevity than previously believed.

keep in mind that sooner or later he will have proven to himself enough about hard courts will decide to cut down on match play and practice on those courts to save his body and his knees.

grass and clay absorb quite a bit of the impact and he moves the best and so much more freely on those 2 natural surfaces.

**best thread in da house.

ORGASMATRON
04-26-2009, 01:55 AM
I agree. I hope Rafa keeps improving enough to win points shorter than he does now. It would be such less stress. But, you know what, I think the rallies are where his high comes from.His self-motivation. I hope he chooses the longevity of his career over the high he get from rallying and winning that point.

Blanka wont improve much more then he did already. He is at the limit of his abilities right now. He will always have to grind out wins. I dont call him Blanka for nothing you know :rolleyes:

FedFan_2007
04-26-2009, 02:10 AM
CD - the haters just can't stand the prospect that Rafa will be on a 200 clay match winning streak or something to that effect...

Clay Death
04-26-2009, 02:18 AM
CD - the haters just can't stand the prospect that Rafa will be on a 200 clay match winning streak or something to that effect...

i dont know about any 200 wins match streak but it is obvious that the Clay Warrior has effectively ruined so many lives and personally put an end to so many dreams.

no telling how many hapless termites he has put in insane asylums. his continued domination of the planet is simply tearing away at the haters.

here is what is really killing them: he wins despite having the following liabilities:

A. weak serve
B. Weak slice
C. Weak volleys
D. Weak return on hard courts
E. has proven to be injury prone/ knee, shoulder, and foot issues

he lets nothing get in his way anyway. nothing. there is a great lesson for us all from the way he conducts his business.

memo to the opposition: die a 1000 deaths or just one

ORGASMATRON
04-26-2009, 02:21 AM
200 match winning streak :silly: Blanka hasnt even won 3 slams in a year yet. Fed did it 3 times.

FlameOn
04-26-2009, 02:35 AM
I don't think Nadal's set to burn out anytime soon. I know WTA isn't tennis and all that :rolleyes: but Venus Williams has had wrist and knee tendinitis and she's still going strong. I think Nadal will gradually lighten his schedule even further (he's hardly a tournament whore as it is compared to some of the other players), which means he might sacrifice the ranking slightly, but he still could be a solid Top 5 player/slam winner for six more years.

miura
04-26-2009, 02:43 AM
Federer demands the #1 rank even if his eyes tear up. No need to hurt Federer by succeeding.
heya, how many friends do you have in real life? we're not counting imaginary here..

ORGASMATRON
04-26-2009, 02:47 AM
I think Heya fell in a pot of liquid LSD when he/she was a baby.

miura
04-26-2009, 02:48 AM
or maybe she just lost all her friends because of her bitter behaviour and decided to haunt several internet disccusion forums to avenge herself...

Clay Death
04-26-2009, 02:54 AM
or maybe she just lost all her friends because of her bitter behaviour and decided to haunt several internet disccusion forums to avenge herself...

who is she anyway? if she is hot, i will have my staff of 300 examine her and interview her.

my harem has an opening.

miura
04-26-2009, 03:04 AM
no hot girl would scavenge this forums day out and day in. she must be a hunchback of notredam.

habibko
04-26-2009, 03:17 AM
:haha: :haha: :haha:

vamosinator
04-26-2009, 03:23 AM
I don't think Nadal's set to burn out anytime soon. I know WTA isn't tennis and all that :rolleyes: but Venus Williams has had wrist and knee tendinitis and she's still going strong. I think Nadal will gradually lighten his schedule even further (he's hardly a tournament whore as it is compared to some of the other players), which means he might sacrifice the ranking slightly, but he still could be a solid Top 5 player/slam winner for six more years.

Exactly, all the Fediots think(or hope) that tendinitis ends careers. Michael Jordan had knee tendinitis from age 28-40 and his final season with Washington Wizards he was the only Wizard to play all 82 games (and also 37 minutes per game, 20ppg, 6.1rpg, 45%fg). And then there is Venus and Serena outlasting everyone of their generation....:o

morningglory
04-26-2009, 03:25 AM
Don't diss heya :lol:
Seems the fed worshippers here fail to appreciate her brand of humor; she does the same thing for Ducky, whom she supports as well. Anyway they have to turn to ad hominem attacks because there's no denying Fed's waterwork displays + poor sportsmanship as of late.

heya
04-26-2009, 05:30 PM
Huge noses are reserved for huge egos. Congratulations on an hourly basis for the geeks who have more than 10 worthless posts a day. Nadal fans have to donate friendship to these special-looking geeks. Humor is not their thing.:sad:

Har-Tru
04-26-2009, 09:23 PM
Will he burn out in 2-3 years? I doubt it. Will he start to fade out by that time? I think so, which doesn't mean he can't be at the top for 2-3 more years, winning a slam here and there, especially in France. However, I don't think he'll be playing after 28.

leng jai
04-26-2009, 10:54 PM
who is she anyway? if she is hot, i will have my staff of 300 examine her and interview her.

my harem has an opening.

I'm hot.

ToniTennis
04-27-2009, 10:10 AM
Careful now, your coming close to becoming a "rafatard". Fedfans said similar things.

Don't be naieve. He came within a hairsbreath of being still stuck on 4 slams. He came 2 points from losing Wimbledon. If Federer had any backbone at all he would have finished your boy good at A/O. Not to mention Verdasco. He neally lost to him as well. If Murray or Tsonga or even Monfis had played any decent tennis Rafa would not have come through A/O me thinks. Dont talk about a weak draw and no competition.

If both had happened you would be looking at 15-4 in slams and Rafa with barely 1/4 of Feds slams. A few points here and there eh.

Doesn't sound so unbeatable now does he your Rafa :wavey:

That is true, but your argument can be easily reversed saying that, for example, Rafa was just two points away from breaking Roger in the 5th set at Wimbly 07, not once, but twice, so perhaps Fed would have at least one slam less. At the end of the day, however, he lost one and won the other and that's what really counts.

ORGASMATRON
04-27-2009, 10:45 AM
no hot girl would scavenge this forums day out and day in. she must be a hunchback of notredam.

Roger that :cool:

lazybear
04-28-2009, 12:28 PM
People are saying the same thing about Lebron James. He's 250 pounds, jumps to the sky, those knees are under extreme pressure, and should have exploded long time ago, well at least according to some people. It's all about the ligaments, really, and genetics has a lot to do with it. Rafa's built is a little different though. I'm among those who don't think he'll last very long, but i certainly don't want him to be injured. Well i try hard not to. :) I don't like him but he's a unique athlete, and a spirited fighter. You gotta respect that in a person. Anyway, i don't get those prediction threads, we can't see the future. Everybody can injure himself anytime, really.

http://www.askmen.com/top_10/fitness_60/74_fitness_list.html

http://www.cracked.com/article_15823_5-wimpiest-pro-sports-injuries-all-time.html

Clay Death
04-28-2009, 02:19 PM
People are saying the same thing about Lebron James. He's 250 pounds, jumps to the sky, those knees are under extreme pressure, and should have exploded long time ago, well at least according to some people. It's all about the ligaments, really, and genetics has a lot to do with it. Rafa's built is a little different though. I'm among those who don't think he'll last very long, but i certainly don't want him to be injured. Well i try hard not to. :) I don't like him but he's a unique athlete, and a spirited fighter. You gotta respect that in a person. Anyway, i don't get those prediction threads, we can't see the future. Everybody can injure himself anytime, really.

http://www.askmen.com/top_10/fitness_60/74_fitness_list.html

http://www.cracked.com/article_15823_5-wimpiest-pro-sports-injuries-all-time.html


the evidence--i repeat the evidence--seems to point to the exact opposite of what you believe or many others believe.

he was a solid #2 for 3 years and is just about a lock for his 2nd straight year at #1. that is 5 years at the top and the guy is just 22.

he still has a huge upside. the improvements in his game alone will help him last longer than previously believed.

are you people even watching the same sport or what?

Foxy
04-28-2009, 02:22 PM
the evidence--i repeat the evidence--seems to point to the exact opposite of what you believe or many others believe.

he was a solid #2 for 3 years and is just about a lock for his 2nd straight year at #1. that is 5 years at the top and the guy is just 22.

he still has a huge upside. the improvements in his game alone will help him last longer than previously believed.

are you people even watching the same sport or what?

True. I am beginning to think haters close their eyes whenever Rafa makes a clean winner. I can only explain it that way. :shrug:

Clay Death
04-28-2009, 02:30 PM
True. I am beginning to think haters close their eyes whenever Rafa makes a clean winner. I can only explain it that way. :shrug:


affirmative. clay monster has ruined many lives and ended a lot of dreams. there is no telling how many more will end up in insane asylums as a result of his success.

rofe
04-28-2009, 02:43 PM
At the time that people were wondering if he would "burn out" (even though burn out is more mental than physical) early it was primarily because he had a grinding game on HC that was hard on his knees so that speculation was justified.

Nadal himself realized that however and made some remarkable improvements like taking the ball on the rise, learning to volley and being aggressive on HC in general to the point that it is no longer an issue for him.

Clay Death
04-28-2009, 03:05 PM
At the time that people were wondering if he would "burn out" (even though burn out is more mental than physical) early it was primarily because he had a grinding game on HC that was hard on his knees so that speculation was justified.

Nadal himself realized that however and made some remarkable improvements like taking the ball on the rise, learning to volley and being aggressive on HC in general to the point that it is no longer an issue for him.


still long ways to go. he continues to show great desire to make small, incremental improvements in his game.

