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Roger news and articles

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Lily
08-16-2002, 09:45 PM
ATPtennis.com

ATP INSIDER

Players Pay Their Respects to Carter

Roger Federer and Marc Rosset were among the tennis friends who paid their last respects to Peter Carter on Wednesday.

UP FRONT...
PLAYERS PAY THEIR RESPECTS TO CARTER
Swiss players ROGER FEDERER and MARC ROSSET were among the more than 200 tennis friends who paid their last respects to Swiss Davis Cup coach Peter Carter at a funeral in St. Leonhard's Church in Basel on Wednesday. The 37-year-old Australian died in a car accident in South Africa on Aug. 1. The moving ceremony was conducted by the priest who had performed the marriage rites between Carter and his Swiss-born wife Silvia little more than a year ago. Eulogies were given by Silvia, Christine Ungricht, president of the Swiss Tennis Association and a close childhood friend from Australia. Federer, who began playing tennis as an eight-year-old with Carter, was joined at the funeral by Rosset and various players from Young Boys Basel, Carter's Club Team. DARREN CAHILL, a long -time hometown friend of Carter and current coach of ANDRE AGASSI, also was in attendance.

truebluefan
04-09-2009, 01:30 AM
The first thread was closed because it exceeded the recommended 5000 posts. Part two started.

VB message board does not handle large threads well.

SUKTUEN
04-09-2009, 08:32 AM
Oh!!!

Welcome Part 2~~

Eden
04-09-2009, 10:11 AM
Federer Struggles With His Altered World

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Published: April 9, 2009

One of the best and cruelest aspects of tennis is that there is nowhere to hide. You might be an all-time great, even the all-time great, and yet you are only as effective as the forehands, backhands and decisions you are making on any given day.

Soccer and rugby stars in a funk or in decline can rely on teammates. Golfers, unless they are Tiger Woods, aren’t expected to win or even shine every week. Stars in judged sports can lean on the judges’ memories and inclinations.

A tennis star like Roger Federer stands exposed — in all his brilliance or all his disarray — in every match. And while it might take a while to know that a seminal athlete in another sport is vulnerable, tennis provides an abundance of evidence in a hurry.

It is piling high for Federer as he continues to devolve from a ruthless closer with a killer forehand into an edgy mortal with performance anxiety. He has won one tournament since the U.S. Open last year and has not won an event in four attempts so far this year, with the clay-court season — never part of his kingdom — now under way.

So far, the studied Swiss with the acquired cool has not left us guessing how much it hurts. There were the uncontrollable tears in defeat at the Australian Open, where he faded in the fifth set against nemesis-in-chief Rafael Nadal. There was the racket smashing in Miami last week early in the third set of his error-strewn semifinal loss to one of his nemeses-in-waiting, Novak Djokovic.

Federer hardly lost the plot altogether. He simply reached down slowly to pick up the crumpled frame and then flicked it in the direction of his courtside chair. But for an understated champion for whom appearances matter (greatly), it was as if he had begun yanking out his hair and shrieking “Why me!?” to the world.

It required great effort for Federer to cure himself of the on-court tantrums of his youth. To see him resume breaking rackets now, after all these years of self-control, was like watching the owner of a health food store start fumbling through his desk drawer for a long-lost pack of cigarettes.

But perhaps we exaggerate for effect, and perhaps we are all getting elegiac about Federer, the tennis genius, rather too soon.

With his 28th birthday looming in August, his days of Slam-in, tournament-out dominance are clearly over. His body is also beginning to betray him more regularly. But it would be both unwise and unfair to write him off just yet.

Yes, the game he once ruled with so few hints of rebellion from the serfs is now governed by Nadal, with Djokovic and, above all, Andy Murray quickly acquiring territory and treasure.

Yes, Federer’s level under the greatest pressure has dropped. He has lost five straight times to Nadal and four straight times to the counterpunching Murray. But he has beaten other quality players convincingly this year, including Fernando Verdasco and Andy Roddick. The range of Federer’s ball-striking ability and world view is such that some meaningful mid-career adjustments are possible.

His appetite for traveling and playing the game appears undiminished, which is due to his intelligent scheduling and also to the fact that his longtime companion Mirka Vavrinec was a globe-trotting tennis professional herself.

Pete Sampras, the modern champion whose career most closely parallels Federer’s, was already growing weary of the grind in his late 20s. But it is Sampras who should provide Federer with some inspiration at this vulnerable stage. After years of dominance on fast surfaces, Sampras also hit an extended rough patch, only to emerge with his 14th Grand Slam singles title.

Sampras did it at age 31 at the 2002 U.S. Open, well aware that big life changes were coming, with his wife Bridgette Wilson pregnant with their first child. Though slightly younger, Federer finds himself chasing No. 14 and a share of Sampras’s all-time record with Vavrinec also expecting their first.

“There are definitely some parallels,” said Paul Annacone, Sampras’s longtime coach, in an interview this week. “Just as it was for Pete, it’s a particularly interesting, challenging time in Roger’s career. But I would look at it with Roger in the same way as for Pete. For guys like that, it is daunting but not that daunting. They are so skilled they can adjust, but a lot of the adjustment is mental.”

Annacone thinks Roger grew accustomed to overwhelming opponents from the back court: to being the better athlete and hitting a more, consistent and heavier ball.

“We are all creatures of habits,” Annacone said. “Roger has won a lot a certain way, and when you’ve done that for four or five years and then in Year 6 or 7 that shot that used to be a winner isn’t a winner anymore, the tendency in human nature is to overplay a little bit. And that’s what’s happening. His couple of patterns that used to be very dominant are still successful against 95 percent of the guys — just not against that last five percent.”

Annacone understandably leans toward Federer’s hiring a full-time coach. “I always feel in an individual sports, it’s up to the guy on court, but as you watch the evolution of careers, it’s good to have someone you trust and who understands you and what you’re trying to do and also your game and the history of what’s gone on,” he said.

To say that Federer has been without a coach is not entirely accurate. He has had world-class voices in his ear, including Jose Higueras last year and Darren Cahill for nine days this year. Both men surely discussed tactical and technical solutions to the negative trends.

Applying those solutions is up to Federer. He has looked, if anything, too intent on getting results: hence the tears and the crumpled racket when the shots won’t obey the mind down the stretch. Perhaps there is more to the mental block: something personal, something private. Tennis is, after all, a mirror to its practitioners’ souls. But knowing what we know, it still seems premature to start summing up the Federer era.

“He may choose to keep doing what he’s been doing and not tweaking, and that’s his choice as a champion,” Annacone said. “But for me it would be a shame. If you have a lot of weapons in your arsenal and choose not to use them, what’s the point in having them? It’s a matter of managing them a bit differently than he did a few years ago.”

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/10/sports/tennis/10iht-ARENA.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&hpw

soraya
04-09-2009, 03:03 PM
Thanks Eden. Great analysis by Annacone, Roger should hire him ASAP.

Or Levy
04-09-2009, 03:07 PM
Yeah, well. Going to the media with his thoughts sort of cut Annacone off from the ever-disappearing short-list, I'd think.

timafi
04-09-2009, 03:37 PM
with the right coach by his side and imo another trainer/physio on the road full-time can only bring out the best in him.
Annacone?
R.Lansdorp?
C.Rodriguez?
who might best suit his game?:scratch:
I want Roger to play well again and it pains me to see him struggle so much:awww:

Daniel
04-09-2009, 04:30 PM
:eek: where is the other thread? Part 1?

Federer accepts wild card for Monte Carlo Masters

MONACO (AP)—Roger Federer has accepted a last-minute wild card invitation to play in the Monte Carlo Masters next week.

The second-ranked Federer is a three-time finalist at the clay-court tournament but has never won. Last year, Rafael Nadal beat Federer 7-5, 7-5 in the final.

Nadal will be going for his fifth straight title at the tournament in Monaco, which will include nine of the top 10 players. Only sixth-ranked Andy Roddick will miss the event.

Tournament director Zeljko Franulovic says Thursday that “we never gave up hope that (Federer) would be present.”

Sunset of Age
04-09-2009, 06:27 PM
:eek: where is the other thread? Part 1?

All the chat threads with more than 5000 posts were closed/changed location/whatever because they caused the forum to crash every time (the 'database errors'). I've been told by the mods that the old threads will be available to read again in due time.

Federer accepts wild card for Monte Carlo Masters

MONACO (AP)—Roger Federer has accepted a last-minute wild card invitation to play in the Monte Carlo Masters next week.

The second-ranked Federer is a three-time finalist at the clay-court tournament but has never won. Last year, Rafael Nadal beat Federer 7-5, 7-5 in the final.

A very pleasant surprise. :D

SUKTUEN
04-09-2009, 06:38 PM
ATP - MONTE CARLO


Dear Fans

I have decided to accept a wildcard into the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters tournament that begins on Monday. I will head there this weekend to start the clay court season.

Thanks to all of you for your continued support.


All the best,

Roger

:eek::eek::eek:

soraya
04-09-2009, 07:43 PM
Has anyone seen this? I think something bigger is happening in his life that people are not aware of. He just looks and sound like a wounded lion, that breaks my heart.:sad:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ilzAU6daSHA

Sunset of Age
04-09-2009, 07:45 PM
Has anyone seen this? I think something bigger is happening in his life that people are not aware of. He just looks and sound like a wounded lion, that breaks my heart.:sad:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ilzAU6daSHA

I'm afraid a lot of people have indeed seen that. There was a gigantic mocking thread in GM yesterday about it - of course. :rolleyes:
Let's not even go there... :help:

nobama
04-09-2009, 11:50 PM
I didn't watch the video, but is this the one where he's wiping sweat from his brow/face which some have claimed is him wiping away tears?

Sunset of Age
04-10-2009, 12:10 AM
I didn't watch the video, but is this the one where he's wiping sweat from his brow/face which some have claimed is him wiping away tears?

It's exactly like you say. The poor fellow had to give that post-match interview only some ten minutes after that dreadful match. He was still sweating - OF COURSE. You can tell he isn't actually *happy* out there, but there are NO TEARS whatsoever.

Whatever. Of course the Hata's were having a field day on GM again. Even some Rafa-tards came along to his defense, guess that tells enough. :help:

soraya
04-10-2009, 06:30 AM
It's exactly like you say. The poor fellow had to give that post-match interview only some ten minutes after that dreadful match. He was still sweating - OF COURSE. You can tell he isn't actually *happy* out there, but there are NO TEARS whatsoever.

Whatever. Of course the Hata's were having a field day on GM again. Even some Rafa-tards came along to his defense, guess that tells enough. :help:

Right! It makes a difference watching it with the sounds on, and it is clear that he was frustrated by silly questions and disgusted with himself. His voice did not show signs of fighting back tears. I think the ATP should ban interviews right after the match.

Mrs. B
04-10-2009, 06:54 AM
The first thread was closed because it exceeded the recommended 5000 posts. Part two started.

VB message board does not handle large threads well.

any chance of accessing that old thread again? So many years of news & articles about Roger... :sad:

Obey.my.dreamz
04-10-2009, 09:41 AM
yea, i just dont get who drop that load of crap telling he is wiping tears?! i mean he was MAD not SAD!,.. i could see how he breathe fire ,..he was just sweating from the match and from the anger,. *u kno how anger = faster heartbeat=sweat...

Or Levy
04-10-2009, 10:28 AM
I also think that losing the article thread is a huge shame, it should have been closed at 4500 and kept as an archive, same with the funny pictures thread on GM, what a shame.

trickcy
04-10-2009, 11:01 AM
I really really hope that things are fixed so that the old Roger News and Articles thread can be a read only thread.. It'd be sad to lose all that :(

SUKTUEN
04-10-2009, 11:31 AM
why it should be delete but not only close the old thread?

Eden
04-11-2009, 12:55 PM
Federer will be back

Martin Kelner

April 11. 2009

http://www.thenational.ae/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=AD&Date=20090411&Category=SPORTCOLUMNISTS&ArtNo=855085521&Ref=AR&Profile=1078&MaxW=300
The target nagging away and frustrating Roger Federer is Pete Sampras's record haul of 14 grand slam titles. Randi Sokoloff / The National

Are Roger Federer’s powers on the wane? That is the question intriguing the world of tennis as we head for grand slams in Paris, Wimbledon, and New York.

The same question was asked last year after his heavy defeat to Rafael Nadal in the French Open, and further disappointment in a thrilling final at Wimbledon. Federer, however, showed with his straight sets victory over Andy Murray at the US Open how deluded those critics were who leapt in to administer the last rites to a wonderful career.

It would, of course, be similarly unwise now to rule the Swiss genius out of the upcoming slams, but his petulant reaction to his defeat to Novak Djokovic in the semi-final at the Miami Masters was a sign that Federer himself is starting to worry about the decline in his game in recent tournaments.

It is by no means unusual to see a player smash his racket, fail to shake hands with the umpire, and be glum and unresponsive in a press conference after losing a match. But not Federer.

He has built a reputation on being cool and dispassionate, putting disappointment behind him, and maintaining focus on the challenges ahead. His reaction in Miami was so much against type, it was as if Shane Warne had announced he was giving up cricket to become a Trappist Monk.

Clearly, the target that is nagging away and frustrating Federer is Pete Sampras’s record haul of 14 grand slam titles. Federer is one short of the total, and came desperately close to reaching it at this year’s Australian Open. His disappointed reaction in Melbourne after defeat to Nadal gives you an idea how important the record is to Roger, and normally you would expect him to win another slam or two – possibly Wimbledon this year – before a gentle decline, and the final ride into the sunset.

His problem now is the form being shown by his rivals on the tour. This is something of a golden age for men’s tennis, with Nadal, Djokovic, and Murray all playing better than ever. Behind them in the rankings, Del Potro, Verdasco, Roddick, and Simon are all capable of upsetting any of the top players. There was certainly not this depth of talent at the top of the tennis tree when Sampras was racking up his titles.

Having said that, I expect Federer to equal Sampras’s record, if not this year, then next.

He is not even 28-years-old yet, and having had the benefit of the best wisdom on nutrition, coaching, and physiotherapy since his teenage years, there is no reason on earth to expect much in the way of physical decline for some time yet.

As with most competitors in individual sports, the main enemy to be feared is between his ears. Failure in Miami rattled him, but experience tells you he will regroup and continue to be the opponent his rivals in the top four least want to encounter.

My view is that Federer’s appearance in 10 consecutive grand slam men’s singles finals between 2005 and 2007 make him the greatest tennis player, and only a curmudgeon would deny him the final slam triumph to cement that title.

Source: http://www.thenational.ae/article/20090411/SPORTCOLUMNISTS/855085521/1078/SPORT&template=columnists

Rita
04-11-2009, 02:18 PM
:awww:

SUKTUEN
04-11-2009, 02:34 PM
Federer will be back

I love this title!!:devil:

timafi
04-11-2009, 03:46 PM
he will no question:yeah:

Carlita
04-11-2009, 09:25 PM
why it should be delete but not only close the old thread?

I really really hope that things are fixed so that the old Roger News and Articles thread can be a read only thread.. It'd be sad to lose all that :(:wavey: I shall try to bring back the news / articles thread and the picture thread as soon as I have some time. It takes up quite a bit of time so it might not be overnight ;)

lamnathalie
04-12-2009, 02:36 AM
:wavey: I shall try to bring back the news / articles thread and the picture thread as soon as I have some time. It takes up quite a bit of time so it might not be overnight ;)
Many thanks, Carlita :worship:

trickcy
04-12-2009, 04:52 AM
:wavey: I shall try to bring back the news / articles thread and the picture thread as soon as I have some time. It takes up quite a bit of time so it might not be overnight ;)

Thanks Carlita :) If it's back sometime, it'd be awesome :)

SUKTUEN
04-12-2009, 05:54 AM
Congratulations, Mr. and Mrs. Federer!

GOD Bless Federer's family have a happy life forever!!!!!!!!!:bounce::bounce::bounce:




OFF COURT - MR. AND MRS. FEDERER


Dear Fans

Earlier today, in my hometown of Basel, surrounded by a small group of close friends and family, Mirka and I got married. It was a beautiful spring day and an incredibly joyous occasion.

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Federer wish all of you a Happy Easter weekend.

Love,
Roger

Daniel
04-12-2009, 06:37 AM
Brief-Tennis-Federer marries long-term girlfriend

WELLINGTON, April 12 (Reuters) - World number two Roger Federer married his long-time girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec in his home town of Basel in Switzerland on Saturday.

“Earlier today…surrounded by a small group of close friends and family, Mirka and I got married,” Federer said on his official website (www.rogerfederer.com). “It was a beautiful spring day and an incredibly joyous occasion.”

Federer and Vavrinec met at the Sydney Olympics in 2000. Federer said last month they were expecting their first child later this year.

(Reporting by Greg Stutchbury; Editing by John Mehaffey; To query or comment on this story email sportsfeedback@thomsonreuters.com)

SUKTUEN
04-12-2009, 03:40 PM
:worship::worship:

Eden
04-12-2009, 09:39 PM
Paris Prep: Federer, Nadal, Murray, Monfils Face Off

By Tennis Week
Sunday, April 12, 2009

Put four-time Roland Garros champion Rafael Nadal, French Open finalist Roger Federer, French Open semifinalist Gael Monfils and US Open runner-up Andy Murray together on a red clay court in Paris this spring and you might be watching the 2009 French Open semifinals, right?

Possibly, but before Roland Garros begins, several of tennis' top players are set to share the court — as teammates and opponents — in a unique new event that will be staged on red clay in Paris providing ideal preparation for the French Open.

Nadal, Federer, Monfils and Murray lead the field for the inaugural Guinot Mary Cohr Masters première tournament, set for May 20-22 at the Paris Golf & Country Club in Rueil-Malmaison on the outskirts of Paris. Eight other players including David Nalbandian, Marat Safin, James Blake, Tommy Haas, Stanislas Wawrinka and the Frenchmen Julien Benneteau and Arnaud Clément will join this dream quartet for an unusual and original set-up. The team competition will feature the same balls and court conditions as Roland Garros.

The 12 players will be divided up into two teams of six, Guinot vs. Mary Cohr, coached by internationally renowned captains. Two best-of-three set matches a day from 1:30 p.m. onwards will commence. Each player will play once only during the three-day tournament and the two captains will challenge one another on the Friday just before the presentation of the trophy. Because the stands are nearer the courts than anywhere else, the spectators will get a close-up of the stars in competition.

A few days away from the kick-off of the Paris Grand Slam, the main contestants of the Musketeers Cup will already feel they are steeped in it. Event organizers say the event "is not an exhibition but rather preparation in ideal conditions. Same climate, same surface, same balls as during Roland-Garros, perfect practice conditions."

For ticket information, please visit www.guinotmarycohrmasters.com or phone 0 825 811 812.

Source: http://www.tennisweek.com/news/fullstory.sps?inewsid=6630606

icedevil0289
04-12-2009, 11:12 PM
Sounds interesting.

nobama
04-13-2009, 02:00 AM
www.independent.co.uk/sport/tennis/honeymoon-on-hold-for-newlywed-federer-1667934.html (http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/tennis/honeymoon-on-hold-for-newlywed-federer-1667934.html)
Honeymoon on hold for newly-wed Federer
World No 2 takes up wild card in Monte Carlo Masters after surprise wedding
By Paul Newman in Monte Carlo

Monday, 13 April 2009
AP
Monte Carlo may sound like the perfect honeymoon destination, but this was probably not what Mirka Vavrinec had envisaged. Having married in Switzerland on Saturday, the bride flew here yesterday with her groom so that he could go straight back to work. Business is business, especially when your husband is the world's most famous tennis player and there is an important tournament in the offing.

Vavrinec and Roger Federer, who is playing here in this week's Monte Carlo Masters, met nine years ago at the Sydney Olympics. She has been his constant companion ever since, helping to run his business affairs and supporting him from the side of courts around the world. The couple recently announced they were expecting their first child this summer and on Saturday they married in Federer's home town of Basle.

The wedding was a closely kept secret, with Federer making a simple announcement on his official website. "Dear fans," he said. "Earlier today, in my hometown of Basle, surrounded by a small group of close friends and family, Mirka and I got married. It was a beautiful spring day and an incredibly joyous occasion. Mr and Mrs Roger Federer wish all of you a happy Easter weekend."

News of the wedding came as a surprise to almost everyone. "I had no idea it was happening," one of Federer's closest associates said here yesterday. "I texted him as soon as I heard. He texted back to say he was over the moon and that it was the best day of his life." :awww:

The wedding probably explains why Federer had initially chosen to miss this week's tournament, which is the traditional start of the European clay-court season. On Thursday last week, however, the world No 2, presumably with the blessing of his bride-to-be, successfully requested a wild card. Federer joins nine of the world's top 10 players, including Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray. Those two yesterday interrupted their preparations to play an exhibition match to publicise the tournament.

Rita
04-13-2009, 08:55 AM
:awww: so freaking cute :hearts:

Dini
04-13-2009, 11:22 AM
Awww Roger that is so sweet "best day of his life" :awww::awww:

Swiss Mountain
04-13-2009, 12:24 PM
What puzzle me is why now? why a damn baby now? it's joy, but lots of problems, couldn't she wait until he pass 15 slams? he wants it, more than he wanted a baby as he stated last year.
He's in a crisis and the news of baby and marriage doesn't seems to make him happy: smashing rackets, crying over and over, playing bad...
I'm really afraid for him, and for the baby which might be and fell that he is the 'cause' of Roger's struggle.

Some say she stabbed Roger in the back on Tennisplanet, what do you think?

I REALLY HOPE NO. I'm just puzzled! and a marriage like you know: 'let's do it, and move away, that is just a formality'.
Come back strong Roger.

trickcy
04-13-2009, 12:32 PM
:awww: So cute :awww:

icedevil0289
04-13-2009, 01:04 PM
What puzzle me is why now? why a damn baby now? it's joy, but lots of problems, couldn't she wait until he pass 15 slams? he wants it, more than he wanted a baby as he stated last year.
He's in a crisis and the news of baby and marriage doesn't seems to make him happy: smashing rackets, crying over and over, playing bad...
I'm really afraid for him, and for the baby which might be and fell that he is the 'cause' of Roger's struggle.

Some say she stabbed Roger in the back on Tennisplanet, what do you think?

I REALLY HOPE NO. I'm just puzzled! and a marriage like you know: 'let's do it, and move away, that is just a formality'.
Come back strong Roger.

apparently you missed the part where roger said it was the happiest day of his life. :rolleyes:

Obey.my.dreamz
04-13-2009, 01:25 PM
He's lying,.. the best day of his life was when he was born ;) but he wants to be a gentleman ,its nice ^^

nobama
04-13-2009, 01:30 PM
What puzzle me is why now? why a damn baby now? it's joy, but lots of problems, couldn't she wait until he pass 15 slams? he wants it, more than he wanted a baby as he stated last year.
He's in a crisis and the news of baby and marriage doesn't seems to make him happy: smashing rackets, crying over and over, playing bad...
I'm really afraid for him, and for the baby which might be and fell that he is the 'cause' of Roger's struggle.

Some say she stabbed Roger in the back on Tennisplanet, what do you think?

I REALLY HOPE NO. I'm just puzzled! and a marriage like you know: 'let's do it, and move away, that is just a formality'.
Come back strong Roger.:cuckoo:

nobama
04-13-2009, 01:31 PM
apparently you missed the part where roger said it was the happiest day of his life. :rolleyes:Nah, he would've had more fun on a practice court in Monte Carlo, don't you think? :D

Dini
04-13-2009, 01:32 PM
Does anyone know if Roger is in MC yet? He is supposed to have a presser today I thought...dunno what time that was scheduled for though :scratch:

Spirit_fire
04-13-2009, 02:38 PM
:awww: So damn adorable...

icedevil0289
04-13-2009, 03:28 PM
Does anyone know if Roger is in MC yet? He is supposed to have a presser today I thought...dunno what time that was scheduled for though :scratch:

According to rf.com he arrived on sunday.

PatRafterFan
04-13-2009, 04:14 PM
What puzzle me is why now? why a damn baby now? it's joy, but lots of problems, couldn't she wait until he pass 15 slams? he wants it, more than he wanted a baby as he stated last year.
He's in a crisis and the news of baby and marriage doesn't seems to make him happy: smashing rackets, crying over and over, playing bad...
I'm really afraid for him, and for the baby which might be and fell that he is the 'cause' of Roger's struggle.

Some say she stabbed Roger in the back on Tennisplanet, what do you think?

I REALLY HOPE NO. I'm just puzzled! and a marriage like you know: 'let's do it, and move away, that is just a formality'.
Come back strong Roger.

:rolleyes: this is such bullshit it's not even worth responding to it.

News of the wedding came as a surprise to almost everyone. "I had no idea it was happening," one of Federer's closest associates said here yesterday. "I texted him as soon as I heard. He texted back to say he was over the moon and that it was the best day of his life."

:awww: gosh, that's so cute

SUKTUEN
04-13-2009, 04:53 PM
:worship:

icedevil0289
04-13-2009, 07:14 PM
You beleive it? did you hear him say it? and if so, does it mean it's true?
Roger hides many things, he lied many times in press conferences, he has to, if he wants to be left in peace.

I hope it's true, that he is happy, but c'mon, seriously, the happiest day in his life? no way, not like when he won Wimbledon or something like that, don't think he cry of joy, mostly in these times it's pretty much the opposite.
Why his child will be born, he's going to say the same

By the way, who is the "friend" who say Roger told him it was the "best day of his life?" is it... Mirka? :p

Funny I always thought he was honest, in fact brutally honest in his press conferences. Anyways I believe him when he said it was the happiest day of his life. There is more to life than just tennis.

timafi
04-13-2009, 07:36 PM
What puzzle me is why now? why a damn baby now? it's joy, but lots of problems, couldn't she wait until he pass 15 slams? he wants it, more than he wanted a baby as he stated last year.
He's in a crisis and the news of baby and marriage doesn't seems to make him happy: smashing rackets, crying over and over, playing bad...
I'm really afraid for him, and for the baby which might be and fell that he is the 'cause' of Roger's struggle.

Some say she stabbed Roger in the back on Tennisplanet, what do you think?

I REALLY HOPE NO. I'm just puzzled! and a marriage like you know: 'let's do it, and move away, that is just a formality'.
Come back strong Roger.

damn baby?are you sure you're a fan of Roger's?:confused::rolleyes:
Roger is a grown ass man and I'm sure if he didn't want a "damn baby" as you put it;he would have taken the steps to not have one right now.

"Problems" for you because I don't see either he nor Mirka who btw is THE carrying the "damn baby" while Roger can still go out there with his WIFE's support.Are you the one who will care for this "damn baby"?You won't have to spend a dime to raise this "damn baby"

Roger and Mirka both have parents who I bet will be more than happy to help care and love their "damn" grandchild.

Roger has earned enough $;not stolen any from you or nobody else to afford a nanny if Mirka and Roger;you know the man who got Mirka pregnant if Mirka needs help while on the road:rolleyes:

If Roger didn't want to get married he would have not gotten married;don't remember Mirka holding a gun in his head and forcing him into marriage;trust me had that been the case it would have made the news:rolleyes:

as for Roger crying and smashing a racket and playing badly;blame it on Roger not having the right coach by his side;his opponents getting a better but don't you blame that on the "damn baby"

Roger I'll remind you is no LLeyton Hewitt and no Llubicic;he's won 13 slams already and many without a coach and if healthy and with the proper coach;with his healthy "damb baby" and his wife by his side'he'll continue to win slams:mad:

Dini
04-13-2009, 07:40 PM
damn baby?are you sure you're a fan of Roger's?:confused::rolleyes:
Roger is a grown ass man and I'm sure if he didn't want a "damn baby" as you put it;he would have taken the steps to not have one right now.

"Problems" for you because I don't see either he nor Mirka who btw is THE carrying the "damn baby" while Roger can still go out there with his WIFE's support.Are you the one who will care for this "damn baby"?You won't have to spend a dime to raise this "damn baby"

Roger and Mirka both have parents who I bet will be more than happy to help care and love their "damn" grandchild.

Roger has earned enough $;not stolen any from you or nobody else to afford a nanny if Mirka and Roger;you know the man who got Mirka pregnant if Mirka needs help while on the road:rolleyes:

If Roger didn't want to get married he would have not gotten married;don't remember Mirka holding a gun in his head and forcing him into marriage;trust me had that been the case it would have made the news:rolleyes:

as for Roger crying and smashing a racket and playing badly;blame it on Roger not having the right coach by his side;his opponents getting a better but don't you blame that on the "damn baby"

Roger I'll remind you is no LLeyton Hewitt and no Llubicic;he's won 13 slams already and many without a coach and if healthy and with the proper coach;with his healthy "damb baby" and his wife by his side'he'll continue to win slams:mad:

Well said :worship:

Swiss Mountain just give up, no one agrees with you, and to put it simply you're sounding bitter.

soraya
04-13-2009, 07:47 PM
as for Roger crying and smashing a racket and playing badly;blame it on Roger not having the right coach by his side;his opponents getting a better but don't you blame that on the "damn baby"



Give the man a break, they are pregnant and hormonal change can bring mood swings.;)

Rita
04-13-2009, 08:40 PM
ca.news.yahoo.com/s/reuters/090413/sports/sports_us_tennis_men_masters_federer_1


Rivals say Federer still a formidable opponent
Module body
By Julien Pretot

MONTE CARLO (Reuters) - Roger Federer may have lost the tag of world number one but he is still a formidable opponent, several top players said on Monday.

The usually-composed Federer, who has yet to win a tournament in 2009, broke down in tears after losing the Australian Open final to the top-ranked Rafael Nadal in January and smashed one of his rackets in this month's Miami Masters.

"I found it strange he broke his racket in Miami, he who always keeps calm," world number three Novak Djokovic told reporters at the Monte Carlo Masters. "But these things happen when you are frustrated on the court.
"Federer won everything for four years and now he starts losing against some players but you cannot say he is in crisis."

Nadal said the Swiss, who starts his Monte Carlo campaign with a second-round match against Italian Andreas Seppi on Wednesday, had performed well this year.

"He has played a grand slam final and two Masters Series semi-finals, these are very good results," said the Spaniard.

"Everybody talks about the racket he smashed in Miami but that's nothing. It happens to everyone.

"He just needs a title to confirm his good start to the season."

CLASS ACT

Frenchman Gilles Simon, who beat the former world number one twice last year and has yet to lose to the Swiss, said Federer was still a class act.

"Why does he lose his temper on the court? Because he did not need to before as he used to slaughter everyone," said world number seven Simon.

"To me, on a good day, he still is the best player in the world. He had already broken rackets before, now he is frustrated so he does it again.
"In a way it makes him more human."
Spaniard Fernando Verdasco said world number two Federer was finding it difficult to cope with more regular defeats.

"Two years ago he was winning everything. Now, since the beginning of the year, he has been beaten by Nadal, Djokovic and (Andy) Murray," said the eighth-ranked Verdasco.

"I think mentally it is not easy to handle."

Gael Monfils, who lost to Federer in the French Open semi-finals last year, said the Swiss would be looking to avenge his defeats.

"We must not forget who he is," said the 10th-ranked Frenchman. "He will be out for revenge."



Monfils is smart :smoke:

Dini
04-13-2009, 09:25 PM
Article written by Daily Mail about Roger's marriage. (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1169716/Roger-Federer-marries-long-term-girlfriend-intimate-ceremony.html)

Thought this bit was particularly interesting:


In an interview, Federer once said of Mirka: 'As long as I wake up in the monring and she is next to me, that's all that matters.'


How romantic :hearts::awww:

And a picture for good measure :angel:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v229/PJ2004/Tennis/Doubles.jpg

icedevil0289
04-13-2009, 09:47 PM
Article written by Daily Mail about Roger's marriage. (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1169716/Roger-Federer-marries-long-term-girlfriend-intimate-ceremony.html)

Thought this bit was particularly interesting:



How romantic :hearts::awww:

And a picture for good measure :angel:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v229/PJ2004/Tennis/Doubles.jpg

awww roger!:worship:

nobama
04-13-2009, 11:04 PM
OK we've got someone who's seriously :retard:. No point in responding except to say it's disgusting to think Roger would marry and father a child with someone he didn't really love. Just because some fans aren't ready to accept Roger as a husband and father (or they think it's distracting him from his career) doesn't mean he's in denial or is doing this against his will.

Spirit_fire
04-14-2009, 01:14 AM
Simon :inlove:
Monfils :inlove:

Sunset of Age
04-14-2009, 01:17 AM
How romantic :hearts::awww:

That exact quote in fact comes from René Stauffer's biography. ;)

Anyone disputing Roger's love for Mirka - or the other way round - is in fact a complete :retard: :retard: :retard:.

There, I've said it. :ras:

Swiss Mountain
04-14-2009, 01:43 AM
damn baby?are you sure you're a fan of Roger's?:confused::rolleyes:
Roger is a grown ass man and I'm sure if he didn't want a "damn baby" as you put it;he would have taken the steps to not have one right now.

"Problems" for you because I don't see either he nor Mirka who btw is THE carrying the "damn baby" while Roger can still go out there with his WIFE's support.Are you the one who will care for this "damn baby"?You won't have to spend a dime to raise this "damn baby"

Roger and Mirka both have parents who I bet will be more than happy to help care and love their "damn" grandchild.

Roger has earned enough $;not stolen any from you or nobody else to afford a nanny if Mirka and Roger;you know the man who got Mirka pregnant if Mirka needs help while on the road:rolleyes:

If Roger didn't want to get married he would have not gotten married;don't remember Mirka holding a gun in his head and forcing him into marriage;trust me had that been the case it would have made the news:rolleyes:

as for Roger crying and smashing a racket and playing badly;blame it on Roger not having the right coach by his side;his opponents getting a better but don't you blame that on the "damn baby"

Roger I'll remind you is no LLeyton Hewitt and no Llubicic;he's won 13 slams already and many without a coach and if healthy and with the proper coach;with his healthy "damb baby" and his wife by his side'he'll continue to win slams:mad:

You sure are sensible to the "damn baby". Sorry for that if that disturb you, but relax a bit, it's not that bad, it's a way to express yourself more brutally. We are on a forum and don't know each other, so it might be difficult to comunicate my feelings.

I'm sure it will be a very cute baby! ok? excuse me!

Swiss Mountain
04-14-2009, 01:49 AM
Anyway...


I like this part from this article, because it seems they are all afraid of Roger not coming back. They're having regrets now, after saying he was over, blah blah blah!:(

Federer will be back

My view is that Federer’s appearance in 10 consecutive grand slam men’s singles finals between 2005 and 2007 make him the greatest tennis player, and only a curmudgeon would deny him the final slam triumph to cement that title.

Martin Kelner
* Last Updated: April 11. 2009

http://www.thenational.ae/article/20090411/SPORTCOLUMNISTS/855085521/1078/SPORT&template=columnists

SUKTUEN
04-14-2009, 04:27 AM
thanks

oneandonlyhsn
04-14-2009, 06:02 AM
ca.news.yahoo.com/s/reuters/090413/sports/sports_us_tennis_men_masters_federer_1


Nadal said the Swiss, who starts his Monte Carlo campaign with a second-round match against Italian Andreas Seppi on Wednesday, had performed well this year.

"He has played a grand slam final and two Masters Series semi-finals, these are very good results," said the Spaniard.

"Everybody talks about the racket he smashed in Miami but that's nothing. It happens to everyone.

"He just needs a title to confirm his good start to the season."

CLASS ACT



Rafa :worship: I might not like his tennis but he is a Fedtard.
Wont it be nice if Roger's first title of 2009 was RG

Eden
04-14-2009, 09:20 AM
The Net Post: Paul Annacone would be perfect fit for Roger Federer

The Times Tennis Correspondent says Pete Sampras's former coach could help rebuild the shattered confidence of the former world No1

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/multimedia/archive/00521/federer_585_521686a.jpg
Roger Federer would be wise to enlist the help of Paul Annacone to help him out of his current trough

Neil Harman

When it comes to probing anything to do with Roger Federer, words have to be chosen wisely, for having sat courtside and witnessed so many memorable matches, to have been up close and exceedingly personal (the front row of the press conference in Miami last week after Federer's loss to Novak Djokovic when he constantly dabbed at his eyes, was not a comfortable spot to be in) and allowed to share a comradeship on what is a lonely road, anyone would feel a special need to get things just right. And there is his legion of supporters who take any word against him as akin to blasphemy.