Ferru said just the other day that the clay monster is determined to be more aggressive on clay as well. we saw some of that at the last French Open.

lazybear
04-28-2009, 03:36 PM
the evidence--i repeat the evidence--seems to point to the exact opposite of what you believe or many others believe.

In this argument, there is no evidence, pro or contra. You simple don't know, neither do I.

he was a solid #2 for 3 years and is just about a lock for his 2nd straight year at #1. that is 5 years at the top and the guy is just 22.

That's an evidence for Nadal being a great player. I know he is.

he still has a huge upside. the improvements in his game alone will help him last longer than previously believed.

Don't know about that huge upside. His serve is what it is. Movement? He'll never be faster. Stamina? At its best. Mindset? There is no room for improvement. Flattened strokes? I can't see it. He already has a good slice. Volleying? He's not natural he'll never be great there. I think he can't play better then he did last year (Garros, Wimbledon, Olympics) which was unbelievable, and he hasn't played that well since then (not even at AO). Not that he had to.

are you people even watching the same sport or what?

Yes, and i'm well aware about his improvements in his game. His idea about the game changed a lot last year, and it changed his game. I think he could've done it even earlier in his career. Anyway, we'll see it when we see it.

FedFan
04-28-2009, 03:40 PM
"Sampras, who believes Federer will break his record, thinks the Swiss can enjoy a longer career than Nadal. "One thing Roger has over him is that I think it takes him a lot less energy to stay on top than it does Rafa," Sampras said. "It's physically and mentally demanding for Rafa because he seems to be strung so tight."

He added: "When you're the best player in the world people are gunning for you year after year and that will take its toll..... It takes a lot of work for Rafa to win these matches. As strong as he is, I think the body will take its toll. There's a certain grind that he goes through, unlike Roger, who's a lot more fluid. His matches are a lot easier. It seems like there are no easy matches for Rafa. He works for every point."

HarryMan
04-28-2009, 03:51 PM
Sampras is right, I mean beating this field on clay must be taking its toll on Nadal. I was surprised the way the field (especially Rochus) fought at Barcelona; Nadal was forced to play the matches of his life to beat the field.

rofe
04-28-2009, 04:07 PM
"Sampras, who believes Federer will break his record, thinks the Swiss can enjoy a longer career than Nadal. "One thing Roger has over him is that I think it takes him a lot less energy to stay on top than it does Rafa," Sampras said. "It's physically and mentally demanding for Rafa because he seems to be strung so tight."

He added: "When you're the best player in the world people are gunning for you year after year and that will take its toll..... It takes a lot of work for Rafa to win these matches. As strong as he is, I think the body will take its toll. There's a certain grind that he goes through, unlike Roger, who's a lot more fluid. His matches are a lot easier. It seems like there are no easy matches for Rafa. He works for every point."

What Sampras doesn't seem to be taking into account is Nadal's exceptional combination of strength and endurance the likes of which hasn't been seen before. Nadal may be much more prepared to handle the longevity question than Sampras gives him credit for.

GlennMirnyi
04-28-2009, 04:21 PM
What Sampras doesn't seem to be taking into account is Nadal's exceptional combination of strength and endurance the likes of which hasn't been seen before. Nadal may be much more prepared to handle the longevity question than Sampras gives him credit for.

Yeah. Nadull is the new superman.

Fanboyism, much?

Clay Death
04-28-2009, 04:22 PM
What Sampras doesn't seem to be taking into account is Nadal's exceptional combination of strength and endurance the likes of which hasn't been seen before. Nadal may be much more prepared to handle the longevity question than Sampras gives him credit for.


sampy the single trick pony thrived on fast surfaces, thanks to his mighty serve. it didnt take optimal fitness with his power game to run down the opposition on hard courts and fast grass.

he would not understand supreme fitness. neither is he willng to give the clay monster any credit for what he has been able to achieve. he was recently heard saying that he could give Nadal a run for his money.

dream on Sampy. you are just as clueless as some of the others. for instance, Clay Monster has the most destructive forehand ever seen in the game. his will is 2nd to none in his era. no one comes close to having mental reserves that he owns and summons at will.

his ability to construct points and play the percentages is without precedence at this time in the sport. he slowly continues to improve on all surfaces, not just on clay. he has the best passing shots in the game and he can hit them from impossible positions.

his near 10 hours of court time to run over both Verdasco and then Fed at the Australian Open attests rather clearly to his physical gifts and his talents.

like i said before, the guy is just 22 and seems to be getting better and stronger, not weaker.

clay is the wellspring from which he flows. with sufficient match play and practice on clay, his ground game will be where it needs to be. it is not sharp right now but the clay season just started. he still has Rome, Madrid, and Roland Garros to fine tune his ground game.

he will take both roland garros and wimbledon again. and with each slam, his confidence grows and his game improves a little. he said that he feels like a little better player as a result of being able to win the Australian Open.

GlennMirnyi
04-28-2009, 04:24 PM
Don't know about that huge upside. His serve is what it is. Movement? He'll never be faster. Stamina? At its best. Mindset? There is no room for improvement. Flattened strokes? I can't see it. He already has a good slice. Volleying? He's not natural he'll never be great there. I think he can't play better then he did last year (Garros, Wimbledon, Olympics) which was unbelievable, and he hasn't played that well since then (not even at AO). Not that he had to.

No, he doesn't.

FedFan
04-28-2009, 04:33 PM
What Sampras doesn't seem to be taking into account is Nadal's exceptional combination of strength and endurance the likes of which hasn't been seen before. Nadal may be much more prepared to handle the longevity question than Sampras gives him credit for.

I am not sure about it, let us wait and see. ;)

I think one problem for Nadal in the near future is, that he can not win easy points, his serve is still too weak and not fluid.

I doubt he can get better, he is in his prime now.

lazybear
04-28-2009, 04:49 PM
No, he doesn't.

Well it's effective. I didn't say it's great, but it's good. Compared to other (great) players who has (or had) a great slice, it's nothing special, but a couple of years ago he didn't have that shot in his repertoire, at all.

rafa_maniac
04-28-2009, 05:08 PM
His slice basically won him the match against Davydenko :shrug: If anything, the problem with it nowadays is that he tends to OVERuse it.

Chair Umpire
04-28-2009, 05:40 PM
"Sampras, who believes Federer will break his record, thinks the Swiss can enjoy a longer career than Nadal. "One thing Roger has over him is that I think it takes him a lot less energy to stay on top than it does Rafa," Sampras said. "It's physically and mentally demanding for Rafa because he seems to be strung so tight."

He added: "When you're the best player in the world people are gunning for you year after year and that will take its toll..... It takes a lot of work for Rafa to win these matches. As strong as he is, I think the body will take its toll. There's a certain grind that he goes through, unlike Roger, who's a lot more fluid. His matches are a lot easier. It seems like there are no easy matches for Rafa. He works for every point."


Sampras sees Nadal threat to record

LONDON (AP) Pete Sampras has long been preparing for the day when Roger Federer eclipses his record of 14 major tennis titles. He's now starting to come to grips with the fact that Rafael Nadal may be able to do it as well.

The 37-year-old Sampras, who is in London to play in a seniors tournament at the Royal Albert Hall, won the 2002 U.S. Open in his last competitive match, giving him 14 Grand Slam championships. Federer has 13 and Nadal has five, including the last four French Open titles.

"If you think about it, Rafa's got as good a chance to win double digits as anyone," Sampras said Tuesday.

"I think Roger's going to break this record over the next couple of years. I think Rafa, he could win some more Frenchs, he could win a couple more Wimbledons. He could have 10-12 majors when he's done, if not more."

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/st20081204a1.html


PS- This thread is bookmark material.

Guy Haines
04-28-2009, 05:46 PM
"Sampras, who believes Federer will break his record, thinks the Swiss can enjoy a longer career than Nadal. "One thing Roger has over him is that I think it takes him a lot less energy to stay on top than it does Rafa," Sampras said. "It's physically and mentally demanding for Rafa because he seems to be strung so tight."

He added: "When you're the best player in the world people are gunning for you year after year and that will take its toll..... It takes a lot of work for Rafa to win these matches. As strong as he is, I think the body will take its toll. There's a certain grind that he goes through, unlike Roger, who's a lot more fluid. His matches are a lot easier. It seems like there are no easy matches for Rafa. He works for every point."

I wonder what Agassi's thoughts might be on this matter.

heya
04-28-2009, 05:54 PM
Sampras, who needed injured opponents and cheered for their injuries? This guy couldn't play on clay or grass after his 29th birthday. He considers Blake a top 10 player. Agassi thinks no one except Nadal could hit a few shots against Federer. Losers.

Erica86
04-28-2009, 09:05 PM
Sampras sees Nadal threat to record

LONDON (AP) Pete Sampras has long been preparing for the day when Roger Federer eclipses his record of 14 major tennis titles. He's now starting to come to grips with the fact that Rafael Nadal may be able to do it as well.

The 37-year-old Sampras, who is in London to play in a seniors tournament at the Royal Albert Hall, won the 2002 U.S. Open in his last competitive match, giving him 14 Grand Slam championships. Federer has 13 and Nadal has five, including the last four French Open titles.

"If you think about it, Rafa's got as good a chance to win double digits as anyone," Sampras said Tuesday.

"I think Roger's going to break this record over the next couple of years. I think Rafa, he could win some more Frenchs, he could win a couple more Wimbledons. He could have 10-12 majors when he's done, if not more."

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/st20081204a1.html


PS- This thread is bookmark material.