As Federer put it as the announcement of his weekend nuptials appeared on his website, his marriage to Mirka Vavrinec in Basel was an 'incredibly joyous occasion' and for that, the Net Post offers the happy couple its felicitations and the hope that they will enjoy a blessed life together and with at least one more significant other, for the couple are expecting a child which could, or so we hear, be delivered as soon as Wimbledon time.

Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi and Albert Costa (not three names you usually mention in the same sentence) have won grand slam titles this century while married, so nothing ought to stand in The Fed's way of taking his tally to No.14 and beyond. I sincerely believe that he will, but something dramatic needs to happen for it to occur. It is too easy to say 'hire a coach' and everything will suddenly fall into place but there does come a time when a player should harken to advice, respectfully offered. This is not a sign of weakness, but one of strength.

As Federer wished his many global disciples a Happy Easter, so there can be no more appropriate time for one to respond in kind to him and simply say "Keep The Faith."

One recalls a press conference similar to Federer's in Miami the week before last at Wimbledon in 2002 when Sampras had lost in the second round to George Bastl of Switzerland and it felt as if his whole world was crumbling apart. Sampras and Federer are similar in many ways, tough to get to know but once you break beyond the initial shyness, both are splendid, sensitive people who are as much touched by their place in the sport as the sport itself has been touched by them.

Sampras' chin trembled when he spoke of his loss to Bastl, how he felt as if he had been affronted by playing on Wimbledon's Court No.2 (they haven't done that to Federer since he became the champion), and that he thought his last chance of a 14th grand slam had been scuppered by a commmittee. He was 30 at the time; Federer is not 28 until August (their birthdays are four days apart). But read this from Sampras's recent book "A Champion's Mind", and what do you make of it?

"I felt utterly empty (after the Bastl defeat) and had no answers to explain it. Marriage may have had something to do with it, especially with Bridgette being pregnant. Maybe all these big life changes were subverting my focus, or putting me at war with myself. But I felt I knew what I wanted: my wife, our child, a good, clean, normal life - and to squeeze every last drop of poential out of my career. I had spent more than a decade beating people for a living, putting all of my mental, physical and emotional energy into the task. I beat people. That was that I did, that was who I was. I had to ask myself Am I still that person?."

It strikes me that that is where Federer is right now. Is he still that person? If he is, he has to play like he is, remember the innate satisfaction he gleaned from lifting those trophies (his last, the US Open of 2008 was not that so long ago), to get his head around the fact that though Rafael Nadal is a titan, he is not unbeatable, nobody is. He remains the tennis player whose many gifts most would kill for. For him it should not be enough simply to walk around and behave like a champion, he has to start playing like one again. For that is how he is best suited. There is plenty of time for him to match and break the Sampras record, as long as his self-belief is not destroyed.

It was all going so swimmingly until Nadal came along; then Novak Djokovic and now Andy Murray. Between them, these three 'youngsters' have contrived to play havoc with Federer's equilibrium, they have sewn doubt where there was once total certainty and clouded his judgement where once there was sureness and clarity.

They have attacked the weak points in his game and, as of now, he is finding it very difficult to get back at them because he does not quite have the belief in himself he used to exude. His strategies have been mixed, the shot selection uncertain, the mood swings evident with the smashed racket in Miami when his game was sagging against Djokovic.

There have been hundreds of applications for the post of Federer's coach, from all manner of well qualified persons and the odd oddball, one of whom suggested that poetry was all that was required to turn him around. Perhaps it is time to sift through them more vigorously. The Net Post - if The Fed does not mind - has a suggestion.

Though he is currently employed by the Lawn Tennis Association, where is he overseeing the progress of Britain's younger male players, could not Paul Annacone be released from his contract for a couple of years and take Federer on? I sincerely believe they would sit famously together. Annacone coached Sampras after the death of Tim Gullikson and did wonders for a stricken superstar, he can do so again.

By sheer co-incidence Annacone said this, this week: "There are definitely some parallels (between Federer's current situation and Sampras when he was in a pickle) "Just as it was for Pete, it’s a particularly interesting, challenging time in Roger’s career. But I would look at it with Roger in the same way as for Pete. For guys like that, it is daunting but not that daunting. They are so skilled they can adjust, but a lot of the adjustment is mental."

Sampras recalls: "Paul knew that different people needed to be handled in different ways. He could coach me or he could have coached Andre (Agassi). He was a good reader of character and temperament, knowing what I needed to hear and how to say it. And that is a huge - repeat (itals) huge (itals) - part of being a high-level coach. You have to understand the guy and work in his comfort zone, avoiding the temptation to change him or make him conform to how you want him to be - even when you know that change would be beneficial. His bedside manner was great. He realised I didn't want to talk about my tennis a lot - I was kind of possessive about the game. He was a great tactician, though I often resisted his strong emphasis on attacking tennis. Tim (Gullikson) was great when it came to my game, Paul was great when it came to the games of guys I would need to beat."

And that is where Federer is right now. He should take a leaf from Sampras's book. He should bring in Annacone, a coach who will tell him what is happening, where he is going wrong and how he might put it right. And, above all things, he must keep the faith.

Source: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/tennis/article6084160.ece?token=null&offset=0&page=1

Or Levy
04-14-2009, 04:00 PM
ROGER FEDERER


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Could you talk about your decision to play this event and what was the thinking?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, it was always an option for me, you know, since a long time. Finally it's a tournament where, one of the Masters, you don't get entered automatically, so it gives me an opportunity. I always wanted to keep it open in case I got married or something, and see how I felt and stuff. I felt like it was the right thing to do, so I'm happy to be here.

Q. How is getting married and playing here connected? Forgive me. Is it sort of a honeymoon option?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah, I mean, of course I spoke to Mirka. She was completely relaxed about whatever decision I took, you know. I feel like I've been on a honeymoon, you know, for the last years, so I don't feel necessarily I need to go somewhere, to a special place, to celebrate with her. We've had a lot of nice moments over all those years. We don't feel like we need it necessarily.
And I wouldn't miss, you know, being with you guys (smiling). It's nice to be here with you guys.

Q. Is this a new start, after what you said when you left Miami, a new beginning?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, well, it's the clay season, you know, starts here. I've had good results the last few years here. It's always exciting to change up your game a little bit and have a different mindset on how the points are being played.
I was the second best clay courter for a long time now. Of course, I hope I can win the big one, you know, the French Open, down the road. That's what the focus is here.
But here it's more about getting into the groove, you know, and hopefully winning some matches and playing well.

Q. Were the results in the U.S. Indian Wells and Miami any factor in you deciding to play here?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I could have played, what, two more matches. So it's not a big, big change. So, no, not really.
I mean, I think the year has been better than last year. You know, I played the finals in Australia, the semis in both the Masters Series. I've been playing okay. I've been playing good, good results. But definitely not playing my best, you know, in the semis of both Masters Series.
Actually, leaves me with hoping that, you know, if my game comes together, you know, the clay court season, I'll have a good chance of going much further than just playing semis.

Q. Can you describe your moment in tennis and as a human being? How can you describe this moment? Is it unique as a human being and not fantastic like a tennis player?
ROGER FEDERER: What do you mean?

Q. Like a human being, because you got married.
ROGER FEDERER: About me getting married?

Q. Yes.
ROGER FEDERER: Yes, it's a very special moment. I thought it to be a bit more relaxed, you know, because we've been together for so, so long. Once you get married, there's not a whole lot that changes. But it definitely does change your mindset, your life.
It was nice sharing the moment with my family, my closest friends. I got very emotional, you know, yet again. So it was very nice. It was just nice to know that, you know, she loves me so much, I love her so much. It was just a very nice day. We had perfect sky, perfect weather. It was just very, very nice. Q. And like tennis?
ROGER FEDERER: As a tennis player at the moment, I feel good, too. I've played better in the past. I know that. But I've played much worse, as well.
Like I said, I'm excited that the clay court season starts. I really like being close to home for a change for the next few months. Just makes traveling easier. I like the rallies on clay. I feel fresh.
You know, I always said that, since I took six weeks off after Australia, let my back heal, I felt like I was able to get away from everything, and now I'm ready to attack. Actually, my mind is fresh, which I think is really key, you know, for my game.

Q. Are you considering taking on any extra coaching for the clay court season or doing anything differently from last year?
ROGER FEDERER: No, not for the moment.

Q. You tried with Darren. Things didn't work out. What is the situation, in general, for coaching?
ROGER FEDERER: Nothing new at that front. I haven't spoken to anyone. I'm not planning to speak to anyone really. It's just me and the clay (smiling).

Q. You said the wedding changes your mindset. What particularly has it changed about your mindset?
ROGER FEDERER: I didn't mean it about tennis. Just, you know, it's nice to be calling Mirka my wife and not my girlfriend. That's just a big change for me. Takes maybe a bit of getting used to. So it's good. I'm here, introducing her, This is my wife. It just sounds so much better (smiling). I didn't think it was going to make that big of a change for me, but it does feel great.

Q. Were there any tears on your wedding day emotionally, or just on the tennis?
ROGER FEDERER: A few tears here and there. It was nice (smiling).
Q. Yours or somebody else's?
ROGER FEDERER: Both.

Q. Did you already decide the name of your son?
ROGER FEDERER: Not yet. You know, we'll see. There's quite a few books around that are that thick, so we'll see where it takes us.
But, no, we haven't decided anything yet. Yeah, I have no clue yet right now myself. Thank God we got time left, right, to decide.

Q. When did you and Mirka decide to get married? When did you decide on the date?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, we've been talking about it for many years now. But last year was kind of busy. All of a sudden it was the Olympics, you know, so it made it difficult to kind of get it organized. So we figured, Let's wait and do it next year. And we always knew that if we do it, we do it pretty quickly, you know, because I didn't want to have a huge wedding.
So thank God the places where we got married were ready, you know, to take us onboard, because it was still Easter Saturday, many things were closed. But they made exceptions for us, which is very nice. And, you know, basically 95% of the people we invited could come, so they changed their schedules around for us.
So everything really worked out really well for us, otherwise we would have waited and done it maybe one month down the road or maybe one year down the road. But everything worked out for this last weekend.

Q. But it was just a few weeks ago that you decided on that day?
ROGER FEDERER: Pretty much, yeah. Things move quickly (smiling).

Q. How difficult was it to keep it secret?
ROGER FEDERER: Not really, you know. I have good friends who keep things quiet, you know. Sure, you try to tell everyone, Please respect the privacy, and everything. But if you want to get married in private, you have to go to Switzerland. They don't actually care over there. They actually want to give you peace and privacy. That's why I love being a Swiss and living in Switzerland.

Q. Did you invite any tennis players?
ROGER FEDERER: No. They were playing. No, I didn't invite anybody. It was really just very close friends and family. So it was just really tight the way I was always hoping to have it.

Q. Was it in a church or like a town hall?
ROGER FEDERER: It was in Basel. That's all I'm going to tell you, yes (smiling).

trickcy
04-14-2009, 04:14 PM
Thanks for posting :wavey:

Roger :awww:

Or Levy
04-14-2009, 04:24 PM
Why the frown? I thought it was a great presser! He sounded so adorable and in love.

trickcy
04-14-2009, 04:29 PM
It's not a frown :).. :(-frown I just find it adorable that he seems to be so happy :wavey:

Q. How is getting married and playing here connected? Forgive me. Is it sort of a honeymoon option?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah, I mean, of course I spoke to Mirka. She was completely relaxed about whatever decision I took, you know. I feel like I've been on a honeymoon, you know, for the last years, so I don't feel necessarily I need to go somewhere, to a special place, to celebrate with her. We've had a lot of nice moments over all those years. We don't feel like we need it necessarily.
And I wouldn't miss, you know, being with you guys (smiling). It's nice to be here with you guys.

:spit: :rolls: Of course it is Roger :lol:

SUKTUEN
04-14-2009, 04:40 PM
:worship::worship::worship::worship:

Roger I ma so Happy for you and Mirka!!!!!!!!!!


and I am so happy for you will get a SON!!!!!!!!:devil::devil:

Thankyou so much my LORD!!!:worship::worship:

punk_chick
04-14-2009, 05:21 PM
Tennis star Roger Federer cries again, but tears of joy this time


MONACO - The tears streaming down Roger Federer's face came not from anguish but from happiness, and the person standing opposite the Swiss star was his new wife.

The 13-time Grand Slam champion, who is playing this week at the Monte Carlo Masters, spoke about his marriage to longtime girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec for the first time Tuesday.

"A few tears here and there," Federer said about Saturday's wedding in his hometown of Basel, Switzerland. "It was nice."

Federer also broke into tears after losing to rival Rafael Nadal in five sets in the Australian Open final. As he was being awarded the runner-up plate in Melbourne, Federer said, "God, it's killing me."

Last weekend, it was a more joyous feeling that led to the weeping.

"I got very emotional, you know, yet again," Federer said. "It was just nice to know that she loves me so much, I love her so much. It was just a very nice day. We had perfect sky, perfect weather."

Ahead of his second-round match against Andreas Seppi of Italy on Wednesday, Federer spoke only briefly about tennis, saying he still hopes to finally win the French Open - the only major he has not won.

"I hope I can win the big one," Federer said. "That's what the focus is here."

Off the court, Federer said he is surprised how different he feels now that he has a wife.

"It's a very special moment. I thought it to be a bit more relaxed, because we've been together for so, so long," Federer said. "It definitely does change your mind-set, your life."

The pair married in a private ceremony, and they did a good job of keeping it secret.

"If you want to get married in private, you have to go to Switzerland," Federer said. "They don't actually care over there. They actually want to give you peace and privacy. That's why I love being a Swiss and living in Switzerland."

Along with chasing a record-tying 14th Grand Slam title at the only major he has never won and reclaiming his No. 1 ranking, Federer is looking for a name for his son. They are expecting their first baby this summer.

"We'll see. There's quite a few books around that are that thick, so we'll see where it takes us," Federer said. "But, no, we haven't decided anything yet."

punk_chick
04-14-2009, 05:32 PM
I really didn't like the news article "Roger Federer Cries Again..." what's the problem in that? so yes, he cries, he gets emotional, he breaks racket... so what? whats the big deal? he's only a human. and also it shows that he's not HEARTLESS like MOST MEN!!! thats something to praise for, not something to critisize...

Sunset of Age
04-14-2009, 05:39 PM
I really didn't like the news article "Roger Federer Cries Again..." what's the problem in that? so yes, he cries, he gets emotional, he breaks racket... so what? whats the big deal? he's only a human. and also it shows that he's not HEARTLESS like MOST MEN!!! thats something to praise for, not something to critisize...

I don't think it was meant as criticism - but I do think Roger's tendency to Open the Floodgates at times does get emphasized in the media a little too much lately. Let the guy be!
Anyway, it is like you say - it shows that he's an emotional guy who's not afraid of showing his feelings. Rather the way I like guys to be... :)

Dini
04-14-2009, 05:41 PM
That title is just :ras:. The journalist thought he was funny :smash:

Or Levy
04-14-2009, 05:47 PM
That's better than what they wrote in one of leading Israeli sport websites after Roger announced he got married:

The article was titled "Double fault: Baby, then a wedding"

Again, someone thinking he was being clever - or maybe the reporter was going through a bad divorce or something.

Roger crying when he got married - now there's a shocker.

nobama
04-14-2009, 06:18 PM
I didn't mean it about tennis. Just, you know, it's nice to be calling Mirka my wife and not my girlfriend. That's just a big change for me. Takes maybe a bit of getting used to. So it's good. I'm here, introducing her, This is my wife. It just sounds so much better (smiling). I didn't think it was going to make that big of a change for me, but it does feel great. I loved this comment. :awww:

All the comments in his presser show that getting married was a much bigger deal than just signing a piece of paper, a legal document. If it was just a formality or no big deal he wouldn't have been so emotional. Obviously it means a lot to him. :)

RogFed#1Fan
04-14-2009, 08:34 PM
So it was very nice. It was just nice to know that, you know, she loves me so much, I love her so much. It was just a very nice day.

I'm here, introducing her, This is my wife. It just sounds so much better (smiling). I didn't think it was going to make that big of a change for me, but it does feel great.
Awwwww Mirka is sooooo lucky :awww:

Spirit_fire
04-15-2009, 04:06 AM
:inlove: Fantastic presser...one of my all time faves actually :inlove:

SUKTUEN
04-15-2009, 05:15 AM
Roger feel very happy for his marriage~~~~~

I also very happy for that. I think Roger will "grow up" again after marry.

SUKTUEN
04-15-2009, 05:16 AM
Roger feel very happy for his marriage~~~~~

I also very happy for that. I think Roger will "grow up" again after marry.;)

Daniel
04-15-2009, 07:26 AM
Federer spending honeymoon on worst possible surface

MONTE CARLO, April 14 (Reuters) - Since Roger Federer’s last outing on clay was nothing short of a nightmare, it is a bit surprising to see the Swiss has chosen to spend his honeymoon at the Monte Carlo Masters.

Instead of whisking his new bride off to a glamorous holiday destination, Federer turned up for work just three days after marrying his longtime girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec in a low-key ceremony in his hometown of Basel.

“Of course I spoke to Mirka. She was completely relaxed about whatever decision I took,” the world number two told a press conference on Tuesday.

“I feel like I’ve been on a honeymoon for the last years, so I don’t feel necessarily I need to go somewhere, to a special place, to celebrate with her.”

Instead of reminiscing about the wedding celebrations with his wife, Federer will be looking to bury memories of his 2008 French Open final ordeal when he won just four games against Rafael Nadal.

“We’ve had a lot of nice moments over all those years. We don’t feel like we need it necessarily,” added Federer, who had at first decided to skip the claycourt event in the posh principality.

“I felt like it was the right thing to do, so I’m happy to be here.”

Federer met Vavrinec while she was playing tennis for Switzerland at the Sydney Olympic Games in 2000.

He said his marriage was the icing on the cake of a long relationship.

“It’s a very special moment. I thought it to be a bit more relaxed because we’ve been together for so, so long,” he said.

“Once you get married, there’s not a whole lot that changes. But it definitely does change your mindset, your life. It was nice sharing the moment with my family, my closest friends.

“I got very emotional. So it was very nice. It was just nice to know that she loves me so much, I love her so much.

“It was just a very nice day. We had perfect sky, perfect weather. It was just very, very nice.”

Federer added that he shed tears of joy on his wedding day, three months after bursting into tears following his defeat to Nadal in the Australian Open final.

“A few tears here and there. It was nice,” he said.

Federer is gunning for his first Monte Carlo Masters title after losing in the final to Nadal in the last three years.

He will start his campaign with a second-round match against Italian Andreas Seppi on Wednesday. (Editing by Pritha Sarkar; To query or comment on this story email sportsfeedback@thomsonreuters.com)

SUKTUEN
04-15-2009, 07:33 AM
:worship:

Dini
04-15-2009, 03:47 PM
This was posted in the MC thread, but I thought it belonged in here :shrug:/:p

Wednesday, 15 April 2009

R. FEDERER/A. Seppi
6-4, 6-4

An interview with: ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Three match points. Was that a good kind of a workout; something you needed to get your confidence?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, not that. Just the match itself I thought was a good one to have as a first round. I knew there was going to be some long rallies with Seppi. He's very happy, you know, just rallying. He's very steady off both sides, you know. So on a good day he can be really dangerous. So I've already played him twice this year, which was kind of good going into this match, knowing what to expect.
I thought I played okay. I had a good stretch at the end of the first set, beginning of the second. Maybe could have made it easier for myself in the second. Had some opportunities. He hung in there and I didn't play my best. But still happy I came through so good.

Q. What is the most challenging thing for you about the adjustments to clay?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I guess things like getting used to the bad bounces. We've been playing on hard court now for nine months, is it, or eight? You know, you never see a bad bounce. So all of a sudden you're a little bit worried, sometimes hitting half volleys because you know they can bounce onto your frame and stuff like that. You've just got to look for confidence that you find by playing matches and practice a lot, you know. As we don't have much practice yet, you're maybe a bit tentative.
And I guess just the sliding, knowing when to slide, how much to slide. Sometimes you slide but you don't have to. Those kind of decision makings just happen naturally the more time you spend on the surface.

Q. When was your first contact with clay this year?
ROGER FEDERER: Maybe nine days ago.

Q. And do you know approximately how many hours you spent on clay this year before this match?
ROGER FEDERER: Sure. Maybe 10 or so.

Q. Is it something that you enjoy, playing on clay? Is there a challenge in it?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, it just feels natural to me because I played so much as a kid. I mean, I remember even wintertimes I used to play indoor clay, you know, under the balloon in Basel. So I played that until I was, you know, 14, basically I only played on clay. Then after that I went to the National Tennis Center, where indoors then was Supreme Court, hard court, which allowed me to improve my indoor skills and, you know, my fast court playing skills.

But the clay has always basically been my first surface, you know, I grew up on. So the sliding and all this comes to me within the first five minutes, then it's just the timing, you know, how much you have to slide. This stuff just comes with time.

But I like the challenge, you know, the way the rallies are sometimes played. Of course, in a match like today or in the beginning of the clay court season, I feel there's many errors from both ends, the rallies, the points finish in an error. That sometimes is disappointing, you know, because you play actually a good point and then in the end you miss by this much and it's not a winner, it's an error. On hard court and on grass courts, you've got to go and fetch the point a bit more, whereas here you can actually pretty much wait for an error from the opponent if you move him around enough.

Q. You mentioned bad bounces. Is that why you hold back the way you play your first few matches on clay?
ROGER FEDERER: Not really. You've got to be careful. I feel sometimes like you want to rally to find the rhythm, and then you realize, well, you're giving the other guy rhythm, too. So it's a fine line, you know, of how you want to play it.

Being offensive is good, too, you know, because you want to keep the points short sometimes and take away time from your opponent and rhythm. So it's always a close call how you want to play. You got to read the situation well.

I felt like I had a bit of both: I think I played well on the offensive at times and also just being steady. I had enough to work too much defensively today, so maybe the next match I'll get more of that.

Q. You played a few times versus Seppi. Did you find any change in his way of playing? Does he play always the same?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, like I said, he's pretty happy, you know, just rallying from the baseline, being aggressive. He can play more aggressive. But to me it seems like he decides not to.

I definitely think he didn't have a good serving day today. Because I've played him like in Australia and, I don't know, was it here last year? Yeah, two years ago. I thought he served better then which helped him a lot to stay in the set and be dangerous because he's a good return player.

I like his style. He stays very easy on his backhand and on his forehand. There's no big upper body movement, you know, and that allows him to pick up tough shots quite easily and make it look nice. So I like his style, yeah.

Q. Are you looking forward to playing Stan? Second time this year.
ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah. I mean, the XO, whatever, doesn't count to me.

Of course, I like to play against him. I'm so happy he was able to take it to the next level last year, getting into the top 10, finally sort of making the break. Not really finally, because he's always been a work in progress. He was always a guy taking one step back, two steps forward. So it's nice to see him playing more consistently now on a regular basis.
It's our first match on clay against each other. I'm excited to see how it's going to turn out.

Q. Some players use sports psychologists seemingly more and more these days. Have you ever used one? What do you think of the idea of using one?
ROGER FEDERER: I had one back in '97/'98, I think, yeah, kind of during that time, for one and a half years. There it was more like anger management, you know (smiling). That was what it was about for me then.

I pretty quickly realized it was basically up to me and not someone else to tell me how to behave, because my parents were telling me anyway, friends as well. Other players were saying, What is wrong with you? That was just up to me to decide when I wanted to take that step and say, you know what, let's try the quiet version of the Roger Federer. So that was pretty funny.

But, no, other than that, I never really considered one, you know. Honestly, I don't know if many have used and that it's been beneficial.

Q. Do you think they offer something to people, something extra to the players?
ROGER FEDERER: I don't know. I think I feel like in different sports maybe I think they can be very beneficial. But I think tennis is quite a unique sport in the sense that we've got to take a decision so short term. I don't know. There's no time to waste. There's no real trick behind winning a tennis match. You cannot sleep all night and still play great; and you can prepare as good as you can, you know, and play the worst match of your life. So there's not a real preparation you can do really to make you play your best tennis.

Then decision making happens so quickly, and confidence is such a good factor that winning matches is what does it to you and losing matches does the opposite. So I think tennis is not the best example for that kind of stuff.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports

Minnie
04-15-2009, 08:07 PM
A bit late with this comment, I know... but I'd have been very surprised to read that Roger didn't cry at his wedding ;)

How lovely that a man is so completely at ease with himself that he can tell the world how much in love he is with the woman in his life :inlove:

Eden
04-15-2009, 08:39 PM
Quite interesting that Roger was getting asked about a sports psychologist in his presser today and to read what he answered :)

Eden
04-15-2009, 08:40 PM
Fed's quest for immortality a question mark

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Posted by James Martin, TENNIS.com

If there's one deadline none of us forget, it's April 15. Which makes it all the more amusing to watch men's tennis this week. While most of us scurry to file our tax returns, the pros are kicking up European dirt in the most renowned of tax shelters, Monte Carlo. It's always been a favorite tour stop for the pros, many of whom live in the city ("maintain residence" may be the more apropos way to describe it).

One player who doesn't need a tax break is Roger Federer, who still lives in his native Switzerland. But the newly married and expectant father, who planned to skip Monte Carlo in an attempt to pace himself during the grueling clay-court season, requested, and was granted, an 11th-hour wild card to compete in the tournament.

Federer has struggled with consistency this season, both in terms of results and actually keeping the ball in play. So logging in more time, not less, on the court might be the best thing for his game.

His recent form has been a point of vigorous debate. Just check out any message board or talk with your friends at the local tennis club and you'll find a hotly debated conversation on what ails the Mighty Fed. It's tennis' new bar-room game. Some of the theories are convincing. For example, there are those who point out that players are smartly exploiting Federer's backhand, which, in turn, has become an increasing liability. And Federer's habit of chipping backhands short to get a cross-court forehand to rip, a once-successful gambit, isn't as effective anymore. Other theories, such as Federer losing his mojo because he's going to be a dad, are about as believable as a Novak Djokovic medical timeout.

In discussing Federer's game with my own circle of tennis nuts, I've heard something that wasn't even imaginable 12 months ago -- namely that Roger Federer will end his career stuck at 13 Grand Slam titles.

Ridiculous, right? Federer is just 27. He has reached the final of the last four majors, a run that included winning the U.S. Open, and he still owns the most complete game on tour. It's enough evidence for me to believe Federer will surpass Pete Sampras' mark of 14 and become the greatest player of all time.

But what if the Mighty Fed isn't as mighty as everyone thinks? A year ago, Federer's only real threat was Rafael Nadal. Now Andy Murray and Djokovic have proven they can beat Federer. Tennis is a confidence game, and with each passing Slam in which Federer comes up short, the pressure will mount.

Imagine the implications if Federer gets stuck at 13. How long do you reckon he'd play to break the record? You can almost see him plying his trade well into his 30s, gray around the temples, the Grand Slam record becoming his Great White Whale.

And what about the G.O.A.T. debate? You won't find a more adversarial exchange than the one that pits Federer fans against Sampras fans. If Federer wins 15 or more majors, the debate is over. He's the G.O.A.T. If he doesn't, message boards will forever be hives of unruly Sampras and Federer acolytes slinging stats and immature attacks at each other.

It's still hard to imagine Federer coming up short. But you can say this: His quest for tennis immortality, which seemed inevitable (and boring), is shaping up to be the most fascinating story in tennis.

Source: http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?entryID=4067796&name=tennis

Swiss Mountain
04-15-2009, 11:34 PM
OK we've got someone who's seriously :retard:. No point in responding except to say it's disgusting to think Roger would marry and father a child with someone he didn't really love. Just because some fans aren't ready to accept Roger as a husband and father (or they think it's distracting him from his career) doesn't mean he's in denial or is doing this against his will.


Is it me you are insulting with a lame and stupid smiley?
Who do you think you are to treat people like that? because you got more messages? Good grief, you want a medal?

Because someone doesn't agree with you and don't think like you, give you the right to call him insane with a stupid smiley not even directly to him but to others?
You are pathetic.
I'm not even waiting for apologies, coming from someone like you, it has no values whatsoever.

Sunset of Age
04-16-2009, 12:58 AM
Quite interesting that Roger was getting asked about a sports psychologist in his presser today and to read what he answered :)

Hit me with it, but it only tells me even more how much he indeed needs one... :help:
Sorry about that folks, but I happen to have this habit of telling my true feelings, whether it's Politically Correct or not. :angel:

nobama
04-16-2009, 01:33 AM
Hit me with it, but it only tells me even more how much he indeed needs one... :help:
Sorry about that folks, but I happen to have this habit of telling my true feelings, whether it's Politically Correct or not. :angel:I agree with Nick Bollettieri. He basically said Roger needs someone who will remind him loud and clear how good he really is. Maybe a psychologist can help him get his confidence back, but I'm not so sure. And anyway it's not something you'd disclose to the media.

mangoes
04-16-2009, 02:07 AM
I agree with Nick Bollettieri. He basically said Roger needs someone who will remind him loud and clear how good he really is. Maybe a psychologist can help him get his confidence back, but I'm not so sure. And anyway it's not something you'd disclose to the media.

Hi Jen :wavey:

I was scanning for the Bollettieri article......but I couldn't find it....could you give me a link to it.

I don't think Roger needs to see a shrink. He just needs a coach to give him that pep talk:D

nobama
04-16-2009, 02:11 AM
Hi Jen :wavey:

I was scanning for the Bollettieri article......but I couldn't find it....could you give me a link to it.

I don't think Roger needs to see a shrink. He just needs a coach to give him that pep talk:DI'll see if I can find it. I don't think it was recent. Maybe Roger needs to talk to Nick. :lol:

mangoes
04-16-2009, 02:24 AM
I'll see if I can find it. I don't think it was recent. Maybe Roger needs to talk to Nick. :lol:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

PatRafterFan
04-16-2009, 06:44 AM
anyone who has a link or a transkript from the interview he gave reuters tuesday? blick.ch online only had a few parts on their homepage. thx.

SUKTUEN
04-16-2009, 03:45 PM
he said someone cried in his wedding, but not said who is cried~:D

violet coley
04-16-2009, 08:25 PM
Federer 16/1 to smash another racket this week By Derek McGovern 15/04/2009


Most of us suspected Roger Federer had gone at all levels and then he went and proved it on Saturday by marrying in secret.

It was a shocking development. Then again, if fat Mirka was my bride, I'd marry in secret, too. The only porkier bride I can think of is Damien McBride.

They say pregnant Mirka has made an honest man of Fed but, if he was that honest, he'd tell her to lose a few stone. Do you think Mirka's being honest when she sets the bathroom scales to half-a-stone below zero? Not that there's anything wrong with being overweight.

My first wife was a lump, yet I worshipped the ground she flattened. Sadly, it was 10 years ago this week that I lost her.

Advertisement - article continues below »


I'll always remember that poker game.

Fed forsook the lure of a honeymoon to pitch up instead this week in Monte Carlo, presumably to spend more time with his money and less with his missus.

He smashed a racket in anger in Miami the last time he played, and Sky Bet are offering 16-1 he smashes another this week in Monte Carlo, where he plays Andreas Seppi in the first round today.

Ladbrokes quote 100-1 for Fed's nipper to arrive during the men's final at Wimbledon - the same price as sunshine - and a very tempting 7-4 for him to miss the halfway cut.

Eden
04-16-2009, 08:49 PM
Roger Agonistes

Posted 04/16/2009

By Pete Bodo

Howdy, everyone. . . just dropping by while you're enduring the rain delay to see what's going on. I was out all of yesterday, mostly trying to load up on sleep and rest and otherwise take a little better care of myself than I've been doing. When I came into the office this morning, I loaded tennistv.com on my office computer for the first time. We have a big television set in our conference room, with cable and Tennis Channel, and I generally prefer watching tennis in the company of others. But I was curious about this internet feed, and I thought remarkably good. I've been trying to keep an eye on the Roger Federer vs. Stan Wawrinka match as I type this; it isn't a divsion of attention I would recommend unless you have a perverse interest in driving yourself nuts.

Like everyone else, I was a little surprised by Federer's last-minute decision to enter Monte Carlo, especially after he'd been so roughed up in the hard court segment. I assumed he was going to circle the wagons, and take a little break to re-group. But as I watched the early portion of his match against his pal, Wawrinka, I had a different idea. Maybe Federer, after getting feedback from a host of people including Darren Cahill, decided that he really does need to make some changes. Perhaps he needs to play more aggressively, especially on red clay. Maybe the handwriting on the wall following these last fw weeks says that whatever happens in Europe this spring, it will not be business as usual, and approaching it as if it were might be a drastic miscalculation.

For the past three years, Federer has been the clear world no. 2 on clay; the past few months suggest that he's unlikely to claim that title again this year. Quite simply, the consistency and free-flowing genius that once powered Federer on all surfaces simply isn't in evidence these days.

So maybe Federer decided that instead of clinging to hia traditional determination to "play my game" come hell, high water, or Nadal kickers to the backhand, he was going to try something new - attacking tennis. That is, he would use the next few weeks to condition himself to attack at every reasonable opportunity. This doesn't necessarily mean serving and volleying, but it does suggest playing flatter strokes, a higher degree of attentiveness, a willingness to hit approach rather than rally shots, and to follow them up with forays to the net. It also implies a willingness to follow a good serve (first or second) to the net now and then, either because of the quality of the serve, or just to make sure the shot was well placed or simply to keep his opponent guessing. Most of all, though, it means Federer embracing the kind of aggressive, focused approach that he generally eschews. Even on grass, he's never really seemed like a guy interested in ending points as efficiently and ruthlessly as possible.

Federer thus far has been a master of long-range aggression; why get into another guy's face by hanging your chin over the netcord and sticking a volley when you can just load up and let fly an inside-out forehand winner from back by the baseline?

But think about this. The only man ever to beat Bjorn Borg at Roland Garros (and he did it twice) was the skillful, attacking Italian player, Adriano Panatta. Federer is easily as skilled as Panatta, and he's just as versatile as were Stefan Edberg and John McEnroe - both of whom were, like Panatta, Roland Garros finalists. But Panatta, Edberg, McEnroe - even former Roland Garros semifinalists, Pat Rafter and Boris Becker - not only used all their tools on clay, they tried to maximize them, especially when playing rivals who had superior groundstrokes and what might be called "typical" baseline- based clay-court games. So far, Federer has declined to use his full arsenal on clay. It isn't like he's fighting the same natural urge that led Edberg and McEnroe to attack; it's more like Federer has dipped into his bag of tricks as a matter of necessity, not conviction, or pride. Remember, this is the guy who told Pete Sampras that the reason he doesn't serve and volley more often at Wimbledon is because he hasn't had to.

This underscores the extent to which Federer's game is chameleon-like. He does what he needs; he doesn't have a specific vision of the game, or an urge to impose a template, or even his will, on a rival. This may be hurting him now that he's struggling with his consistency and confidence, because he doesn't have a clear trail to follow through the woods back into the sunshine. It occurred to me today that perhaps Roger has decided that he needs that clear trail, some solid vision of the game to embrace and use to pull himself out of his present hole. It would take an adjustment to do something like that, it would take time to make a change and embrace a new strategy. Hence, it makes sense to enter more than the two clay events to which Federer had been committed. This could be called the strategic equivalent of the old "play your way into shape" approach to fitness.

This would not be an ill-chosen moment, career-wise, for Federer to try something like that. It's not a bad time for him to experience an epiphany: Hey, I've got 13 majors and I'm just 27. I've got more money than God and a kid on the way. Why don't I just go out there and have some fun, hit the crap out of the ball, see if I can push these guys around and make something good happen for myself?

I sensed something of that in the way Federer played in the first set against Wawrinka. He seemed to want to force the action; driven back behind the baseline by a penetrating groundstroke, he seemed eager to scramble back, to get inside the court. And he showed a greater willingness than usual to move forward behind his best shots. As the match wore on, though, his error count increased and his play was, to use a word that just doesn't sound right, applied to Federer, sloppy.

If Federer is indeed committed to playing more aggressive tennis on clay, you could groan and protest that it isn't working. That's okay; it's early in the process, if we can call it that. The level of execution Federer showed today wouldn't have worked for Edberg, McEnroe, or Panatta, either.The greatest game plan in the world is useless if you can't execute it. But there's a lot to be said for working on your execution in order to be able to implement what may prove to be a winning game plan.