Nadal has 6, not 5.

moonlightdance
04-28-2009, 09:50 PM
Nadal has 6, not 5.

the article was written back in december, when rafa did have 5 GS to his name ;)

GlennMirnyi
04-28-2009, 10:03 PM
Well it's effective. I didn't say it's great, but it's good. Compared to other (great) players who has (or had) a great slice, it's nothing special, but a couple of years ago he didn't have that shot in his repertoire, at all.

Nah. He still doesn't have it. And will never have.

His slice basically won him the match against Davydenko :shrug: If anything, the problem with it nowadays is that he tends to OVERuse it.

Yeah, I'm sure that was what murdered Davydenko.

prima donna
04-28-2009, 10:13 PM
It's interesting to observe the gradual changes in the plebeian mentality of the average Nadal fan.

luie
04-28-2009, 11:35 PM
I don't think nadal will burn out anytime soon,he is way above the field especially on clay ,he is not even challenged much anymore. Look at last years RG he was sick with the flu and still destroyed the field.What will happen when he is healthy,look Murray & federer bombed out of the AO 09 ,08 because they were unhealty but nadal even though he is unhealthy destroyed the field. He is just that good.

Guy Haines
04-28-2009, 11:50 PM
It's interesting to observe the gradual changes in the plebeian mentality of the average Nadal fan.

And what castle in the sky or gutter do you observe these changes from, oh wise aristocratic one?

Let them eat clay.

prima donna
04-29-2009, 12:09 AM
And what castle in the sky or gutter do you observe these changes from, oh wise aristocratic one?

You've perfectly illustrated my point.

2003
04-29-2009, 12:37 AM
Exactly, all the Fediots think(or hope) that tendinitis ends careers. Michael Jordan had knee tendinitis from age 28-40 and his final season with Washington Wizards he was the only Wizard to play all 82 games (and also 37 minutes per game, 20ppg, 6.1rpg, 45%fg). And then there is Venus and Serena outlasting everyone of their generation....:o

Thats 3 athletes who survivied, but your ignoring the countless number of others who succumbed to tendinitis.

Guy Haines
04-29-2009, 12:39 AM
You've perfectly illustrated my point.

Your point being that you are incredibly rude in public forums, but cover it up with pish-tosh pomp turns of phrase?

prima donna
04-29-2009, 12:44 AM
Your point being that you are incredibly rude in public forums, but cover it up with pish-tosh pomp turns of phrase?


:lol:

I most enjoy reading your posts, sadly the only thing that distinguishes you from most Nadal fans is your beautiful command of language (star and Castafiore being exempt from that generalization).

You're all the same!

Guy Haines
04-29-2009, 01:07 AM
:lol:

I most enjoy reading your posts, sadly the only thing that distinguishes you from most Nadal fans is your beautiful command of language (star and Castafiore being exempt from that generalization).

You're all the same!

I'll play the role of Court Jester. :banana:

We're all the same.

Clay Death
04-29-2009, 01:18 AM
Your point being that you are incredibly rude in public forums, but cover it up with pish-tosh pomp turns of phrase?

clay monster`s success has torn apart the world of an average hapless termite that lingers unremittingly here on mtf.

all they are left with is ridicule and mockery which weakens their case even further.

why am i not surprised. they have no concept or understanding of how the war is waged on the court in the modern game of tennis. none what so ever. big fat ZERO.

the game has moved on and is different from the way it was being played even just 5 years ago, let alone 10 years.

kingfederer
04-29-2009, 03:07 AM
wow i just watched the wimbledon 2008 final again and its unreal, nadal is as tough as they come, saving break point in that 5th set by nadal was unbelievable. still get nervous watching it even though u know the result, and rafa going into the royal box to meet the prince filipe of spain was even better! the new world order in world tennis started that night! it was the day and match where the roger federer era came to an end and the changing of the guard happened, and roger federer did not want to easily give up his reigns to rafa nadal. it took everything in nadal to finally end federer's era!

respect for nadal, it took a super human effort to pull that off!
WOW!

Clay Death
04-29-2009, 03:33 AM
australian open final for the first 4 sets is as good as it gets. it was tennis warcraft.

Erica86
04-29-2009, 05:46 PM
:lol:

I most enjoy reading your posts, sadly the only thing that distinguishes you from most Nadal fans is your beautiful command of language (star and Castafiore being exempt from that generalization).

You're all the same!


By language, do you mean English?
If you think that English is the ONLY language of the world, you are the most stupid person in this forum.

Har-Tru
04-29-2009, 05:59 PM
wow i just watched the wimbledon 2008 final again and its unreal, nadal is as tough as they come, saving break point in that 5th set by nadal was unbelievable. still get nervous watching it even though u know the result, and rafa going into the royal box to meet the prince filipe of spain was even better! the new world order in world tennis started that night! it was the day and match where the roger federer era came to an end and the changing of the guard happened, and roger federer did not want to easily give up his reigns to rafa nadal. it took everything in nadal to finally end federer's era!

respect for nadal, it took a super human effort to pull that off!
WOW!

it's Philipee

nkhera1
04-29-2009, 06:07 PM
It's interesting to observe the gradual changes in the plebeian mentality of the average Nadal fan.

What might these changes be?

heya
04-29-2009, 06:20 PM
When Nadal always wins, his supporters (or sympathizers)
become automatically threatening to the Federer fans, no matter where and who he plays. If you don't support anything Federer does, you supposedly can't speak
comprehensible English.

prima donna
04-29-2009, 08:24 PM
you supposedly can't speak
comprehensible English.
I haven't berated the linguistic abilities of Nadal fans. I simply made a perfectly innocuous joke, and expressed my great pleasure in reading Guy Haines' posts. He's an eloquent guy, so what ?

prima donna
04-29-2009, 08:44 PM
What might these changes be?
Oh, I don't know, an increased level of haughtiness ? Say what you will about Rafael Nadal but he certainly isn't pompous, and the same could be said of his fans until he began dominating.

I mean, there's nothing wrong with the occasional arrogant remark, but there's one minor problem: A habitually arrogant Nadal fan is about as peculiar as a grunge rocker who belongs to a country club. It's just odd.

Rafa = Fed Killa
04-29-2009, 09:00 PM
It's interesting to observe the gradual changes in the plebeian mentality of the average Nadal fan.

Math > English

Nadal > Federer

Pansy poets suck.

prima donna
04-29-2009, 09:02 PM
Math > English

Nadal > Federer

Pansy poets suck.
All right, cowboy.

Rafa = Fed Killa
04-29-2009, 09:05 PM
All right, cowboy.

Math is the universal language which improves human life.

English is useless if compared to math.
Federer is useless if compared to Nadal.

Accept it, Evolve and give up your poetry for Math.

Clay Death
04-30-2009, 04:45 AM
Math is the universal language which improves human life.

English is useless if compared to math.
Federer is useless if compared to Nadal.

Accept it, Evolve and give up your poetry for Math.

affirmative. screw the english verbal gymnastics that mean nothing.

instead, read this article as to why the Clay Warrior is going to continue to be a force. Nadal haters go ahead and read and weep some more. if you want to beat him and i always said this, your best chance is at a best of 3 sets foremat.

check it out for yourself. this is not me talking but others like his fellow pros, experts, and sports psychologists:

Secret to beating Nadal on clay yet to be foundby Matt Cronin, Special to FOXSports.com

Novak Djokovic was fired up after winning the second set from Rafael Nadal in the Monte Carlo final. The contest was knotted at a set apiece, and the Serbian's groundstrokes had depth and meaning. For a few moments, it was Djokovic who was doing the pushing and pulling.

But on the Spaniard's beloved red clay, it's Nadal who usually wins super heavyweight tug of wars, because he knows his opponents have to be able to hang with him until the last ball is struck. And over the past five years, no one has shown that they have the legs, the stamina or the heart to grapple with him on clay. That's why the multi-talented Djokovic went down 6-3, 2-6, 6-1, just like dozens of others have before him.

"He's got the psychological edge where everyone knows that he's Rafael Nadal, and he's already up a set and break before he walks on the court," said sports psychologist Allen Fox, author of "The Winner's Mind" and a former touring pro. "You know he's never going to quit, and it's a nasty prospect."After winning his fifth consecutive Monte Carlo crown, the left-handed Nadal ran his clay court record in finals to 23-1, which makes the 22-year-old — to state the extremely obvious — a gigantic favorite to win every clay-court tournament he enters, including Barcelona this week, Masters Series titles in Rome and Madrid during the first two weeks of May and, of course, his fifth consecutive French Open.

One of the reasons he's an overwhelming favorite is that Nadal continues to win on clay — and most other surfaces — even when he's not at the very top of his game. He plays a nearly error-free type of game, where his defense is almost always airtight and his offense borders on spectacular.

(this paragraph above is key so read it again. clay is what makes him so great. he has the heavy topspin obviously which means sky high margins but clay gives him the confident mentality, physical toughness, and it also fine tunes his ground game.)


His uncle and coach, Toni, said that after his nephew put down his two nearest competitors of the season — Andy Murray and Djokovic — at Monte Carlo, Rafa was missing a bit of confidence and his serve was way off.

Still, Nadal bullied his foes when necessary, because they can't figure out a way to get the ball past him when he's comfortably sliding and sticking his groundstrokes.

"Nadal has a throwback head to the old guys. Jimmy Connors was probably the last of the bunch, where he went after every point," said Fox, who also coaches world No. 38 Igor Kunitsyn. "Nadal makes every single point painful, regardless of the score. That pays off. On clay, the balance of power shifts toward the ability to grind the guy down mentally because you can't blow Nadal out. Now you are getting into a brawl, and he's the best brawler around."


Rafael Nadal has been nearly unbeatable on clay over his career. (Lionel Cironneau / Associated Press)

There don't seem to be too many competitors around who relish the prospect of facing Nadal on clay — even his countrymen, who grew up on the surface like Nadal.

Nadal's Davis Cup teammate, Feliciano Lopez, told Diaro Sport that his friend simply doesn't check out.
"He's very ambitious and has demonstrated that he wants it more every day," Lopez said. "In spite of everything that he's already achieved, he still has the same attitude and desire."

Two-time French Open finalist Alex Corretja, who is now helping coach Murray, believes that no player is better at staying in the moment than Nadal, who doesn't even understand the meaning of resting on one's laurels.

(another very key fact just above so read it again).


"Everything that he's obtained no longer satisfies him, and because it doesn't, what he seeks is to repeat and to win again," Corretja said. "That makes him the greatest one."Another one of Nadal's Davis Cup teammates, Tommy Robredo, thinks Nadal is human and will have a bad day eventually — but also added that to beat him, a player has to play perfectly.

"Physically, there is no way to get at him," Fox said. "The way he's beatable, if at all, is to attack into the forehand, because that can come up short, and then maybe take advantage of the other side and come in. Getting him wide of the forehand is the best play — but from there, it depends on what you've got to be able to finish the point. If it's down to where you beat a guy physically, a guy can have an off day where he's just missing, but on clay, it invariably comes down to the mental aspect. Everyone can keep the ball in court, but Nadal isn't going to have a bad day mentally."

There are two schools of thought as to how to tackle the Spaniard on clay. One is play far back in the court in the style of a backboard and force him to go on offense. Another is to attempt to rip winners and climb all over the net. Neither has worked since Nadal won his first Roland Garros crown in 2005. He has answers for anything and everything.

"Physically, you can't depend on hitting big shots every day, but mentally, you can have a good day every day as he does," Fox said. "Players aren't going to be mentally stronger than he is. If you can't blow him out, it's going to come down to a mental brawl, and he's not going to have an off day that way. If you try to play steady with him, then you are sure to get into the brawling, and no one can concentrate as long as he can."

Fox believes that attacking the Spaniard is the only solution. No. 2 Roger Federer has tried that for portions of his matches against Nadal at the French Open during the past four years. But he has failed to pull off a victory because Nadal passes like a demon. Djokovic found out the same at Monte Carlo, as he converted less than 50 percent of his net rushes.

Fox said that in his long career counseling athletes, he's discovered they run into problems that are insolvable at times. So he tells them to pick the best of the worst solutions. Maybe, just maybe, a modern player will zone in, like Adriano Panatta did against six-time French Open champion Bjorn Borg at Roland Garros, attacking at all costs and taking the cool Swede out of his rhythm.

"I can't see there's a strategy where you have the edge over Nadal on clay," Fox said. "They are all losing strategies, but you have to choose the best shot that you have, which is to attack rather than just stay back and trade body punches, which is even worse."Federer can get him, but his problem is that when Nadal hits his first shot into Federer's backhand, Federer has nowhere to hit the ball where it's any good. If you try and just play into Nadal's backhand, he eventually runs around and hits the forehand where he likes it, which is inside out, and then you're in trouble. And if you get it to his backhand, nothing good happens anyway, so the only chance is to get it to his forehand and try to open up the court."

Nadal recently said that in two-out-of-three-set matches, the top players are more vulnerable because a player can get scorching hot with his serve or favorite groundstroke and pull off an upset before the better man can dig in. But at the Grand Slams, that's almost impossible, as in three-out-of-five sets, the hot player tends to cool off a bit and the more established player usually finds his way into a match. That's why Nadal and Federer have combined to win 19 out of the last 21 Grand Slams, with only Djokovic and Marat Safin battling their ways to major titles during this period of Spanish and Swiss domination.

"Everyone only has so much mental strength, but in three-out-of-five, you know you have to concentrate for up to five hours rather than two or three," Fox said. "It's so much tougher, and it's going to come down to who has the staying power upstairs."
Fox and every player on tour concede that it's Nadal who has the most willpower these days. When he arrives in Paris in late May with the intention of pocketing his fifth crown, Nadal will surely be thinking that he has all the solutions and it's up to the rest of the field to find a magic formula that might confuse him.

"You have to attack him somehow," Fox said. "The way I've seen it done best is like Murray does from time to time. If you have a really good backhand, you can hurt him badly on the forehand side. It's tougher on clay, but the alternative is to fight the shark in the water. Maybe he can be upset by playing steady, but I've never seen it done and I can't see how it would be done."

vamosinator
04-30-2009, 07:30 AM
affirmative. screw the english verbal gymnastics that mean nothing.

instead, read this article as to why the Clay Warrior is going to continue to be a force. Nadal haters go ahead and read and weep some more. if you want to beat him and i always said this, your best chance is at a best of 3 sets foremat.

check it out for yourself. this is not me talking but others like his fellow pros, experts, and sports psychologists:

Secret to beating Nadal on clay yet to be foundby Matt Cronin, Special to FOXSports.com

Novak Djokovic was fired up after winning the second set from Rafael Nadal in the Monte Carlo final. The contest was knotted at a set apiece, and the Serbian's groundstrokes had depth and meaning. For a few moments, it was Djokovic who was doing the pushing and pulling.

But on the Spaniard's beloved red clay, it's Nadal who usually wins super heavyweight tug of wars, because he knows his opponents have to be able to hang with him until the last ball is struck. And over the past five years, no one has shown that they have the legs, the stamina or the heart to grapple with him on clay. That's why the multi-talented Djokovic went down 6-3, 2-6, 6-1, just like dozens of others have before him.

"He's got the psychological edge where everyone knows that he's Rafael Nadal, and he's already up a set and break before he walks on the court," said sports psychologist Allen Fox, author of "The Winner's Mind" and a former touring pro. "You know he's never going to quit, and it's a nasty prospect."After winning his fifth consecutive Monte Carlo crown, the left-handed Nadal ran his clay court record in finals to 23-1, which makes the 22-year-old — to state the extremely obvious — a gigantic favorite to win every clay-court tournament he enters, including Barcelona this week, Masters Series titles in Rome and Madrid during the first two weeks of May and, of course, his fifth consecutive French Open.

One of the reasons he's an overwhelming favorite is that Nadal continues to win on clay — and most other surfaces — even when he's not at the very top of his game. He plays a nearly error-free type of game, where his defense is almost always airtight and his offense borders on spectacular.

(this paragraph above is key so read it again. clay is what makes him so great. he has the heavy topspin obviously which means sky high margins but clay gives him the confident mentality, physical toughness, and it also fine tunes his ground game.)


His uncle and coach, Toni, said that after his nephew put down his two nearest competitors of the season — Andy Murray and Djokovic — at Monte Carlo, Rafa was missing a bit of confidence and his serve was way off.

Still, Nadal bullied his foes when necessary, because they can't figure out a way to get the ball past him when he's comfortably sliding and sticking his groundstrokes.

"Nadal has a throwback head to the old guys. Jimmy Connors was probably the last of the bunch, where he went after every point," said Fox, who also coaches world No. 38 Igor Kunitsyn. "Nadal makes every single point painful, regardless of the score. That pays off. On clay, the balance of power shifts toward the ability to grind the guy down mentally because you can't blow Nadal out. Now you are getting into a brawl, and he's the best brawler around."


Rafael Nadal has been nearly unbeatable on clay over his career. (Lionel Cironneau / Associated Press)

There don't seem to be too many competitors around who relish the prospect of facing Nadal on clay — even his countrymen, who grew up on the surface like Nadal.

Nadal's Davis Cup teammate, Feliciano Lopez, told Diaro Sport that his friend simply doesn't check out.
"He's very ambitious and has demonstrated that he wants it more every day," Lopez said. "In spite of everything that he's already achieved, he still has the same attitude and desire."Two-time French Open finalist Alex Corretja, who is now helping coach Murray, believes that no player is better at staying in the moment than Nadal, who doesn't even understand the meaning of resting on one's laurels.

"Everything that he's obtained no longer satisfies him, and because it doesn't, what he seeks is to repeat and to win again," Corretja said. "That makes him the greatest one."Another one of Nadal's Davis Cup teammates, Tommy Robredo, thinks Nadal is human and will have a bad day eventually — but also added that to beat him, a player has to play perfectly.

"Physically, there is no way to get at him," Fox said. "The way he's beatable, if at all, is to attack into the forehand, because that can come up short, and then maybe take advantage of the other side and come in. Getting him wide of the forehand is the best play — but from there, it depends on what you've got to be able to finish the point. If it's down to where you beat a guy physically, a guy can have an off day where he's just missing, but on clay, it invariably comes down to the mental aspect. Everyone can keep the ball in court, but Nadal isn't going to have a bad day mentally."

There are two schools of thought as to how to tackle the Spaniard on clay. One is play far back in the court in the style of a backboard and force him to go on offense. Another is to attempt to rip winners and climb all over the net. Neither has worked since Nadal won his first Roland Garros crown in 2005. He has answers for anything and everything.

"Physically, you can't depend on hitting big shots every day, but mentally, you can have a good day every day as he does," Fox said. "Players aren't going to be mentally stronger than he is. If you can't blow him out, it's going to come down to a mental brawl, and he's not going to have an off day that way. If you try to play steady with him, then you are sure to get into the brawling, and no one can concentrate as long as he can."

Fox believes that attacking the Spaniard is the only solution. No. 2 Roger Federer has tried that for portions of his matches against Nadal at the French Open during the past four years. But he has failed to pull off a victory because Nadal passes like a demon. Djokovic found out the same at Monte Carlo, as he converted less than 50 percent of his net rushes.