Whatever Frederer had in mind, it was a calculated risk entering Monte Carlo. If he did it just because the appearance fee grew so big that he felt he couldn't afford to turn it down, he's got a nice built-in excuse (I went for the dough, but what do you expect? That kid's gonna need shoes some day!). But I'm guessing that Federer entered the tournament because he decided that doing something is better than doing nothing. And if there's anything to my theory that we're going to see Federer taking many more chances on clay this year, he'll be less worried about the scorelines and results than finding a comfort zone on the court.

That presents an interesting dilemma; is Federer better off trying to hit his way or trying to work his way through his problems? While losing matches has never been prescribed as a miracle cure for a slumping player, Federer is beyond the point where he needs to prove anything to anyone. And he doesn't just need to find his game - he needs to find a game - one that might produce a different result than the game that carried him to the Roland Garros final these past three years.

That, to me, is what this entire clay-court season is, or should be, about for Federer. I don't know what you would tell him, if you had the chance (but I'm sure you'll be happy to tell me, in the comments) but here's what I would say to Roger: Forget the ranking points, forget Andy Murray, forget the spectre of Nadal, forget surprising third-round losses to Stan Wawrinka. If you game is in ruins, as it appears to be, take advantage of the chaos to re-invent yourself. Pick up those pieces and try putting them together in a slightly different way. Give yourself time; you're going to lose some matches as you build the new, improved model, but keep building and never, ever lose the conviction that you can do this. After all, you're Roger Federer.

If Federer isn't thinking along these lines, he's in even deeper trouble than I thought. He's not going to be beating a lot of guys in the coming weeks based on what he's shown us in the preceding weeks. If he's not thinking any differently this spring than in years past, the next few weeks are going to be pure torture. This just isn't the right time and place to discover that you left your game back in Miami, or that you're not really that into playing long matches on clay. I suppose there's the chance that Federer's decision to enter Monte Carlo was driven by panic - the fear that his rivals would gain too much ground if he didn't manage to somehow block them. But that's the worst-case scenario; It's hard to imagine that Federer was that desperate, or that he doesn't know that while there are a lot of bad reasons for choosing to play, there's only one good one: because you want to.

Much of this potential weight gets lifted off of Federer's shoulders if he decides that this is the right moment to roll the die, to try doing something a little different, perhaps even new. Others have taken comparably big risks - who can forget Ivan Lendl choosing not to play in the French Open (when he would have been a favorite to win), simply because he thought that a few additional weeks of training on grass might enable him to win the one title that always eluded him, at Wimbledon? Did that hurt Lendl's reputation in the long-term, or diminish his record? Not in the least. If anything, it made some people respect Lendl that much more - for trying, for daring to do something a little different.

Federer's is in a similar position. And what he's been thinking about this clay season may have a lot do do with what he's feeling about this clay season at the very moment you read these words: If he's got a plan - okay, indulge me, let's say he's decided to play much more aggressively on clay this year - he may be thinking that he pressed too hard, that he was too eager to force the action and tried to get to square E without stopping to touch squares B through D. Maybe he's taking stock of how often he hesitated, instead of moving forward with confidence and alacrity (how about that sliced backhand approach shot he put in the net, to go down love-30 in that critical 5-all game in the second set? For a player fully locked into attack mode, that was a gimme). Maybe he's thinking: I didn't really want to play here anyway, but now that I did I've got a pretty solid idea about the task I set myself, and a starting point for building a good attacking game.


And what's he thinking if he entered Monte Carlo in the hope that he'd somehow find a way to win? That by some strange and unforseen act of will, luck, or magic he'd suddenly find himself transformed into the Mighty Fed of yore, as if the past six or eight or 10 months had been just some terrible mistake, or aberration of the natural order? I'd rather not go there, and I think that tells us all we need to know about Federer's present state, and how imperative it is for him to alter the plan, for one purpose or another.

Source: http://tennisworld.typepad.com/tennisworld/2009/04/tk.html

icedevil0289
04-16-2009, 08:51 PM
Federer 16/1 to smash another racket this week By Derek McGovern 15/04/2009


Most of us suspected Roger Federer had gone at all levels and then he went and proved it on Saturday by marrying in secret.

It was a shocking development. Then again, if fat Mirka was my bride, I'd marry in secret, too. The only porkier bride I can think of is Damien McBride.

They say pregnant Mirka has made an honest man of Fed but, if he was that honest, he'd tell her to lose a few stone. Do you think Mirka's being honest when she sets the bathroom scales to half-a-stone below zero? Not that there's anything wrong with being overweight.

My first wife was a lump, yet I worshipped the ground she flattened. Sadly, it was 10 years ago this week that I lost her.

Advertisement - article continues below »


I'll always remember that poker game.

Fed forsook the lure of a honeymoon to pitch up instead this week in Monte Carlo, presumably to spend more time with his money and less with his missus.

He smashed a racket in anger in Miami the last time he played, and Sky Bet are offering 16-1 he smashes another this week in Monte Carlo, where he plays Andreas Seppi in the first round today.

Ladbrokes quote 100-1 for Fed's nipper to arrive during the men's final at Wimbledon - the same price as sunshine - and a very tempting 7-4 for him to miss the halfway cut.


wtf, is he for real? What is with all this mirka bashing. I mean I know she is not on the thicker side, but all these jokes about her weight are starting to get annoying. She's not a size 2, but I don't think she's fat.

Sunset of Age
04-16-2009, 09:22 PM
wtf, is he for real? What is with all this mirka bashing. I mean I know she is not on the thicker side, but all these jokes about her weight are starting to get annoying. She's not a size 2, but I don't think she's fat.

Well said.
You know what it is? If any a player doesn't perform well - blame the girlfriend/wife. It's pathetic.

I can do without ANYTHING posted by Mr. Bozo as well right now. Moron. :(

rofe
04-16-2009, 09:36 PM
Roger Agonistes

Posted 04/16/2009

By Pete Bodo

[snip]



Thanks for the article Doris.

Bodo is giving Roger his benefit of doubt by saying that the attacking tennis we saw in MC is part of a grander plan. Somehow, I have a hard time believing that.

It was instead more of the same philosophy - keep making error after error and hope that at some stage it will all come together. Also hope that when it does come together, it is a slam.

This is classic denial because he can easily rationalize not hiring a coach, not focusing on mental focus and continuing a punishing physical fitness regimen. With the baby coming, he will need to do more and not less to get his game together if he ever wants to get over the hump of winning the 14th and 15th slam.

When he says that he knows what to work on, I hope he realizes that he won't get any free points from whatever is left of his aura anymore. By participating in tournaments and losing early, he has given other players too much confidence when they play against him. As a result, he will have to work doubly hard in matches so any work he will hopefully do on his FH and serve should reflect this new reality.

Or Levy
04-16-2009, 09:41 PM
RofE -

If you play badly, you lose your Aura. The number of matches Roger won on Aura was small, the vast, vast majority of them he won due to the tennis we're not seeing now.

I read Pete's article, would love to believe it - but I don't think that's the issue. Roger is forever trying to play more aggressive, and he knows he need to do that against Rafa on clay - he loves playing aggressively, basically - he's an agressive player, not a defensive one.

But you can't play tennis with an MIA serve, but he's aware of the problem and working on it - hopefully we'd see an improvement soon.

rofe
04-16-2009, 09:50 PM
RofE -

If you play badly, you lose your Aura. The number of matches Roger won on Aura was small, the vast, vast majority of them he won due to the tennis we're not seeing now.

I read Pete's article, would love to believe it - but I don't think that's the issue. Roger is forever trying to play more aggressive, and he knows he need to do that against Rafa on clay - he loves playing aggressively, basically - he's an agressive player, not a defensive one.

But you can't play tennis with an MIA serve, but he's aware of the problem and working on it - hopefully we'd see an improvement soon.

Yes, Roger won a majority of his matches due to his game but I think you are underestimating momentum changes in a match due to his aura of invincibility. That aura makes a difference between pushing the ball at break point and going for a winner.

nobama
04-16-2009, 10:09 PM
I refuse to read any of the stuff Bodo the clown writes. In his post about the Roger/Cahill situation he made some gossipy insinuations about Mirka - which if you read between the lines were basically blaming her for Roger's problems. I know it's not the first time a girlfriend or wife has been the scapegoat/thrown under the bus, but I find it quite distasteful. :rolleyes:

Sunset of Age
04-16-2009, 10:35 PM
I refuse to read any of the stuff Bodo the clown writes. In his post about the Roger/Cahill situation he made some gossipy insinuations about Mirka - which if you read between the lines were basically blaming her for Roger's problems. I know it's not the first time a girlfriend or wife has been the scapegoat/thrown under the bus, but I find it quite distasteful. :rolleyes:

I feel exactly the same about that Bozo-Moron, Jen. :mad:

Continuously blaming Mirka for Roger's problems, and do you remember lately, that he even insinuated some 'personal problems' being the reason for Rafa's subpar playing as well? I know you dislike him, but I just mention it for the 'Grander Scheme of Things'.

An absolute Yellow Press Journo, and I'd much appreciate it to never ever see an article published by that :silly: over here ever again.
Yeah, I AM angry. :mad:

nobama
04-16-2009, 11:13 PM
I feel exactly the same about that Bozo-Moron, Jen. :mad:

Continuously blaming Mirka for Roger's problems, and do you remember lately, that he even insinuated some 'personal problems' being the reason for Rafa's subpar playing as well? I know you dislike him, but I just mention it for the 'Grander Scheme of Things'.

An absolute Yellow Press Journo, and I'd much appreciate it to never ever see an article published by that :silly: over here ever again.
Yeah, I AM angry. :mad:
Yeah I heard the speculation about Nadal too. What a joke.

Sunset of Age
04-16-2009, 11:39 PM
Yeah I heard the speculation about Nadal too. What a joke.

A COMPLETE IDIOT. Jeebus. Somebody help me from posting even more - DESERVED - http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v358/tveye363/Random/SmileyBarf.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v358/tveye363/Random/SmileyBarf.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v358/tveye363/Random/SmileyBarf.jpg

I mean, insinuating 'personal problems' and thereafter backing out, without giving any a clue? what a moron, in any case. Sick. Nasty. whichever player it concerns. :o

nobama
04-16-2009, 11:49 PM
A COMPLETE IDIOT. Jeebus. Somebody help me from posting even more - DESERVED - http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v358/tveye363/Random/SmileyBarf.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v358/tveye363/Random/SmileyBarf.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v358/tveye363/Random/SmileyBarf.jpg

I mean, insinuating 'personal problems' and thereafter backing out, without giving any a clue? what a moron, in any case. Sick. Nasty. whichever player it concerns. :oSad thing is in the case of Roger & Mirka nasty insinuations are made and never retracted. We've seen some of them on this forum. :rolleyes:

clever1980
04-16-2009, 11:53 PM
A COMPLETE IDIOT. Jeebus. Somebody help me from posting even more - DESERVED - http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v358/tveye363/Random/SmileyBarf.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v358/tveye363/Random/SmileyBarf.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v358/tveye363/Random/SmileyBarf.jpg

I mean, insinuating 'personal problems' and thereafter backing out, without giving any a clue? what a moron, in any case. Sick. Nasty. whichever player it concerns. :o

Karin!! :hug: :hug: I read some speculation about his dad and mom not getting along? But I wouldn't read too much into all these press stuff. I would burf.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v358/tveye363/Random/SmileyBarf.jpg


:unsure::cuckoo: What is this?

Sunset of Age
04-17-2009, 12:00 AM
Karin!! :hug: :hug: I read some speculation about his dad and mom not getting along? But I wouldn't read too much into all these press stuff. I would burf.

Classy, isn't it, first insinuating stuff, and never bothering to back up those rumours? :mad: :mad: :mad:
Bozo = Moron.

:unsure::cuckoo: What is this?

A barf-smiley indicating Bozo and his tendency to always Fuel-the-Fire with stupid rumours, especially when it concerns a player not matching the expectations set upon him... :angel:

clever1980
04-17-2009, 12:15 AM
Classy, isn't it, first insinuating stuff, and never bothering to back up those rumours? :mad: :mad: :mad:
Bozo = Moron.

A barf-smiley indicating Bozo and his tendency to always Fuel-the-Fire with stupid rumours, especially when it concerns a player not matching the expectations set upon him... :angel:

:hug: :hug: I have stopped reading his articles in a while. He offers nothing more than speculations, I rather read MTF. :devil: :devil:

Aww.. Now I get that smiley. ;) BTW, I am glad your friend is clear of cancer.

Sunset of Age
04-17-2009, 12:25 AM
:hug: :hug: I have stopped reading his articles in a while. He offers nothing more than speculations, I rather read MTF. :devil: :devil:

A terrible media-vulture, continuously spreading stupid rumours without ever backing them up.
Even worse: no-one ever seems to be able to call him out on that fact, as he apparently censors the comments being allowed to be posted on his site. Yuck.

Aww.. Now I get that smiley. ;) BTW, I am glad your friend is clear of cancer.

:hug: - not entirely free, yet. Four weeks of chemo to follow after amputation. But the outlooks are a lot better than was initially stated, thanks providence. Thanks for your concern, so much appreciated! :)

clever1980
04-17-2009, 12:41 AM
A terrible media-vulture, continuously spreading stupid rumours without ever backing them up.
Even worse: no-one ever seems to be able to call him out on that fact, as he apparently censors the comments being allowed to be posted on his site. Yuck.

No wonder many tennis fans don't like him.

:hug: - not entirely free, yet. Four weeks of chemo to follow after amputation. But the outlooks are a lot better than was initially stated, thanks providence. Thanks for your concern, so much appreciated! :)


:awww::awww::awww: I guess we have to be optimistic, think positive. I have a friend who survived lymphoma for almost 9 years now. Docs gave her months to live. But she was very strong. After chemo, radiation, she lives. Sometimes, I wonder if her positive way of thinking and love she received from her family gave her another chance.

Sunset of Age
04-17-2009, 12:51 AM
:awww::awww::awww: I guess we have to be optimistic, think positive. I have a friend who survived lymphoma for almost 9 years now. Docs gave her months to live. But she was very strong. After chemo, radiation, she lives. Sometimes, I wonder if her positive way of thinking and love she received from her family gave her another chance.

Thanks so much for your kind words. :hug:
Well Sigi will survive as well. I'm pretty sure about that. Not going into details here right now, it's too late, and I've posted enough rubbish tonight already... :sad:

See you laters, Fedfans, gonna crash right now! :hug: :wavey:

clever1980
04-17-2009, 12:57 AM
Thanks so much for your kind words. :hug:
Well Sigi will survive as well. I'm pretty sure about that. Not going into details here right now, it's too late, and I've posted enough rubbish tonight already... :sad:

See you laters, Fedfans, gonna crash right now! :hug: :wavey:

Good night Karin.

SUKTUEN
04-17-2009, 02:03 PM
S. WAWRINKA/R. Federer

6‑4, 7‑5

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Was it kind of just bad timing all day today, with the weather and everything? Did that have any effect on how it went today?
ROGER FEDERER: Not really. I mean, I thought the conditions were fine to play, you know. They were pretty heavy, obviously, you know, because there was no sunshine, and wet courts, so that made it kind of tough to get a lot of free points on the serve.
But I thought I had decent timing on my backhand. You know, I was playing it okay, trying to mix it up as well. But, you know, my forehand was hurting me in the beginning. I was making a few too many errors. That kind of gave him the advantage.
It was unfortunate. But I thought Stan played well. It was okay.

Q. Do you feel when you don't have the timing on the forehand, do you know pretty quickly it's going to be a tough day?
ROGER FEDERER: Not really. It's normal for me to miss forehands. I don't just push them in. I usually try to go for it and be aggressive on it, you know.
But it got better towards the end. But still I just struggled. I guess it was Stan's game. He did a good job today. He kept the ball in play. He was just better, so it was okay.

Q. Does it hurt more or less to lose to Stan?
ROGER FEDERER: Less for me anyway (smiling).

Q. Do you think you had enough preparation on clay? Is that part of the problem coming in?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's the problem for everyone. Are you going to ask this of everyone who loses this week? You're going to get the same answer. Nobody had a preparation. So it's a difficult one, you know. Slim excuse, because it's the same for everyone.

Q. Do you think playing two matches here in Monte‑Carlo will help for the next tournaments?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, this I don't know. I hope it will. I think what it helps is knowing what I need to work on, you know, next week. That's always been one of the reasons why I came here to Monaco without preparation. I've tried it differently, not playing Monaco I think maybe for two years, and using that as a serious buildup. Now I've always sort of decided to come here, see what happens. Actually I've done really well.
That's why I came again this year, because it just gives you information going into your practice sessions, you know, what you need to work on. Today definitely my serve wasn't working. I haven't served my best throughout the season, so I have to make sure I get my serve back in, you know, going well for me because I just don't hit the spots when I really want to.
Not that I expect, you know, 10 aces a set here on this type of heavy clay, but I just think it's something I need to work on,you know, make sure my timing gets right, my footwork gets right, and my forehand, that I use it the right way.
It just showed me again this week what I need to work on for next week. That's why I think it was good to come here. Look, I didn't expect myself to dominate everybody this week. I knew it was going to be difficult. Playing Stan in the second round I thought was always going to be difficult for me because this is his place here.
I got close, you know, but not good enough to beat him today.

Q. Is there any way you will try to play next week or will you just practice?
ROGER FEDERER: I'll play for a week, but on the practice courts.

Q. Does it make any difference to lose to another Swiss?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I'm out of the tournament, you know, so it doesn't matter who you lose against.
I'm happy for him that he's, you know, progressed so much over the last couple years. He's finally making a push, you know, getting close to top players and beating top players like myself. I think it's great for him. The beginning of the clay court season, he's already playing really well. That's stuff he couldn't really do three seasons going because he got injured or he had tough draws or he played one horrible match which took away this is confidence.
And this year and last year I think it's all sort of coming together for him. I'm happy for him. Like I told him, the loss doesn't hurt as much just because I know it's against a good guy, so...

FastScripts by ASAP Sports

Rita
04-18-2009, 10:19 AM
article Higueras talks about Rog in Spanish
http://www.publico.es/deportes/219526/federer/estancado

rough translation :

Higueras says Roger has an incredible talent and instinct and he feels the ball like very few players do, but it would be nice for him to have someone who could open his eyes in certain moments. The Nadal, Murray and Djokovic issue are not in Roger's head in Higueras' opinion; he thinks it is a technical mistake - he thiks Roger stoped improving; his shots are still good, but they are the same as years ago and meanwhile that worked in the past years, now with the new players who are used to his weapons and know what he is going to do, that doesn't work much. He thinks that Federer can improve his game, but that he doesn't always use the right style. He thinks Roger did use the right style in US Open 2008 in the semis and final - he was agressive, attacking the net and very fast and that is why he won. He also says it is a pitty that Roger and Cahill didn't work longer, because Cahill is great.

And he also said that during last year he coulnd't speak about Federer because of the contract, but now he can; he said that he was prepared to follow him all over the world and refuse the job they were offering him in America, but Roger offered him only 10 - 12 weeks in the year and he thought that was not enough to make something big on the court.



if only roger had kept him :sad:

SUKTUEN
04-18-2009, 01:19 PM
that can't be change now, just hope Roger can find a good coach in the future~~~:sad:

rofe
04-18-2009, 01:20 PM
article Higueras talks about Rog in Spanish
http://www.publico.es/deportes/219526/federer/estancado

rough translation :

Higueras says Roger has an incredible talent and instinct and he feels the ball like very few players do, but it would be nice for him to have someone who could open his eyes in certain moments. The Nadal, Murray and Djokovic issue are not in Roger's head in Higueras' opinion; he thinks it is a technical mistake - he thiks Roger stoped improving; his shots are still good, but they are the same as years ago and meanwhile that worked in the past years, now with the new players who are used to his weapons and know what he is going to do, that doesn't work much. He thinks that Federer can improve his game, but that he doesn't always use the right style. He thinks Roger did use the right style in US Open 2008 in the semis and final - he was agressive, attacking the net and very fast and that is why he won. He also says it is a pitty that Roger and Cahill didn't work longer, because Cahill is great.

And he also said that during last year he coulnd't speak about Federer because of the contract, but now he can; he said that he was prepared to follow him all over the world and refuse the job they were offering him in America, but Roger offered him only 10 - 12 weeks in the year and he thought that was not enough to make something big on the court.



if only roger had kept him :sad:


It wasn't simple with Jose. He was also Ginepri's coach at that time and I remember him saying that he would also be coaching Ginepri. With that situation, I wonder if Roger actually felt comfortable hiring him full-time so Jose's recent statement that he could have been with Roger full-time seems like a contradiction.

Rita
04-18-2009, 01:39 PM
Good point, i had forgotten about Ginepri :o

nobama
04-18-2009, 01:53 PM
I don't disagree with everything Higueras said, but in terms of the coaching situation wouldn't it be more professional and classy NOT to talk about that in public? Tony Roche never said anything about his split with Roger. I don't think Brad Gilbert did either after he and Murray parted ways. How could Higueras be with Roger full-time if he was working with Ginepri? And if he thinks he would've been able to right the ship with Roger, why not work with him part-time in the hopes of convincing him to go full-time?

rofe
04-19-2009, 01:40 AM
The Federer Fade

How a tennis god lost his topspin.

As a boy tennis player who was more interested in style than in victory, and as a tennis fan of nearly 60 years' standing, I can think of no greater delight than to watch Roger Federer at play. Soon to be 28, Federer was, between 2004 and 2008, the No. 1-ranked player in the world. During much of that time he was without near peer; dominating tennis, he won 13 Grand Slam championships. It was only a matter of time, or so everyone thought, before he would close in on and surpass Pete Sampras, who in his career won 14 Grand Slams—more than any other player in the history of the game.

Now it looks, alas, as if Federer may not make it. He looks the same, hits the ball with the same intensity, has the same on-court elegance of bearing. Something vital, though, is missing. Federer is currently ranked No. 2 in the world, behind the Spaniard Rafael Nadal, whom he seems unable to beat. Lately, he's losing to people you've never heard of—this week, in the third round at Monte Carlo, in straight sets to a fellow Swiss player named Stanislas Wawrinka. It is painful, if inevitable, to watch; even more painful to ponder why it's happening.

Federer's grandeur has never been about statistics; it has been about perfection, about playing the game more perfectly than anyone had hitherto imagined it could be played, and doing it over and over again through a long stretch of top-level competition.

Sampras had a more dominating serve, as does Andy Roddick today; Donald Budge and the Australian Ken Rosewall had more accurate backhands; John McEnroe was more adept at volleying; Nadal has a more devastating forehand. While not supreme in any of these discrete elements, Federer nonetheless has performed them all with an unmatched combination of grace and efficiency that could only have encouraged a feeling of utter hopelessness in those up against him.

He is 6 feet 1, perhaps 180 pounds, an impressively average size in a game with more and more male players of over 6 feet 4. He does not avail himself of a coach, part of the retinue of the contemporary successful tennis pro. And Federer doesn't argue; he doesn't throw tantrums on court. He doesn't, as Nadal and so many other players, male and female, do, grunt orgasmically as he strokes the ball.

Roger Federer's sang-froid and good manners have gone a long way to retrieve tennis from wretched excess and to revive it as a game of tactics, skill and elegance. A small corps of elite athletes have rendered esthetic pleasure of this kind. In boxing, there was Sugar Ray Robinson and, later, Muhammad Ali. In baseball, there was Joe DiMaggio and Willie Mays; in football, Joe Montana. In basketball, Julius Erving did so, as did, more emphatically, Michael Jordan. Tiger Woods does it for people who watch golf, Pelé used to do it for soccer fans. All these figures add a touch of poetry to the games they play, and thereby elevate their sport to something greater than itself.

Apollonian is the way I think of these artist-athletes. In Greek mythology, Apollo and Dionysius are the sons of Zeus, with Apollo the god of the sun, lightness, music, poetry. Apollo typically represents wholeness and civilization, as opposed to Dionysius, who represents individualism and primal nature. In style and manner, Federer is the pure type of the Apollonian, while his great adversary, Rafael Nadal, is Dionysian. Or, if one prefers to come down from Olympus, Federer is Athens, Nadal is Sparta.

And, of late, Sparta has been beating the hell out of Athens. True, Federer appeared in three Grand Slam finals in 2008, and won one of them (the U.S. Open), which for any other player would be a glorious year. He is still capable of supplying what the late novelist David Foster Wallace, a Federer admirer, called Federer Moments: "These are times, as you watch the young Swiss play, when the jaw drops and eyes protrude and sounds are made that bring spouses in from other rooms to see if you're OK." But recently Federer Moments seem fewer. He has not won a Masters ATP tournament in the past two years. Ordinary human mistakes in his game are now more common. The number of his unforced errors sometimes exceed those of his opponents. Something strange is happening.

Neither age nor injury appears to be Federer's problem. Throughout his career, he has never had to "retire" from a match owing to injury or exhaustion. Nor does his having had so much success—having grown complacent on victory and spiritually fat on money—seem likely. His recent marriage to his longtime lady-friend and manager seems unlikely to have had much to do with his downward slide.

Might it be that Roger Federer, having attained perfection, has nowhere to go but down? Can anyone concentrate on one thing—in this case, year after year being the last one to return a small fuzzy ball within the lines of a tennis court—for as long as he has? His confidence is on the run; his aura of invincibility, shattered. Upstarts, sensing the weakness of the grand lion who once led the pride, are closing in. In a recent match against Novak Djokovic, the even-tempered Federer, in a moment of angry frustration, smashed his own racquet against the ground.

Perfection in sports, or any other realm, for that matter, has been given to few, and even then it is never an outright gift but more on the order of a temporary loan. Athletes may hold it on the briefest terms of all. Although I hope that I am completely wrong, and that Roger Federer comes roaring back to win many more Grand Slams, my ineluctable sense is that, for this great athlete whose skill has given me so much pleasure, the loan is due and payback time, sadly, is at hand.

Source: http://www.newsweek.com/id/194479

clever1980
04-19-2009, 02:33 AM
The Federer Fade

How a tennis god lost his topspin.

Source: http://www.newsweek.com/id/194479

Here we go again. :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes: Newsweek has nothing better to print?

SUKTUEN
04-19-2009, 02:16 PM
I dislike the topic:(

timafi
04-19-2009, 03:01 PM
Larri Passos(Guga Kuerten's old coach)who not long ago said he would have loved to coach Roger is coaching Daniela Hantuchova now:sobbing::sobbing::sobbing::sobbing::sobbing:

Elora
04-19-2009, 03:04 PM
Here we go again. :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes: Newsweek has nothing better to print?

I dont even bother to read anymore :shrug:

youngbuck
04-20-2009, 05:30 AM
article Higueras talks about Rog in Spanish
http://www.publico.es/deportes/219526/federer/estancado

rough translation :

Higueras says Roger has an incredible talent and instinct and he feels the ball like very few players do, but it would be nice for him to have someone who could open his eyes in certain moments. The Nadal, Murray and Djokovic issue are not in Roger's head in Higueras' opinion; he thinks it is a technical mistake - he thiks Roger stoped improving; his shots are still good, but they are the same as years ago and meanwhile that worked in the past years, now with the new players who are used to his weapons and know what he is going to do, that doesn't work much. He thinks that Federer can improve his game, but that he doesn't always use the right style. He thinks Roger did use the right style in US Open 2008 in the semis and final - he was agressive, attacking the net and very fast and that is why he won. He also says it is a pitty that Roger and Cahill didn't work longer, because Cahill is great.

And he also said that during last year he coulnd't speak about Federer because of the contract, but now he can; he said that he was prepared to follow him all over the world and refuse the job they were offering him in America, but Roger offered him only 10 - 12 weeks in the year and he thought that was not enough to make something big on the court.



if only roger had kept him :sad:

Forget stubborn, Roger's delusional if he thinks he can get by without a full-time coach. Having a coach for only 10-12 weeks a year at this point of his career isn't going to work. He needs a full time coach and he can point to Luthi being at his side all he wants but it's obvious to everyone that Luthi is not the answer.

I really wonder what happened between him & Cahill because I'm not buying the story that's out there. He knows the sacrifice it takes being a coach, he didn't just realize it when he met Roger.

yanchr
04-20-2009, 10:47 AM
I really wonder what happened between him & Cahill because I'm not buying the story that's out there. He knows the sacrifice it takes being a coach, he didn't just realize it when he met Roger.
My guess is that Cahill found out the baby news when he flew to Dubai. And as a dad himself, he might think Roger would be too hand-full to fully concentrate for their relationship to yield...That's just me though. I don't buy the story either.

mangoes
04-20-2009, 01:49 PM
I don't disagree with everything Higueras said, but in terms of the coaching situation wouldn't it be more professional and classy NOT to talk about that in public? Tony Roche never said anything about his split with Roger. I don't think Brad Gilbert did either after he and Murray parted ways. How could Higueras be with Roger full-time if he was working with Ginepri? And if he thinks he would've been able to right the ship with Roger, why not work with him part-time in the hopes of convincing him to go full-time?

Roche and Gilbert's respective "partings" were rocky........but I don't think Higueras is saying anything sensitive:shrug:

Nevertheless......I'm wondering if he would have stopped coaching Ginepri. I'm also wondering if Roger's reason for just offering a 12 week contract was because he didn't think he needed a full time coach or he wanted a trial period. For some reason, I think it's the first reason:o

I think Higueras made some solid points.

mangoes
04-20-2009, 02:03 PM
My guess is that Cahill found out the baby news when he flew to Dubai. And as a dad himself, he might think Roger would be too hand-full to fully concentrate for their relationship to yield...That's just me though. I don't buy the story either.

I had the same thoughts...

nobama
04-20-2009, 03:49 PM
Roche and Gilbert's respective "partings" were rocky........but I don't think Higueras is saying anything sensitive:shrug:

Nevertheless......I'm wondering if he would have stopped coaching Ginepri. I'm also wondering if Roger's reason for just offering a 12 week contract was because he didn't think he needed a full time coach or he wanted a trial period. For some reason, I think it's the first reason:o

I think Higueras made some solid points.At the time he might not have thoguht he needed a full time coach. But apparently that's what he wanted from Cahill. And if Cahill wasn't prepared to sign on to a full time arrangement I'm not sure why he ever went to Dubai. :confused: Anyway since it was only a trial and nothing had been agreed to I wish it never would have become public.

SUKTUEN
04-21-2009, 02:40 PM
any articles for Roger said that he will have a SON soon? > 0 <

timafi
04-21-2009, 03:29 PM
is Tarik Benhabiles available?

Eden
04-21-2009, 09:47 PM
http://www.tennisviewmag.com/images/magazineCover.jpg

Journey of a megachampion

http://www.tennisviewmag.com/images/issue04/federer00.jpg

What’s it like to be the best of the best? Look to tennis sensations Jimmy Connors, John McEnroe, Ivan Lendl, Pete Sampras and Roger Federer for the answer. Each of these distinguished players has racked up more weeks ranked No. 1 than any other players on the ATP Tour. This accomplishment suggests they are not merely champions – they are mega-champions. The five stars are profoundly different from one another in personality and playing style, yet their paths to success were similar: The mega-champions experienced significant tournament victories when they were young; they were consistent performers, winning one big match after another; and when the megachampions faced opponents that challenged their ranking distinction, they didn’t quit – after a slip, they fought to regain their ranking and succeeded.

Roger Federer has realized all characteristics of a mega-champion with the exception of one – he has yet to reclaim the No. 1 ranking. At 27 years of age, time is not a luxury for the Swiss. He’s on the tail end of his prime, facing the young and eager Rafael Nadal, Andy Murray, Gilles Simon and others. Despite fierce competition, a look at Federer’s past accomplishments may silence the skeptics and make them believe that Federer is more likely to rise again than fall in defeat.

http://www.tennisviewmag.com/images/issue04/federer01.jpg


WINNING YOUNG – AND CONSISTENTLY
Achieving big tournament success at a young age is the first sign a player is on the path to reaching a No. 1 ranking in the ATP. If a player hasn’t claimed a big win by the time he’s in his early 20s it’s unlikely he’ll reach No. 1 – ever. Federer won his first Grand Slam singles title, Wimbledon in 2003, when he was 21. He ranked No. 1 within the year.

Mega-champions perform their best when it counts the most. Federer has consistently delivered top performances, appearing in more consecutive Grand Slam singles finals (11) than any other player beginning with the 2005 Wimbledon and ending with the 2009 Australian Open.


A Grand Slam victory gives a player the most points towards his ranking. The records of Sampras and Federer best illustrate the correlation between major tournament wins and total weeks spent at No. 1: Sampras holds the record for both, winning 14 Grand Slam titles and holding the No. 1 ranking for 286 weeks; Federer has 13 Grand Slam titles and 237 weeks on top.


SUSTAINING NO. 1 STATUS
Since the inception of the ATP Ranking System in 1973, 24 players have claimed the No. 1 ranking and most held it for less than a year. Connors, McEnroe, Lendl, Sampras and Federer, however, have held the top spot three years or longer. Mega-champions have returned to the top over and over again.


Name Age of First
Grand Slam Age First
Ranked No. 1 Age of Last
Grand Slam Age Last
Ranked No. 1 Total Times
at No. 1 Weeks Ranked
at No. 1 Age
Retired
Jimmy Connors 22 22 31 31 9 268 44
John McEnroe 20 21 25 25 13 170 33
Ivan Lendl 24 23 29 28 8 270 34
Pete Sampras 19 21 31 29 11 286 31
Roger Federer 21 22 27 27 1 237 NA

Jimmy Connors
In 1974, Connors ranked No. 1 for the first time after bumping John Newcombe out of the top spot. Connors held the position for three years until Bjorn Borg claimed it in 1977, ending Connors’ 160-week streak. One week later, Connors
reclaimed No. 1 and sustained it for two more years. In 1979, Borg returned again and took back the top spot. John
McEnroe emerged as a contender and traded the No. 1 spot with Borg for 18 months. Then, after a three-year dry
spell, Connors reappeared in 1982 and reclaimed No. 1. For six months Connors and McEnroe traded the top spot until Ivan Lendl claimed the position in February 1983. Connors last held the No. 1 ranking on June 13, 1983. Between 1974 and 1983, Connors held the No. 1 ranking nine separate times.


Pete Sampras

Sampras, in comparison, held the No. 1 ranking 11 times over the course of 8 years. During that period, he lost the
No. 1 ranking four times to American rival Andre Agassi. Sampras was also dethroned by Thomas Muster, Marcelo
Rios, Carlos Moya, Yevgeny Kafelnikov and Patrick Rafter. Despite hiccups in his rankings, Sampras is still heralded
as one of the greatest tennis players of all time, claiming the year-end No. 1 ranking a record six years in a row.

Roger Federer

Federer lost the No. 1 ranking to Spaniard Rafael Nadal on August 18, 2008. Since then, tennis fans and the media have been monitoring the Swiss’ every move, questioning his skill and will to regain the top spot. From a clinical perspective, sports psychologists and mental conditioning experts find it unsurprising that Federer’s ranking slipped.

“Losing his No. 1 ranking was inevitable at some point or another. Roger, like most top athletes, will use these losses to learn from his mistakes. He may experience a temporary blow to his confidence, but he will probably bounce back rather quickly,” said Patrick Cohn, Ph. D.

Mental conditioning consultant Marc Sagal agreed with Cohn: “I think he (Federer) will work hard to show that he’s not done. The history of tennis is full of examples of players who have successfully come back after serious slumps. The very fact that they have achieved elite status demonstrates the kind of mental toughness and adaptability that comes with this level of success.”

FEDERER’S FUTURE
Will Federer retire soon? Can he meet the challenge of Rafael Nadal and other young players? Can he reclaim the No. 1 ranking?

Federer has not expressed a desire to retire, so barring unforeseen injury or a mental break-down, he should be able to compete much longer. The average age of retirement for a mega-champion is 35. Sampras, at 31, was the youngest mega-champion to retire; Connors, at 44, was the oldest. The history of mega-champions suggests an early retirement by Federer is not likely.

“We’ll see a lot more of Roger. Great champions rise to that level by understanding how to manage and embrace adversity,” said Adam Naylor, sport psychology coach.