Fox said that in his long career counseling athletes, he's discovered they run into problems that are insolvable at times. So he tells them to pick the best of the worst solutions. Maybe, just maybe, a modern player will zone in, like Adriano Panatta did against six-time French Open champion Bjorn Borg at Roland Garros, attacking at all costs and taking the cool Swede out of his rhythm.

"I can't see there's a strategy where you have the edge over Nadal on clay," Fox said. "They are all losing strategies, but you have to choose the best shot that you have, which is to attack rather than just stay back and trade body punches, which is even worse."Federer can get him, but his problem is that when Nadal hits his first shot into Federer's backhand, Federer has nowhere to hit the ball where it's any good. If you try and just play into Nadal's backhand, he eventually runs around and hits the forehand where he likes it, which is inside out, and then you're in trouble. And if you get it to his backhand, nothing good happens anyway, so the only chance is to get it to his forehand and try to open up the court."

Nadal recently said that in two-out-of-three-set matches, the top players are more vulnerable because a player can get scorching hot with his serve or favorite groundstroke and pull off an upset before the better man can dig in. But at the Grand Slams, that's almost impossible, as in three-out-of-five sets, the hot player tends to cool off a bit and the more established player usually finds his way into a match. That's why Nadal and Federer have combined to win 19 out of the last 21 Grand Slams, with only Djokovic and Marat Safin battling their ways to major titles during this period of Spanish and Swiss domination.

"Everyone only has so much mental strength, but in three-out-of-five, you know you have to concentrate for up to five hours rather than two or three," Fox said. "It's so much tougher, and it's going to come down to who has the staying power upstairs."
Fox and every player on tour concede that it's Nadal who has the most willpower these days. When he arrives in Paris in late May with the intention of pocketing his fifth crown, Nadal will surely be thinking that he has all the solutions and it's up to the rest of the field to find a magic formula that might confuse him.

"You have to attack him somehow," Fox said. "The way I've seen it done best is like Murray does from time to time. If you have a really good backhand, you can hurt him badly on the forehand side. It's tougher on clay, but the alternative is to fight the shark in the water. Maybe he can be upset by playing steady, but I've never seen it done and I can't see how it would be done."

That's a long article though I didn't learn anything new, I could have written it easily :D

A_Skywalker
04-30-2009, 07:33 AM
That people that say Nadal will burn out simply wanted it to happen, thats why they say it, its simple. Now they are pulling their hair for the stupid statements made.

Greatness
04-30-2009, 08:10 AM
Nadal is definitely taxing his body with all that running for every ball on every point. However, I think that people often ignore the possibility that Nadal might tweak his game accordingly if he loses some of his mobility.

Bazooka
04-30-2009, 08:12 AM
If you watch him play in 2004 you can easily see why. His movement is simply unbelievable, his topspin is twice what he does now, chases after every ball no matter the score, and spends more energy by celebrating points than his opponents in actually playing.

Also people automatically labelled him "dirtballer" and assumed he would get the clay curse. Borg, Kuerten, Coria, Gaudio... for some reason, if you're succesful in clay and/or RG and your name is not Ivan Lendl, you tend to have a short career, or at least shorter than it "should".

However he's not playing like that anymore, except for a few points. He has been adjusting during 2006 and 2007, and now we see the results. Plus, his main weapon are not his legs or topspin, but his mind and unprecedented willpower, and such a weapon becomes more and more powerful with each year.

vamosinator
04-30-2009, 08:26 AM
If you watch him play in 2004 you can easily see why. His movement is simply unbelievable, his topspin is twice what he does now, chases after every ball no matter the score, and spends more energy by celebrating points than his opponents in actually playing.

Also people automatically labelled him "dirtballer" and assumed he would get the clay curse. Borg, Kuerten, Coria, Gaudio... for some reason, if you're succesful in clay and/or RG and your name is not Ivan Lendl, you tend to have a short career, or at least shorter than it "should".

However he's not playing like that anymore, except for a few points. He has been adjusting during 2006 and 2007, and now we see the results. Plus, his main weapon are not his legs or topspin, but his mind and unprecedented willpower, and such a weapon becomes more and more powerful with each year.

That is why I'm surprised you only think he will win 6 RG, 2 Wimbledon, 1 Australian Open, 1 US Open, according to your sig:o

Bazooka
04-30-2009, 09:28 AM
That is why I'm surprised you only think he will win 6 RG, 2 Wimbledon, 1 Australian Open, 1 US Open, according to your sig:o


I was called a Rafatard a dozen times because of it, now I am a Rafa hater. Oh well... :D

My prediction is not bound to be perfect, I may be 1-2 slams off... either way!

I agree that he will not "burn out" but his career has been longer than people think, he turned pro 8 years ago and has been winning slams for 5 years now . We are not in the wooden racquet era, with guys being top 3 for over a decade. Seven or maybe eight top-game years would be the most reasonable prediction, looking at other careers. So maybe 3 more years winning slams, at 26 he could have a record like 720-120 and 10-12 slams, but his legs will be heavy and his "natural" forehand requiring more power than he can handle.

Of course he can always evolve his game yet again and stay on top longer. He's so smart, and uncle Toni is wise. But more likely the outcome will be different. In a recent interview he was asked if he could still improve. He answered that the day he felt he could no longer improve, he would be gone. And I believe him.

vamosinator
04-30-2009, 09:46 AM
Although improvement may not necessarily mean further physical (or even tactical) development of his game, rather improvement could be as simple as improving his hardcourt record (by winning US Opens so his record becomes comparable on hardcourt as it is on clay, for example). So in that case I'd think he will keep playing while he still thinks he can win slams and 'improve' his record. It seems more logical than merely only playing while his flat forehand or faster serve can still improve. And besides, it is tempting to win more slams, surely for anybody who enjoys the feeling of winning and collapsing to the surface in triumph.

ORGASMATRON
04-30-2009, 09:57 AM
Nadal will burn out its inevitable. And he cant improve his attacking game anymore, hes currently at the limits of his talents. He will never have a huge serve or volley like Federer. Grinding is part of his make up.

Primus
04-30-2009, 10:36 AM
Nadal will burn out its inevitable. And he cant improve ....
A penny for each time I read that statement...Bill Gates would be envy of me :)
That's your wishful thinking. I think your Rogy, has reached this road. Maybe he will never have great server like Federror, but he will still beat him badly and this only proves how greater base line stoker he is.

Clay Death
04-30-2009, 02:35 PM
That's a long article though I didn't learn anything new, I could have written it easily :D


next time you write it.

Clay Death
04-30-2009, 02:41 PM
If you watch him play in 2004 you can easily see why. His movement is simply unbelievable, his topspin is twice what he does now, chases after every ball no matter the score, and spends more energy by celebrating points than his opponents in actually playing.

Also people automatically labelled him "dirtballer" and assumed he would get the clay curse. Borg, Kuerten, Coria, Gaudio... for some reason, if you're succesful in clay and/or RG and your name is not Ivan Lendl, you tend to have a short career, or at least shorter than it "should".

However he's not playing like that anymore, except for a few points. He has been adjusting during 2006 and 2007, and now we see the results. Plus, his main weapon are not his legs or topspin, but his mind and unprecedented willpower, and such a weapon becomes more and more powerful with each year.

not to mention the confidence that comes with each additional slam in the back pocket and with each year that he manages to be ranked #1.

fellow pros start to respect you more and more for what you have achieved and continue to achieve. they also fear you more and more.

nobody in the game wants to play this guy in a best of 5 sets match on any surface.

The Oracle
06-08-2009, 05:15 AM
I can certainly see it........you can only play hard for so long.......if he cant even last 12 months on no. 1, maybe it is after all just a lucky year, Federer so far holds the edge on the rivalry.

Mimi
06-08-2009, 06:39 AM
he is burnt out now :wavey:

FedFan_2007
06-08-2009, 06:50 AM
It's true Rafa is feeling a bit burned out right now, mentally and physically. Unfortunately he has to start playing again in 2 weeks.

Kuhne
06-08-2009, 07:03 AM
Look at it from the positive side thread starter... you didn't have to wait a few years to see him burn out, just a couple of months

Mimi
06-08-2009, 08:17 AM
Look at it from the positive side thread starter... you didn't have to wait a few years to see him burn out, just a couple of months

yes, you can open your champagnue now :wavey:

Kuhne
06-08-2009, 02:14 PM
yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeessssssssssssssssssssssssssss ssssssssssssssssssssss

The Oracle
06-20-2009, 12:44 AM
Look at it from the positive side thread starter... you didn't have to wait a few years to see him burn out, just a couple of months
Very harsh..but somewhat reflective of the truth.......

Nadal's style of play is not as sustaining as the apparently effortless play from Federer.

But I suppose that is why when Nadal does win....he won it harder and, some may agree, more inspirationally.

twisturhead
06-20-2009, 12:53 AM
another good thread

green25814
06-20-2009, 01:50 AM
Lol, CD got owned here. :lol:

shotgun
06-20-2009, 02:16 AM
yes, you can open your champagnue now :wavey:

http://img2.menstennisforums.com/500/champaign.gif

Del_Toro
06-20-2009, 02:19 AM
I hate to say it but... I told you!
Rafito is burnt out. Let's see if he can bounce back.

GlennMirnyi
06-20-2009, 02:21 AM
http://img2.menstennisforums.com/500/champaign.gif

Let's have a toast.

These pretzels are making me thirsty!

twisturhead
06-20-2009, 02:21 AM
http://img2.menstennisforums.com/500/champaign.gif

:devil:

luie
06-20-2009, 02:23 AM
http://img2.menstennisforums.com/500/champaign.gif
Fedmug will be popping a few tonight I'am sure.:D

finishingmove
06-20-2009, 02:25 AM
Fedmug will be popping a few tonight I'am sure.:D

no, he doesn't take joy from these things.

betowiec
06-20-2009, 02:30 AM
no, he doesn't take joy from these things.

....surrrrrrrrrrre
like he wanted to play nadal in the final in paris 2 weeks ago

luie
06-20-2009, 02:32 AM
no, he doesn't take joy from these things.
He want's revenge I'am sure.:rolleyes: Fed doesn't care if he has to play oscar hernandez for the title (if he get's that far)Federer I mean not oscar.

HKz
06-20-2009, 03:33 AM
I don't understand why a lot of people said that Nadal will be burnout in a few years (I'm talking here about not biased people). He hasn't been seriously injured since 2005, and right now he is playing without the protection for his knees, and winning without major complications, so no physical problems are bothering him.

Connors played a lot of tough matches in his career and had a very physical game too, he never gave up and fought every point, and won GS in his 30's and even reached SF of US Open at 39.
So why this burnout argument with Nadal?

Discuss.

Look at Chang, Courier, etc. They aren't more/less human than Nadal and they burned out in a few years. I would think the more workouts Nadal has done to strengthen his body has also made his body more vulnerable to burning out. Unless you consider Rafalafa a god with inifinite strength like so many others do :rolleyes:

chammer44
06-20-2009, 03:36 AM
Math is the universal language which improves human life.

English is useless if compared to math.
Federer is useless if compared to Nadal.

Accept it, Evolve and give up your poetry for Math.

Of course, having been expressed in mere english, a confessedly inferior medium, this post should be ignored.

The Oracle
06-20-2009, 03:37 AM
No on says that Nadal is god (well, not as godly as Federer anyways)........

But he is burning out because his age will only permit him to play with only strength for so long....

He needs to model after Agassi.

twisturhead
06-20-2009, 03:46 AM
No on says that Nadal is god (well, not as godly as Federer anyways)........

But he is burning out because his age will only permit him to play with only strength for so long....

He needs to model after Agassi.

yeah drop out of the top 100 and come back late in your career to complete the career slam

rocketassist
06-20-2009, 04:04 AM
On clay he will defend, defend, defend when finishing points after 2 or 3 shots saves time, energy and legs. He needs to have this shit drummed into him. Finish points off QUICKLY if he's going to have a longer career.

NYCtennisfan
06-20-2009, 04:16 AM
the evidence--i repeat the evidence--seems to point to the exact opposite of what you believe or many others believe.

he was a solid #2 for 3 years and is just about a lock for his 2nd straight year at #1. that is 5 years at the top and the guy is just 22.

he still has a huge upside. the improvements in his game alone will help him last longer than previously believed.

are you people even watching the same sport or what?

:lol: You go on and on about how Nadal and his camp messed things up with their scheduling, yet a mere two months ago you say that there is nothing to support the idea that the game is taking a toll on Nadal's body. Which one is it? Are you watching the same sport or what?

NYCtennisfan
06-20-2009, 04:29 AM
On clay he will defend, defend, defend when finishing points after 2 or 3 shots saves time, energy and legs. He needs to have this shit drummed into him. Finish points off QUICKLY if he's going to have a longer career.

But he doesn't play that way. One of the main reasons why Nadal has such an overwhelming psychological advantage going in to matches is the fact that he will work you on every point and you will have to work on every point unless you could hit an ace or first FH winner on the lines. You won't be able to count on a low 1st serve % because it won't happen and it won't matter since he won't win too many points off of it anyway away from grass. You won't get a free point a game off of an error and you surely won't get two. Then you have to go do this for 2 or 3 or 5 sets. You will have to keep working when up 40-15 because he's not going to give you a freebie. You will have to work on break points because he won't give you anything and he actually play better and more fearlessly when BP down.

If he tries to finish points off quickly, he is in danger of losing one of his greatest assets--consistency throughout a match and tournament with very few dips into sloppy error filled games. Most opponents on the tour will give you tons of these kinds of games, but Nadal won't and it slowly wears you down.

I remember a match he played a few years back against Baghdatis at IW. It was very windy at the beginning much like many IW night matches and this was at a time when Nadal wasn't as good at playing in the wind. He played aggressively without trying to hit winners and it wore Baggy down. By the second set, there was a helpless look on Baggy's face because he knew that there would be no relent in any game no matter what the score and that if he were to win any more games, he would have to hit near the lines, something very few players can do throughout a match.

Nadal can probably try to finish off points quickly against weaker players, but his relentless consistency off of both wings no matter what the score is one of the things that makes him such a daunting opponent for other top players. I'm not sure whether he can apply the same approach against them.

GlennMirnyi
06-20-2009, 04:49 AM
On clay he will defend, defend, defend when finishing points after 2 or 3 shots saves time, energy and legs. He needs to have this shit drummed into him. Finish points off QUICKLY if he's going to have a longer career.

How? Moonballing doesn't exactly translate into a barrage of winners.

twisturhead
06-20-2009, 04:58 AM
How? Moonballing doesn't exactly translate into a barrage of winners.

if you hit it over the opposition's head its an ez winner

JolánGagó
06-20-2009, 04:58 AM
http://img2.menstennisforums.com/500/champaign.gif

:retard:

and yet some people believe someone celebrating a top player injury would be a good MTF moderator :rolleyes:

Hairom
06-20-2009, 05:21 AM
pathetic, i feel sorry for Nadal and hope he recovers soon.

FedFan_2007
06-20-2009, 05:46 AM
Only evil haters are celebrating this.

denisgiann
06-20-2009, 07:56 AM
Nadals own game brought him in this situation.He made a choice playing like this and now he is paying for it.Simple as that.Only people who dont know anything about training believe that nadal can actually maintain his rabbit running ways until his early 30s.If he just lose halfp step of his speed..he is prey for so many top players and if his defense starts to suffer....his decline will be far more rapid than players who have an attacking style and have tendency to finish points quickly.Everything in life has its price.Iam not happy that nadal is injured but you cant burn super bright for super long time.You have to pay the price sometime.
Now if he tries to changes his playing style-which i find really difficult to do-then he will save lots of energy but he ll be just a regular joe...lots of errors coming from all directions...

FedorEmelianenko
06-20-2009, 08:19 AM
Backfire threads are the best

duong
06-20-2009, 08:20 AM
I think that the conclusion now about this thread is that you should never draw conclusions from very recent events about the evolution of a carreer as a whole.

Jonathan Crane had drawn conclusions from a very short period.

It's not the moment either to draw definitive conclusions about Nadal being "burnt out".

Many people, including the one who knew him the best (his uncle), had said that it would be a hard way for him about his physical in the long run.

Some people here had drawn very quick conclusions that these people had mistaken or cheated, and even for some of them, they thought that the people who said that were just "haters".

I think now the latter people can just be more modest ;)

In the same way, I would never say that his carreer is "burnt out" now, because of his recent withdrawal :
basically we know that his uncle wants him to change his way of running his carreer, and for sure he will change.

I still don't think that he will have a very long carreer like Connors :rolleyes:
but he can still be there for several years and win many grand slams (yes he can win more than 10 of them for sure).

Let me say something else :
I read many things about his style of play, that what happened was certain because of his "style of play".

But it's not only about his style of play.

Many experts had stressed his fragilities in his legs in the past (knees, short feet),
and the specific problem of the way he presses so hard on his legs when he plays the ball,
which was something different and harder than what Connors or others did.

If Nadal had had longer feet, more solid knees, who knows ? maybe he wouldn't have had that problem.

But anyway, now I think everybody can see the non-accuracy of some comments which want to drawx conclusions for the long run from what happens in the short run and from "examples" of the past who were completely different ;)

duong
06-20-2009, 08:27 AM
Really? I've been hearing / reading the same thing since the end of 2005, and look now 3 years after what's happening

yes look now : don't be too impatient :wavey:

Allez
06-20-2009, 08:32 AM
If Nadal had had longer feet, more solid knees, who knows ? maybe he wouldn't have had that problem.


And we all know what they say about men with big feet :eek:

duong
06-20-2009, 08:33 AM
Haters forget everything when it comes to Nadal. They only remember yesterday and today so they can bitch about it.

The original post is excellent, especially the Connors comparison.

After that: woodwork squeaks and out come from the freaks.

You'd think naysayers would have learned after 3-4 years that they are incorrect that Nadal is injury-prone. You'd think wrong.

J. Crane's thread is so-well-timed because of the old thread Tangy revived yesterday that was full of most of the 2005-06 Fed loving or Nadal-hating reasons why Rafa was supposed to be retired or ranked #28 by now. Funny reading.

Glenn, it's curious how people associated with ;) tend not to have long careers. Their career peaks tend to be shorter -- in span (usually Olympics bursts or one season of a year) and overall duration (once, or a few years) -- than Nadal's already. Strange indeed.

Another funny post to re-read, especially that :

They only remember yesterday and today so they can bitch about it.

Yes indeed : maybe they looked more in the long run after all ;)

Lleyton in the beginning of the thread had asked a little bit of patience : that was wise :worship:

Please note that I don't say that Nadal is burnt out,
I just say that some had drawn conclusions too quickly and the Connors comparison was totally inadequate

duong
06-20-2009, 08:39 AM
now as for WHY people said it, it is very clear no? not many people are fans of his game really, a game like Federer or Edberg is more likely to attract admirers than a game of power and consistency, not to mention all the haters etc...

now you see it was not only because of that :shrug:

duong
06-20-2009, 08:45 AM
Uncle Tony is a clown. Don't you remember what he said during the match against Feliciano in Madrid? "Nadal is injured and won't finish the match"

Uncle Toni is not a clown.

duong
06-20-2009, 08:50 AM
You can not compare Nadal to Connors. The game has changed a lot since then. Connors was very light-weighted (only 70 kg)and moved easily on court.