Every mega-champion has faced young, hungry, talented players rising through the ranks. It’s a predictable cycle that can create the best of rivalries and the highest quality of competition. Federer’s talent and resilience – both physically and psychologically – will undoubtedly be tested, yet the trends of past mega-champions indicate that he is favored to reclaim the top spot. On average, mega-champions ranked No. 1 on ten separate occasions throughout their careers.

“This is an opportunity to further refine his game and be able to play at perhaps the highest level the game has ever seen,” commented Naylor.

When will Federer reclaim No. 1? He lags considerably behind the course of fellow mega-champions: the majority had reclaimed No. 1 within one month of losing it. By April 2009 it will be seven months for Federer. And, his emotional five-set loss to Nadal at the 2009 Australian Open has added distance between the two top spots.


>> The career of a No. 1 ranked professional tennis player doesn’t necessarily end when his ranking slips to No. 2 – or even out of the top 100. Andre Agassi, for example, reached a No. 1 ranking for the first time April 10, 1995. A year later, he fell off the radar for almost 5 years hitting an all-time low, No. 141, on November 10, 1997. Agassi then regrouped, rebounded and rose to the top in less than two years. He reached his sixth and final No. 1 ranking on June 16, 2003. Three years later, Agassi retired at the 2006 US Open.

TOTAL WEEKS AT NO. 1 PLAYER COUNTRY WEEKS NO. 1
PETE SAMPRAS USA 286
IVAN LENDL CZE 270
JIMMY CONNORS USA 268
ROGER FEDERER SUI 237
JOHN MCENROE USA 170
Bjorn Borg SWE 109
Andre Agassi USA 101
Lleyton Hewitt AUS 80
Stefan Edberg SWE 72
Jim Courier USA 58
Gustavo Kuerten BRA 43
Ille Nastase ROM 40
Rafael Nadal SPA 27*
Mats Wilander SWE 20
Andy Roddick USA 13
Boris Becker GER 12
Marat Safin RUS 9
Juan Carlos Ferrero ESP 8
John Newcombe AUS 8
Yevgeny Kafelnikov RUS 6
Thomas Muster AUT 6
Marcelo Rios CHI 6
Carlos Moya ESP 2
Patrick Rafter AUS 1

*as of February 22, 2009


"Federer needs a new internal psychological strategy to increase his odds of winning. Roger's mental coach needs to help him find motivation and a mental gear which will load his game up with confidence, calmness and focus," said Jay Granat, Ph.D.

In addition, many experts agree that Federer requires intense physical conditioning and a greater arsenal of weapons to reclaim No. 1. In the event that he never takes back the coveted top spot, Federer will own a new record: the first mega-champion to not reclaim No. 1.

Give the Swiss a little more time.

http://www.tennisviewmag.com/images/issue04/federer04.jpg


Source: http://www.tennisviewmag.com/issue04_rogerfederer.html

SUKTUEN
04-22-2009, 03:31 PM
thankyou so much!!

Daniel
04-27-2009, 08:22 AM
Federer refocuses in Rome after wedding
By ANDREW DAMPF, AP Sports Writer

ROME (AP)—Roger Federer has refocused on tennis after getting married and then promptly losing to fellow Swiss player Stanislas Wawrinka in the third round of the Monte Carlo Masters.

The 13-time Grand Slam winner spent the last week in intensive training with fitness coach Pierre Paganini, grinding out daily four-hour practice sessions on Italian clay courts.

“I’m expecting big things from myself, especially looking ahead for the French Open,” Federer said Sunday on the eve of the Rome Masters, a key clay-court tuneup for Roland Garros, which begins May 25. “I would like to go extremely far there and create the opportunity to win the one slam I haven’t won yet.

“Monaco for me was just, ‘Let’s see how it goes,”’ the second-ranked Federer said. “With the wedding before I didn’t have the preparation. … I didn’t expect to win the tournament, so I don’t think we have to look too much into how I played there.

“I was missing serves and missing forehands. That’s what I was trying to tighten up now, in this last week, when I was practicing extremely hard. I hope that this week it’s going to show a little bit.”

Federer entered Monte Carlo immediately after marrying longtime girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec. The straight-set loss to Wawrinka stretched his title drought to seven tournaments.

Federer said he concentrated on his movement with Paganini and had 219th-ranked Stefan Koubek along as a hitting partner.

“The movement part is the big part on clay. The best clay-court players are the ones that move the best,” Federer said, adding that his back troubles are long behind him.

Federer was upset by Radek Stepanek in the Rome quarterfinals last year. He will likely open up against Ivo Karlovic this time if the big-serving Croatian gets by a qualifier.

In the rankings, No. 3 Novak Djokovic and No. 4 Andy Murray are starting to pressure Federer, who has lost contact with top-ranked Rafael Nadal.

“I don’t necessarily need to get to No. 1; I just need to win the French Open,” Federer said. “That’s what my goal is.

“For me, it doesn’t matter if I’m 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 or 10 in the world. For me, it’s either No. 1 or somewhere else. Especially for me, who has been No. 1 for so long and won so many titles,” Federer said. “If you’re not No. 1 then it’s about winning titles and getting back No. 1. That’s the position I’m in now.”

Federer has reached the final twice in Rome, losing to Felix Mantilla in 2003 and to Nadal in a fifth-set tiebreaker in 2006.

SUKTUEN
04-27-2009, 02:52 PM
:worship:

Eden
04-28-2009, 08:12 PM
There is an interview with Stefan Koubek in the press which I translated:


28.04.2009

Interview by Christian Frühwald

"Wife and children won't burden Roger"

Stefan Koubek is keeping his fingers crossed for Federer at the French Open

Vienna - Last week many tennis fans would have loved to swap places with Stefan Koubek

The 32years old guy from Kärten had the honour to train a whole week with superstar Roger Federer on Sardinia.

As sparring partner the Austrian Daviscupplayer should partake in helping Federer finding his form on clay, in order to start once again a run to get the first French Open title.

"The training was extremely strong", Koubek tells in an interview with LAOLA1 after his home running from Italy. "It was impressive, how good and how much Roger is training."

Beside this Koubek is revealing what he can take away from this trainingsweek, why he wasn't present at the Federer wedding and how he is assessing the chances of Federer in Paris.

LAOLA1: Last week you were allowed to spend a trainingsweek with Roger Federer and his team on Sardinia. How did the training with such a superstar went?

Stefan Koubek: It was really great. The traning was extremely strong and good. I was lucky to be able to work with Roger's physiotherapist as well, otherwise I don't know if I would have bore the week. I had lots of fun and was impressed how good and how much he is training. Before I thought he wouldn't do that much.

LAOLA1: How exactly did the training run?

Koubek: It's a combination of a lot of things, not just on the court. Before the tennistraining he always did a fitness training. Afterwards he took a massage and so on. It's a long procedure. To get up early in the morning, training, to loosen. During the lunchbreak we had something to eat and then went back to practicing. One day in the week we had the half day off, but were on court from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Of course there was the fitness training before again.

LAOLA1: Did you practice anything special?

Koubek: We started with drills and played a few points afterwards. At bottom this is nothing diffent which I would usually do in practice. The level is of course totally different and this time I was the sparringspartner. I did all the practices like Roger. It was a common practice of. We both benefit from it.

LAOLA1: How did this whole trainingsweek arise?

Koubek: His coach asked me at the start of the season what I would be doing at this time of the yearand respectively in the summer. He wanted to know whether I would like to practice with Roger. No question I was interested in it. I told him he should say me a date. When I don't play a tournament at that time I would be available.

LAOLA1: You are a friend of Federer for several years. How is your relationship to him these days?

Koubek: We are still good friends, but of course we didn't have that much contact in the last years as before because he has a lot of things to do. We still get along really well and had a blast on Sardinia. We always joked in the training.

LAOLA1: You weren't present at the wedding, right?

Koubek: No, I was already in Southafrica at that time. Roger's wedding took place in a really small group. Allegro and Chiudinelli were the only tennisplayers who were there. They know each other since their boyhood. .

LAOLA1: Do you think that Federer has changed because of the wedding? Is he more loose or relaxed or do you think it could even have a negative impact?

Koubek: I don't think his wedding has any impact on his tennis. It will be something different when his child is born. This can go in both directions. I think he is still really motivated and is going to play tennis for a couple of years. He can afford it to take his child with him on the tour. I'm not worried that it will stress him.

LAOLA1: You are on the tour for many years and an experienced player. What can you take with you from such a practice with Roger Federer?

Koubek: You can adopt several things, although there are a couple which would be helpful, but I can't realise them. For example no "normal" player can afford to have a masseur, a tennis coach, a fitnesscoach and someone to restring the rackets. But you can really adopt many things from Roger, who is the best player in the world for me. His physical state is really impressive. He is moving very well and is extremely fit.

LAOLA1: How do you rate his chances at the French Open this year?

Koubek: Nadal is in a class of it's own on clay for sure, but Roger can tame him on a good day. The opportunities are there. I wish for Roger that he is going to get the title in Paris. For me he is the best tennisplayer of all time and a victory in Roland Garros would only prove it.



Source: http://www.laola1.at/128+M59722665055.html

nobama
04-28-2009, 09:01 PM
Thanks Doris. Nice interview with Stefan. :)

Daniel
04-29-2009, 02:44 AM
Johnny Mac advise Federer? You cannot be serious!
By MELISSA MURPHY, AP Sports Writer

While McEnroe would like to give the 13-time Grand Slam champion some pointers on how to snap out of his winless season, the mild-mannered Federer isn’t quite taking him up on the offer. McEnroe told a French weekly that he’d like to help the Swiss star get on track after Federer lost in the semifinals of the Miami Masters.

“I guess anybody would like to give me advice,” Federer said at the Rome Masters. “So I don’t think that’s a crazy comment we should look into much.”

With the French Open looming, Federer is gearing up for another possible match against top-ranked Rafael Nadal, who has defeated Federer in their last five meetings. Federer is still seeking a win at Roland Garros, the one major title that has eluded him.

McEnroe has some ideas on how the second-ranked Federer can beat Nadal on clay.

“Take the ball earlier and not get pulled off the court,” McEnroe said in a phone interview from Los Angeles on Tuesday. “Nadal has a lefty slice out wide. Roger is content to get into a rally, and not attack the net, which is difficult on clay because of the slipping and sliding.”

After getting married April 11, Federer lost in the third round of the Monte Carlo Masters, and his record fell to 18-5 this year.

“There’s an argument that he doesn’t need a coach and an argument that he could use some help with someone, which he’s done in the past,” said McEnroe, a seven-time singles Grand Slam winner. “He won 11 majors in four years. And back in my prime, I’d laugh at them (who offered advice).

“If he wants my input, we have people that represents us. It’s a phone call away.”

On Wednesday, Federer is scheduled to play 6-foot-10 Ivo Karlovic of Croatia in Rome. It’s a clay-court tuneup for the French Open, which begins May 25.

“At this stage, he’d have to have a lot of things fall his way to win it,” McEnroe said. “If Nadal is healthy, he seems virtually unbeatable on clay. In a best of five, he’s one of the fittest guys on tour.”

Federer said he spoke with McEnroe during the “Showdown of Champions” in November. He played James Blake and McEnroe faced his old nemesis Bjorn Borg in a series of exhibitions in Macau and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

“I spent time with him in the Asian exhibitions,” Federer said. “We were there together and talked tennis like I did with James and Bjorn. So we had a good time over there.”

Federer is one shy of Pete Sampras’ all-time Grand Slam record of 14 titles. McEnroe believes Federer will break the record with titles at Wimbledon or the U.S. Open.

McEnroe, in Los Angles to promote an ad campaign about prostate health for men over 50, said he won’t be too upset if Federer doesn’t call.

“The few times people asked me to help in past, no one listened to a word I said,” McEnroe said of Boris Becker, Sergi Bruguera and Mark Philippoussis.

AP Sports Writer Andrew Dampf in Rome contributed to this report.

ORGASMATRON
04-29-2009, 03:06 AM
Federer refocuses in Rome after wedding
By ANDREW DAMPF, AP Sports Writer

ROME (AP)—Roger Federer has refocused on tennis after getting married and then promptly losing to fellow Swiss player Stanislas Wawrinka in the third round of the Monte Carlo Masters.

The 13-time Grand Slam winner spent the last week in intensive training with fitness coach Pierre Paganini, grinding out daily four-hour practice sessions on Italian clay courts.

“I’m expecting big things from myself, especially looking ahead for the French Open,” Federer said Sunday on the eve of the Rome Masters, a key clay-court tuneup for Roland Garros, which begins May 25. “I would like to go extremely far there and create the opportunity to win the one slam I haven’t won yet.

“Monaco for me was just, ‘Let’s see how it goes,”’ the second-ranked Federer said. “With the wedding before I didn’t have the preparation. … I didn’t expect to win the tournament, so I don’t think we have to look too much into how I played there.

“I was missing serves and missing forehands. That’s what I was trying to tighten up now, in this last week, when I was practicing extremely hard. I hope that this week it’s going to show a little bit.”

Federer entered Monte Carlo immediately after marrying longtime girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec. The straight-set loss to Wawrinka stretched his title drought to seven tournaments.

Federer said he concentrated on his movement with Paganini and had 219th-ranked Stefan Koubek along as a hitting partner.

“The movement part is the big part on clay. The best clay-court players are the ones that move the best,” Federer said, adding that his back troubles are long behind him.

Federer was upset by Radek Stepanek in the Rome quarterfinals last year. He will likely open up against Ivo Karlovic this time if the big-serving Croatian gets by a qualifier.

In the rankings, No. 3 Novak Djokovic and No. 4 Andy Murray are starting to pressure Federer, who has lost contact with top-ranked Rafael Nadal.

“I don’t necessarily need to get to No. 1; I just need to win the French Open,” Federer said. “That’s what my goal is.

“For me, it doesn’t matter if I’m 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 or 10 in the world. For me, it’s either No. 1 or somewhere else. Especially for me, who has been No. 1 for so long and won so many titles,” Federer said. “If you’re not No. 1 then it’s about winning titles and getting back No. 1. That’s the position I’m in now.”

Federer has reached the final twice in Rome, losing to Felix Mantilla in 2003 and to Nadal in a fifth-set tiebreaker in 2006.

Daniel you should at least link to the original post :rolleyes:

SUKTUEN
04-29-2009, 02:33 PM
:worship:

Dini
04-29-2009, 05:40 PM
Article following his match against Karlovic:

http://www.internazionalibnlditalia.it/1/PopNews.asp?LNG=EN&IDNews=471

FEDERER: “I WAS PRETTY MUCH CRUISING”
No2 seed Roger Federer was as relaxed in the interview room as he was on court after beating giant Croat Ivo Karlovic 6-4, 6-4 to get through to the last 16.

“I got off to a good start in both sets which is always good and kind of comforting against Ivo,” said the 2003 and 2006 Rome finalist. “He found his groove later on on his serve but I already had the break in the second, which is perfect. It was just important to be really solid on my serve. I had two close service games in the beginning. From then on, I was pretty much cruising. I can't judge this kind of kind of a match because it's not real tennis with Ivo because it's all about reaction. The next match will be a different type of clay-court test. This was more like a hard-court match - just hoping to get through. It's a real tough one to have as a first round.”

“The surface seemed fine,” continued Federer. “It’s tough to kind of maintain those courts with the rain. There's always the occasional bad bounce and you got to live with that. It doesn't help against such a big server I guess sometimes, because you're choosing the right side and then you have the right swing and then it bounces wrong and then you can't adjust anymore because it's just too difficult. The ground underneath is harder so there is less clay, because there seems like a concrete almost under it, and then you have the clay on top which makes it slippery. In Monaco or Hamburg, probably Madrid as well, you just have clay and surfaces that when they get wet you can dig in. Here it seems not possible and that's why if it's nice weather the ball can bounce really high. I think from the baseline, if you give yourself some room, don't half volley too much, it's as good as any courts out there right now.”

“For me, it was about to getting into the rhythm and making sure that I'm in good shape for my first round. Obviously my preparation was minimal for Monaco,” said Federer in reference to his recent marriage to former player and long-time girlfriend Mirka Vavrinec. “It's been like this a few years but the last few years I just was able to play finals over there. This year it wasn't enough, but that didn't matter. I just wanted to get out there and have some fun and play some tennis again in a match situation. It gave me information. I practiced really hard, so I feel better. It's important to have a good warm-up tomorrow before the match and to get a good rhythm, and then I can really judge my performance here in Rome.”

When asked his opinion as to why seeds Ferrer, Murray and Davydenko lost on Wednesday, Federer gave a detailed reply. “It’s still early in the clay court season for some. Masters Series are tough especially for the seeds like me today. I haven't played yet here. Some might think it's an unfair disadvantage for us to always have a bye. But at the same time, it's always difficult. Other guys are coming in with at least one match under their belt that they're ready to go. That's the danger. I guess everyone has a different sort of reason why they lost.”

“Davydenko is coming back from injuries, so he's looking to find his form,” Federer commented. “Ferrer had a rough week last week. He also struggled here last year losing to Stepanek before I lost to him. Maybe there is something with the surface he doesn't really like that much. Maybe it's a bit too fast after having maybe the slow clay last year. Murray was a great match. I thought Monaco played a great match. But the draws are tough here. I think on clay there's really a solid base of players who always make it hard for us, the seeds. So I'm happy he didn't get me today.”

nobama
04-29-2009, 06:09 PM
Roger thought Monaco played a great match? :spit: I hope he's just being kind.

Minnie
04-29-2009, 10:05 PM
Roger thought Monaco played a great match? :spit: I hope he's just being kind.

Guess it was better than saying Murray played like a passive fool at critical times in the match :lol::lol: Thank heavens Roger saved my day - I was expecting "trouble" against Karlovic and what I saw was a Roger never in real danger of losing that match.

I'm going to admit though that I won't be sorry his match with Steps will be played probably when I'm travelling from the office tomorrow evening ;) Its not that I don't have faith in him ... just that atm I'm not quite sure which Roger Federer is going to turn up on any given day. If the real one shows up, he'll win.

Swiss Mountain
04-29-2009, 10:43 PM
I think Rog is going to be well prepare for RG.
Last year nobody beleived he would reach the RG final.

tennis2tennis
04-30-2009, 05:51 AM
Guess it was better than saying Murray played like a passive fool at critical times in the match :lol::lol: Thank heavens Roger saved my day - I was expecting "trouble" against Karlovic and what I saw was a Roger never in real danger of losing that match.

I'm going to admit though that I won't be sorry his match with Steps will be played probably when I'm travelling from the office tomorrow evening ;) Its not that I don't have faith in him ... just that atm I'm not quite sure which Roger Federer is going to turn up on any given day. If the real one shows up, he'll win.

i know what u mean there was a time where we didn't even look at the draw and expected roger in every final!

xohxmyx
04-30-2009, 09:56 AM
i know what u mean there was a time where we didn't even look at the draw and expected roger in every final!

lol those where the good old days! back then i barely bothered to really watch any match that wasnt a final because i knew roger would be there already:lol:

SUKTUEN
04-30-2009, 02:51 PM
:worship:

FedFan_2007
04-30-2009, 07:32 PM
i know what u mean there was a time where we didn't even look at the draw and expected roger in every final!

04-07 you could expect Roger in every final, because he made 90% of them.

Minnie
04-30-2009, 08:12 PM
04-07 you could expect Roger in every final, because he made 90% of them.

I tried to keep reminding myself at the time how precious those years were and that they would end one day ... but I wasn't quite prepared for the way the losses started to come about... as in Roger getting mono. Having had that myself as an adult, I know how much it takes out of you and how the effects linger on. I was devastated when I learnt that was the illness he had because I wondered if he'd ever be the same player again. I have heartfelt sympathy for Mario Ancic too as he seems to have suffered much more from the effects of mono.

So now I try to tell myself that every Roger win is a bonus ... but what I really want is for him to get a Masters/Slam - not for me, but for him and what it would do to give him back that confidence to take on the world again.

Seems the "real" Roger turned up today - the match was played while I was still in the office (much to my surprise when I switched the livescores on) and I nearly had heart failure when I saw he got broken serving for the 1st set and didn't dare look again until it was 5-0 in the 2nd! I could then concentrate on what I was supposed to be doing!

But the low serve percentage worries me ... he won't keep getting away with that I fear.

Eden
04-30-2009, 10:10 PM
FEDERER: 'THIS YEAR WAS VERY DIFFERENT'

Despite avenging his 2008 defeat at the hands of Radek Stepanek with a comfortable 6-4, 6-1 win, No2 seed Roger Federer feels that he has yet to find his rhythm.

“I think maybe conditions were just a touch slower today than they were last year,” he said of his 2008 exit in two tie-breaks to the same opponent. “I think his serve worked really well against me last year, and I couldn't get a real proper read on it. This year was very different. I could read his first serve and his second serve was not a problem either. I didn't have a problem even to attack his second serve, whereas last year I was just trying to get the ball into play, and then obviously he was able to mix it up and make me doubt much more. This year I had the control from the baseline and he didn't have the opportunities like last year. I played well really when I had to, so I'm really happy with the performance today. Sure, when you walk on the court you still have the highlights from that (previous) match, but you try to give it another shot. It's a different match. I'm still always going to be the favorite against him. I just tried and get off to a good start and I did, which is perfect.”

“Today I definitely got some rhythm in, even though he's still a player who likes to take the rhythm away or tries to take the net away, maybe tries to keep the points short at times,” said Federer of the atypical, serve-and-volleying Stepanek. “It was still a good match for me. I had to counter his pace because he's trying to play hard and flat. I felt like I was hitting the ball well. Maybe from the movement side it's pretty slippery out there. I still have to find my footing just because I haven't had to do a lot of sort of defensive work yet.”

In the first set, Federer only managed to get 33% of his first serves over and was broken when serving for the set. “I tried to take some pace off my serve and use more spin plays,” he explained, “and because I was still leading and winning, I still had the opportunity to go after it. I didn't care how much how high my first serve percentage was, as long as I was winning. But it's definitely something I have to make sure I do better in the next match. Towards the end, I actually served well again, and also in practice actually before the match I was serving well. So it's just a matter of now make sure that it happens during the next match.”

Source: http://www.internazionalibnlditalia.it/1/default.asp?LNG=EN

Eden
04-30-2009, 10:15 PM
Roger Federer fires back by subduing Radek Stepanek

Neil Harman

To the strains of Vangelis’s emotive theme to Chariots of Fire, Roger Federer, whose wheels seem to be back on and rolling in a forward direction, was pictured with not one, but two trophies in the cauldron of the Foro Italico at the Rome Masters yesterday. What the Swiss would not give to lift the one that really matters on Sunday.

A lot of people may be deserting Federer. Articles suggesting he is all at sea are de rigueur, former champions have indicated that his game has more holes than a colander and the way it is going one expects to see Denise Robertson sitting beside him on the This Morning sofa, patting him on the knee and offering some homely Wearside thoughts on where he goes from here. But two important sections of the population have not yet given up on him just yet — his fellow players and his public.

The cut-glass prizes brandished yesterday were the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship Award, as voted by his fellow professional players, and the ATPWorldTour.com Fans’ Favourite honour. He has won both a record number of times — six for sportsmanship and seven from the fans. For all of Rafael Nadal’s remarkable recent feats, the world No 1 has not quite nudged Federer from his pedestal of universal popularity.

As nice as those awards are, they are not recompense for holding something gained through blood, sweat, toil and tears on the court (and there have been too many tears lately). Federer is two parts of the way to becoming the champion in the Italian capital for the first time and a conclusive 6-4, 6-1 dismissal of Radek Stepanek, the Czech who defeated him on the same piece of baked earth a year ago, was a satisfying means of reaching the quarter-finals.

Stepanek is a nuisance — all arms, legs, pirouettes and geeky gestures. One can imagine that many players have wanted to pin him to the locker-room wall for he is as aggravating as Ilie Nastase once was, but without the “nasty” streak. Federer knew that he had to prepare for the unlikely, not least those absurd net rushes behind snail’s-paced second serves. He coped admirably with all that Stepanek threw at him and dished out some pretty superlative shots of his own.

And so to the endless critiques of his form. He has won three quarters of his matches in the first four months of the year and reached the semi-finals or better in four of five tournaments, which would equate to “not too bad”. He said: “I have read these funny things when I’ve lost, that they know why I lost, which is sometimes completely wrong. So I started not to get carried away with it. Too many friends are telling me: ‘It’s going to be OK Roger, don’t worry.’ I’m like: ‘What’s the problem?’ There’s no problem. Even my friends start to believe it, so this is when I really know I shouldn’t peek at the papers.

“I guess it’s something that I have to get used to — a bit more press that’s just not always in my favour. For the last five, six years I’ve been playing so well and I’ve been so dominant there was really little to write about in a negative way.

“The important thing as a player is you know what’s going on. I’m very confident I know what’s wrong and I know what’s right. It’s important that I work hard and get back to my best play. I know I’m very close to it.”

Today comes a test he could not have been expecting. Mischa Zverev, a qualifier from Germany, defeated Gilles Simon, the No 8 seed, 6-4, 6-1, a performance that suggested that France is an awfully long way from finding a prospective men’s champion for Roland Garros.

Source: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/tennis/article6201830.ece

rofe
05-01-2009, 12:43 AM
FEDERER: 'THIS YEAR WAS VERY DIFFERENT'

Despite avenging his 2008 defeat at the hands of Radek Stepanek with a comfortable 6-4, 6-1 win, No2 seed Roger Federer feels that he has yet to find his rhythm.

“I think maybe conditions were just a touch slower today than they were last year,” he said of his 2008 exit in two tie-breaks to the same opponent. “I think his serve worked really well against me last year, and I couldn't get a real proper read on it. This year was very different. I could read his first serve and his second serve was not a problem either. I didn't have a problem even to attack his second serve, whereas last year I was just trying to get the ball into play, and then obviously he was able to mix it up and make me doubt much more. This year I had the control from the baseline and he didn't have the opportunities like last year. I played well really when I had to, so I'm really happy with the performance today. Sure, when you walk on the court you still have the highlights from that (previous) match, but you try to give it another shot. It's a different match. I'm still always going to be the favorite against him. I just tried and get off to a good start and I did, which is perfect.”

“Today I definitely got some rhythm in, even though he's still a player who likes to take the rhythm away or tries to take the net away, maybe tries to keep the points short at times,” said Federer of the atypical, serve-and-volleying Stepanek. “It was still a good match for me. I had to counter his pace because he's trying to play hard and flat. I felt like I was hitting the ball well. Maybe from the movement side it's pretty slippery out there. I still have to find my footing just because I haven't had to do a lot of sort of defensive work yet.”

In the first set, Federer only managed to get 33% of his first serves over and was broken when serving for the set. “I tried to take some pace off my serve and use more spin plays,” he explained, “and because I was still leading and winning, I still had the opportunity to go after it. I didn't care how much how high my first serve percentage was, as long as I was winning. But it's definitely something I have to make sure I do better in the next match. Towards the end, I actually served well again, and also in practice actually before the match I was serving well. So it's just a matter of now make sure that it happens during the next match.”

Source: http://www.internazionalibnlditalia.it/1/default.asp?LNG=EN

Why is he spinning his serves in? :confused:

Why is his first serve at 33% if he is spinning them in? :scratch:

Sunset of Age
05-01-2009, 01:28 AM
I tried to keep reminding myself at the time how precious those years were and that they would end one day ... but I wasn't quite prepared for the way the losses started to come about... as in Roger getting mono. Having had that myself as an adult, I know how much it takes out of you and how the effects linger on. I was devastated when I learnt that was the illness he had because I wondered if he'd ever be the same player again. I have heartfelt sympathy for Mario Ancic too as he seems to have suffered much more from the effects of mono.

So now I try to tell myself that every Roger win is a bonus ... but what I really want is for him to get a Masters/Slam - not for me, but for him and what it would do to give him back that confidence to take on the world again.

Seems the "real" Roger turned up today - the match was played while I was still in the office (much to my surprise when I switched the livescores on) and I nearly had heart failure when I saw he got broken serving for the 1st set and didn't dare look again until it was 5-0 in the 2nd! I could then concentrate on what I was supposed to be doing!

But the low serve percentage worries me ... he won't keep getting away with that I fear.

Well said Minnie. I feel exactly the same. As of now, every win is a good one. :D

SUKTUEN
05-01-2009, 05:36 AM
April 29, 2009
Roger Federer
ROME, ITALY

R. FEDERER/I. Karlovic
6-4, 6-4

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Good solid effort for you. Any complaints about that match? No problems?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, not really. I got off to a good start in both sets, which is always good, kind of comforting against Ivo. He found his groove later on on his serve, you know, but I already had the break in the second, which is perfect.
Yeah, it was just important to be really sold on my serve. I had two close service games in the beginning. From then on, I was pretty much cruising.

Q. Which is the biggest difference between this surface and Monte-Carlo?
ROGER FEDERER: The ground underneath is harder, so there is less clay, sort of, you know, because there is like -- seems like a concrete almost under it, and then you have the clay on top which makes a slippery.
In Monaco or Hamburg, probably Madrid as well, you just have sort of clay, and, you know, just surfaces that when they get wet you can dig in. Here it seems not possible.
That's why if it's nice weather the ball can bounce really high.

Q. Just a follow-up to that. How did you find the court today? Obviously it's taken quite a hammering over the last couple days.
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, it's tough to kind of maintain those courts with the rain and everything. But the surface seemed fine, you know. There's always the occasional bad bounce, and you got to live with that. Doesn't help against such a big server I guess sometimes, because you're choosing the right side and then you have the right swing and then it bounces wrong and then you can't adjust anymore because it's just too difficult.
I think from the baseline, you know, if you give yourself some room, don't half-volley too much, it's as good as any courts out there right now.

Q. After a match like this that you finish so early, what are you doing now in Rome? What is your schedule in Rome today?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, not that early. But, no, I like to go to the city and have nice dinners usually. If I got a real chance, on an off-day maybe some sightseeing. I've seen the city a lot now over the years. I arrived late here on Sunday, so I didn't have that many opportunities.
For me, it was about to getting into the rhythm and making sure that I'm in good shape for my first round. Yesterday, unfortunately, it was raining, so there was not much we could do.
I like to have the occasional look into the stores here and go around and see some nice buildings again. You don't need to go, you know, that far. You see many nice places here anyway. It's really a nice city to be in.

Q. Are you feeling stronger maybe this week than perhaps you were at Monte-Carlo because of what you did last week?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, obviously my preparation was minimal, you know, for Monaco. It's been like this a few years, you know, but last few years I just was able to play finals over there. This year it wasn't enough, you know. Preparation was maybe too small.
But, I mean, that didn't matter. I just wanted to get out there and have some fun and play some tennis again in a match situation. It gave me information. I practiced really hard, so I feel better.
Like I said, I can't judge this kind of kind of a match because it's not real tennis with Ivo because it's all about reaction.
So I guess next match will be a different type of a clay court test. You know, this was more like a hardcourt match just hoping to get through. It's a real tough one to have as a first round, I think.
It's just important to have tomorrow before the match a good warm up and to get some good rhythm, and then I can really judge my performance here in Rome.

Q. It's just tennis, or do you think it's a specific reason why today Ferrer, Murray, Davydenko lost?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, still early in the clay court season, you know, for some. Masters Series are tough, you know, especially for the seeds like me today. I haven't played yet here. Some might think it's an unfair disadvantage for us to always have a bye.
But at the same time, it's always difficult. Other guys are coming in with at least one match under their belt that they're ready to go. That's the danger. I guess everyone has a different sort of reason why they lost.
Davydenko is coming back from injuries, so he's looking to find his form. I mean, that's pretty normal.
Ferrer had a rough week last week. You know, he also struggled here actually last year losing to Stepanek before I lost to him. Maybe there is something with the surface he doesn't really like that much. Maybe it's a bit too fast after having maybe the slow clay last year.
Murray was a great match. I thought Monaco played a great match. There you go. You got some reasons why they lost.
But the draws are tough here. I think on clay there's really a solid base of players who always make it hard for us, the seeds, you know. So I'm happy he didn't get me today.

kissakiss
05-01-2009, 02:59 PM
April 30, 2009


Roger Federer

ROME, ITALY

R. FEDERER/R. Stepanek
6-4, 6-1


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Last year, you had more difficulty with his serve and net play last year. This year you dealt a lot better with it. What was the difference between you for the two games?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think maybe conditions were just a touch slower today than they were last year, as far as I remember. It's a long time ago. I think his serve worked really well against me last year, and I couldn't get a real proper read on his serve.

This year was very different. I could read his first serve. His second serve was not a problem either. I didn't have a problem even to attack his second serve, whereas last year I was just trying to get the ball into play, and then obviously he was able to mix it up and make me doubt much more.

This year was good. I had the control from the baseline, and he didn't have the opportunities like he did have last year. I played well really when I had to, so I'm really happy with the performance today.

Q. My question was about the same Roger. I have been beaten so many times on this court when I was young player. When you walk into the court and you have close to you the guy that beat you the previous year, what passes through your mind? You're thinking about that, or you try to forget?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you think about it if you haven't played him again since, but I played him three times since the match here last year: US Open, I think, and Madrid and Shanghai. So I got three wins there.

I played very solid against him, and I, you know, really told myself I have to be very disciplined in my playing today, the way I play my tactical game against him and just the way I have to focus.

Last year I got a little bit unsure about my own game and he played well, and then I was not 100% sure of what I wanted to do. Sure, especially because it's the same court, you know, it's not a different center court. It's the identical court of last year.

Sure, when you walk on the court you still have sort of the highlights from that match. But, you know, you try to give it another shot. It's a different match. I'm still always going to be the favorite against him. I just tried and get off to a good start and I did, which is perfect.

Q. You played a couple of eccentric players in your first two matches here, players who it's difficult probably to get a really rhythm against. Having said that, do you feel as though you're striking the ball in the manner that you'd like to be after two matches here?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I think today I definitely got some rhythm in, even though, like you say, he's still a player who likes to take the rhythm away or tries to take the net away, maybe tries to keep the points short at times.

It was still a good match for me. To me, I had to counter his pace because he's trying to play hard and flat. Who knows, maybe that's what I'll see against Gilles Simon as well.

I felt like I was hitting the ball well. Maybe from the movement side it's pretty slippery out there. I still have to find my footing just because I haven't had to do a lot of sort of defensive work yet. I think that's definitely going to happen in the next match.

Q. You mentioned Gilles Simon. He's a player who's had some success against you. What's been difficult about playing him for you in the past?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, we only played twice. Once I was coming back from injury, and it was tough in Shanghai. He played well both times I thought against me. He's very patient and he's is fantastic counterpuncher and he moves extremely well on clay.

Honestly, I haven't seen him play a match yet, but I'm sure that the guys at the top today can play on any surface. He for sure grew up on clay, so it shouldn't be a problem for him. No, but he makes it hard for the top guys just because he puts the ball in play and makes you hit the extra shot.
When you're moving extremely well, you know, especially having a lot of confidence, that can create some great plays. That's what he's really been able to do the last nine months to a year now.

Q. Did you wait for Francesco Totti or Ilary Riasi to see you?

ROGER FEDERER: I didn't see him. I missed him. I have to look at the telly again to make sure that he was really there. I didn't see him. I'm happy he came.

Q. When your first serve percentage was as low as it was in the first set, is there any conscious effort you can take, or just hope it gets better?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yes, you hope it gets better. After a while if it's still not getting better, then you try to change it up a bit. I, you know, tried to take some pace off my serve and use more spin plays.

Because I'm still leading and winning, I still had the opportunity to go after it. I didn't care how much how high my first serve percentage was, as long as I was winning, you know. But it's definitely something I have to make sure, you know, I do better in the next match.

Towards the end, I actually served well again, and also in practice actually before the match I was serving well. So it's just a matter of now make sure that it happens during the next match.

Q. In Rome, were you more unhappy when you lost to Mantilla when you were strongly favored, or when you lost to Nadal and you had two match points? What was the most painful defeat between the two in your mind and that you recall afterwards?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I don't know if I was big favorite going into the Mantilla match. I mean, I was still sort of young and, you know, unexperienced in finals of Masters Series tournaments. He was one of those guys that was always going to be hard for me to play against. Sure, he came through as kind of a surprise. But then seeing the players who he beat, I knew he was going to be extremely tough.