To be fair, this argument about the Nadal-Connors comparison was far better than mine which was more related about their mental.

I think their difference is more physical than mental, some of you were right and I was wrong about that.

Branimir
06-20-2009, 08:52 AM
Bigger Stronger Faster

duong
06-20-2009, 08:53 AM
Sorry for being long, but I like to notice the posts which seem the most relevant, as the issues they raise are very relevant and very interesting for many people in now's time :

Rafa has a good point of view on his career's longevity. Whenever he is asked the question about his physical style leading to a short career, he replies by saying one (or both) of two things: 1) that of course his career can end at any time, and that he must enjoy the moment while he has it; and 2) that he has already had a long career, since he has been on the pro tour since he was 15, and many tennis careers do not last 7 full years. This falls into his pattern of not burdening himself with grandiose expectations, which I think is one way he counters his natural mental intensity, i.e. his ridiculous drive to win every point, every game, every match, every tournament, etc. I think if he keeps his head on straight (and we have very little indication that he won't, given his history), that his mental burnout will be mainly apparent in short-term situations rather than career-shortening long-term situations. Rafa seems much more likely to become affected for a tournament or two when he has expended too much mental energy (such as what we saw this year in Miami, or in 2007 in Hamburg) than to let mental burnout shorten his career (such as what Borg went through, or what I feel Federer is being threatened by). He -- and Toni -- are very very good at the kind of psychological zen trickery that keeps Rafa in the moment.

Much as I love what duong has to say, I don't agree with the point that Connors was "easy". He was incredibly mentally intense and very focused. So was Ivan Lendl, who was probably the most OCD top tennis player ever. Neither of them had anywhere near Nadal's "be with calm" mentality, and yet they both had nice long careers.

As for Nadal's physical burnout, who can say? Michael Jordan and Serena Williams both dealt quite effectively with tendonitis for many years. Nadal has a bit of an advantage on other tennis players in that he grew up on clay and perhaps hasn't taken the concrete pounding for as many formative years as a Hewitt or an Agassi, for example. He can also eventually extend his career for a couple of years by concentrating on clay and grass when he winds down. As Vida said in another post, he comes from an athletic family, and knows how to deal with injury and fame (which can be the real killer, you know?).

Cool thread, definitely, but I wouldn't be overly concerned that he'll retire before he achieves whatever his goals might be: I don't think he'll let himself.

finishingmove
06-20-2009, 09:11 AM
so duong, basically you're saying that nadal is now finished

duong
06-20-2009, 09:17 AM
so duong, basically you're saying that nadal is now finished

NEVER : just re-read my posts a little bit above.

If you want a summary, I say that :

1. you should never draw too quick and too definitive conclusions from a recent event, as some had done in the beginning of the year

2. what Uncle Toni and many experts had said was accurate : summarizing it to "haters and clowns" was inadequate

3. Nadal is not as solid as some had said in this thread : "he's very strong, just look at his Australian open and so on" ... as if it was a matter of "being strong" :rolleyes:

4. all these things never happened to Connors

But I also said that I believe he will play several years more and win more than 10 grand slams.

finishingmove
06-20-2009, 09:31 AM
my bad, missed that line.

obviously he won't play until 35 or something, but we'll just have to wait and see how much his condition will affect him.

he's got a chronic condition, but i think scheduling his tournaments better will help him stay longer on tour.

as for burning out mentally, that's another issue, i don't think he's anywhere near that yet.

duong
06-20-2009, 09:45 AM
as for burning out mentally, that's another issue, i don't think he's anywhere near that yet.

No, but he will start a second carreer on that point of view, with, I believe, a totally new history and approach of tennis and his carreer.

habibko
06-20-2009, 02:32 PM
now you see it was not only because of that :shrug:

burning out and being hampered by injuries are two different things, those who talked about him burning out are mostly dislikers/haters of him or his style, we all knew he had injuries and he could step away from tennis for a while because of them, it's not the first time this has happened in his career, doesn't mean he has burned out.

duong
06-20-2009, 03:01 PM
burning out and being hampered by injuries are two different things, those who talked about him burning out are mostly dislikers/haters of him or his style, we all knew he had injuries and he could step away from tennis for a while because of them, it's not the first time this has happened in his career, doesn't mean he has burned out.

1. I didn't say that he was burnt out : re-read what I said

2. but the signs of what Uncle Toni and many people had said, are clearly there. Neither Uncle Toni nor these persons are Nadal haters.

I'm fed-up with these debates about "haters" : they are very mean forum debates.

But at least when Uncle Toni speaks, don't say he's a clown.

When the doctors speak, don't say that they are "publicity-seekers".

When Noah, Agassi or Becker say that it will be hard for him to last long, don't say that thay are "haters".

The beginning of the thread shows quite clearly that the purpose of this thread was to shut these people up, saying "the debate is over, they were wrong, the evidence is there" :

no there is no evidence, and the debate is not over, that's the only thing I say :shrug:

Now if you wish to keep on a "haters vs non-haters" debate, just do : I will not be interested in that.

Start da Game
06-20-2009, 03:18 PM
I don't understand why a lot of people said that Nadal will be burnout in a few years (I'm talking here about not biased people). He hasn't been seriously injured since 2005, and right now he is playing without the protection for his knees, and winning without major complications, so no physical problems are bothering him.

Connors played a lot of tough matches in his career and had a very physical game too, he never gave up and fought every point, and won GS in his 30's and even reached SF of US Open at 39.
So why this burnout argument with Nadal?

Discuss.

they don't know what they are talking because they don't know nadal.......simple as that.......

any player would be injured if he plays this much in a hectic schedule, not just rafa.......we are not even finished with wimbledon and rafa has already played a minimum of 25 unnecessary matches, most of them on hardcourts.......exos in abu dhabi, rotterdam, barcelona/madrid, davis cup against serbia and most importantly doubles everywhere.......doubles alone constitute some 15 matches, most of them on hardcourts.......all this in a jam packed schedule.......

now which other top player is playing this much at such a high level? once he stops doing all this nonsensical stuff and plans a good schedule, those mouths will be shut automatically.......

actually, rafa must be stronger than what we all think.......he has been playing in pain since months and i don't know how it has not aggravated the situation further.......

key is to realize his mistake and start wising up.......just participate singles and main mandatory events.......he will finish of f seasons injury-free with ease........

shotgun
06-20-2009, 03:22 PM
:retard:

and yet some people believe someone celebrating a top player injury would be a good MTF moderator :rolleyes:

Knew that someone without a clue would read too much into my post. :lol:

malisha
06-20-2009, 03:34 PM
He has been adjusting during 2006 and 2007, and now we see the results. Plus, his main weapon are not his legs or topspin, but his mind and unprecedented willpower, and such a weapon becomes more and more powerful with each year.

Nadal wolud change his 2007-2008 claycourt game for his present "all court" game in a blink of a second if he colud
hes adjusting it cos he must do it..not cos he wants to

Bagelicious
06-21-2009, 06:23 AM
..all this in a jam packed schedule.......

now which other top player is playing this much at such a high level? once he stops doing all this nonsensical stuff and plans a good schedule, those mouths will be shut automatically.......

actually, rafa must be stronger than what we all think.......he has been playing in pain since months and i don't know how it has not aggravated the situation further.......

key is to realize his mistake and start wising up.......just participate singles and main mandatory events.......he will finish of f seasons injury-free with ease........

Not to rub it in, but I believe Federer played more matches than anyone else on tour during 2004-2007 (off the top of my head, haven't doublechecked).

You know what? I feel for Rafa. I feel for any player (and the players that I have been a fan of) who go through injury just when their star seems to be burning brightest.

But after reading some of the comments in this thread by his so-called 'fans', I'm not sorry for the fans that posted earlier in the thread.

If you build up a player into this magical, indestructible being, you deserve to have that false image shattered. Why can't you just be a fan of his? So many of you were willing to say how all the people predicting burnout were unfulfilled wishes from haters, but couldn't you see that your own predictions were also unfulfilled wishes? Can't you be happy with what he's achieved instead of acting as though your being a fan is about 'how much more' you think he might achieve in future?

For those of you who were predicting about how his game should last 'easily' for the next 5-6 years, and how he should 'easily' win this slam or the other, have you been a fan of other tennis players? Of players who haven't achieved as much as you may have liked, of players who are headcases, of players whose careers have been cut short by injury?

I guess those would be the 'real' Nadal (tennis?) fans, the ones who know better than to take his good health/results for granted because they know how quickly those can vanish. Probably the ones that were wise enough not to make hyperbolic posts in this thread, or the ones who avoid posting hugely inflated expectations of his future results.

I hope Rafa comes back fit and healthy and that you've learned better than to assume that his health and results are a given.

FedFan_2007
06-21-2009, 06:24 AM
'tards will always have their dreams shattered.

jonathancrane
06-21-2009, 08:16 AM
yes look now : don't be too impatient :wavey:

This is a break, similiar to the one he had by the end of last year, and we all know what happened after that break.
I think he's far from be burnout

Uncle Toni is not a clown.