I don't know, it was disappointing losing that one because Mantilla wasn't a big name out there. Could have been a Kafelnikov in the final, or a Ferrero who was at the top of his game. But Especially after I think I beat Ferrero in the semifinals I was dreaming of winning this title. So I was -- I guess I was pretty disappointed in that one just knowing that I missed maybe a big opportunity.

Against Nadal, it was just nice being part of such a wonderful match. The moment itself, sure, I was not so disappointed, more angry that I missed such a big opportunity. But at the end the day, they both feel the same, you know. Just going through the trophy ceremony as the finalist is just not something that's a lot fun. You just try to get through it and try to take the positives out of it and move onto the next week.

Q. A lot of people write a lot of things and say a lot of things on TV programs about you and your career and your form. Do you listen to them or read it, or do you completely ignore it and get on with your own thing and let other people worry about what they talk about and write about?

ROGER FEDERER: Depends when. When I win, I read it. When I lose, I don't read it.

Q. Okay.

ROGER FEDERER: It's pretty simple. (Laughter.) Too often it's happened that I'm reading these funny things when I'm losing. That they know why I lost, you know, which is sometimes completely wrong. So I just started not to get carried away with it.

You know, too many friends are telling me like, It's going to be okay Roger. Don't worry. I'm like, What's the problem? There's no problem. Even my friends start to believe it, you know, so this is when I really know I shouldn't have a peek at the papers.

No, I mean, I guess it's something that I also have to get used to, just a bit more press that's just not always like in my favor. You know, just for the last five, six years I've been playing so well and I've been so dominant
there was really little to write about in a negative way.

All of a sudden some people think when you're only playing semifinals and the finals, you know, then things are kind of getting really tough, which is not the case. There's always reasons why you play well and why you don't.
Important thing is as a player you know what's going on. I'm very confident I know what's wrong and I know what's right. It's just important that I work hard and get back to my best play. I know I'm very close to it.

End of FastScripts

SUKTUEN
05-01-2009, 05:22 PM
:worship:

Rita
05-01-2009, 06:54 PM
Q. Is your level rising at the rate you want it to and you're pretty much where you want it to be, or still more to go?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I feel like it was a good match. Now again, it was the, again, different type of match. I really had to take the offensive because he was playing really far back in the court, and I think I did well. I didn't have to play that much defense. I had to come up with some passing shots, and I think it's always kind of good that you're on the back foot and you have to come up with some good shots at the right time. That was a good test. He's a great player. It was an interesting first match we had.

Q. Another boy of '87 like Novak and Murray, and another left hander. Do you think he's another left hander like Verdasco and Murray, they're increasing left-handers, or it's a normal situation?
ROGER FEDERER: We have very few left handers in the game, so it's pretty normal that there should be more coming. I can't imagine having fewer lefties than we had maybe two years ago. We had maybe maximum five in the top 100, which is was very little. So it's nice to have more of these guys. Seems like he's a talented player. I think he's got potential, and he showed it this week.

Q. Do you think there's less pressure on you when you player on clay now than before, in last years?
ROGER FEDERER: Not really. I think everywhere I go there is always pressure involved, because I still think people expect me to go far and win tournaments and so forth. So I feel the same way, as long as I know my game is up there so I can win tournaments. I'll also always have pressure. Even though today I see it a bit differently than when I was breaking through as a junior. It's nicer now anyway, because I'm always playing on center court and I have a full stadium, and that helps to play your best.

Q. The Djokovic semifinal, are you looking forward to that after Miami?
ROGER FEDERER: Sure. I mean, we had semis in Monaco last year on clay. I don't know if we played another time on clay. Actually, Monaco a few years before that in the first round when he was coming up. We haven't had each other that much on clay. Sees like he's playing well again. He came through very convincing against good players, so I expect a good match. I hope I can play better than in Miami.

http://ubitennis.quotidianonet.ilsole24ore.com/2009/05/01/171437-federer_press_conference.shtml

oliverbwfc
05-01-2009, 08:07 PM
Q. Another boy of '87 like Novak and Murray, and another left hander. Do you think he's another left hander like Verdasco and Murray, they're increasing left-handers, or it's a normal situation?
http://ubitennis.quotidianonet.ilsole24ore.com/2009/05/01/171437-federer_press_conference.shtml

Murray a left-hander :spit:

SUKTUEN
05-02-2009, 09:06 AM
Murray a left-hander :spit:

:devil:

kissakiss
05-03-2009, 04:22 PM
May 2, 2009

Roger Federer

ROME, ITALY

N. DJOKOVIC/R. Federer
4-6, 6-3, 6-3


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. How did it get away from you after the rain delay, if that's the case?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I was in good shape. Maybe also a little pity that I didn't get the break to go 3-0 before the rain delay.

But after that, actually I started okay. I thought he came through with a bit more energy, you know, after the rain delay. Before that he was pretty flat.

So that was maybe -- you know, all of a sudden it became a different match and he played better, you know. Should have held once, you know, to not give away one of the breaks at least. Then I would have had a better opportunity.
No, I thought he was playing better. Definitely had the win on my racquet today, so it's pretty disappointing.

Q. If you compare with the match in Miami, are you more dissatisfied by this match, or the same feeling?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, Miami was a difficult one just because I played pretty good in the first set. Thought I was actually playing, you know, sort of in control, and then I completely lost control.

You know, so this time around it was different. I was in the match obviously all the way through. Feel like this is not a match I should have given away, you know, because break up in the second, break up in the third, and I usually don't give away opportunities like this.

So it's bad, but I still have some work to do on the clay. I think I'm playing better obviously than Monaco. The hard work has been paying off. But just got to fix my serve a little bit. I have the feeling that maybe since I had the back problem, my serve is just not working there where I want it to be.

I think then -- I feel that in the tough it maybe could have saved me a few times and it didn't, so that's something I have to make sure I can fix for Paris.

Other than that, there was some good moments, sure, which is a good thing. Also some bad ones. I have to make sure they don't happen as frequently, obviously.

Q. You had some problems with your backhand, and you made a lot of backhand errors towards the end of the game.

ROGER FEDERER: I thought the ball was definitely flying more when we came back after the rain delay. Things kind of got warmer, and there was more bounce in the ball. Yeah, maybe I was just miss-timing them a bit. That's the reason, I guess.

You know, but I wish it would have been a bit more solid. But, honestly, I don't think I lost the match because of my backhand.

Q. Would you actually like to play Nadal on clay before you get to Paris? I know you can't do it here. It can only happen once more, and that's in Madrid. Would prefer to go in to Paris having tested yourself against him on clay, or does it not matter?

ROGER FEDERER: Doesn't really matter to me. I mean, I think the last few years it's helped Rafa playing me before Paris. Just that he knew maybe a bit more what to expect from me, whereas you know exactly what you're going to get with Rafa. So I think it maybe worked more in in his favor the last few years.

We'll see how Madrid turns out. If we have to play each other, I still think it's a great match and I would look forward to that. But the focus is elsewhere right now.

Q. From the stands it seemed that the second and third set when you lost your serve you rushed a little bit in these games. Is that the feeling you have, or is it something else?

ROGER FEDERER: Not really. I mean, I tried to take my time and focus on my serve and make sure I start off the point well. Potentially, you know, I try always not to rush too much. That's what he was doing as well when it wasn't going his way in the beginning of the second set. It's always something you try to slow down a bit, you know.

But I didn't have the feeling I was particularly rushing. Points were just going quickly, you know, because he would hit it close to the baseline and I was made an error and not get my first serve in.

Obviously at Love-30 things are not that easy anymore, you know. No, but you try to take your time and go step by step. But sometimes it just goes quick when you play bad.

Q. How will you prepare now? Will you go Italy someplace, or back to Switzerland?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I'd like to go back to Switzerland. I've been on the road again for a few weeks here, so I'd like to go there and make sure I get early enough to Madrid and get used to the altitude. Just make sure I'm in good shape over there.

Q. You said at the start of the week that you thought getting to the semifinal would be kind of satisfactory. You might have an idea where your game is. With the circumstances today, is that kind of a disappointment now that you haven't gone all the way and gone to tomorrow?

ROGER FEDERER: At the end, it's always disappointing for me when I exit a tournament losing a match? I've gotten used to winning tournaments, you know, and then leaving a tournament having lost just leaves a bitter taste, obviously.

It doesn't take me long to get over it, but in the moment itself it's just not really fun. Because it's just these kind of matches I feel like I should have won here and I end up losing them, so it's just not a good feeling.

It's just a matter of getting back in shape and, you know, playing good hopefully in Madrid again.

Q. You think we would have seen a different match if it wasn't raining? Not to find an excuse; you don't need that.

ROGER FEDERER: Speculation. I mean, I think things were going well for me. You know, I was playing him well and serving well when I had to and putting him under pressure. So it kind of definitely changed the momentum.

I mean, the rain delay came at a perfect moment for him, because he came through a tough service game at 2-0 down. Instead of going 3-0, he goes 2-1 and then the rain comes, so he's got something positive to look at.

Then when he comes back conditions changed, so, sure, it helped him. But then again, who knows. He might have come back anyway and beat me in the end. He did well today to use the rain delay in his favor, that's for sure.

End of FastScripts

kissakiss
05-03-2009, 04:24 PM
Audio of the after-match presser

http://multimedia.quotidianonet.ilsole24ore.com/?tipo=media&media=6310

kissakiss
05-03-2009, 04:45 PM
An interview with BBC

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/8030695.stm

SUKTUEN
05-04-2009, 01:55 PM
:worship::worship:

tennisfan444
05-04-2009, 03:35 PM
Thanks for sharing :)

lunahielo
05-04-2009, 11:13 PM
Nice interview, kissakiss~~thank you. :hug:

SUKTUEN
05-05-2009, 01:52 PM
Thanks for sharing :)

tennisfan444 I love your avarat!!:devil:

tennisfan444
05-05-2009, 05:31 PM
Thank you! :devil:

Eden
05-05-2009, 06:13 PM
Federer's losses no longer an anomaly

By Greg Garber
ESPN.com

http://a.espncdn.com/photo/2009/0504/ten_a_federer_djokovic_576.jpg
AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia

The manner in which Roger Federer has been losing is disconcerting.


For the sixth time this year, Roger Federer failed to win a tennis tournament. And so for the sixth time, the media's forensic psychologists tried to get a fix on the 27-year-old champion's bruised psyche.


"I've gotten used to winning tournaments, and then leaving a tournament having lost just leaves a bitter taste, obviously," Federer told reporters Saturday in Rome. "It doesn't take me long to get over it, but in the moment itself it's just not really fun because it's just these kind of matches I feel like I should have won here, and I end up losing them.

"I usually don't give away opportunities like this."

Federer won the first set of his semifinal match against Novak Djokovic, but after forging service breaks early in the second and third sets, he ultimately fell 6-4, 3-6, 3-6. It was, tellingly, Federer's first loss to Djokovic on clay. More unsettling was the way he lost.

Federer was up 3-1 in the final set, but three consecutive unforced errors handed Djokovic the opportunity to break back and draw even. Moreover, Federer's backhand all but evaporated. He simply, sadly, unraveled.

Afterward, Federer said that an hourlong rain delay during the second set "kind of definitely" changed the match's momentum. His serve was broken five times in the final two sets.

"I have the feeling that maybe since I had the back problem, my serve is just not working to where I want it to be," Federer said. "It maybe could have saved me a few times and it didn't, so that's something I have to make sure I can fix for Paris."

Rain, bad back, indifferent serve -- to some, those will kind of definitely sound like excuses. For Federer, they were rational explanations for this very specific loss. But with the French Open only a few weeks away, there is a larger, more troubling picture developing.

With the loss to Djokovic, Federer is now an astonishing 0 for his last 11 in matches against his three closest rivals atop the tennis food chain: Rafael Nadal (0-5), Andy Murray (0-4) and Djokovic (0-2).

So when does an anomaly become a trend?

"That's a good question," Paul Annacone said on Monday.

Annacone has rare insight into Federer's struggles; he coached Pete Sampras -- the man to whom Federer is most often compared -- for eight years. Today, Annacone is the coach of men's tennis for the Lawn Tennis Association, Great Britain's version of the USTA. He remembers the drought that followed Sampras' triumph at Wimbledon in 2000 -- 26 months and 33 tournaments without lifting a trophy -- before he won his 14th and final major, the 2002 U.S. Open.

"You're in that same press conference over and over again," Annacone said. "When are you going to win again? Are you a step slower? Now that you're married, are you thinking about stopping? Negative questions every week.

"I don't care who you are, it's going to affect you. It might not be much, but that 2 percent can make a difference. And then Pete's losing to Wayne Arthurs. A lot of people can look at the tennis, but very few people can look at the man, assess the issues in his life, the chronology of events in his career and say definitively, 'Here's what's wrong.'"

http://a.espncdn.com/photo/2009/0504/tennis_a_federerts_200.jpg
Roger Federer is 0 for his last 11 versus the other members of the Big Three.

Annacone has a little more than a year left on his contract with the LTA, but he seems uniquely qualified to navigate Federer's course toward the end of his career. He says he hasn't talked with Federer, who has been searching for a full-time coach since his four-year association (2000 to '03) with Peter Lundgren. According to Annacone, there are probably "4 million" applicants for the job.

"You can't just put anyone in there and have it work," Annacone said. "Ultimately, it's up to the player. You have someone who is steel-willed and incredibly confident and incredibly stubborn as well. You have to have buy-in.

"Roger is similar to Pete in so many tactical and technical ways. The first four, five years he killed everybody, but didn't necessarily get any better. If you don't see the urgency, you probably aren't going to get better."

It's safe to say Federer is starting to feel that sense of urgency. His last tournament title came in his hometown of Basel, Switzerland, in October 2008. Since then, he has gone 0-for-8. His record this year is 21-6. For context, consider that from 2004 to 2007 he averaged six losses a season.

Nadal (38-3) and Murray (29-4) have separated themselves from the field.

"When Rafa started to play so well, I said, 'Terrific, now Roger has to get better,'" Annacone said. "That's a problem for some people, but not guys like Roger, who have so many tools. Roger feels it, but I'm not sure he knows exactly how to go about doing it.

"His life is more complicated now -- he just got married and he's about to become a father. But, just as in Pete's case, those aren't reasons that he's not winning. They're components of your life that you have to deal with. Roger sees it, but he just hasn't found the right balance yet."

It was during an eight-month sabbatical from Annacone when Sampras suffered one of his most crushing defeats in 2002. The seven-time Wimbledon champion lost at the All England Club to George Bastl, ranked No. 145, in the second round. A few weeks and several heart-to-heart talks later, the two were reunited and Sampras went on to win the U.S. Open.

As things stand, that unlooked-for victory is all that separates Sampras and Federer in terms of majors.

Sampras was 31 when he won his final Open, meaning Federer probably has something approaching a four-year window to surpass him.

"I'd be shocked if he doesn't win more Grand Slam titles," Annacone said. "If he has any of the same drive that Pete had, I'd be absolutely shocked. They're wired differently than most players. They expect to win -- no matter what the circumstances.

"Look at talent level and what he's able to produce. Take all those ingredients and corral them, manage them just a little better, and he can win again."

Source: http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/columns/story?columnist=garber_greg&id=4137246

soraya
05-05-2009, 07:51 PM
Thanks for sharing, I like Annacone's positive analysis.

Eden
05-05-2009, 10:23 PM
You are welcome :)

There's a short report about Roger in the Swiss newspapers. He is in Switzerland at the moment and practiced in Zürich with Roman Valent, who won the junior title in Wimbledon in 2001.

rofe
05-05-2009, 11:05 PM
The way Paul is describing Roger's trials and tribulations and putting it in the context of Pete's problems, I can almost feel that he is fishing for a job as Roger's coach. :lol:

Having said that, I would be pretty happy if Roger and Paul hook up. Roger can probably easily pay the penalty for Paul breaking the LTA contract.

SUKTUEN
05-06-2009, 04:27 PM
INTERNAZIONALI BNL D'ITALIA (MEN)
May 2, 2009

ROME, ITALY


N. DJOKOVIC/R. Federer
4-6, 6-3, 6-3


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. How did it get away from you after the rain delay, if that's the case?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I was in good shape. Maybe also a little pity that I didn't get the break to go 3-0 before the rain delay.
But after that, actually I started okay. I thought he came through with a bit more energy, you know, after the rain delay. Before that he was pretty flat.
So that was maybe -- you know, all of a sudden it became a different match and he played better, you know. Should have held once, you know, to not give away one of the breaks at least. Then I would have had a better opportunity.
No, I thought he was playing better. Definitely had the win on my racquet today, so it's pretty disappointing.

Q. If you compare with the match in Miami, are you more dissatisfied by this match, or the same feeling?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, Miami was a difficult one just because I played pretty good in the first set. Thought I was actually playing, you know, sort of in control, and then I completely lost control.
You know, so this time around it was different. I was in the match obviously all the way through. Feel like this is not a match I should have given away, you know, because break up in the second, break up in the third, and I usually don't give away opportunities like this.
So it's bad, but I still have some work to do on the clay. I think I'm playing better obviously than Monaco. The hard work has been paying off. But just got to fix my serve a little bit. I have the feeling that maybe since I had the back problem, my serve is just not working there where I want it to be.
I think then -- I feel that in the tough it maybe could have saved me a few times and it didn't, so that's something I have to make sure I can fix for Paris.
Other than that, there was some good moments, sure, which is a good thing. Also some bad ones. I have to make sure they don't happen as frequently, obviously.

Q. You had some problems with your backhand, and you made a lot of backhand errors towards the end of the game.

ROGER FEDERER: I thought the ball was definitely flying more when we came back after the rain delay. Things kind of got warmer, and there was more bounce in the ball. Yeah, maybe I was just miss-timing them a bit. That's the reason, I guess.
You know, but I wish it would have been a bit more solid. But, honestly, I don't think I lost the match because of my backhand.

Q. Would you actually like to play Nadal on clay before you get to Paris? I know you can't do it here. It can only happen once more, and that's in Madrid. Would prefer to go in to Paris having tested yourself against him on clay, or does it not matter?

ROGER FEDERER: Doesn't really matter to me. I mean, I think the last few years it's helped Rafa playing me before Paris. Just that he knew maybe a bit more what to expect from me, whereas you know exactly what you're going to get with Rafa. So I think it maybe worked more in in his favor the last few years.
We'll see how Madrid turns out. If we have to play each other, I still think it's a great match and I would look forward to that. But the focus is elsewhere right now.

Q. From the stands it seemed that the second and third set when you lost your serve you rushed a little bit in these games. Is that the feeling you have, or is it something else?

ROGER FEDERER: Not really. I mean, I tried to take my time and focus on my serve and make sure I start off the point well. Potentially, you know, I try always not to rush too much. That's what he was doing as well when it wasn't going his way in the beginning of the second set. It's always something you try to slow down a bit, you know.
But I didn't have the feeling I was particularly rushing. Points were just going quickly, you know, because he would hit it close to the baseline and I was made an error and not get my first serve in.
Obviously at Love-30 things are not that easy anymore, you know. No, but you try to take your time and go step by step. But sometimes it just goes quick when you play bad.

Q. How will you prepare now? Will you go Italy someplace, or back to Switzerland?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I'd like to go back to Switzerland. I've been on the road again for a few weeks here, so I'd like to go there and make sure I get early enough to Madrid and get used to the altitude. Just make sure I'm in good shape over there.

Q. You said at the start of the week that you thought getting to the semifinal would be kind of satisfactory. You might have an idea where your game is. With the circumstances today, is that kind of a disappointment now that you haven't gone all the way and gone to tomorrow?

ROGER FEDERER: At the end, it's always disappointing for me when I exit a tournament losing a match? I've gotten used to winning tournaments, you know, and then leaving a tournament having lost just leaves a bitter taste, obviously.
It doesn't take me long to get over it, but in the moment itself it's just not really fun. Because it's just these kind of matches I feel like I should have won here and I end up losing them, so it's just not a good feeling.
It's just a matter of getting back in shape and, you know, playing good hopefully in Madrid again.

Q. You think we would have seen a different match if it wasn't raining? Not to find an excuse; you don't need that.

ROGER FEDERER: Speculation. I mean, I think things were going well for me. You know, I was playing him well and serving well when I had to and putting him under pressure. So it kind of definitely changed the momentum.
I mean, the rain delay came at a perfect moment for him, because he came through a tough service game at 2-0 down. Instead of going 3-0, he goes 2-1 and then the rain comes, so he's got something positive to look at.
Then when he comes back conditions changed, so, sure, it helped him. But then again, who knows. He might have come back anyway and beat me in the end. He did well today to use the rain delay in his favor, that's for sure.

soraya
05-06-2009, 10:13 PM
The way Paul is describing Roger's trials and tribulations and putting it in the context of Pete's problems, I can almost feel that he is fishing for a job as Roger's coach. :lol:

Having said that, I would be pretty happy if Roger and Paul hook up. Roger can probably easily pay the penalty for Paul breaking the LTA contract.

It wouldn't be a bad try. How are you Mahesh?

rofe
05-06-2009, 11:05 PM
It wouldn't be a bad try. How are you Mahesh?

Doing good Soraya. How are you?

Many of the regulars from two years ago (including me) aren't posting as much as they used to. On the other hand, there seem to be a lot of new fans posting so that is good.

Anyway, it would be great if Fed can hire Paul but I am not holding my breath.

oneandonlyhsn
05-08-2009, 10:22 AM
Doing good Soraya. How are you?

Many of the regulars from two years ago (including me) aren't posting as much as they used to. On the other hand, there seem to be a lot of new fans posting so that is good.

Anyway, it would be great if Fed can hire Paul but I am not holding my breath.

Ditto, I think Paul would be a good fit for Roger, he has a good grasp of the game, has worked with champions who most considered finished and is a guy who knows how to work with smart players.

lunahielo
05-08-2009, 03:31 PM
Ditto, I think Paul would be a good fit for Roger, he has a good grasp of the game, has worked with champions who most considered finished and is a guy who knows how to work with smart players.

A double ditto from me. :)

Rita
05-08-2009, 07:48 PM
http://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/2397066/Sports-superstars-help-out-Wairarapa-hospice

Two of the world's biggest sporting stars have donated personal items to help raise money for dying cancer patients in Wairarapa.

Swiss tennis ace Roger Federer and world golf No 1 Tiger Woods agreed to lend their help to support this month's Wairarapa Hospice fundraising sports memorabilia auction.

A signed shirt and photograph was sent from Federer's camp in Switzerland while Woods' Kiwi caddy Steve Williams forwarded a signed golf glove and two golf balls.

The glove is the only item at the May 30 auction with a reserve, set at $3000.

One of the auction's backers, Greg Peters, took a gamble and sent email requests to some of the world's sporting greats. He said the support from the likes of Woods and Federer was overwhelming.

"It has been so refreshing that these people or even their organisations had the courtesy to reply. Every single one of them said they were backing us because it was such a worthy cause. I really didn't expect that kind of response because to some of these people, where is the Wairarapa?"

Other donations included a pair of boxer shorts, which had been flown to France and back by the All Blacks' physio, just to be signed by Daniel Carter, and a baseball cap from golfing legend Greg Norman.

And not only did a Superbike GP champion, Australian Casey Stoner, come up with a signed shirt, "his mother rang me from Australia and wanted to apologise that Casey couldn't make it to the auction personally on the night. We hadn't even been as bold as to mention that in the emails, but that is the type of person with a heart that we have come across", Mr Peters said.

Tickets to the black-tie auction at Masterton Town Hall are $30.

SUKTUEN
05-09-2009, 03:11 PM
:worship:

Rita
05-16-2009, 11:20 AM
PRESS CONFERENCE
May 15th 2009

PLAYER
Roger FEDERER (SUI)

MATCH RESULT
Roger Federer (SUI) d. Andy Roddick (USA) 7-5 | 6(5)-7| 6-1

Q: There seemed to be times out there today when you appeared to be enjoying yourself as much as you have for a while on clay. Do you think that that would be a correct statement? Do you think that you were playing well at times?
A: Yes, I think it was a close match, there was a good atmosphere, good weather, all of that helps. I thought it was a good match, I think Andy was mixing up his serve very well and I think I came up with some nice points, you know, those make me happy, so, I’m happy with the way I played today, of course, I should have or could have won in straights but that is what happens when you play Andy sometimes but it bounced back well in the third and I played well.

Q: Do you think that you are going to have some kind of fitness advantage in the semi finals considering that your opponent are probably going to start playing at around 11 tonight?
A: Not really, it’s best out of three after all. I don’t think Andy and Del Potro played last week either and they both had a bye, so, it’s not like they had to play seven matches in the last seven days, so I don’t think it’s’ going to come down to fitness, it’s not that hot at the moment, I didn’t even have to change my shirt today even though the sun was out, maybe sitting on the stands for over two hours might have been hot but for us down there it was actually the perfect conditions. So I doubt it, I think it’s going to come down to who plays best.

Q: Could you just analyze the potential semi finals?
A: Sure. Del Potro, I had a great match with him in Australia, I know that’s not going to happen again, that happens very rarely on tennis so I’m expecting a tough match because he played well against Stanislas. I’m sure if he’s able to beat Murray it’s going to be a tough one. I like his game and the way he’s been coming through to rankings is impressive. Whereas with Andy I’ve been having more problems, it’s been more difficult to beat him but then again I haven’t played him on clay, I was supposed to play him on the Davis Cup but they decided to not make him play so, which was funny but I’m excited to be first to go to semi finals and let’s see what happens in the semis tomorrow.

Q: Which of the components of your game are you more satisfied with at the moment? And which ones are you not so satisfied with?
A: Well, I think this week is a kind of a different week, the balls fly, it’s quick, you can play quick points if you want, which is a good thing and on top of that I have also been trying to keep the points short… Let’s say it’s been a tough week because I haven’t been playing those regular Spaniards and guys who want to extend the rally, I’ve been playing guys who have been standing in trying to keep the points short and have big services like Soderling and Roddick. It’s never easy but at the same time I’ve always been a dominant player from the baseline, so I know whoever I’m going to get in the semis is going to be much different, I’m going to have to work much harder and the rallies will be extended and it’s going to come down partly to the fitness level and to the mental strength as well, which I haven’t had to show quite that much yet this week. I’m not saying that I’m uncertain about what is going to happen in the semis but there are good things in my game, there are also bad things and I just feel like I have to tighten up a few things and there are definitely big improvements that I can use this week, I just haven’t had to show them yet.

Q: Playing in the altitude of Madrid, what is the shot that is most difficult to control? Is there a shot that you don’t use as much as you would somewhere else?
A: No… I mean, balls fly here but at the same time I feel like I have control of the ball, which it’s a good thing because sometimes, you know, a few years ago I would get on clay and I would really struggle with the returns or just to be able to play the back hand over shoulder height at the beginning and that doesn’t seem to be a problem for me anymore during this week and I think that’s definitely a good sign when looking ahead to the French open where the bounce is not going to be that bad. Certainly the slice floats but I feel that I have it under control, I’m not missing any easy ones and those are all good things, so, I feel like I have a decent amount of control over the ball this week.

Q: Roger, Del Potro said yesterday that he is “the best of the bad ones” and he put you and the other 3 in different league. Do you agree? Do you see such a big gap between him and you 4?
A: Well, I don’t know how the points have been but we have been the most dominant and solid. He’s got many tournaments coming up that needs to defend, it’s going to be interesting to see how he’s going to play first up against the two possibilities that are going to be highly ranked at the French and at Wimbledon, that’s definitely going to give him some chances. I guess he’s right but at the same time, all the other players are very strong too, I think that the pack behind us are solid and dangerous players. They are also playing consistently and that’s why they’re coming through to the quarters very regularly and very comfortably, actually. Also he’s one of the youngest and therefore has most potential to improve, with Tsonga I guess.

Q: If it is Andy tomorrow, do you feel that it is about time that you beat him? I think that he’s won the last four between you and I know that you want to protect the difference in points between your second ranking and his third ranking.
A: Not really, it’s not my goal. I want to get back to number 1 but he’s been playing very well, very consistent, he’s maybe going to struggle a bit more on clay but that’s kind of normal, you know, it’s early in the season on clay and it’s short for us, we only play a handful of tournaments and it’s kind of tough but, sure, I’d like to beat him, at least on clay, especially after losing to him so many times this year on hard court… I just have to make sure that I put on a solid performance.

Q: Would you like to play in Buenos Aires in the Telmex cup? People would be very excited to see you there because we have never seen you in Buenos Aires.
A: It’s a long way. The reason why I never go there is because it’s in the season I usually play in Europe or in Dubai, isn’t it? And I don’t usually go on clay before Indian Wells or Miami. I wish I could go to South America more often, to be quite honest, but the swing they have is a bad timing for me, the travelling is hard so I have to pick my weeks and I hope that if I don’t come for a tournament I will eventually play some exhibitions at least, because I know that I have many big fans over there, especially in Argentina and there are many good players, so, who knows, before we even know it I’m going to be there for Davis Cup, so we never know.

Q: Did you change anything technically about your backhands?
A: Not really, it’s just a feeling I have and thanks to all the other players who played to my backhand it’s improving, you know, it’s a good thing! Especially on clay where there is more of the kick serves and I have to slice them, I always do this on all surfaces and it’s been a successful play but it’s important to be able to come over it, also in the being able to step in on the return and to take it early. It’s just important to find the right timing and with the bad bounce on clay you have to be very selective but I feel like I’m hitting it OK, which is a good thing.

didadida
05-16-2009, 01:50 PM
he looks in a very good mood and confident

good luck tonight Roger

NYCtennisfan
05-16-2009, 03:01 PM
Interesting comments he made regarding Murray. Usually he'll say something about his own play against Murray that winds up being the deciding factor in the outcome, but here he's saying that he really hasn't been able to beat Murray and just wants to put in a solid performance. He also says that they 'haven't played on clay' before as if it's a last refuge.

Hopefully he has two strong matches with the serve and fh to close this tournament.

SUKTUEN
05-16-2009, 04:00 PM
OFF COURT - MY FACEBOOK ACCOUNT


Dear Fans

My fan community on facebook is steadily growing - a great thing to see! Along with my website, my facebook account is the perfect place to exchange all kinds of information, pictures, videos, links, etc. I'm already looking forward to seeing you all there, just follow the link below to access my page.

Kind regards
Roger


http://www.facebook.com/Federer?sid=5436c463ab9899edfbc0978bb2129d01&ref=search

Federerhingis
05-16-2009, 07:03 PM
OFF COURT - MY FACEBOOK ACCOUNT


Dear Fans

My fan community on facebook is steadily growing - a great thing to see! Along with my website, my facebook account is the perfect place to exchange all kinds of information, pictures, videos, links, etc. I'm already looking forward to seeing you all there, just follow the link below to access my page.

Kind regards
Roger


http://www.facebook.com/Federer?sid=5436c463ab9899edfbc0978bb2129d01&ref=search



Thanks dear Suki for posting. I was not even aware Roger had a link on facebook. :wavey: :hug:

Rommella
05-16-2009, 11:02 PM
Interesting comments he made regarding Murray. Usually he'll say something about his own play against Murray that winds up being the deciding factor in the outcome, but here he's saying that he really hasn't been able to beat Murray and just wants to put in a solid performance. He also says that they 'haven't played on clay' before as if it's a last refuge.

This is the closest he's gotten to admitting that Andy's got his number. This year, he's done some bit of trash-talking as regards Andy and got whacked each time. He dished out some on Novak, too, and he's 0-2 against him this year. Humility much?

SUKTUEN
05-17-2009, 07:10 AM
Thanks dear Suki for posting. I was not even aware Roger had a link on facebook. :wavey: :hug:

you are welcome~~~~:D

Daniel
05-17-2009, 08:28 AM
Nadal faces Federer at Madrid final

By PAUL LOGOTHETIS, AP Sports Writer

MADRID (AP)—Roger Federer will face Rafael Nadal for a championship.

On clay. In Spain.

The two rivals set up their first clash since the Australian Open when Nadal saved three match points to beat Novak Djokovic 3-6, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (9) on Saturday.

Playing their fourth match this year, they needed a Masters Series record 4 hours, 3 minutes to decide matters at the Magic Box tennis center. Federer beat Juan Martin del Potro 6-3, 6-4 in their semifinal.

Top-ranked Nadal’s 33rd straight win on clay lifted him into his seventh final this season, but he will be nursing a right knee injury into Sunday’s match.

Federer has lost his last five matches against Nadal, including the finals at the French Open, Wimbledon and Australia in February, when the Swiss player was in tears after the defeat.

“What’s important for me is to get past that semifinal hurdle that I haven’t been able to get past in the last couple of months,” Federer said ahead of their 16th meeting in a final. “I feel like playing him anywhere is a challenge. The extra flair here is that it’s in Spain.”

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Earlier, top-ranked Dinara Safina beat Patty Schnyder 6-4, 6-2 to set up a final against teenager Caroline Wozniacki, who put away former No. 1 Amelie Mauresmo 7-6 (1), 6-3.

Nadal, who won in the Spanish capital in 2005 when the event was played on indoor hard court, is 9-1 on clay against Federer, who didn’t doubt Nadal would be in top shape for the pairs first match in Spain.

“They asked me the same question in Australia,” said Federer, who faced Nadal after he had won a grueling five-set match against Fernando Verdasco. “I think with the adrenaline and the crowd he’s going to be the Rafa we know tomorrow.”

It’s the mental aspect that Federer will have to prepare for as he comes face-to-face with Nadal for the first time since the Spaniard denied him a chance to equal Pete Sampras’ record of 14 Grand Slam wins.

Djokovic was also left red-eyed after feeling in control for most of Saturday’s match.

“It’s frustrating when you play so well and you can’t win,” No. 4-ranked Djokovic said.

Nadal complained of discomfort in his right knee before the match, which hampered his ability to move as he made uncharacteristic errors that allowed for an early break in the first set.

Nadal had his leg wrapped in the second set before leveling.

In the deciding tiebreaker, Djokovic watched Nadal hit forehand winners down the near line to save his first two match points. The Serb then beat Nadal with a passing shot to save a match point of his own.

But leading 9-8, Djokovic sent the ball out and then netted on Nadal’s next match point to end the longest three-set match in the history of Masters tournaments, the ATP level below the Grand Slams.

“I love these matches, it’s very special to play these matches,” said Nadal, who improved to 27-1 in clay semifinals. “If I don’t fight here, when am I going to fight?”

Despite 50 unforced errors against Djokovic, Nadal’s perseverance paid off as he rallied the 12,500 spectators with crucial winners to reach his 26th clay-court final. He has won 25 of those.

Djokovic, who missed a chance to take the No. 3 ranking from Andy Murray, added his latest loss to Nadal to those recently in the Olympics, the Davis Cup, and finals at Monte Carlo and Rome.

“I played one of my best on this surface, so … I don’t think you need my comments, you saw everything,” Djokovic said. “A couple of points decided the winner.”

Federer improved to 5-0 against del Potro, who has yet to take a set off the former No. 1. He will be going for his 15th Masters title—and first in nearly two years—which would allow him to equal the 22-year-old Nadal’s tally. Only Andre Agassi has won more with 17.

Safina, coming off a victory at Rome, reached her fifth final of the season by staying undefeated in four meetings against Schnyder.

Wozniacki, who hasn’t dropped a set this week to reach her third final of the season, saved two set points before rallying to take the first and then clinched it on her second match point when Mauresmo hit long.

www.yahoosports.com/ten

SUKTUEN
05-17-2009, 03:31 PM
:worship:

Daniel
05-17-2009, 03:55 PM
Madrid Masters: Federer wins first title of 2009
By Tennis Guru on May 17, 2009 in ATP, Featured, Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer, Tennis News

XHello there! If you are new here, you might want to subscribe to the RSS feed for updates on this topic.
Powered by WP Greet BoxWorld number two Roger Federer finally ended the title drought this year by winning the Mutua Madrileña Madrid Open, beating top-ranked Rafael Nadal in two sets 6-4, 6-4. The Swiss star also denied the Spaniard the chance to clinch all three ATP claycourt Masters title in a single year.

Federer simply outplayed his rival, who was visibly weary after winning an epic semifinal match against Serbian Novak Djokovic yesterday (read related article HERE).

The title win propels Federer’s ATP Masters title haul to 15, tying Nadal’s record.Both players are in the position to overtake Andre Agassi’s record of 17 Masters titles.

Federer’s victory once again reignited the rivalry between the two. The 13-time Grand Slam champion will head to Paris with newfound confidence on his claycourt game.

Meanwhile, in doubles - the Serbian-Canadian duo of Nenad Zimonjic and Daniel Nestor clinched their fifth title of the season by defeating Simon Aspelin and Wesley Moodie 6-4, 6-4.

SUKTUEN
05-17-2009, 04:49 PM
Congrat Roger !!!!!

my tennis King!!!!!!!:bounce::bounce:

juninhOH
05-17-2009, 06:05 PM
I want to read the press conference :)

Eden
05-17-2009, 07:18 PM
I want to read the press conference :)

It hasn't been posted yet unfortunately, but we get some comments from Roger in this article:


http://www.madrid-open.com/media/uploads/noticias/a_6.jpg

58th tour title "satisfying" for Federer

Mutua Madrileña Madrid Open champion Roger Federer said he had never stopped believing he would win a title in 2009, despite failing to reach the final of an event since the Australian Open in January.

“I’ve had some bad losses this year in terms of the way I’ve played but I’ve felt it coming in the past few weeks so it’s very satisfying,” said the Swiss.

The first two-time champion in Madrid (previously the tournament had seven different winners) Federer said he had played a solid clay court match.

“I though I played well – you have to against Rafa on clay. There are no easy ways against him and he’s not going to hand it to you,” said the 27-year-old former world No.1.

“I served well, mixed it up well, took all the right decisions today. In the end it looked comfortable for me out there so it’s a good win for me and very satisfying.”

Celebrating his 58th career title and 15th Masters Series trophy, Federer said that he didn’t feel any great sense of relief in breaking his run of match losses to Nadal.

“I got so close in Australia and at Wimbledon so it wasn’t a question of ‘oh, finally’, said Federer. “Even though I lost I had to keep the belief. The press was all telling me that he was invincible and I didn’t want to believe what the press was saying.”

And Federer said that he didn’t feel that Rafa’s loss would have any long-term effects on the world No.1’s confidence.

“I know his game inside out. He’s rock solid, does one thing excellently, moves well on this surface and is an excellent competitor. It makes him very difficult to beat.

“He had a bad patch last season and he recovered from that so I don’t think he will have any problems bouncing back from this loss,” said Federer.

Source: http://www.madrid-open.com/site/news/6/3401

Rita
05-18-2009, 07:07 AM
PRESS CONFERENCE
May 17th 2009


PLAYER
Roger FEDERER (SUI)

Roger Federer (SUI) bt Rafa Nadal (ESP): 6 - 4 | 6 - 4

Q. How satisfying is that for you and how well do you think you played?
A. I thought I played really well, I think you have to against Rafa on clay, there are no easy ways there. He is not going to hand it to you and that is what has made him so tough the last few years on this surface. I thought I mixed it up well; I served well and was dangerous on particular return games. I thought I took all the right decisions today and in the end it looked pretty comfortable so it was a perfect win for me.

Q. Are you relieved to beat Rafa Nadal after nearly two years?
A. Well not really. I was so close in Australia and Wimbledon, of course it is nice. It´s not like “oh, finally I got him again”. I felt I was close to Rafa and I felt that, even though you lose, you keep the belief, especially on this type of surface because you come into the press rooms and they all they talk about is Rafa and it works you and you don´t want to believe what the press says, you want to stay positive and that´s what I did. I am very happy that I remained positive and I got the win I needed badly because I have had some rather bad losses this year in terms of the way I played but I think that everything is falling into place and I felt it coming the last few weeks so it is the right time to get a victory like this.

Q. You said to is yesterday that you might just wake up this morning and go for it. You did?
A. Yeah, I think so. I definitely didn´t try to go into massive amounts of rallies but at the same time, Rafa was missing some returns and I kept him guessing many times. We have both played better, in the past, from the baseline and I´m sure that´s what it is going to take to beat Rafa at the French Open. This was a particular clay court match against each other; for both of us we both had trouble controlling the ball, because the pints were kept shorter it was better for my game and that´s why I won today.

Q. After your Hamburg title two years ago, you said that you learned something about how to play Rafa on clay; Did you learn something new about his game today, thinking about Paris?
A. Not a whole lot. I know his game inside out. It´s not like he changes many things, he is just rock solid like when Leyton Hewitt was no. 1 and all those other guys who were dominating from the baseline. He does his one thing excellent and he is the best mover on this surface.
He is just an excellent competitor and that is what makes him so difficult to beat.
I know what you have to do but it´s not easy to do against him because he is so good.

Q. Did you notice that he was slightly slower today than usual?
A. No, not really. I think and I am sure - that´s my approach anyway – that when I go into a match and I start and finish a match there are no excuses, otherwise you retire during the match, which is not my philosophy, or you don´t play, but I don´t think you should play injured or hurt or whatever it is. We didn´t have many rallies so I don´t know where you can see that he was slow. As I said, conditions were tough out there, tough to control the ball and I saw some of those things against Djokovic, that he was struggling in the beginning to control his serve and probably Djokovic should have finished him off in two but then the adrenalin and the whole thing that Rafa came back with made it difficult for him to close out the match so I just raced to the finish line and it was all over before he could react so it was a good match.

Q. First of all congratulations, they said that the clay is a little bit hard because Madrid is a little but high for the players; we want to know if it was a problem for you because you beat Nadal here?
A. Yes, I think it was tough for both of us today. You could see that we both struggled to control the balls but like I said yesterday I don´t think it´s so extreme, it´s not like it´s impossible to control. I think it´s interesting to be playing on clay at a different altitude, I´ve played in Gstad before which gives you opportunities to play aggressive and it´s more interesting that you have the chance to come forward and you have the chance to play aggressive and it´s not so easy to hit passing shots because at times on other surfaces when it´s so slow it´s almost impossible to come to the net because the guy is just moving past so well that this is a nice change for me.

Q. You said in Rome that since your back problems you were having trouble finding the motion of your serve the way it used to be before; it seems that this week things sort of clicked for you?
A. I had some good serving already this year but then at the same time I couldn´t do it consistently. I would go through a few games where I would serve very well and then get broken a couple of time is a row and that´s not something that I am used to. I just felt that I couldn´t hit my spot so well and today and this whole week it has been coming back. I am obviously aware that this is altitude and that it´s easier to serve well here and to mix it up but still I feel, in my body, that the serves are working, the motion as well, I have the right rhythm and I think that is very good looking forward to the French Open where it is important to serve well, for me.

Q. How important is this win for you going into the French, does it massively change your confidence going in?
A. Yes, I think that at this stage it does. Now that I haven´t won a tournament yet this year, in other years it didn´t matter whether I won or lost, I was always one of the top two or favorites. This year it looked like other guys might come moving up but I always knew that I was going to get stronger week by week on clay, obviously I didn´t give myself the best opportunity in Monaco but I worked extremely hard in the two off weeks I had before and after Rome and it´s all finally paying off, it´s not the moment to get carried away but it is definitely good for my confidence especially beating Rafa in the final so it definitely proves that I am doing the right things and I am working extremely hard and it is paying off so it´s a nice feeling. I am very excited about going to Paris whereas a couple of weeks ago I was still a little bit unsure about my game and not sure if I could win the French. Obviously that has not changed.

Q. Confidence is a fragile thing for players and this is now Rafa´s first defeat in 33 clay court games and he has lost to you as well, his main rival; Do you think that might have some impact on his psychology going into Paris?
A. I snapped his streak at 81, a couple of years ago and it didn´t really bother him too much – he went back on another streak so I don´t think so. Sure, it´s nice to beat him in his own country where it is probably the hardest, you see the spectators and it´s pretty tough when it gets close plus he has that game which keeps you doubting because you have to keep going for your shots and as the crowd gets into it it´s hard but I don´t think that’s he is going to be damaged by this. He has played so well in Monaco, Barcelona and Rome, I think this is probably the best clay court season he has had so far so I´m sure he will be rock solid in Paris again.

Q. Andre Agassi was talking yesterday about the Slams and he said that he thought Nadal had a chance of winning all four this year; do you think that he has improved that much and has a chance of doing that?
A. Well he is the only guy who has obviously. I don´t know, same as me the last few years when a guy wins the Australian Open. I think when a guy wins the Australian Open and his better surface is clay then sure there is a big chance that he might go two for two but I came very close a few times and it´s not the easiest thing to do. I said a couple of weeks ago that he definitely has a chance. There are guys who don´t want to allow him to do that and I am the first guy so... I have a great record at Wimbledon and the US Open and I have my dreams at the French Open so I have some say there hopefully.

Q. You bet Rafa Nadal, one hour ago, two years ago and you bet him today to; What about in Roland Garros, will you beat him because we heard that he was a little bit tired and he hadn´t slept too well?
A. I hope that when we play each other that he is not going to sleep much either because he knows that I am waiting the next day. I don´t think that it makes any difference that he played a long match yesterday and that he didn´t sleep much. Sure, it´s not the perfect preparation but I think that we are all tough enough to take it so that´s why he was out there today trying hard for the spectators and for himself. I am sure Paris is a different circumstance, he has never lost there, obviously his confidence is very high there but I think that we have seen this week, that if you play Rafa the right way there are chances whereas sometimes he has gone out and dominated just about everybody on clay and it is good from the other players and also from myself, that it´s most important because I am always the one gunning after Rafa, especially at the French Open and I hope that this year could be the right one.

Daniel
05-18-2009, 08:32 AM
those ugly girls next to him :rolleyes:
http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/news?slug=reu-menmadridfederer_pix&prov=reuters&type=lgns

Madrid win lifts Federer for tilt at French Open

MADRID, May 17 (Reuters) - Defeating claycourt king Rafael Nadal on Sunday has convinced Roger Federer the pieces are falling into place to enable him to seize the Spaniard’s French Open crown and win the only grand slam title that eludes him.

The Swiss world number two has lost to Nadal in the final at Roland Garros the past three years and fell to his 22-year-old rival in the semi-finals in 2005.

He said his 6-4 6-4 victory over number one Nadal in the Madrid Open final on clay had come at the perfect time with the French Open starting in Paris at the end of the month.

“I think everything is falling into place. I kind of felt it coming the last few weeks,” Federer, 27, told a news conference.

“This year it looked like other guys might be moving up but I always knew that I was going to get stronger week by week on clay,” he added.

“So it’s a nice feeling and I’m very excited going into Paris now whereas maybe a couple of weeks ago I was still a little bit unsure about my game and not sure whether I could win the French and now that’s changed.”

Federer said Nadal was unlikely to be affected too much by only his fifth defeat on his favoured surface in 155 matches since the start of 2005.

“I snapped his streak at 81 a couple of years ago and it didn’t really bother him too much,” he said, referring to his victory over Nadal in the final of the 2007 Hamburg Masters.

“I don’t think he’s going to take any damage away from this. He’s played so well in Monaco, Barcelona and Rome that this is probably the best claycourt season he’s had.

“So I’m sure he’s going to be rock solid in Paris again.”

Speaking at a separate news conference later on Sunday, Nadal said the Madrid Open—a new clay event this year with faster courts than Paris that better suit Federer’s game — could not be compared with the French Open.

“I don’t think there is too much to analyse from this defeat,” he said. “He broke my serve twice and that was that, I was on my way home. I don’t think it will make any difference at Roland Garros.” (Editing by Sonia Oxley; To query or comment on this story email sportsfeedback@thomsonreuters.com)

SUKTUEN
05-18-2009, 02:51 PM
thanks!

recessional
05-18-2009, 06:44 PM
Not really an article, but...

From Andy Roddick's Twitter (start reading at the bottom):

9. sometimes he is gonna pay the consequences of physical encounters as well.... all part of the game and does not take away from feds win

10. @SoAZtec i dont agree with this point... if his style gets credit for wearing other people down then it needs to be pointed out that

11. @irisjumbe point being its not even an argument on clay... calm down

12. tourney...... great week of paying by both guys and cant wait for the french!

13. the conditions in madrid were fast because of the altitude and dry air... slower conditions in paris and 3 out of 5 sets make it a different

14. roger definitely made a statement and this certainly adds another element of intrigue for roland garros!

15. and i am very suprised some of u have turned so fast... i guarantee u roger would tell u the same thing. rafa is the favorite for the french

16. in the final. he played extremely clean confident tennis throughout... that being said rafa is still the best clay player in the world

17. ok so i have had a lot of q's about the rafa/fed match from yesterday .... here goes... roger was the best player last week and not just

I love Andy so. :awww: :inlove: Totally following him now. :D

SUKTUEN
05-19-2009, 02:02 PM
Oh thanks Andy!!!!!!!!

You really care Roger!:devil:

nobama
05-19-2009, 02:04 PM
Translated by member vrazkar on rf.com

There is an article about an interview that Roger gave before the final in Madrid. I've tried to translate it below as it seemed interesting to me.

Happy Federer warns his opponents
17.05.2009
In a big interview for the newspaper "Sunday" tennis superstar Roger Federer warns his opponents against writing him off because of being a husband and father. He pictures the way he plans to combine family and profession.
Federer's form curve is obviously directed upwards. Today at 16 o'clock he will play on the final in Madrid. However he is not fully contented with himself yet. In the newspaper "Sunday" the Basel superstar says: "What I lack in the moment is the confidence, that I had before, especially against the top 4 players."
The question is how he'll restore this confidence. Confidence which he'll make good use of against the #1 Rafael Nadal today. Federer knows the formula: "This might be just a single victory." The answer is not recruiting a new coach. The present tennis team Federer is good enough for achieving big wins and titles.
Many people say a lot
The paper "Sunday" goes on that there are voices saying that Federer isn't open to advice, doesn't want to listen to different opinions. Federer is cool: "There are many people who say a lot". He believes that success will return. He wants to break the Sampras's record of 14 GS but not at any cost. "I am very close and would love to succeed but I don't chase this with sick ambitions."
Federer believes that his kid who will be born in the summer will give him a big impulse. "Our common dream has always been that our children get born while I still play tennis. Now the first child is on its way and I already feel big joy. I just need to stay around some more years so that my child can consciously see me playing."
His wife and his family want to accompany him also in the future. "We will be a tennis family on the road", Federer says. His family planning is perfect and he is very happy. He also warns his opponents: "This satisfaction and happiness also inspire me. I can just advise against writing off the husband and father Federer."
http://bazonline.ch/sport/tennis/Gluecklicher-Federer-warnt-seine-Gegner/story/16111890 (http://bazonline.ch/sport/tennis/Gluecklicher-Federer-warnt-seine-Gegner/story/16111890)

SUKTUEN
05-19-2009, 02:21 PM
thankyou so much Mrs.B!

nobama
05-20-2009, 12:08 AM
Posted on rf.com

done with the Welt Online interview
"Noone should write off Father Federer" -- 19.05.2009
http://www.welt.de/sport/article3768668/Niemand-sollte-den-Vater-Federer-abschreiben.html (http://www.welt.de/sport/article3768668/Niemand-sollte-den-Vater-Federer-abschreiben.html)
In the middle of the decade he was the best tennis player in the world. But Roger Federer actually conquered the fans' hearts for the first time, only during the last twelve months, when Rafael Nadal caused him consecutive painful defeats. In an interview on WELT ONLINE the Swiss reveals how he wants to achieve his latest great career goals.

Roger Federer (27) is the most successful active tennis player of our days - till now he has won 57 tournaments, among which 13 Grand Slam Titles. But recently he has shown signs of weakness, he has been defeated many times by Rafael Nadal, and he has been waiting since October 2008 for a tournament victory - until he beat his steady rival on Sunday at the final in Madrid.

WELT ONLINE: Mr. Federer, next week the French Open begins. Where do you see yourself standing right now, just before the major tournaments in Paris and then at Wimbledon?
Roger Federer: I'm convinced that, after a hard year in 2008, I am again fully on the right way. This has also to do with the fact that I feel much fresher and fitter.

WELT ONLINE: Can a single victory like the one in Madrid change everything?
Roger Federer: Sometimes a great success is enough. Everything comes and goes very quickly in tennis. I haven't been saying without a reason, when I was no1, that nothing is for granted when it comes to my dominance.

WELT ONLINE: It seemed like a given fact however - after all you have dominated the tennis world for many years. Now you're still only (sic) no2, and therefore recently people say constantly that you're going through a crisis.
Roger Federer: I myself have created these great expectations/ high standards. When you remain the no1 for so many years and you only lose 5,6 times in one season, with some more defeats a state of emergency will be proclaimed. But I was never in a crisis. I never really lost my calm, and I have always looked into the situation with composure.

WELT ONLINE: Really? Boris Becker, after a sudden fall from the top of the world, once said: Tennis is brutal.
Roger Federer: This is in the nature of things - when you're out there all alone, you can't hide. There's noone to catch (?) you, like in a football team. You can win ten tournaments in a row, everything's great. But even if you lose (only) two times in a row, people start asking questions. Sometimes even you yourself start wondering. That's something you can't prevent.

WELT ONLINE: Many great athletes have felt true/genuine support from the beginning, while you had to walk off with big defeats first. What do you think of this?
Roger Federer: Yes, particularly after Wimbledon, last year. People were sad for me rather than happy for Nadal. I found that almost bitter for him. Many suddenly understood: Federer's wins are not for granted. It makes someone more human, if one loses sometimes.

WELT ONLINE: There have been voices that said, Federer is not receptive to advice, he wants no guidance.
Roger Federer: There are many who say much. I am not standing on a memorial (pontium?) and say: I know everything, I can do everything. I see the weaknesses, I see the strengths. And I bear the consequences. I examine myself every day, I am my own strict judge. Otherwise I would have never managed to have these successes.

WELT ONLINE: Observers have interpreted the latest developments this way: The big pack, that has hunted in vain for years, have now lost their respect for Federer. Because he has no longer the aura of the Invincible.
Roger Federer: Maybe. I never felt though, that there was a great pressure for other players to stand against me. You could get out on court and you had an easy job: either lose, which was nothing special, or be the hero who brought Federer to his knees.

WELT ONLINE: You are still highly motivated, even though you have won everything. Are you ever tired of tennis?
Roger Federer: I love this sport incredibly. There may be a moment once in a year, that I think: Now it would be nice to stay at home. As a junior I had already those zero-willpower-days, because I only depended on my talent.

WELT ONLINE: How much have you been thinking about the Grand Slam Record? Pete Sampras' 14 titles record is to be beaten.
Roger Federer: A few years ago I said: let me win ten titles, and then we'll talk about it. Now I am damn' close and I would like to make it. But I don't chase this goal with sick ambition. This is imputed to me indeed, but it's not true. I read: Federer fails at Wimbledon, at the Australian, because he has Sampras' recond in mind. That is silly.

WELT ONLINE: A few weeks ago you got married to your partner Mirka Vavrinec, and you will soon become a father for the first time. How much will this affect your career?
Roger Federer: My life's gonna change for sure. But I don't feel that this is going to make me lethargic/unenthusiastic. More likely the contrary: this will give me a boost. Our shared dream has always been that our children would be born while I would still be playing tennis. And now the first child is on the way, and I already feel great anticipation.

WELT ONLINE: Will your wife still travel with you so regularly?
Roger Federer: I would like this very much. And we have the means - certainly more than others - to sort out the financial matters and to organise the practical matters. We will be a travelling tennis-family. Right now I feel very happy. And this happiness, this satisfaction in my life - these feelings inspire me. I wouldn't advise anyone to write off husband and father Federer.

WELT ONLINE: Have you already talked to other tennisfathers about the impact of the birth of a child?
Roger Federer: No, not yet. Right now all I wish for is that our child is healthy, that everything turns out well. In the beginning one thinks: is it going to be a boy? is it going to be a girl? But then there is only one thought, that there will be no complications. The attitude is changing very quickly.

WELT ONLINE: The birth date is during summer. Approximately during Wimbledon?
Roger Federer (laughing) : There is nothing to worm out of us - and this is the right thing to do.

FedFan_2007
05-20-2009, 12:28 AM
:worship: Father Federer

Or Levy
05-20-2009, 11:07 AM
Goodness me. What a statement. He just waited for a chance to say it, I believe.

SUKTUEN
05-20-2009, 02:09 PM
thanks!

didadida
05-20-2009, 08:55 PM
very nice interview

OMG during Wimby

xohxmyx
05-21-2009, 10:29 AM
heres a (particularly bias and not overly pleasent) article which was written in my local paper "The Courier"

Nadal can be beaten: Federer

PARIS. Rafael nadal is poised to become the first man to claim five successive French Open Titles and once again crush Roger Federers fading, lifetime ambition of a career grand slam.

The 22-year old world No.1 may ahve seen his latest , marathon claycourt winning streak halted at 33 by Federer in Madrid.

But the swiss star's hopes of that victory-which came a day after Nadal spent over four hours beating Novak Djokovic in his semi-final- heralding a new dawn seem certain only to usher another dark chapter at Roland Garros where he has lost the last three finals to his Spanish rival.

Two years ago, federer ended Nadal's 81-match streak on clay at Hamburg to instil fresh confidence of finally cracking the French code, but he was to be denied once they resumed hostilities in Paris.

On evidence of the 2008 tournament, where Federer won just four games in a brutally one-sided final, the 13-time grand slam title winner looks doomed.

Adding to the odds stacked against him is Nadal's record of having won all 28 matches he's played in the French capital. Furthermore, in 2008, the Spaniard swept to the title without dropping a set.

But Federer refuses to concede defeat, believing that his win in Madrid, which is his 58th career title, but first of 2009 could be another launchpad.

"He has never lost in Paris so obviously his confidence is very high, but i think we have seen that if you play Rafa the right way there are chances" said the 27-year-old world No.2.

"i know his game inside out. It's not like he changes many things. He is just rock solid like when Leyton Hewitt was No.1 and those other guys who were dominating from the baseline".

"he is the best mover on this surface. He is just an excellent competitor and that is what makes him so difficult to beat".
"i know what you have to do but it's not easy to do agaisnt him because he is so good"

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
the first bold statement just irritates me...why suddenly now is it a fading dream? yes ok so he hasn't had the amount of wins he normally has but its not like he's old and useless all of a sudden.

and the second statement is the kind that irritates me most of all!:( why is it that whenever someone loses wither it be federer or nadal, djokovic or murray whoever...no one can ever just say "oh well the better man won" why is it always..."oh well he played for 4 hours yesterday"..."oh his back was playing up"...."oh it was to hot and im a cry-baby serb"(:lol:)....on the day, Federer was infact Betterer....and he won...Nadal played for like 5 hours in the AO semi against Verdasco and he still got through and beat Roger in the final....it just seems like a cop-out.

and the part about Federer knowing Rafas game inside-out is also true Rafa's game IMO never changes its 9 times out of 10 really good but the same game, just a different day....by now you would think he would have figured out a way to crack it:rolleyes:

Dini
05-21-2009, 11:14 AM
Amy don't bother getting annoyed, I also hate these clearly biased and non-factual articles. They really put me off.

:sobbing:

SUKTUEN
05-21-2009, 03:26 PM
:worship:

Rita
05-21-2009, 07:46 PM
Sampras tips Federer to win Wimbledon
May 21, 2009 - 7:44PM

Tennis great Pete Sampras tipped Roger Federer to regain his Wimbledon crown from Rafael Nadal, who will be carrying extra pressure as defending champion.

The American, who won Wimbledon seven times, said he sensed Federer was hungry for another title.

"It will be interesting for Rafa to come back as defending champion as before he was always just a contender, so there will be a bit more pressure on him this year," he said as he launched the Venetian Macau Showdown on Thursday.

"Roger is very hungry for the title and he came so close last year.

"In last year's final Roger and Rafa really transcended the sport. It's also a good opportunity for players like Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic to come through.

"If I was to put money on it I would say Roger, but he's not a shoo-in."

If Federer does win Wimbledon he could equal or even beat Sampras' record 14 Grand Slam titles. The Swiss superstar currently has 13 and has a chance to make it 14 at next week's French Open, although clay is not his best surface.

Meanwhile, Sampras, who retired after winning the 2002 US Open, dismissed suggestions that the standard of American men's tennis was in decline, saying it had always gone in cycles.

"In the early 1990s people were saying the same thing then Andre (Agassi), Jim (Courier), Michael Chang and myself came along," he said.

"And the state of American men's tennis is not poor right now. We've got Andy (Roddick) and James (Blake).

"It's just that people expect No.1s and Roger and Nadal are head and shoulders above everyone else.

"Hopefully we will get back to being right at the top and we have some promising players coming through who can hopefully do that."

Sampras will play an exhibition game in Macau in October against old rival Andre Agassi.

© 2009 AFP
http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-sport/sampras-tips-federer-to-win-wimbledon-20090521-bh0a.html

Daniel
05-22-2009, 08:02 AM
www.yahoosports.com/ten

HONG KONG (AP)—Pete Sampras thinks his record of 14 Grand Slam titles will be tied by Roger Federer at Wimbledon this year.

Sampras made the prediction Thursday while discussing an October exhibition match against his old rival Andre Agassi in Macau.

Federer needs one more major title to match Sampras’ mark. Sampras never managed to win the French Open before he retired. Federer hasn’t won the title at Roland Garros, either, leaving Wimbledon as the most likely opportunity for him to tie Sampras.

Federer’s five-year winning streak at Wimbledon ended last year in a five-set final loss to Spaniard Rafael Nadal, who also won the French Open last year and the Australian Open in January.

“It will be interesting for Rafa to come back as defending champion as before he was always just a contender, so there will be a bit more pressure on him this year,” Sampras said of the looming Wimbledon tournament. “Roger is very hungry for the title and he came so close last year.

“If I was to put my money on it, I would say Roger, but he’s not a shoo-in.”

While Sampras was mulling over Federer’s prospects, he was reliving his own past clashes with Agassi.

The two Americans will face off on Oct. 25 at The Venetian Macao casino in the Chinese territory and gambling enclave.

Praising Agassi’s service return and passing shots, Sampras said in a telephone conference: “We always had really tough matches and we brought out the best in each other.”

When the duo were top and second-ranked men’s players in the world in the mid-1990s, the rivalry “transcended the sport,” Sampras said.

“When people ask me who my great rival is I always tell them Andre.”

Sampras won 64 singles titles, and Agassi took 60, including being the last man to win all four grand slam titles over his career.

In 34 meetings between the two, Sampras won 20, including the finals of the U.S. Open in 1990, 1995 and 2002, plus Wimbledon in 1999. Agassi beat Sampras in the 1995 Australian Open final.

The Sampras-Agassi exhibition recalled brighter times for American tennis, but Sampras said the presence of Andy Roddick (No.6) and James Blake (No.16) in the world’s top 20 showed the U.S. game was not in bad shape.

“It tends to go in cycles,” Sampras said. “In the early 1990s people were saying the same thing and then Andre, Jim (Courier), Michael Chang and myself came along.”

SUKTUEN
05-22-2009, 06:42 PM
thanks~~~

kissakiss
05-23-2009, 01:23 PM
An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE FRENCH OPEN

22 May 2009

Paris, France

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You're here in Paris. Everybody in the world would like to be in Paris. It's everybody's dream as a tourist. How do you feel about it?

ROGER FEDERER: I'm happy, too. I only get here twice a year, you know, for big events, you know. I hope one day I can come back as a tourist, too.

Q. Right now your morale is good? I know you've improved the morale of all your fans from my e‑mail messages anyway.

ROGER FEDERER: Have I? That's good to hear.

Q. How's yours?

ROGER FEDERER: I feel fine, you know. I'm in a good mood. My game is doing well. I feel like I'm practicing well this week.

I didn't have any problems to, you know, adapt to the different conditions here than in Madrid. But also important is that I'm, you know, mentally and physically fresh at this stage, and I feel like I am.

Of course, it's important I come through the first round and find my way through the tournament. But of course the tournament victory in Madrid was a big boost for me.

Q. Just a bit like Bud's question, but the fact that you speak French, how much more do you think it helps you sort of appreciate Roland Garros and just feel at ease here, compared to a player, say, who doesn't speak French just in the organization, being in the city?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, it definitely helps. I felt like it's hard to get around sometimes in Madrid, for instance, where I don't speak the language. I don't go to many countries where, you know, I don't speak the language. And if I do, they do speak quite good English. Spain is a bit more difficult because Spanish is a such a big language in the world. It made it a bit harder.

Here everything here is very natural, very easy. They're helpful. It's a nice tournament. I like coming here.

Q. What is the key point of training for this tournament on a clay court?

ROGER FEDERER: Getting used to, you know, the conditions again here in Paris. It's been a year, so you've just got to, you know, feel your way into Chatrier Court, Suzanne Lenglen Court, the bounce, the sliding, how much does it slide and everything. That takes a few days and everything.

I felt everything happened very, very quickly for me. For instance, today I'm only going to hit for an hour because I already played so much the last few weeks. At this stage, it's just about, you know, pacing myself, as well, and doing the right things.

So it's resting up quite a bit, you know. But at the same time, when I'm on the court, it's more quality than quantity this week.

Q. You played some offensive tennis in Madrid. Do you think it's a style of play you could repeat at the French Open, even though the surface is different than in Madrid?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I kind of always feel like I play offensive. I'm not the guy to wait for an error from the opponent, except if the scoreline suggests that I have to play differently.

But, no, I mean, I tried, you know, last week to play as good as I could. I decided for the finals to play a bit more offensive than what I usually so and it worked, so that was a good thing.

But other than that, you know, the rounds before that I just tried to play my game, and it worked. I was happy the way I played.

Q. What do you expect from Alberto Martin, your first rival?

ROGER FEDERER: I think we played once before, I'm not 100% sure. In Monaco, I think we played. Yeah, I mean, we know each other since a while. We've been on tour for quite some time. You know, he's one of those Spaniards who's gonna to make it hard for you. It's important for me to be able to take control from the baseline and play aggressive in such a player, not let him get too much rhythm.

But that's definitely a test in the first round. I guess we'll see.

Q. You said you miss the Spaniards, playing the Spaniards on the clay.

ROGER FEDERER: Here we go. First up.

Q. You're one of the few people who knows what it feels like to dominate a particular tournament the way Nadal has here. Your success, for example, at Wimbledon year after year, or the US Open. Is there a difference when you arrive at a tournament like one of those where you have had a lot of success? Do you arrive with a different mindset or feeling coming to a place that you've had a lot of success?

ROGER FEDERER: You mean compared to this, or...

Well, sort of. Maybe a little bit, I guess. You know, just because especially if you come back to Wimbledon or US Open when I won three, four, five times in a row, sure. Nothing else is acceptable than a victory, I feel. You know, everything else would be a big loss.
But at the same time, you take every tournament round by round, you know, just because you don't want to get ahead of yourself because you know the road is long to victory.

For me, being so long on tour now, I take every tournament very, very seriously. I'm as professional as ever and I'm working as hard as ever. I'm not underestimating any opponents, no matter if I had had success there or not.

But it maybe gives you a slight edge knowing you've been successful at a certain tournament.

Q. Besides tennis, which sport do you like to play?

ROGER FEDERER: Um, I used to do all sports when I was younger. Now, obviously the time being short for plenty of other sports. I still like to follow soccer as much as I can. I like to go skiing if I get a chance. You know, play maybe basketball with my friends if I've got a little bit of time. Table tennis, squash, you name it, you know. I like all sort of ball sports.

It's good for coordination, I think. It's good to free your mind sometimes. And other than that, I just like to also relax a little bit.

Q. What's your perspective on this: You won in Madrid and kind of the global buzz is, Roger's back. You've been saying all along you've been feeling pretty good and you've been ranked No. 2 in the world lately, No. 1 before for a long time. How do you put that in perspective? Do you feel that's a positive thing, or is it too much of a knee‑jerk thing and you try and put it in perspective.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, for me, it doesn't really change a whole lot from one week to the next. I always look at the big picture: this year, next year, the next five years. So of course I'm interested how I'm playing and if I'm winning tournaments, you know. But I don't think just because of one tournament or, you know, one first‑round loss or one tournament victory everything changes.

You know, I know I've been doing the right things trying to get back in shape after the problems I've had with my back, you know, just regaining the edge, you know, against my fellow rivals, you know. It's just important that I played well when I had to, and I was able to do that last week in Madrid, which I wasn't before just because, you know, something was lacking in my game, just lack of practice maybe.

Now everything is coming together during the phase of this year, which is most important, you know, ahead of the French Open, Wimbledon right behind. So it's good for me to gain confidence, but, still, work's not done yet. It's just only starting. It's important to stay on top of things, do the right things, and work hard and be positive about this great challenge ahead now.

Q. I'm glad to hear you mention the words "five years," because I had so much mail after Australia saying, Is he going to quit the way Borg did? You don't have any plans like that, do you?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I was talking ‑‑ I thought I explained myself clear enough. That I definitely want to play until the London Olympics, and after that I would like to play a even more. I even said that I'd like to have my child see me play, as well. My child is not five yet, so that should answer all the questions.

Q. Do you ever give yourself hell?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I always question myself, you know. I've questioned myself in the best of times when I was winning four, five titles in a row. What can I improve? What can I change to get better? I think it's important to do that when you're on top of your game, but also again when things were not going so well.

There are certain times during the year where you just have to sit down and analyze, are you happy with what's going on? Could you do more? Should you do less? Because some sometimes less is more.

So, yeah, I mean, I always try to find the best ways to get better as a player.
(Translated from French.)

Q. Djokovic played a tough match against Nadal, and you defeated Nadal in Madrid. Is it good for you? Does it make you feel it's possible here in Paris?

ROGER FEDERER: I forgot at the beginning of your question.

Q. The fact that Nadal had a tough match against Djokovic and the fact that he defeated Nadal in Madrid, is it good for you from a psychological standpoint?

ROGER FEDERER: The important thing to me is that I won against Nadal, not the fact that he had a tough match against Djokovic. It gives me confidence. Confidence about this tournament. I'm very happy to be here and fit. I feel good.

Then when you have to play like Rafa who has always been very good on this surface, and to see that he almost lost against Djokovic, you realize that if you play him the right way you can beat him. Because each year he wins 40 matches on clay and you never defeat him, you can be a bit pessimistic.

I realize if I play well, there is an opportunity there. But at the end of the day, you need to focus on your game and see what comes out.

Q. This gesture you had at the end of Madrid, was the gesture of a daddy to his son? You were pointing your finger like this. We were not used to seeing you doing that at the end of the match.

ROGER FEDERER: No, I was just happy. It was good winning this tournament. I'm not going to lie down on the court, because that was ‑‑ that wouldn't have been appropriate. It was a quick match. I played well. But that's it.

Q. Nadal never lost here in Paris. 28 victories. No defeats. Isn't it a bit scary?

ROGER FEDERER: No, because he should have played the two years before that, but he was injured. So it's an extraordinary record he holds. Everybody would like to have the same record. But he was a bit more fragile when he was younger. But if he had played, maybe he would have lost a few games.

But, no, since he started, everything went fine for him. It's not all that scary, but I have great respect for what he has achieved.

Q. After Madrid, you said you were happy about the result, because it's also the result of all the work you put in your game. So my question is: What did you work on particularly before Madrid? Did you modify your program or your schedule before you came here?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yes and no. I had problems in my back in February, so I missed the Davis Cup then. I got married, so I didn't have much time to prepare on clay for Monte‑Carlo.

But then between Monte‑Carlo and Rome and Rome and Madrid I practiced a lot; I trained a lot. I worked on my regularity, on my placement, and I had the feeling that I was still a bit slow on some of my shots.

So I wanted to be more regular, to be able to do that for hours and hours. I worked a lot, and it paid off in Madrid. I was a bit surprised to see it paying off that quickly.
I realized I could get much stronger very quickly, so I'm happy everything worked well. Everything is okay to start this big tournament.

Q. Would you consider that compared to last year, would you say that this year you have a better chance to win Roland Garros? And if yes, why?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not really. It's always been the same thing over the last few years. I've always been one of the favorites on the tournament, just like this year, so I don't think I have a better opportunity.

Q. The fact you defeated Nadal, does it give you more confidence?

ROGER FEDERER: If I play him in a final, maybe. But we're not there yet. We have to see how it goes.

Q. After the beginning of your season, the press was having questions; the crowd was having questions. But now we have more faith again. How do you experience that as a champion?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, that was a bit of a surprise. I lost in five sets in Australia, and a very difficult match. It was very high‑level of tennis. People see it as my losing in the second round, but it's a bit disappointing, you know.

I lose in Wimbledon, and then they say, Okay, he lost a Grand Slam. But if you analyze things a bit closer, I was close to winning three tournaments out of four. I had problems with my mononucleosis, and the problems, my injuries in the back, so you needed to take a bit of time and see how many tournaments I can actually win.

And should I have played them or not is what ‑‑ I think yes, because it was good for my body to win. But I couldn't win the tournaments I wanted to win, one, because of Rafa, but my game was not there at 100%. It was there at 98%, and that wasn't enough.

Then I lost my confidence a bit, but I've always had faith in my game. I worked a lot. I knew I was on the right tracks. Then, you know, having to explain yourself is not always that fun. You start thinking, maybe it's better for me not to play in a tournament. Not out of fear of losing, but just because you don't want to justify yourself.

So you want to practice, do the right things without being monitored and having people watching you all the time.

Q. You play Alberto Martin for your first round, a Spaniard for your first round on clay. Is it a fast track for you?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know. I'm in good shape, so I think if I play well, I should win this first round. But I only played him once, so we don't know each other well. He's been on the tour quite a while, just like me.

When I played him I won very easily 6‑1, 6‑1, but that was a long time ago. I'm in good shape right now, and I hope I can repeat a good performance against him this time.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports

kissakiss
05-23-2009, 01:25 PM
From Simon Kuper of Financial Times.

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/f276c082-46ff-11de-923e-00144feabdc0.html

How to win that elusive French title: Federer’s tip sheet
Published: May 22 2009 19:52

How can Roger Federer finally win the French Open?

It is the last unsolved mystery of men’s tennis. The Swiss has won every grand slam but this one. Each June in Paris Rafael Nadal thrashes him in the final. That fate looms again when the tournament starts on Saturday. And at 27 years old, Federer has few chances left.

So I solicited advice from Bjorn Borg, Mats Wilander and Serena Williams. Between them they have won 10 French Opens. They could charge fortunes in consulting fees. But Federer can get their wisdom for the price of today’s Financial Times.

When I asked Borg he chuckled, said, “Errm”, and then paused. The Swede, now in elegant middle age, was sitting on a lawn a mile from the court where he won six French Opens. He recalled Federer’s humiliation in last year’s final. The Swiss had uncharacteristically rushed the net a lot, and was thrashed even harder than usual.

“You should always go out and play your own game,” said Borg. “He cannot handle that particular game he played against Nadal.” Perhaps Borg was thinking of his own trauma. In the final of the US Open in 1981 against John McEnroe he uncharacteristically rushed the net a lot, and lost. Three months later he retired.

Borg said: “People say it was because of John coming up, but it was not because of John. It was because I was losing my interest, my fun, my enjoyment. Federer still has the motivation. Even today I regard he is the best tennis player ever to play the game.”

In 1982 Mats Wilander succeeded Borg as champion of the French Open. Down the phone from the Idaho ski resort where he lives, Wilander gave the opposite advice to his fellow Swede. Federer should come to the net, but do it with feeling.

Wilander, now a commentator for Eurosport, explained: “When the ball goes over the net more than three or four times, everyone knows that Nadal wins 19 points out of 20.” So Federer must finish points quickly, and that means charging the net.

Didn’t Federer do that last year? Not quite, said Wilander. “He was coming to the net hoping, coming to the net listening to other people. You’ve got to do it and believe it’s the right thing. And surely now he believes that the other way is the wrong way. Unless he gets slightly stronger and changes something in his backhand so that he can hit better topspin backhands above his shoulder.” That’s Federer’s one weak spot, and Nadal always finds it.

Wilander believes Federer will indeed charge the net properly this year. The Swede explained: “Every time he played Nadal on clay, he was worried about embarrassment.” So Federer played a cautious game. But last year he was embarrassed anyway. “Now it’s not going to happen again. He is not going to lose from the baseline again.”

Serena Williams has a milder dose of Federer’s Paris syndrome. Though she dominates the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour, she has only won the French Open once, in 2002. I asked her why she and Federer struggled on the slow clay of Paris.

Williams said: “You just have to be super fit. The whole thing is just to be like Nadal, and I’m sure I’ll win.” She mused: “Maybe I’ll have him play my matches. He’s really fit, he can do it.” Could she really become as fit as Nadal? “No way! I wouldn’t even want to be that fit. He works too hard on the court. I feel like I want a more Roger Federer-type energy.” Did that mean winning quick points with brilliant shots? “Yeah, yeah. Life is easier.”

More than all the advice, what struck me was how badly Borg and Wilander want Federer to win in Paris. Wilander explained: “It’s not about Federer beating Nadal. It’s only about Federer becoming the greatest player ever.” If the Swiss can win the French Open, equal Pete Sampras’s record of 14 Grand Slam titles, and later surpass it, said Wilander, “then the most fluent, natural player and the most sporting guy on court would also be the best player ever.”

If Federer buys the FT today, it may yet happen.

simonkuper-ft@hotmail.com

SUKTUEN
05-23-2009, 02:39 PM
thanks

Rita
05-25-2009, 05:42 PM
http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/interviews/2009-05-25/200905251243271377152.html

R. FEDERER/A. Martin

6‑4, 6‑3, 6‑2

An interview with:

ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Could you just take us through that match? Pleased to be back on center court? Pleased to get the win in fairly straightforward?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I was happy with the way I played. It always takes some time to getting used to the match conditions here on center court, you know, but started maybe a bit slow but reacted, you know, all right.

Once I got the upperhand, things were pretty much in control. Yeah, it was good. I served well when I had to, and mixed it up. That's how I want to play. I'm happy to be through without a fright.

Q. Was the heat a problem a little bit?

ROGER FEDERER: Not really. I mean, maybe what, 30 degrees? You know, it didn't ‑‑ definitely felt warmer than the last fewdays. This and in America and Australia we play at, you know, 40,45 degrees, you know. So it's still pretty mild for my liking, but, you know, the ball flies more, bounces more, so it's more like Madrid a little bit.

Obviously I played a guy who played really far behind the baseline, so the court felt really big. I just have to get used to that. It was nice conditions, not too much wind. Little warm, so it was good.

Q. The dropshot seems to have become one of your weapons on clay. You tried a couple today. Could you tell us about it?

ROGER FEDERER: They worked well. That's what I mean, mixing it up, coming to the net, hitting dropshots. You can't hit them against everybody, you know. There are certain types of players that don't allow you to do it, and others you can do it all the time. Today was sort of the right time to do them, but, you know, I'm happy I got to learn how to use it over the years. I used to not be a fan of the dropshot at all. I always thought it was a shot you only hit when you're panicking from the baseline, when you're scared maybe to take on the fight, you know.

But today I realized that actually you can use it to your advantage against like players like today. It just makes it a little bit more easy.

Q. Just in general, not in the tournament, how distracting can it be, all the media activities, all the sponsors, all that stuff you have to do outside the court?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, the sponsors slow down once the tournament starts. It's maybe the week before, you know. But I think once you get used to that, it's no problem. I mean, it's nice to be, how you say, in the limelight and that people are interested in you.

You'd be a fool saying it's wrong. Of course, sometimes I have to do a little less media, you know. That's in the rule books. Sure,after a match like this, how much can you really talk about, you know?

So maybe other guys don't have to do press. Some guys only do 5 to 10 minutes. I do 45 minutes. It's not always most fun, but at the it's part of the business today, you know. Times have changed. I told myself many years ago when I was coming up and about, and I was coming through the ranks that I was hopefully having a decent relationship with the media, because I'll see them for the next hopefully 10, 15, 20 years, you know.

So far it's been okay, so I do still enjoy coming to the press rooms sometimes, because usually it's pretty full,and it's nice that people want to hear what I say.

Q. (InFrench) This is not about today's match,but Santoro is playing his 20th Roland Garros. What do you think about the player, Santoro? He's been playing so long.

ROGER FEDERER: It's become a great accomplishment for me to play against him a great many times. He's very talented the way he touches the ball, hits the ball. He's one of the greatest tacticians in terms of his play.

You know, he was quite limited when he plays two‑handed, but he's always trying to fumble his way through. I've always enjoyed playing against him and watching his matches, as well. We respect each other, I think.

Q. Now, we're talking about the other ones. What about Guillaume, young one. He's just won a match, if you're aware of this. What do you think about this?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know him, unfortunately. It's a good thing for him. Now that I know him, it's going to be a great moment for him. (laughter.)

No, I don't know how old he is. 19? Yes. 19. Wonderful. Great. To play on the main draw.

When you're young and to win a match immediately, it's something I couldn't do when I was younger. I didn't manage to do this. Well, my draw was more difficult against Rafter here, but it's always a good thing for the beginners, and mainly for him here in France.

Q. You were asked what you think about the heat. Now, to me, when I think about heat, I think about your spouse. Have you said anything about the fact that she wouldn't attend or she wouldn't watch you during one of your matches? You've always said it's very important for her to be with you.
ROGER FEDERER: Well, yes, for her it's even more important than for me. You know, nothing against her, of course. She likes watching me when I play. She wants to be here at each and every single match, but if it's too warm, maybe if she needs a bit of fresh air, no problem.

If Mirka or my coach or my physical trainer or if anybody else can be here in my corner, I can play tennis correctly. So I don't really watch them very often. Five times per match only, so it's quite simple. Well,I prefer if she's here. If I see she'sokay, like today, she was feeling good, so it's simpler for me.

Q. Last time you played on the central court last year, the end was not good. What did you feel today when you had to go on the court?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I didn't even think about last year's match on the same court, because I was so much concentrated. I wanted to do my best. I didn't want to lose my first match. I wanted to start well. I wanted to get into the match, to look around. Maybe you wouldn't believe me,but now that you say it, I realize that was true.

The final was very difficult. It was the very last match. But, you know, after what counts is how you played in Madrid, Monte‑Carlo and Rome and on clay surfaces,and what you look at is the matches you've won. If you've lost, okay, no problem, because between then and now, you have played something like 60 matches, so that was okay today for me.

Q. Was it a good thing to play just after him, to watch Rafa's match, or did you watch anything? Or would you rather focus on your style?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's Stan I watched. He was fighting hard. I was more interested compared with Rafa. Well, sometimes I do other things. I had to eat, and then to practice. So one set I watched Nadal and two or three sets played by Stan.

So I'm really happy for Stan, because he played after a number of difficulties he had.

Q. It's the first round, okay. What would you think about your play and what you've done today that's going to be useful in the future?

ROGER FEDERER: It's a good thing that I won this first round. I have a few days. Now I can focus. I can unwind for a while. I have less pressure, because the pressure is when you have to manage the first round. I have a bit of time.

I think I played well. I could play even better. I served well, that's true. It's a good thing for me, because my serve is good to start the tournament, which is what I like. Now the rounds are going to be tougher and tougher, so I hope I can play better and better, as well.

Q. Is it you who asked to play today rather than tomorrow to have more days of rest? You could have played Tuesday.
ROGERFEDERER: I asked for Sunday, but Monday and Tuesday would have been okay. Wednesday, as well. Well, we can go through the whole week if you want to. You know, what counts is that ‑‑ well, in any case, you have to win seven matches. Never mind who you're going to play against and the type of weather you have, but what you have to do is end this race and win the battle.

recessional
05-25-2009, 06:05 PM
Q. You were asked what you think about the heat. Now, to me, when I think about heat, I think about your spouse. Have you said anything about the fact that she wouldn't attend or she wouldn't watch you during one of your matches? You've always said it's very important for her to be with you.
ROGER FEDERER: Well, yes, for her it's even more important than for me. You know, nothing against her, of course. She likes watching me when I play. She wants to be here at each and every single match, but if it's too warm, maybe if she needs a bit of fresh air, no problem.


:tape: :spit:

Rita
05-25-2009, 06:17 PM
Mirka will give him a good spanking for that tonight ;)

SUKTUEN
05-26-2009, 02:22 PM
:worship:

wackykid
05-27-2009, 08:24 AM
ROGER FEDERER: They worked well. That's what I mean, mixing it up, coming to the net, hitting dropshots. You can't hit them against everybody, you know. There are certain types of players that don't allow you to do it, and others you can do it all the time. Today was sort of the right time to do them, but, you know, I'm happy I got to learn how to use it over the years. I used to not be a fan of the dropshot at all. I always thought it was a shot you only hit when you're panicking from the baseline, when you're scared maybe to take on the fight, you know.


it's good to hear such comments from federer... i really hope that he doesn't stop at trying anything ... (next up... bigger rackets... double handed play...?) reminds me of an anime i watched (initial d) that teaches a good lesson about a battle -- if you believe only in winning beautifully... you will only constraint yourself in a cocoon and your growth will be restricted by it... in a battle... winning is all that counts. so i hope federer will try anything and everything... as long as it's not against any rules...!


regards,
wacky

FedFan_2007
05-27-2009, 08:27 AM
it's good to hear such comments from federer... i really hope that he doesn't stop at trying anything ... (next up... bigger rackets... double handed play...?) reminds me of an anime i watched (initial d) that teaches a good lesson about a battle -- if you believe only in winning beautifully... you will only constraint yourself in a cocoon and your growth will be restricted by it... in a battle... winning is all that counts. so i hope federer will try anything and everything... as long as it's not against any rules...!


regards,
wacky

I agree, but I hope to god Roger never even thinks about double-hander. There is just such a classical elegance to the single-hander. If Roger switched(which is 99.9999% unlikely) that would be the death of that shot.

Or Levy
05-27-2009, 08:41 AM
Mirka will give him a good spanking for that tonight ;)

Yeah, I'd slap him for the comment, too.

Mirka, how about suggesting you go shopping during the FO final, and see how much he likes that.

Obey.my.dreamz
05-27-2009, 08:54 AM
it's good to hear such comments from federer... i really hope that he doesn't stop at trying anything ... (next up... bigger rackets... double handed play...?) reminds me of an anime i watched (initial d) that teaches a good lesson about a battle -- if you believe only in winning beautifully... you will only constraint yourself in a cocoon and your growth will be restricted by it... in a battle... winning is all that counts. so i hope federer will try anything and everything... as long as it's not against any rules...!


regards,
wacky

well,actly i dont,.. coz if that happens , i most likely won't cheer him no more,..coz If he played ugly as murray or rafa? i wouldn't watch him in the first place... IT's the beauty he brings into game.. i would rather see him loses every match playing like an artist than win like andy murray..

oneandonlyhsn
05-27-2009, 09:46 AM
I agree, but I hope to god Roger never even thinks about double-hander. There is just such a classical elegance to the single-hander. If Roger switched(which is 99.9999% unlikely) that would be the death of that shot.

:eek: That would be the end of tennis. Although roger's BH for me is not as good as Gaudio's but its a key feature of why i love roger. I wish all players had the one handed BH, only one i like is Marat's :drool:

wackykid
05-27-2009, 12:09 PM
well,actly i dont,.. coz if that happens , i most likely won't cheer him no more,..coz If he played ugly as murray or rafa? i wouldn't watch him in the first place... IT's the beauty he brings into game.. i would rather see him loses every match playing like an artist than win like andy murray..

well beauty is in the eyes of the beholder... to me having every single shot in the game and execute them to the perfection... and the ability to change styles and adapt to different players is beauty...

I agree, but I hope to god Roger never even thinks about double-hander. There is just such a classical elegance to the single-hander. If Roger switched(which is 99.9999% unlikely) that would be the death of that shot.

:eek: That would be the end of tennis. Although roger's BH for me is not as good as Gaudio's but its a key feature of why i love roger. I wish all players had the one handed BH, only one i like is Marat's :drool:

well i knew someone would make such comments! i'm not saying roger to change to playing two-handed 100% of the time... but once in a while perhaps in 1-2% of his shots he can suddenly execute a two-handed backend shot to surprise the opponent and break his rhthym -- at the same time put extra power into that shot... it'll be amazing if someone can be that versatile!


regards,
wacky

biological
05-27-2009, 12:27 PM
:tape: :spit:

:rolls:

Dini
05-27-2009, 12:53 PM
Fed himself has said he'd rather win ugly than lose beautifully as it were. :p :shrug:

oliverbwfc
05-27-2009, 01:02 PM
Fed himself has said he'd rather win ugly than lose beautifully as it were. :p :shrug:

tbh i've never found his game ugly, whatever style he plays he seems to make it look beautiful, I bet if he attempted a nadalesque moonball-fest it would still look pretty attractive

Dini
05-27-2009, 01:30 PM
tbh i've never found his game ugly, whatever style he plays he seems to make it look beautiful, I bet if he attempted a nadalesque moonball-fest it would still look pretty attractive

:haha: :inlove: :hearts: I bet you're right! :drool:

Obey.my.dreamz
05-27-2009, 02:01 PM
hahahaha. mooball-fest ^^

classic

SUKTUEN
05-27-2009, 05:55 PM
Roger is so beautiful~~:devil:

Rita
05-28-2009, 05:27 PM
Some Questions :spit: and some of his answers :spit:

Rita
05-28-2009, 05:27 PM
ROGER FEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions in English, please.

Q. How pleased were you to be able to cope with all the emotional highs and lows of that match? Looked like you should have lost the first set, you lost the second, should have lost the third, and you won it in four.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, could have won both, first three sets. Could have lost them, also. Of course, I'm thrilled, you know, to be through. It was sort of a fun match to be part of, you know, with so many ups and downs. It's not the usual, you know.
I thought Jose played well, and I started to struggle a little bit throughout the third set after sort of being up a break in the second set and things were looking like things were under control. I was mistaken.
I'm happy to have come through such a tough match, you know. Those matches are good, you know, knowing that physically it wasn't a problem. I'm excited about the next match, that's for sure.

Q. Do you think that during the most difficult moments of the match, especially the first three sets, you took advantage of your mental toughness, which is maybe even more than Acasuso's?

ROGER FEDERER: Sure. I mean, I guess in such a match it comes down to details, you know. Mentally I've always been very strong, but I'm not being put in a position like this very often, you know. So it was good to win both breakers. I mean, I definitely think he didn't play a good tiebreaker in the third set, but I had to get there first after being so bad.
I thought he made it really difficult for me today. I was looking for my game, you know, midway through the third set, just trying to get the rallies going my way. It was hard, because he was playing so well.
Definitely it was a sign of mental strength, and, you know, the physical abilities I have.

Q. Did you start to have any problem with your shoulder?

ROGER FEDERER: Shoulder?

Q. Yeah.

ROGER FEDERER: No. Not that I know of. (Laughter.)

Q. Was that a good kind of fighting match to get out of the way in this round as opposed to later on? And then perhaps, you know, something more about your clay game now.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, absolutely. I think conditions made it definitely hard today for the players, you know. It was slow, so you had to really be very patient and that might have played in his favor.
But, you know, coming through such a match is always a great feeling. Like I said, I'm not part of such close matches that often, you know. So when they happen, you know, it's great to put in the fight when you can. I was happy with my performance today, you know, because the stats actually looked pretty good. I just had to stay calm with all the ups and downs there were in the first three sets.

Q. In the last set, and when he got behind, he started to look a little discouraged or tired. Did that allow you to relax at all?

ROGER FEDERER: Sure, a little bit. But at the same time, you don't really relax until you have maybe double break, especially after seeing what happened one set before, you know, even with double break. You're not that relaxed anymore because conditions were kind of slow, and there was always a chance he might get back in it.
He definitely looked a bit tired to me. I was just trying to really tighten up my game, and I was able to do it and close him out. It was a good feeling.

Q. As fatherhood gets closer and closer, have you thought at all about how that's going to change your approach to tennis, or perhaps even to life?

ROGER FEDERER: Um, not a whole lot, but I'm very excited, obviously, about it. You know, we talk about it with Mirka on a regular basis, and I'm sure it's going to have a very positive impact, you know, for my personal life, obviously.
I think for my tennis life, too ,it's just going to make it more exciting, trying to find the best ways to balance both things. I know from my side I'll be as professional as ever, you know, even when the baby is there. It's something I'm really looking forward to, and, yeah, I'm excited.

Q. Do you have any kind of plan laid out for the first few weeks?

ROGER FEDERER: No. I mean, Mirka would like to travel with me as much as possible, you know. But we'll see how it goes. I mean, honestly, I'm kind of in the French Open right now. I'm trying to, you know ,mentally also be with Mirka as much as I can, obviously.

Q. It looks like you do not have so many options on clay as on other surfaces. What's your thought about when one doesn't work? It's more difficult on clay?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, there's always going to be different types of games, you know, in all different surfaces, you know. Then you also have different opponents making it more difficult for you.
I think a player like José suits me definitely better on a faster court where I've played him a few times. But when you play him on clay, you've never played him there, that makes it more difficult than today. Conditions were very slow, extremely slow. It was even raining in the beginning.
So of course that takes away game plans, because you can't just attack the net blindly and try to bluff your way through a match like this, especially best of five set match.
Clearly it does take away options. Not just for me, but for anybody. I still feel I have plenty of ways to try and beat a player. José played me well today, and it was a close match.

Q. You've had a lot of success in Shanghai at the Masters Cup, but what do you envision it as you go there as a Masters Series? What kind of tournament is going to shape up?

ROGER FEDERER: I think it's going to be very exciting for the fans to see, you know. A ton of players all of a sudden, you know, after just seeing sort of a handful, and I think that's going to be nice.
Also, it's an outdoor event now, so the roof is going to be nice and open. It's going to look fabulous. Then the whole feeling on the grounds, you know, I think it's not something you really have during the Masters Cup. It was all based around center court.
So I think that's going to be nice for the Chinese fans to go there and see. I'm excited to go there, and hopefully it's going to be a nice event again. I'm sure they'll put on a beautiful tournament.

THE MODERATOR: Questions for French.

Q. At 5 1 you scared your fans. Were you afraid, too?

ROGER FEDERER: I think it was okay. But the way the game was in the third set, I was not particularly happy. I changed my tactic at the beginning of the third set. It didn't work out well, especially on my return, and that made things a bit more complex. I had to think about my tactics, and at the same time I was losing, so that wasn't fun.
But I tried to make his life difficult, and to come to an end in the game, but that was sufficient for me to be back in the set. That was a very nice match we had, and I'm very happy the way I fought today.

Q. Yes, but you didn't answer. Were you a bit worried at 5 1 in the third set?

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, a bit. But I was not afraid to die, so everything was okay.

Q. That type of match, is that something you have to go through for a Grand Slam, having a difficult match? Does it make your life easier afterwards?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I like easy matches, but it's also nice to fight on these difficult matches, especially when you win. Then it's nice to talk about this match, but I have good experience here in Roland Garros on the center court.
Physically speaking, I was fine. I was fit. I can't forecast any problem for the future, and the work I did over the last month pays off.

Q. You explained your mistakes all along this match. Is it due to lack of concentration and lack of focus? Did it happen in your head, as well?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's a combination of many things. He played very well. I was not managing and controlling the match the way I should have. Having him back, allowing him to come back was not a good thing.
Well, many things. My analysis now is different from the one I had at the end of the second set, which I should have won and I lost, but he did deserve a few sets.

Q. You talked about your tactical problems. Do you feel your game has evolved over the last years here in Roland Garros?

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, quite clearly. At the beginning I had many difficulties with my backhand, for instance. For instance, in '03 when I won Wimbledon afterwards, I think I was not very solid from a mental standpoint. After I lost the first set, it was almost impossible for me to be back and win the match.
And I put too much pressure on myself, even before the match. Today I'm much calmer, which is very helpful. I also have more experience, so I know the players more than I used to. Physically, mentally, I'm stronger. I have improved my backhand, so I hope I play better today than I did a few years ago.

Q. On the match point, what was your feeling? Were you relieved you avoided a trap?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I had good feeling. I thought it was a very good match for me.
Many mistakes, but many mistakes in three and a half hours, that's pretty normal. But there were many winning points, as well. I made many aces, no double faults, so statistics were good for me.
What I want to say with the crowd at the end, they I had a standing ovation at the end, and that's very moving each time. I have a feeling I'm the grand favorite here in Paris, and that's very nice.

Q. Maybe this is a stupid question, but you won the draw and you decided to receive. Is it a new approach?

ROGER FEDERER: I returned? Okay. Okay. I returned. I was not serving. Yeah, I decided to return, because it was raining a bit. I said, Okay, serve. You first, and we'll see afterwards.
So I chose it. I made that decision because I didn't feel I was capable of scoring four aces in a row.

Q. A double question: Did you look at Mirka and Pierre any more than you usually do? And second question, why do you have to have the people supporting you each time?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I probably did look at them a bit more than during the first match, because well, I had more opportunities. When you have a fight like this one, your team is important, and they did support me.
I said to Mirka, It's important you’re main calm in difficult moments. Well, it's better for her right now. No, but it's fine with Pierre, Gary. They all supported me. That was important.
With the crowd? Honestly, I do nothing. Maybe this is what the people like. I'm not trying to seduce the crowd. I just try and play beautiful tennis. If they like it, great. If they don't like it, nothing I can do. I also think being a fair player with regards to your opponent, with regards to the game, with regards to the people there, it's very important to me, and this is something people seem to like.

Q. Between30 Celsius your first day and a humid atmosphere today, has the court evolved? Is it more of a problem? And if yes, do you look at the weather forecast?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yes, of course. It has to do the weather has to do with the tension I decide for my racquets because the ball bounces more and the surface is faster. The kick was not going very high, and the ball remains lower.
Then there are advantages linked tothe conditions we had today. But the way Acasuso was playing today, maybe that was not a great advantage. But that's also the way I won in Hamburg, so that's why I like this surface.
When you know it's going to be wet weather you can adapt. I've been playing on wet clay courts since I was a young kid, so I know this surface.

www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/interviews/2009-05-28/200905281243527446029.html

Dini
05-28-2009, 06:29 PM
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, could have won both, first three sets. Could have lost them, also. Of course, I'm thrilled, you know, to be through. It was sort of a fun match to be part of, you know, with so many ups and downs. It's not the usual, you know.
I thought Jose played well, and I started to struggle a little bit throughout the third set after sort of being up a break in the second set and things were looking like things were under control. I was mistaken.
I'm happy to have come through such a tough match, you know. Those matches are good, you know, knowing that physically it wasn't a problem. I'm excited about the next match, that's for sure.

No that wasn't fun! :mad: :fiery: For you maybe Feddie, but certainly not for us fans. :sobbing:

Minnie
05-28-2009, 08:27 PM
It;s fun to watch it already knowing the result as I'm doing right now on the Replay :haha: Very funny to hear the comms say that if Acasuso plays the way he is, he should win this 3rd set ... but the other comms says he wouldn't bet money on it - how right he was.

Eden
05-28-2009, 08:42 PM
Merci pour l'interview Rita :) It's always interesting to read what Roger has to say.

Eden
05-28-2009, 08:46 PM
A little change will go a long way for Fed

By Greg Garber
ESPN.com

http://a.espncdn.com/photo/2009/0528/ten_g_rfederer2_576.jpg
Roger Federer's unyielding mindset has stunted his success for quite some time.

PARIS -- As he politely tapped his red Wilson racket to acknowledge the standing ovation of the Roland Garros crowd on Thursday, Roger Federer wore a look somewhere between self-loathing and utter contempt.

He had just played a troubling second-round match, lasting nearly 3½ hours, against Jose Acasuso, the erratic Argentine, and been lucky to escape with a 7-6 (8), 5-7, 7-6 (2), 6-2 victory that was even closer than the score suggests, if that is possible.

"Could have won first three sets, could have lost them also," Federer said afterward. "Of course, I'm thrilled to be through. It was sort of a fun match to be part of, with so many ups and downs."

It was, in a sense, a microcosm of Federer's last 15 months. Since his straight-sets loss to Novak Djokovic in the finals of the Australian Open, he has been a marked man. Each tournament has presented the opportunity for pundits to pontificate on the state of his supposedly fragile psyche.

At times, these investigations have descended into hysteria. Indeed, some of the dispatches have read like obituaries. There was his humiliation in the French final when he won only four games against Rafael Nadal, then his loss in a glorious final at Wimbledon and the inevitable loss of his No. 1 ranking. Back in March, some saw Federer's infamous racket-smash in Miami -- a three-second echo of his angry junior days -- as the definitive sign that he had completely lost his mind.

Well, in the interest of equal time, let's review the state of Federer's game:

• He is the reigning U.S. Open champion and has reached 19 consecutive Grand Slam semifinals, nearly double the previous record of Rod Laver and Ivan Lendl (each managed 10).

• He remains the No. 2-ranked player in the world.

• He is coming off a straight-sets victory over Nadal in the Madrid final and is trying to reach the final here for the fourth straight year.

"I had problems in my back in February, so I missed Davis Cup," Federer said here last week. "I got married, so I didn't have much time to prepare for Monte Carlo. But then, between Monte Carlo and Rome, and Rome and Madrid, I practiced a lot. I trained a lot. I worked on my regularity, on my placement, and I had the feeling I was a bit slow on some of my shots.

"So I wanted to be more regular, to be able to do that for hours and hours. I worked a lot, and it paid of in Madrid. I was a bit surprised to see it paying off that quickly. I'm happy everything worked out well. Everything is OK to start this big tournament."

It is a marvelous achievement to reach three consecutive finals at Roland Garros, but when you are Federer it is not enough. He has been the world's second-best clay-court player, but so far Nadal has prevented him from winning a personal Grand Slam.

How does Federer change that? By changing. Those who have worked with him say it isn't easy to adjust a champion's mindset, particularly when there are 13 Grand Slam singles titles on the résumé.

"When you've won so many Grand Slams for so many years, small changes -- it feels like drastic changes," said ESPN analyst Darren Cahill. "It takes time. You can't just snap your fingers and do all the things all these people are telling you to do."

Cahill has some insight into Federer's struggle. He spent nine days working with him in Dubai as the two discussed a coaching arrangement. Ultimately, Cahill -- who has two young children and lives in Las Vegas -- opted to take a less-invasive job as an adidas consultant. Still, he sees signs that Federer is more flexible in his game plans.

One thing that gets lost, Cahill said, is that Federer actually has a full-time coach. He is Severin Luthi, the Swiss Davis Cup captain, and he worked with Federer for 35 weeks last year.

Ivan Lendl, the three-time French Open champion, said there is one solution:

"Winning breeds confidence, and he's not winning as much as he has in the past," Lendl said. "The guys are less afraid of you. I certainly cannot speak for Roger, but no matter who you are, everybody needs confidence."


The need to evolve


Jose Higueras was Federer's coach through last year's clay-court season that ended badly in Paris.

He was asked recently if the very thing that makes Federer the great champion he is -- stubbornness -- prevented him from modifying his game to deal with the younger players who are starting to beat him.

"You can say that," said Higueras, after a long pause. "The thing I stressed with him -- we keep in touch still -- you have to get better, with everybody else. There's not that much that can be better. But I feel if he gets back maybe 3, 4 percent, that's a big difference, maybe the difference between three or four more Grand Slams.

"Roger, if you saw him play three years ago, he was the best player in the world. He didn't like much change in anything."

Higueras paused again.

[+] EnlargeMatthew Stockman/Getty Images
Despite a slew of desultory performances, Roger Federer has reached 19 consecutive Grand Slam semifinals."As champions get older, "he said, "they need to evolve. Rafa -- he's still getting better. At the same time, if he doesn't keep evolving, people will catch him from behind."

A year after Higueras tried to convince Federer to be more aggressive on clay -- to take bigger swings at second serves, make the occasional journey to net, try some drop shots for a change of pace and hit his forehand harder and deeper (in short, cast his lot with more risk and greater reward) -- he did just that in Madrid.

Sure, Nadal was spent after a four-hour-plus match with Djokovic, but Federer showed signs that he is making those subtle changes.

"That first-round match [in the French Open, against Alberto Martin], he was working on his drop shots, trying some things," Cahill said. "It was a practice match for the rest of the tournament."

The second round was far more difficult. Acasuso actually had a 6-3 lead in the first-set tiebreaker and squandered four set points before Federer won the final point with a serve outside and a delicate drop shot. After losing the second set, Federer fell behind 5-1 in the third.

Was he worried? "Yes, a bit," Federer said. "But I was not afraid to die, so everything was OK."

Sure enough, Federer saved another set point and rallied to force another tiebreaker, which seemed to break Acasuso's spirit. Federer won that breaker easily and took six of the last seven games in the final set.

"I'm happy to have come through such a tough match," he said. "I'm excited about the next match, that's for sure."

If the draw progresses as expected -- although, suddenly, the prospect of meeting Frenchmen Paul-Henri Mathieu or Jeremy Chardy in the next few rounds feels vaguely uncomfortable -- Federer would meet Novak Djokovic in the semifinals. After pushing Nadal to the very brink in Madrid, Djokovic has been anointed as the man most likely to beat Nadal. Federer aches to change that perception.

Much has been made of Federer's spasm of temper in Miami, but Cahill saw it as a positive thing, a back-to-the-future message.

"That sent him back to his junior days," Cahill said. "It showed he cares. The young Roger wanted to show the world he could be one of the best players in the world. He wants to do that again.

"I think he's got his spark back."

Source: http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/french09/columns/story?columnist=garber_greg&id=4212328

Rommella
05-29-2009, 12:25 AM
Much has been made of Federer's spasm of temper in Miami, but Cahill saw it as a positive thing, a back-to-the-future message.

"That sent him back to his junior days," Cahill said. "It showed he cares. The young Roger wanted to show the world he could be one of the best players in the world. He wants to do that again.

"I think he's got his spark back."

Source: http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/french09/columns/story?columnist=garber_greg&id=4212328

I pray you are right, Tiger. For his sake and, especially, mine. This roller-coaster ride is going to be the death of me.

SUKTUEN
05-29-2009, 12:34 AM
thanks for the interview~~

Rommella
05-31-2009, 12:30 AM
From The Times
May 31, 2009

Roger Federer hitting form in French Open
A splendid recovery in Paris shows the former world No1 is almost back to his best after months of anguish and uncertainty
Nick Pitt

There is an air of hope and vitality in Paris, for Roger Federer and all who are moved by the rich uncertainties of sporting contest. Only a few weeks ago, the prospect of another title for Rafael Nadal, claimed without challenge and concluded by a ritual thrashing of Federer, invited boredom for most, dread for the Swiss.

But after months of anguish and uncertainty, Federer seems a liberated man, the attacking genius of old. Yesterday, he dealt with difficult conditions, with the red dust swirling around as if it was a Texas cattle drive, and an awkward opponent, in Paul-Henri Mathieu, who went for his shots with nothing to lose and made an outrageous number of them. After losing the first set, Federer tightened his game and took control, winning the third-round match 4-6 6-1 6-4 6-4.

His cause was further improved by the very surprising straight-sets defeat of Novak Djokovic, who was the most obvious danger on his side of the draw. Djokovic was flat, almost mediocre, as he lost all three sets to Philipp Kohlschreiber by six games to four. Sometimes, Djokovic wilts in the heat and he admitted that he had no answers to the German, who played as well as required. Nor did Djokovic have a good answer to what was wrong. “I played too passive,” he said. “I couldn’t find my rhythm at all.”

After holding match points against Nadal in Madrid, Djokovic had legitimate hopes of challenging him for the French title and he was very disappointed. But he has a history of losing the physical battle. At the Australian Open this year, he pulled out during his match with Andy Roddick, just as he had at Monte Carlo against Federer in 2008.

It’s not hard to trace Federer’s new-found spirit and confidence, for a fortnight back he cast aside his misery and five consecutive defeats against Nadal by beating him emphatically in Madrid, and on clay. Now that Nadal owns all that Federer holds dear in the game, the psychological tables are turned. Nadal has to defend his position as No 1, as well as his titles, and holding the castle is less natural to him than marauding. Furthermore, those clamouring at the walls are acting for the moment in the common interest to bring him down. In Madrid, Djokovic wounded Nadal in the semi-finals in a three-set match lasting four hours; Federer finished him off.

When Federer was at the summit, he had one adversary to really worry about: Nadal. Nadal has several: Djokovic, Andy Murray, Juan Martin Del Potro, Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Federer.

While Djokovic lost tamely, others who might threaten Nadal remain. Del Potro beat Igor Andreev with ease and has yet to drop a set in three rounds. Nor has Tsonga, who brushed aside Christophe Rochus. But it is the resurgence of Federer that is most intriguing and welcome. His fall over the past year had a tragic quality. Hailed as the athletic wonder of our age, his adornments were stripped from him one by one.

When he lost to Nadal in the Australian Open final, Federer wept, and even those who support and admire Nadal had to shed a tear. For while Nadal and most in the hunting pack all have astonishing and varied gifts, none brings such fearful beauty to the game as Federer.

Perhaps he needed to hit the bottom before he could rebound. During the clay-court season, he worked hard on his game and condition, trying to take his game from 98% to 100%, the margin by which he reckoned he had slipped.

He found the two per cent and although there were extenuating circumstances for Nadal in Madrid, Federer was scintillating, his old self, attacking flat out, imposing his own game rather than trying to prove he could match Nadal in a war of attrition. And the weapons, so recently rusty, gleamed in the sun. Federer’s service thundered; his forehand was devastating, but sure.

Most of all, he had the surge of confidence, and that, of course, comes in and recedes not in margins but floods.

The imperative question is whether Federer can sustain his resurgence, the flood-tide of optimism. If he can, he might not be able to win at Roland Garros — with Nadal around, that seems beyond him, and Nadal is crushing all-comers as usual. But Federer might manage to give Nadal a contest and go on to achieve two goals closer to his heart: he can win Wimbledon again; and before the year is out he can be the world No 1.

Daniel
05-31-2009, 07:05 AM
nice article

SUKTUEN
05-31-2009, 01:33 PM
:worship:

recessional
06-01-2009, 06:12 PM
R. FEDERER/T. Haas

6‑7, 5‑7, 6‑4, 6‑0, 6‑2

An interview with:

ROGERFEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions in English, please.

Q. The question for the last month or maybe more has been, What does Rogerhave to do to beat Rafa? You don't haveto answer that anymore, I guess. Are yourelieved?

ROGER FEDERER: Um, he didn't retire, right? (Laughter) No, he'll bounce back strong. I'm convinced about that. Sure, it was a big upset, but I mean, thefocus wasn't really there, to be quite honest.

Of course, my dreamscenario is to beat Rafa here in the finals, but I gotta concentrate on my partof the draw and make sure I come through like today.

Tommy Haas was very good today, so this iswhere my focus was, and will be also in my next round.

Q. Beingtwo sets down is difficult for any player on a five‑setter, but especially whenDjokovic and Nadal had lost, did that put extra pressure on you? In the third set at 4‑4, he made a doublefault when he had an advantage. Didthat...

ROGER FEDERER: I don't remember. No, I mean, I thought actually I wasplaying ‑‑ serving all right, especially for a set and a half. You know, I was down a set but up in thesecond set. Unfortunately I got broken,I think it was 4‑3. That definitely mademe a little bit nervous, you know, just knowing that I still haven't reallyfound my range and my rhythm from the baseline.

Tommy was also servinghimself extremely well, you know, and mixing up his game very well. So I definitely felt under pressurethere. He played another pretty goodgame to break me and get the set and stuff, but I tried to remain calm.

In a situation like this, you don't reallythink about whoever is out of the draw or not. You just try to come through yourself, and it's hard enough, you know,to stay positive when you're down two sets to love and a break point.

It was a great battle for me, andI'm thrilled to be through and given another chance here.

Q. Itgoes without saying that you're a fabulous professional, and you're known foryour focus. But you're a human being,too. Can you share with us what yourthoughts were when your great rival lost? What went through your mind in terms of your opportunities and what youwould have to do just with the whole psychological situation and the realsituation of Rafa not being here?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I watched ‑‑ I only sawthe last bit because I was practicing and in transportation. Soderling certainly played great when he hadto towards the end. He didn't getnervous. Didn't look like it,anyway. He came up with the right playsevery single time, especially in the breaker when it really mattered.

I mean, it just showsthat it's hard, you know, to win day in, day out at a particulartournament. His incredible run stretchesback to a few years ago. He won over 30matches in a row here.

It's a phenomenal achievement, but it justshows that we're all human. We all loseat some stage, and people always make it sound so simple since like five years,that it's normal that he wins on clay, I win on grass, and then we share thehardcourts. It's not just the way it is.

I speak firsthand, you know, knowingwhat it takes to dominate. You know, Ithink he knows that, too, already since quite a while. But it's I think the press that blow it up orhype it up a bit too much that you are invincible, unbeatable.

Tennis is not like this. You come out and you always have guys goingafter you, like Tommy Haas today, like Soderling yesterday. I think it only gives them extra motivationknowing that you're the guy to beat or ‑‑ they have nothing to lose, because ifthey lose, it's a normal result. If theywin, it's an incredible achievement.

That's what Soderling was able todo, and it definitely creates some mind plays, I think, in some of the players'minds. You know, knowing that now theirsection is open. Mine hasn't beenaffected in a big way because I'm on the other side of the draw.

But I think for a lot of playersover there, I think it must be quite a big opportunity, and their heads must bespinning right now.

Q. Howmuch of this newly‑opened scenario is an opportunity, and how much of thatopportunity is a burden?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I'm used to any kind of asituation, so it doesn't affect me in a big way.

Sure, you're aware ofit. You try and stay in the draw, but,you know, at the end of the day you're focusing on your shots and your matchand on how you play and the game plan against that player.

Not a whole lot more. I think if you make it to the finals thenit's a different scenario. Becausewhoever I play in the finals I probably have a decent record against, you know,which wouldn't be the case with Rafa, knowing that he has all the experienceand the confidence, you know, of winning here.

Definitely changes it up if I wereto make the final. But we're not thereyet, so honestly it hasn't changed a whole lot for me.

Q. 3‑4in the fourth when you have break point against you and you hit the inside‑outforehand for a winner. I asked Tommyabout that. You know that much, maybe itgoes out and it lands in. I said, Longcareer. How do you feel about pointslike that? He says, That's just RogerFederer being Roger Federer. How doesRoger Federer explain a shot like that at a crucial moment?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I was struggling throughout thefirst two‑and‑a‑half sets from the baseline. I was serving all right, and that was keeping me in the match. Again, swirly winds made it hard for both ofus to keep the ball under control, especially that we both play sooffensively. You know, the rallies werealways going to be short.

That thing can stretchthrough a longer period of time not having any rhythm. I thought almost that it was my first goodshot of the match. It came on a breakpoint on the third set. I knew thesignificance that have shot, because I knew if I come out of that game I cancreate some opportunities later on and in that set.

I knew I was going to look back on thatshot. That saved me on that day, youknow. That's exactly what happened, andI was able to turn around the whole match. It's a great feeling, because I was in quite some danger right there.

Q. Couldyou just take us through your level in the fifth? For some of us, it was as good as we've seenyou play on clay for some time. Were youvery satisfied with the way you finished off the match?

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, and, you know, like I said, I think Iplayed actually pretty well against Acasuso to come out of that one.

I think the conditionswere rough against ‑‑ with the daylight, the sun, the shadow and the windsagainst Mathieu. I came out of thatmatch not knowing exactly where I was. That's kind of how I felt also in the first couple sets against TommyHaas.

Now that I won the last three sets, youknow, that I just played, I feel much better. I think it would have been different having, let's say ‑‑ had Ibeen up two sets, lost two sets, and then winning the fifth.

But like this, you know, I reallyfelt like I was getting stronger as the match went on. Of course, he didn't put up maybe the ‑‑he didn't play his best set in the fourth set when I won 6‑Love.

But still, I was able to put himaway there. And when I really needed toplay well, I really found my A game in the fifth set. That was a great feeling to get, and I hopethat can inspire me to play actually really nice tennis in the next round.

Q. Onthe other side of the draw now, Andy Murray is now seeded to get through to thefinal. Do you see him getting there, anddo you see him as your biggest individual threat now?

ROGER FEDERER: Not really. I mean, sure, he has a good chance to make the finals, you know. But then at the same time, I think Davydenko hasit, you know. I mean, he's been writtenoff a little bit. I've been disappointedthat I haven't heard much about him, you know, because he's a great player.

He was in the top 4 fora long time. He was unfortunate withsome injuries. So he couldn't keep hisranking because of that, not because he was losing first rounds all the time. Ithink that's why he's actually got a great chance of going forward.

Then we have other players, too. But I think the draws are wide open on theother side right now.

Q. Foryounger players, how difficult is the pressure to deal with, the fact that whenplayers like Rafa have gone out, that maybe people are now expecting Andy to goall the way?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, I think it's the same for allthe players right there, you know, to be quite honest. It's like if you've just beaten a greatplayer, and then you have to back it. Like Kohlschreiber has to do or Soderling has to do.

It's not an easy task,because how often does it happen in your life? It happens just a few times, and it's hard to back them up. I went through it when I beat Sampras at Wimbledon and then lost to Tim. I didn't play that bad against Tim, but youjust realize that not only Sampras can play tennis, but Henman can and thereare so many other players that play so well.

Just because you beat this one particularplayer, it doesn't mean you're going to now beat everybody easily. That's where it's hard mentally to be ableto shift. Yourself you have tokeep on playing dream tennis, and that's a hard thing to do sometimes.

THE MODERATOR: Questions in French.

Q. I'd like to know about Mirka or Séverin Luethi. How did they react to the fact that Nadal wasousted? What did they say? Did they say this was your year?

ROGER FEDERER: No, they didn't really say something likethis. You see, I watched the match withmy physiotherapist. Like any othermatch, he was down two sets to zero, and I watched the end of the match.

That's all, because I'ma fan of tennis. We were impressed bySoderling's game. But Séverin, Mirka,and the others never came to me saying, Now you have to win this match,otherwise you will never do it, ever.

No. By the way, this is not what I wanted to hear, and this is not theirreaction. I'm really happy, because westayed calm. It's normal, because I havea very harmonious team, which is what we need.

Q. Todaythere was this first set when you didn't lose any points on your serve, excepttwo points when there was a tiebreak. Onthe contrary, there was the very important tiebreak during the third set. Would you say that mentally it was the mostimportant thing?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, mentally it is very important; that'strue. But it's a combination of manythings. You know, you can't learn how tohit the ball this way on a break point. It's because I've practiced; I've trained. It's also a bit of luck.

But I had to stay calmat the right moment and try and go for it. You know, you can be more of a defensive player, but then if you dothis, what's going to happen is that the opponent is going to have thechoice. He's going to choose his shots.

As, you know, I try and attack more. I want the luck to be on my side, and thegood thing is that I hit the ball really normally and well at that moment. I managed to remain more or less calm. I was very much relieved afterward, becausethen I served well and managed to gain the first game point.

But mentally, it's very important,you know, to be strong, to go through these moments, and then reuse thisexperience later on. That's what I wasthinking about. It's even more difficultthan winning any other points.

Q. Whatabout this break point, you know, this forehand that was really close to theline? A few millimeters from theline. What would you say aboutthis? Because sometimes it's a questionof millimeters.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, we know that, for instance, ongrass. But also on hardcourts,sometimes. It's a question of a fewpoints only, few centimeters to finish a match.

On clay, it's less thecase, you know, because we have more margin, more leeway, so things could havechanged. You know, there are more breakpoints on clay than on any other surfaces, so there's always this thing.

You always think that the match couldchange, even though the other one is leading the match. It's more difficult to break if it's 5‑4 andthe other one is going to serve for the match. It's more difficult to win the breakpoints.

Q. Haveyou got a cold, a runny nose?

ROGER FEDERER: Just a little. Not much.

Q. Is it because of Roland Garros?

ROGER FEDERER: I've always had a cold, you know. I've always ‑‑ caught cold in mylife. It goes and comes and goes andcomes very quickly. No, it's not veryserious.

Q. You said it would be a dream to play against Nadal during thefinals. Now, if you win today or if youwin Roland Garros, would you say that there would be less intensity comparedwith Nadal?

ROGER FEDERER: No, never mind who you're going to play inthe final, and as long as you win. Socan you ask me the question another time.

Q. I have another question that has nothing to do with this match. Mirka is very important in the life ofFederer. How important is it to havesuch a wife as a player?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, Mirka, you know, the first two years wewere together she didn't really travel that much with me because she had herown career. We met in Miami and the Grand Slam tournaments ormatches, and then unfortunately she was seriously injured. She had to wait.

You know, there was aperiod of rehabilitation. Then when shehad to go through the surgery or operation, it was not easy for her. But frankly, she decided very quickly todedicate or to give up her career to focus on mine, even though today she stillhurts.

I mean, her foot operation didn't go onreally nicely, so it was easy for her to give up and say, Okay, I'll stop mycareer and I'll have my husband.

Now I think she is supporting me atthe right moment, because, you know, I won Wimbledonin 2003, and that's when she didn't really know what to do with hercareer. She didn't know if she would tryit or not.

That's when she started helping mewith the hotels, the plane tickets. Ihad no managers at the time. That's whenshe started dealing with the press, as well. It was a lot for her, I know, but she would protect me from many things.

And now, afterwards, it wasbetter. It was easier and she was withme day in and day out, throughout the world, and she helped me considerably, asa person, you know. I developed faster,grew faster with her. Thanks to her Iwas very calm in the important moments in my career. She was always here, always supportive. I owe her a lot. It's normal.

Q. Youmight play against Gaël Monfils who you defeated last year. Would you say this season he plays better andstronger? And how would you explainthis?

ROGER FEDERER: We'll see if he manages to defeat AndyRoddick, but I think he's fit. I've notseen or watched all of his matches, all of his sets, but I think he playsreally well.

He was injured, youknow, considering this. I know Gaëlnow. I've played several times againsthim. He's always got his ups and downs. You know, his attitude, as well, is up anddown. You never know what to expect withGaël.

But his game is quite solid now. He's calmer than he was in the past when hewould play his first Roland Garros tournaments.

I think this is going to help him,because it's not five sets each time for him for the first two rounds. I think he's fit. But what I saw is that it's going to be toughfor Roddick today.

Q. Todaythe crowd was supporting you, whereas yesterday they were supportingSoderling. How come?

ROGER FEDERER: I was not here yesterday on the stadium, so Idon't know. It's difficult to explainthis. Well, maybe Soderling was verymuch into the game. He was dictating thegame, which is always something that people like. He would take the risks, so maybe that's oneof the reasons. I don't know.

And then, you know,unfortunately sometimes when someone is too much of a winner, then people arenot really against you but in favor of the other player. You know, I saw that in 2006 and 2007 when Iwas not really losing at any moment.

When I would lose a set, then it was like abig show for the crowd. This issomething that you have to experience one day or another. But this time I don't know why they weresupporting me, even though the other player was doing better.

Q. Whendid you realize there was a turnaround in your favor?

ROGER FEDERER: After this big forehand, the inside‑outpoint. I said, That's a turnaround. That's a turnaround, the inside out. The forehand. Otherwise I was not thinking about this. I was not really playing well from the baseline and I didn't have enoughpace, but that's due to Tommy Haas.

His game was reallygood. I was in a very tricky position, Imust say this. But that's when I thoughtI have all the assets in my hands to change this match, and that was the case.

http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/interviews/2009-06-01/200906011243875382614.html


No "these kind of matches are fun" comment... I'm surprised. I wonder if that means he was actually really scared in that match?

SUKTUEN
06-02-2009, 02:25 PM
And now, afterwards, it wasbetter. It was easier and she was withme day in and day out, throughout the world, and she helped me considerably, asa person, you know. I developed faster,grew faster with her. Thanks to her Iwas very calm in the important moments in my career. She was always here, always supportive. I owe her a lot. It's normal.


Roger is so sweet~~

Celaeno
06-03-2009, 12:01 AM
Roger has won the "Prix Orange" award for a 5th consecutive year. Congrats, Rogi :D

OFF COURT - PRIX ORANGE

Roger was awarded the Prix Orange as voted by the French public and press online for a record fifth consecutive time.

The Prix Orange goes to the ambassador of sportsmanship, 2009 marked the 29th edition of the award. “It is a pleasure to receive this award again, it is maybe because I spend so much time with the press,” said Roger.

http://www.rogerfederer.com/en/rogers/news/newsdetail.cfm?uNewsID=916

SUKTUEN
06-03-2009, 12:29 AM
Congrat Roger!!!

Rommella
06-03-2009, 09:21 AM
Looks like this writer is a Fed fangirl, all right.


Microsoft effort to best Google yields results
By Katherine Boehret, The Wall Street Journal
Wednesday 03 June 2009
Software giant hopes 'Binging' will replace 'Googling' when it comes to Web search.

... snip

I tried comparing Bing with Google in side-by-side searches for tennis player Roger Federer. Bing showed me six colorful images of Federer atop its results page, along with an Explore Pane full of links to his biography, posters, quotes, blog and more. The third listed related-search term,"Roger Federer Shirtless," made me laugh.

Google didn't automatically embed images of the tennis great on its results page (for that, of course, you have to go to its Image search page), but it did display Federer's winning score for that day's French Open match -- information that was extremely useful to me.

Bing presents photos in a more eye-pleasing way than Google. The Roger Federer image search on Bing filled the page with images only -- none of the messy text descriptions that appear in the same Google search results. By selecting visuals in the top right of the Bing results page, I changed the size of the photos to small, medium, large or detailed. As I moved my cursor over an image, the image popped forward in a larger version with text details.

...snip

SUKTUEN
06-03-2009, 03:18 PM
:worship::worship:

didadida
06-04-2009, 02:11 PM
RG: History vs . . . Le Sod?
Posted 06/03/2009 @ 8 :42 PM

We’ve reached the end of the long, dusty, sometimes bumpy, often slippery highway known as the European clay-court season. There have been fabulous sights along the roadside—Nadal-Djokovic in Monte Carlo and Madrid stood out as shining peaks of will and athleticism; we’ll put the snapshots on our Facebook pages—as well as a couple of bizarre and eye-opening locations, like Soderling-Nadal, that didn’t appear on the map. Most surprising of all, however, and something we’ll need to discuss once this trip is over, is how three of the vaunted Big 4 ran out of gas before the finish line.

For now, let’s concentrate on who’s still in the race. Of the eight players left in Paris, there's a little of the familiar—Roger Federer has reached his fifth straight semi at Roland Garros; Dinara Safina and Svetlana Kuznetsova will try to improve on past runner-up finishes—and a lot of the foreign. Did anyone on this planet have Cibulkova, Stosur, or Soderling in their brackets? If you had all three, then you know too much about tennis and need to find a hobby; look into curing cancer for us.

What does this mean for the four semifinals to be played Thursday and Friday? Unpredictability is the first word that comes to mind. We’ll see new faces coping with new situations, and last year’s underdogs, Federer and Safina, will find themselves the favorites this time around. But nothing is so unpredictable that we can’t make a stab at predicting it, right? It just means there’s a higher chance of me being wrong, which, if you’re anything like I am when I read other sportswriters, is what you want to happen in the first place. It’s such a bore when they get it right.

It’s a little late to make the women forecasts—they go on court about 11 hours from now—so I’ll stick with the guys today and get back to the WTA on Friday.

Robin Soderling vs. Fernando Gonzalez

Judging from the way these guys have played over the last couple of rounds, this could be the most vicious slugfest in the sport’s history—it will at least have the most elaborate wind-ups. I feel sorry for the ball, as well for anyone or anything, ball kids, linespeople, the net, that has to be on court with these two guys.

Gonzo owns a 4-3 record over Le Sod and has won their last four encounters, two of which came on clay. But they haven’t faced each other in two years, and you get the sense from their past scorelines that Soderling, while he’s the less-accomplished player, has held his own most of the time.

In this dynamic, that means he’s been able to stand toe to toe with Gonzalez and make his mark with his own long-swinging belts at the ball. They can both win points, and will need to win points, with their serves. They can each light up a forehand, but where Gonzo uses his once-handed backhand primarily as a rally shot, Soderling can be consistently offensive, both from the baseline and off returns of serve, with his two-hander. Gonzalez is the faster player and better athlete. The Chilean is also more comfortable on clay, though the Swede defended and slid surprisingly well in beating Nadal.

This one will be decided by Soderling. Is there more to this tall man's Cinderella story? Will he continue to live in his zone of unconsciousness, where the balls that used to fly away now land exactly where he wants them? Can he keep walking that magical and infinitesimal line between hitting as hard as you can and overhitting? I think he can. I don’t think Soderling's race is run quite yet.

Winner: Soderling

Juan Martin del Potro vs. Roger Federer

The five-set, one-good-inside-out-forehand escape against Tommy Haas will help Federer. It worked that way when he won a five-setter over Andreev at the U.S. Open last year, and it very nearly worked again when he came back from two sets down to beat Berdych in Melbourne. It will lessen his anxiety if he gets behind and make him feel, somehow, that the worst is behind him. He played a much cleaner, looser, unhurried, and assured match against Monfils today. Rarely has Federer transferred his elegantly forceful all-court game so completely to clay. It helped that Monfils, while a dangerous bomb-thrower from afar, is hardly the bullying type. He allowed Federer free rein to create, especially on the key points in the first set tiebreaker. And you know what happens when Federer has free rein.

As I wrote over at ESPN on Wednesday, Roger Federer’s insurance policy right now is “Roger Federer.” If you’re trying to close out a three-of-five-setter against him, you’re not just trying to beat a player, you’re trying to beat a name. It may be an unremarkable name to you and I, possibly the product of a garbled mispronunciation by an ancient stammerer in his family—why isn’t is just “Feder”?; why not go all the way and make it “Federererer”?—but it spells doom for his opponents at the majors. The thought of ending Federer's run here, and his streak of 20 straight Slam semis, is a lot of weight to carry around a tennis court, and three sets is a long time to think about it. You could see Haas buckle under that weight when he double-faulted at 4-4 in the third set of their fourth rounder.

No one has been more obviously spooked by Federer's reputation than del Potro, who lost an embarrassing two-bagel semi to him in Australia. But the long and lean Argentine has taken his career one step upward at a time—he’s beaten Nadal and Murray for the first time in 2009—and will be better prepared for the same stage in Paris. I’ve been impressed by the way he’s carried himself through this event. No panic, no frustration, no ups and downs. He’s stalked the courts patiently and come up with big serves when he’s needed them. Unlike Monfils, I have to believe that del Potro will try to impose his will as soon as he gets a chance and not let Federer run free; he should be able to hurry him in rallies. A lot of it may come down to del Potro’s return—he anticipates well—and whether he can trouble Federer in his service games and make the match a scrappier, more up and down affair than Sire Jacket would like it to be. I’ll give him a set.

Winner: Federer

Final: If it’s Le Sod vs. Roget, the Swede will need to do his best to take control of the rallies ASAP, the way he did with Nadal. I’d give him a shot, as you should all Cinderellas, of staying unconscious for three more sets. But while he’ll go into the match with nothing to lose, if he gets ahead, he’ll suddenly find himself with very much to lose. In the end, Federer couldn’t ask for a better opponent. He’s 9-0 against Soderling and hasn’t dropped even a set to him since 2005 (he’s 12-1 against Gonzalez).

The opportunity to finally win the French and claim the Goat mantle once and for all will put pressure on Federer and motivate him in equal measures. He’s always been a strong closer at Slams, and he’ll have to feel relieved and freed up a bit not having to face Rafa. Plus, there’s the obnoxiously partisan Parisian crowd, which will make either Soderling or Gonzalez feel like they’re facing into the gale-force winds of tennis history and committing a criminal act by trying to fight it. I’d advise both of them to keep their heads down. If they look up past the audience and to the heavens for help, they may catch a glimpse of the scoreboard, with its bright flashing letters spelling out the two words they don't want to see: Roger Federer.

Champion: Federer

didadida
06-04-2009, 02:13 PM
Roger: Pleased to Meet Me!
Posted 06/03/2009 @ 3 :36 PM




By Pete Bodo

For a while there today, I thought I was going to go nuts. I sit beside Doug Robson (you can also read him in USA Today) in the press room, and there's about eight inches of room between the edges of our flat-screen, digital, Sony TV monitors. His was tuned to Serena vs. Sveta, mine was dialed in to the first set of the match between The Mighty Fed and The Flighty Monf - or, if you prefer, La Monf.

At about the time Federer and Monfils were playing their critical first-set tiebreaker on Chatrier, the women were handing break and match points back and forth out on Lenglen. My eyeballs were flying back and forth while I was trying to trying to keep up with the commentary in French on my box, and nearby Tom Tebbutt was yelling at some editor in Toronto about how well TMF was playing.

Granted, it wasn't the worst place to be on otherwise ordinary Wednesday afternoon in June, and my problem more or less solved itself with surprising speed when Serena gagged and Federer tagged a cross-court volley to do something he hadn't managed in his two previous rounds: win the first set.

Suddenly, the story line was obvious: these were two champions, traveling in two different directions - Serena toward the first-class lounge at Charles de Gaulle airport, and Federer toward, well, daring to go where few if not exactly no men have gone before - a career Grand Slam. There hasn't been much talk about "full flight" Federer these past few months; maybe from now on we should talk about. . . Starship Roger.

But let's look at that women's match first. It was complicated and highly entertaining in the manner of similar WTA brawls (for example, their most recent previous meeting, in the Australian Open of a few months ago). By the time it was done, Williams and Kuznetsova both clutched hanks of each other's hair, each woman had scratch marks on her face, and splintered fingernails. It's futile talking about turning points and momentum shifts in such matches. And while the following analysis, delivered in what is becoming Serena's trademark deadpan, halting, borderline sarcastic drawl, doesn't quite do justice to the gritty nature of the battle (one nasty tumble left Kuznetsova with a patch of clay sticking to her wet hair; she would wear it proudly the rest of the way), it's a pretty accurate description of what happened:

"In the third I had an opportunity and I got really tight, and I pretty much gave it to her (Serena was up a break early and served to stay in the match at 5-6 and was broken). It was like. . .'Here. . .' you know, 'Do you want to go to the semis? Because I don't.' She was like, Okay.' "

Some reports will also emphasize that Serena's praise for Sveta was lukewarm at best, and how she once again bathed in that storied Egyptian river when she said: "Honestly I think I lost because of me, and not because of anything she did. You know, I don't think that makes it easier, but it makes me realize that, you know, had I done different things I would have been able to win."

I don't mind the self-centeredness of this familiar rationalization; she's a highly combative, competitive athlete. What I object to is its careless, unexamined stupidity. I'll bet Serena would be far less inclined to seek comfort in that trope if someone, some day, asked her: Serena, does it ever occur to you that, oh, Virginia Ruano Pascual might have said the same thing after you dusted her, two-and-oh, in the second round? You know, had I done different things, I would have been able to win.

Duh! Serena's crime may not be arrogance, but simple thoughtlessness.

Anyway. . . I sitting just a few feet behind the baseline at Lenglen for the first set of the match and it was a treat, even for a worn-out old guy like me. I savored the great shots executed by these two exceptional talents, which were numerous even when interrupted by occasional bouts of the competitive yips. These are two of the most appealing ball strikers in the game, which means that they strip the two qualifying adjectives out of the term, "clay-court tennis."

If you remember their Australian encounter, you'll know that Kuzzie served for that one, too, at 5-4 in the second - only to choke it away. The letdown opened the door to a 6-1 in the third win by Serena. The big difference today was that Kuznetsova, while gagging frequently and freely at various points, never quite surrendered to the subversive fatalism that runs like veins of coal through her otherwise colorful thoughts and feelings. She didn't exactly banish doubt, she just managed it a hail of a lot better than she has on previous occasions. And for that she was rewarded.

In any event, the other closely-watched match of the day played out as differently as could be imagined. This morning, I posted some thoughts on how the "French issue" might affect this match, and my reasoning was flawed. I assumed (albeit unconsciously) that Federer/Monfils would be a shootout - maybe nothing quite so wild west as Sveta-'Rena (is anything?), but a good grapple in the red dirt. It was no such thing because Federer played a first set that would have entitled him to sit down on the next changeover and say to himself: Roger Federer? Pleased to meet me!

Federer came out firing on all cylinders, and you could almost visualize him ticking the items off a mental to-do list in that critical first set (and let's remember he hasn't won one of those here since the second round):

- Get your first serve in, often check

- Play aggressive, but don't take unnecessary risks, check

- Use your drop shot, check

- Make him work to hold, check

- Win set, to win over the crowd, check

- Remember pickles and chocolate-chip cookie dough ice cream for Mirka (just kidding).

As TMF completed this list, we were left with images of tennis's version of sugar plum fairies, the Roger Federer of yore. Oh, there was a misstep here and there - jawing at umpire Mohammed Lahyani about missing that bad call by a linesman on a ball that basically landed at the foot of Lahyani's's chair at 2.3 mph was one of them. It isn't often that Federer gets booed, but he did then (by a few partisans, anyway).

Then there was that uncomfortable break-point situation at 5-5, resolved when Federer stayed in a quality rally long enough to tease a forehand error out of Monfils and quell the threat. And what was up with being set point down in the tiebreaker, with a second serve to hit against a Frenchman in Paris? A crisp overhead dispatched that menace, after which it was clear sailing. At one point, Federer hit a gorgeous winner, started walking back toward the baseline and, seeming to remember something, he threw in token, half-hearted fist pump.

It was like he was thinking: I don't need to do this crap anymore, but what the hail, for old time's sake. . .

Given Federer's multiple skills, and the depth of his tool box, it's sometimes easy to forget the extent to which, like any mortal tennis player, he tends to make his own life much easier when he's got a good serving groove going. That was never more obvious than it was today, and it seemed to me the key factor in the match. Although his 57 per cent conversion rate for the match (Monfils was one percentage point higher) may leap out at you, Federer's overall serving efficiency was praiseworthy. You know that the man is letting it rip when he ends up with his knees practically touching his abs as he follows through and launches forward.

The critical error Monfils made - and it was one that underscored that this was, after all, only his second Grand Slam quarterfinal - was losing his taste for the war after Federer won the first big battle. It was a pity, because Monfils handled the situation beautifully. He played a fine first set; whatever emotions he felt never distracted him his realistic game plan or his efficient, maturely calibrated stroking combinations. He played at a very high level, and if he failed to sustain it, the reason is more likely to have been inexperience than the inability to keep up that standard.

Monfils' confidence and focus wilted under the afternoon Parisian sun in the second set, and so did the crowd's willingness to offer their hearts and lungs to the distracted young warrior. But as this was Federer 2.0 again, many of them gladly hopped the razor-wire and bolted for the camp of the enemy. It was as if they were thinking, Hey, how many more times are we going to get the chance to be part of something that, if it comes to pass, would be as historic as a Federer win at Roland Garros?

Monfils played his way out of the match in the second set, and by the time he lifted his spirits and got into the chest-pounding, yelling, fist-pumping territory, it was too late. He wasn't going to fool Federer, he wasn't going to fool the crowd, and he wasn't going to fool himself. It was over.

Read the Federer presser - it contains some real gems, and his tone and overall attitude suggests that Federer's most perilous moments here might be behind him. Here's a question I posed in the presser:

The game and even the attitude you showed in that first set, some of us think we haven't seen that from you in recent times. Did you feel that way too? Did you feel you're back on a track that hasn't been running as straight as it has in the past?

He replied, "Well, I thought I played great in Madrid, you know. I was mixing up my game really well. I think these last four matches have been rather on the difficult side, just because I had some tough starts to the matches. Instead of maybe going ahead a break I was down a break or down a set. You know, being down a set is never really a comforting feeling. That's why for me it was important to get off to a better start today, and thank god I got the first set. For the first time I could play a bit more relaxed match. I think I showed it today. I was able to hit through the ball more. Everything just started to click. That's something I haven't had a whole lot at this tournament yet."

I wrote after the Haas match that there appears to be a fated quality to Federer's drive at Roland Garros this year, and his proudest fans ought to be happy to hear that he feels it, too. Of course, he may not want to go there - not in his own conscious mind, and certainly not in public even if he did entertain the thought. But read this riff, which he went on in response to a question about feeling the support of the crowd here:

"Yeah, I mean, I feel it since a few years now, to be honest with you. But this year even more extreme. When I walk on the streets or drive in the transportation or I go for dinner, everybody is like, This is your year. You've got to do it. They're screaming from their scooters and out of the car. They even get out at the red lights and want me to sign an autograph or take a picture. It's quite incredible these last couple of weeks."




As much as I love torturing Federer fans and could leave you with nightmares about jinxing your man by predicting that there's no way he loses this title, I'll leave it at that.

I mean, how can anyone not hope that Federer wins this one?

SUKTUEN
06-04-2009, 02:30 PM
thanks!

trickcy
06-04-2009, 04:46 PM
Link: www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/tennis/rogerfederer/5445154/French-Open-2009-Roger-Federer-deserves-to-make-history-says-Tim-Henman.html


French Open 2009: Roger Federer deserves to make history, says Tim Henman

Tim Henman doesn't really 'do' angry, but ask him if Roger Federer, the French Open favourite, is on the slide and he positively bristles.

Federer, who faces Juan Martin Del Potro in the semi-finals at Roland Garros, is two wins away from tennis history. A 14th grand slam title would equal Pete Sampras' record and give Federer a prestigious clean sweep of all four majors.

It would also make predictions about Federer's demise seem significantly premature.

"People don't appreciate how good Federer is," Henman told Telegraph Sport. "They say 'oh, that was a good shot', and you think no, hang on, that was an unbelievable shot. He just made it look easy.

"Federer won three majors in a year three times. No one has ever done that. There's two ways to go from there. You either win the grand slam or you come down a bit, and realistically you can only drop from that level.

"But the guy is 27. He's hardly over the hill. He's made 19 consecutive grand slam semis. I think the best before that was nine or something. It's a joke how good he's been. He's the best player I've ever seen, or played against. I'm not a massive fan of comparisons through the generations, but if you asked me to pick one I'd say he's the best player ever."

Many pundits cited this year's defeat against Rafael Nadal in the Australian Open final - which left Federer in floods of tears - as the moment power shifted in men's tennis. But Henman reads nothing into such a raw display of emotion.

"Roger's a really good friend of mine, and he's so laid back and down to earth," said Henman.

"I beat Federer in the final at Basle [Federer's home town] three or four years ago and he was crying his eyes out. When he won Wimbledon in 2003 he was bawling his eyes out. He's just a really emotional guy. He's honest enough to say 'this is who I am'."

Rita
06-04-2009, 05:57 PM
Tim :awww: nice words from him.

tennis2tennis
06-04-2009, 07:03 PM
I always appreciate the words from former players because they see things in a way that most tennis writers don't

recessional
06-04-2009, 07:04 PM
As much as I love torturing Federer fans and could leave you with nightmares about jinxing your man by predicting that there's no way he loses this title, I'll leave it at that.

I mean, how can anyone not hope that Federer wins this one?

:tape:

Link: www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/tennis/rogerfederer/5445154/French-Open-2009-Roger-Federer-deserves-to-make-history-says-Tim-Henman.html


French Open 2009: Roger Federer deserves to make history, says Tim Henman

Tim Henman doesn't really 'do' angry, but ask him if Roger Federer, the French Open favourite, is on the slide and he positively bristles.

Federer, who faces Juan Martin Del Potro in the semi-finals at Roland Garros, is two wins away from tennis history. A 14th grand slam title would equal Pete Sampras' record and give Federer a prestigious clean sweep of all four majors.

It would also make predictions about Federer's demise seem significantly premature.

"People don't appreciate how good Federer is," Henman told Telegraph Sport. "They say 'oh, that was a good shot', and you think no, hang on, that was an unbelievable shot. He just made it look easy.

"Federer won three majors in a year three times. No one has ever done that. There's two ways to go from there. You either win the grand slam or you come down a bit, and realistically you can only drop from that level.

"But the guy is 27. He's hardly over the hill. He's made 19 consecutive grand slam semis. I think the best before that was nine or something. It's a joke how good he's been. He's the best player I've ever seen, or played against. I'm not a massive fan of comparisons through the generations, but if you asked me to pick one I'd say he's the best player ever."

Many pundits cited this year's defeat against Rafael Nadal in the Australian Open final - which left Federer in floods of tears - as the moment power shifted in men's tennis. But Henman reads nothing into such a raw display of emotion.

"Roger's a really good friend of mine, and he's so laid back and down to earth," said Henman.

"I beat Federer in the final at Basle [Federer's home town] three or four years ago and he was crying his eyes out. When he won Wimbledon in 2003 he was bawling his eyes out. He's just a really emotional guy. He's honest enough to say 'this is who I am'."

:hug:

Why is it so hard for others to understand this? :awww:

Celaeno
06-04-2009, 07:15 PM
Why is it so hard for others to understand this? :awww:

Perhaps because they simply don't want to? :shrug:

Or Levy
06-04-2009, 09:19 PM
Three or four years ago? LOL, Tim's delusional. Try eight.