Of course he is. The fact that now Nadal is really injured don't erase his past bullshits

Arkulari
06-21-2009, 08:20 AM
Jon: one thing is withdraw for the WTF and other very different is withdrawing from Wimbledon where you are the defending champion :sad:
I'm not saying that Rafa won't be back, but his knee problem is going from bad to worse and it's up to him and his team to decide what to do about it in the long run :shrug:

twisturhead
06-21-2009, 08:22 AM
'tards will always have their dreams shattered.

fedfan_2007--->nadalfan_2008--->____________________

duong
06-21-2009, 08:24 AM
This is a break, similiar to the one he had by the end of last year, and we all know what happened after that break.
I think he's far from be burnout

OK. We will see, the debate is far from over imo.


Of course he is. The fact that now Nadal is really injured don't erase his past bullshits

Well :shrug:

I don't think Rafa would like these words : imo he owes and will owe a lot to his uncle.

As far as I'm concerned, I have a lot of respect for Toni Nadal :worship:

twisturhead
06-21-2009, 08:27 AM
they don't know what they are talking because they don't know nadal.......simple as that.......

any player would be injured if he plays this much in a hectic schedule, not just rafa.......we are not even finished with wimbledon and rafa has already played a minimum of 25 unnecessary matches, most of them on hardcourts.......exos in abu dhabi, rotterdam, barcelona/madrid, davis cup against serbia and most importantly doubles everywhere.......doubles alone constitute some 15 matches, most of them on hardcourts.......all this in a jam packed schedule.......

now which other top player is playing this much at such a high level? once he stops doing all this nonsensical stuff and plans a good schedule, those mouths will be shut automatically.......

actually, rafa must be stronger than what we all think.......he has been playing in pain since months and i don't know how it has not aggravated the situation further.......

key is to realize his mistake and start wising up.......just participate singles and main mandatory events.......he will finish of f seasons injury-free with ease........

tendinitis is not an injury. its an on again off again condition.

Start da Game
06-21-2009, 06:35 PM
Not to rub it in, but I believe Federer played more matches than anyone else on tour during 2004-2007 (off the top of my head, haven't doublechecked).

You know what? I feel for Rafa. I feel for any player (and the players that I have been a fan of) who go through injury just when their star seems to be burning brightest.

But after reading some of the comments in this thread by his so-called 'fans', I'm not sorry for the fans that posted earlier in the thread.

If you build up a player into this magical, indestructible being, you deserve to have that false image shattered. Why can't you just be a fan of his? So many of you were willing to say how all the people predicting burnout were unfulfilled wishes from haters, but couldn't you see that your own predictions were also unfulfilled wishes? Can't you be happy with what he's achieved instead of acting as though your being a fan is about 'how much more' you think he might achieve in future?

For those of you who were predicting about how his game should last 'easily' for the next 5-6 years, and how he should 'easily' win this slam or the other, have you been a fan of other tennis players? Of players who haven't achieved as much as you may have liked, of players who are headcases, of players whose careers have been cut short by injury?

I guess those would be the 'real' Nadal (tennis?) fans, the ones who know better than to take his good health/results for granted because they know how quickly those can vanish. Probably the ones that were wise enough not to make hyperbolic posts in this thread, or the ones who avoid posting hugely inflated expectations of his future results.

I hope Rafa comes back fit and healthy and that you've learned better than to assume that his health and results are a given.

firstly, federer might have played more than others in those years but the max no. of matches he played was 97 in 2006 with at most sensible scheduling and the ease of opponents that he enjoyed helped him as well, no djokovic, no murray and no rafa on non clay to trouble and tire him out.......you know something? rafa played 112 matches just last year alone i.e 2008.......and guess what, he retired midway through paris and entirely skipped tennis masters cup.......that is just mad.......he missed out on two events, lost in the 2nd round at rome and still managed 112 matches.......that is brutal on anyone's body........

secondly, i don't know about anyone here as i am new........but i have always been fearing something like this since the last one and a half year......just ask 'clay death', he knows me too well.......it's all due to his headless scheduling.......not much because of his style of play to be honest.......it's driving people towards a myth that rafa's style is hurting him but believe me he has what it takes to continue in that style.......

i believe that rafa is NOT burnt out.......like i said, any player who has invested his energy in that many no. of matches in a suffocating schedule would suffer the same way.......one thing - fans believe their player.......what's wrong in believing that rafa will last for another 5 or 6 years easily? it's clownish(of them) of the fed bandwagoners to aim arrows at rafa fans for their belief.......yes, rafa will and rafa can play for another 5 or 6 or 7 years easily.......it's just the matter of some sensible planning and we won't even be discussing on this once he starts doing it.......the problem is, rafa is not giving himself a chance to finish off a season injury free.......to play in pain for months together, he is stronger than what people actually think.......now slip in some sense in his season schedule, he will be devastating.......

Start da Game
06-21-2009, 06:36 PM
tendinitis is not an injury. its an on again off again condition.

hello, tendinitis is a RECURRING(the on and off that you call it) injury, not that it's not an injury.......when you cannot move well and there is some pain in your body, you are said to be 'injured'........

The Oracle
06-21-2009, 06:49 PM
hello, tendinitis is a RECURRING(the on and off that you call it) injury, not that it's not an injury.......when you cannot move well and there is some pain in your body, you are said to be 'injured'........
Hi...Dr. Singh....here's a question for you:).

Does Nadal need a surgery or something?

duong
06-21-2009, 07:12 PM
it's all due to his headless scheduling.......not much because of his style of play to be honest.......it's driving people towards a myth that rafa's style is hurting him but believe me he has what it takes to continue in that style.......

Hello :), I also have a question for you :

I've read from doctors, not now, but some time ago, that the way Rafa presses on his legs in very hard positions for his body, when he goes for a shoot,

is dangerous for his legs.

All the more as, I've also read, Nadal has small feet and it makes it even harder.

I've also read, but I'm less sure about thatj, that Nadal may have a small genetic problem in his knees.

My question is : what do you think about that ? do you think his body is solid enough to suffer the way he presses on his legs ?

I mean not just "a defensive style of play" as some say, but specifically the way he presses on his legs.

I've read about these by French physiotherapists in French newspapers, not this year actually.
I would like your opinion about that.
Thanks in advance :)

mcnasty
06-21-2009, 07:50 PM
Connors played a lot of tough matches in his career and had a very physical game too, he never gave up and fought every point, and won GS in his 30's and even reached SF of US Open at 39.
So why this burnout argument with Nadal?

Discuss.

Believe it or not when Connors first emerged he dominated the way Sampras and Federer did during their best years.

Then came Borg and McEnroe whose respective games made Connors flat hitting power game an anachronism. Though competitive he was no longer a factor on the biggest stage and this may have actually been a blessing as it spared Connors the wear and tear that goes along with performing at the biggest stage year in and year out.

When Connors reemerged, he never contended for #1 ranking, as he picked his spots to excel and shine. In other words he was good enough to pull off improbable upsets and theatrical comebacks which endeared him to the crowds, and it was that which he fed off in his rennaisance period.

That's why he was (or he seemed) so good for so long.

duong
06-21-2009, 08:02 PM
Believe it or not when Connors first emerged he dominated the way Sampras and Federer did during their best years.

Then came Borg and McEnroe whose respective games made Connors flat hitting power game an anachronism. Though competitive he was no longer a factor on the biggest stage and this may have actually been a blessing as it spared Connors the wear and tear that goes along with performing at the biggest stage year in and year out.

When Connors reemerged, he never contended for #1 ranking, as he picked his spots to excel and shine. In other words he was good enough to pull off improbable upsets and theatrical comebacks which endeared him to the crowds, and it was that which he fed off in his rennaisance period.


Actually he still managed to be number 1 and win 2 slams in 1982 : he was 30 years old, only Agassi managed to be number one at that age since then, I guess.

And between 1976 and 1978, he had a real competition with Borg, not so much dominated, beating him twice in the final of the US Open for instance (once on claycourts), taking him to 5 sets in Wimbledon ...

The story was not that simple.

mcnasty
06-21-2009, 08:23 PM
The year Connors won Wimbledon and the US Open, that is 1982, Connors was #1 for 7 weeks, meaning that McEnroe who hadn't won a major that year held the #1 ranking for the remaining 41 weeks or thereabouts. Thru 1983 Connors did regain the #1 ranking several times but never more for than 3 weeks. So, yes, technically he was #1 again, technically.

duong
06-21-2009, 08:26 PM
The year Connors won Wimbledon and the US Open, that is 1982, Connors was #1 for 7 weeks, meaning that McEnroe who hadn't won a major that year held the #1 ranking for the remaining 41 weeks or thereabouts. Thru 1983 Connors did regain the #1 ranking several times but never more for than 3 weeks. So, yes, technically he was #1 again, technically.

I also think that in 1982, he was given the title of "world champion" following his achievements in slams.

The same way as Borg was considered "world champion" in the 70s whereas Connors was number 1 for the computer ! :lol:

MacTheKnife
06-21-2009, 08:33 PM
I also think that in 1982, he was given the title of "world champion" following his achievements in slams.

The same way as Borg was considered "world champion" in the 70s whereas Connors was number 1 for the computer ! :lol:

Yea, Conners was 29 that year, beat Mac at Wimby in 5 sets, then beat Lendl in the USO.

duong
06-21-2009, 08:36 PM
Yea, Conners was 29 that year, beat Mac at Wimby in 5 sets, then beat Lendl in the USO.

Ok he was very near to 30 years old in the US Open as he was born in september 1952 :lol:

Actually it's like now for Federer : everybody says he's 27 years old but he will be 28 in one month !

superslam77
06-21-2009, 08:55 PM
Ok he was very near to 30 years old in the US Open as he was born in september 1952 :lol:

Actually it's like now for Federer : everybody says he's 27 years old but he will be 28 in one month !

HE IS 27 years old but everyone says he is very close to 30 :rolleyes: and that Nadal is still 22 :rolleyes: