Ancic to speak at Harvard [Archive] - MensTennisForums.com

Ancic to speak at Harvard

Daniel25
03-19-2009, 08:55 AM
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/columns/story?columnist=ford_bonnie_d&id=3991181

Wow, respect to Mario! To combine a tennis career and a law study :worship:

JMG
03-19-2009, 09:12 AM
But it's obvious that Lepi Ancic didn't have to study as hard as normal students to get his degree.

Machiavelli
03-19-2009, 09:25 AM
But it's obvious that Lepi Ancic didn't have to study as hard as normal students to get his degree.

i am a law student in Zagreb, and everybody except the media in Croatia makes fun of Mario, yeah he got that diploma, but how he did it is another thing, people go mad studying law, he did it just like it was nothing special, so many exams at ones, he must be a freakin genius cause normal students prepare one exam, maybe two, he managed to do it like a superman...

The university of Split where he studied law is known for this shit,offering easy ways for famous students, he is a smart fellow, but that diploma is doubtful......

I mean how can soemone train for lets say 5 or 6 hours a day, or even more, travel arround the world, so many torunaments and matches, dealing with sponsors and the media, we speak about pro athletes not some amateurs, and then be able to learn for a couple of hours (7-8 hours is minimum for law school) in the same day, learning from books that have a couple of thousand pages, and then when he is injured he suddelny passes all teh exams he has left; he is truly amazing :rolleyes:....

P.S: I actually like Mario, but that bragging about the diploma, he did not need this....

Daniel25
03-19-2009, 09:31 AM
Mmmm, well, his nickname is Supermario.... ;)

gulzhan
03-19-2009, 09:39 AM
He may not have studied as much as other law students but he studied way more than any other tennis pro. Plus, if any law student studies a lot, that does not mean he'll make a better lawyer. And visa versa.

I think Mario is a great example for tennis players, he proves you can combine professional sport with respect to education. That's awesome!

Machiavelli
03-19-2009, 09:50 AM
He may not have studied as much as other law students but he studied way more than any other tennis pro. Plus, if any law student studies a lot, that does not mean he'll make a better lawyer. And visa versa.

I think Mario is a great example for tennis players, he proves you can combine professional sport with respect to education. That's awesome!

i did no say he was not smart, especially for an athlete, but regular students don't get by far the same treatment he did, just wanted to point out that anyone could finish law shool that way, other students have to work as hard as it gets to get where he got, some students need more some need less time to learn, and the best students do not turn out to be the best lawyers, that is a fact; my point is that normal students go step by step on foot, he went through it like a ferrari, i hope you get what i tried to say, that is not fair regarding all the other students, especially not when he brags about it so much...

SwiSha
03-19-2009, 09:55 AM
Does not matter if he is smart or not

you cant ever play pro tennis and study law at the same time

gulzhan
03-19-2009, 09:55 AM
I understood you and disagree. I think exactly the opposite-- anyone with normal high school education and average intelligence can finish a law school without combining it with doing sports professionally, it takes an extraordinary person and/or family to manage to get a law degree while being a professional athlete in any sport, especially in tennis.

*bunny*
03-19-2009, 09:57 AM
i am a law student in Zagreb, and everybody except the media in Croatia makes fun of Mario, yeah he got that diploma, but how he did it is another thing, people go mad studying law, he did it just like it was nothing special, so many exams at ones, he must be a freakin genius cause normal students prepare one exam, maybe two, he managed to do it like a superman...

The university of Split where he studied law is known for this shit,offering easy ways for famous students, he is a smart fellow, but that diploma is doubtful......

I mean how can soemone train for lets say 5 or 6 hours a day, or even more, travel arround the world, so many torunaments and matches, dealing with sponsors and the media, we speak about pro athletes not some amateurs, and then be able to learn for a couple of hours (7-8 hours is minimum for law school) in the same day, learning from books that have a couple of thousand pages, and then when he is injured he suddelny passes all teh exams he has left; he is truly amazing :rolleyes:....

P.S: I actually like Mario, but that bragging about the diploma, he did not need this....

I think he was out of tour with mono for many months while preparing his dissertation. Didn't he say something like when he had mono he couldn't train or play tennis at all and all he could do was studying and that helped?

SwiSha
03-19-2009, 09:59 AM
i don't know how it is in other countries, but in Germany you have to practically give up your ''life'' to study law

Daniel25
03-19-2009, 09:59 AM
[QUOTE=Machiavelli;8300677]regular students don't get by far the same treatment he did, just wanted to point out that anyone could finish law shool that wayQUOTE]

Well, I believe you when you say that he got a special treatment, but I don't think anyone could finish law school that way. Combining a tennis career and a (adjusted) law study is still a great achievement imo.

gulzhan
03-19-2009, 10:03 AM
i don't know how it is in other countries, but in Germany you have to practically give up your ''life'' to study law

:lol: save it for your parents!

I've had a couple of friends from Germany when studying in a law school in US (not Ivy league but still pretty good), I know what I am talking about ;)

SwiSha
03-19-2009, 10:09 AM
:lol: save it for your parents!

I've had a couple of friends from Germany when studying in a law school in US (not Ivy league but still pretty good), I know what I am talking about ;)

so do I since 2 of my sisters graduated from the FU and Potsdam studying law, they dedicated 6-7 years of their lives reading books giving up social activities

dunno about your ''german' friends

malisha
03-19-2009, 10:23 AM
a pal which studies law in Split was in the same room with him when he was on his exam
he said he did pretty well
but he suspect that the questions were rigged for him

there are other athlets in Croatia which are on much easyer program then Ancic was...their path is much harder...they dont have enough time
Ancic had for one of the most intense program there is here in Croatia

asmazif
03-19-2009, 12:17 PM
such a legend

TankingTheSet
03-19-2009, 12:19 PM
I wouldn't see Ancic as a brilliant law specialist with his diploma.

However, clearly he does know a lot about law so maybe he can apply to it to sports like tennis and get a job in that area, because clearly he also knows everything about being a pro-athlete. There's a lot of room of improvement in the judicial rights of tennis players for example in cases of drug testing and bans because of small bets made on unrelated sporting events. This has been a witch hunt in recent years, reasonable doubt didn't even come to it (for example it has been almost impossible for a player to be fully cleared of a false positive drugs test or when there was no willful intend to use doping by the player proven in court later -- their lives and careers were ruined anyway).

TennisViewer531
03-19-2009, 12:26 PM
how nice! Have a great time at Harvard! :)

timafi
03-19-2009, 03:56 PM
good on you buddy:yeah:

star
03-19-2009, 03:59 PM
i am a law student in Zagreb, and everybody except the media in Croatia makes fun of Mario, yeah he got that diploma, but how he did it is another thing, people go mad studying law, he did it just like it was nothing special, so many exams at ones, he must be a freakin genius cause normal students prepare one exam, maybe two, he managed to do it like a superman...

The university of Split where he studied law is known for this shit,offering easy ways for famous students, he is a smart fellow, but that diploma is doubtful......

I mean how can soemone train for lets say 5 or 6 hours a day, or even more, travel arround the world, so many torunaments and matches, dealing with sponsors and the media, we speak about pro athletes not some amateurs, and then be able to learn for a couple of hours (7-8 hours is minimum for law school) in the same day, learning from books that have a couple of thousand pages, and then when he is injured he suddelny passes all teh exams he has left; he is truly amazing :rolleyes:....

P.S: I actually like Mario, but that bragging about the diploma, he did not need this....

Supposedly, he did it while he was off for a year with the mono. But, even so, I was wondering how the hell he completed the studies in just one year. He couldn't do that in the US. I'm glad to have someone confirm that it looks fishy to Croatians as well.

cornellboy
03-19-2009, 04:10 PM
Does anybody know in what room/what time he's speaking? It doesn't say on any of the calendars or press releases..

maiden
03-19-2009, 04:19 PM
Supposedly, he did it while he was off for a year with the mono. But, even so, I was wondering how the hell he completed the studies in just one year. He couldn't do that in the US. I'm glad to have someone confirm that it looks fishy to Croatians as well.

He's been doing it since 2002.

SpinLES
03-19-2009, 04:21 PM
being from Split i think Machiavelli and Swish are on point here..no way this was legit

Jōris
03-19-2009, 04:54 PM
Pshhh... Harvard is so passé. Yale Law School's where it's at.

GlennMirnyi
03-19-2009, 04:56 PM
Does not matter if he is smart or not

you cant ever play pro tennis and study law at the same time

You can't study exact sciences and play pro tennis. The rest is manageable.

Deboogle!.
03-19-2009, 04:59 PM
You can't study exact sciences and play pro tennis. The rest is manageable.Have you studied law? I can't personally imagine doing anything else besides studying law, I studied Chemistry for a year, and studying law is just as hard and time-consuming. In the US it is a full-time job for 3 years, forget about the bar exam.

That said, the article says Mario studied for 6 years. I can believe that he studied part-time and that it took him that long. that'd make sense.

GlennMirnyi
03-19-2009, 05:01 PM
Have you studied law? I can't personally imagine doing anything else besides studying law, I studied Chemistry for a year, and studying law is just as hard and time-consuming. In the US it is a full-time job for 3 years, forget about the bar exam.

That said, the article says Mario studied for 6 years. I can believe that he studied part-time and that it took him that long. that'd make sense.

That's how it works for you, maybe you're more dedicated.

I doubt any lawyer studied a tenth of what engineers, mathematicians and physicists studied, in general.

Deboogle!.
03-19-2009, 05:13 PM
That's how it works for you, maybe you're more dedicated.

I doubt any lawyer studied a tenth of what engineers, mathematicians and physicists studied, in general.That's simply untrue. I don't think I worked unusually harder than anyone else I went to law school with. It's a qualitatively different kind of study. I know many scientists and engineers who say they could never study law that it would be too hard for them because they're just not "language"-based people. It's simply different. To get a law degree in the US you need 7 years of full-time education and two degrees. Obviously it's different in Croatia if Mario was studying for his law degree for 6 years and is only just turning 25. You can't possibly suggest how it is around the world and if you've never studied law, you can't begin to guess how hard we have to work to memorize all this shit, often written in language that's just as complicated as engineering and mathematical equations. I have many friends who are scientists of all types because I went to an undergraduate university with a particularly large science and engineering section, and I really don't think they'd say they've worked harder than I had to work in law school. Most people's minds are boggled when I tell them how much I had to study, and i'm sure Mario would agree.

cornellboy
03-19-2009, 05:15 PM
Have you studied law? I can't personally imagine doing anything else besides studying law, I studied Chemistry for a year, and studying law is just as hard and time-consuming. In the US it is a full-time job for 3 years, forget about the bar exam.

That said, the article says Mario studied for 6 years. I can believe that he studied part-time and that it took him that long. that'd make sense.

Errr... as a third-year Harvard Law student, I can say law school is not that big a deal. And the bar exam is even more of a joke - most people just take 7 weeks of Barbri and call it a day

Federerhingis
03-19-2009, 05:16 PM
Pshhh... Harvard is so passé. Yale Law School's where it's at.

You seem to know what you're talking about, Yale is where it really is, and where you want to be if you want to catch on the eyes of future law firms. I've always considered Harvard so overrated. :o

At any rate, I would still say it's quite commendable that at least Ancic has some interest in furthering his education.

Jōris
03-19-2009, 05:19 PM
You seem to know what you're talking about, Yale is where it really is, and where you want to be if you want to catch on the eyes of future law firms. I've always considered Harvard so overrated. :o

At any rate, I would still say it's quite commendable that at least Ancic has some interest in furthering his education.

Nah I'm clueless on Ivy League ratings, but I thought it was time I joined the thread with a random post. :o

cornellboy
03-19-2009, 05:19 PM
You seem to know what you're talking about, Yale is where it really is, and where you want to be if you want to catch on the eyes of future law firms. I've always considered Harvard so overrated. :o

This person clearly did not go to Harvard
:lol:

Deboogle!.
03-19-2009, 05:20 PM
Errr... as a third-year Harvard Law student, I can say law school is not that big a deal. And the bar exam is even more of a joke - most people just take 7 weeks of Barbri and call it a dayWell aren't you lucky that it came so easily to you :lol: For me it was a full-time job for 3 years and in many ways it ruined my mind. My friends and I laugh all the time that we have lost our short and long-term memory since law school, that we are way more clumsy, that we are losing our eyesight from reading all the small print for so many horus a day, and many more things. Studying for and taking the bar exam was the worst two months of my life and I wouldn't wish it upon my worst enemy. Congrats to you if you find it so much easier but that doesn't mean as a blanket statement, it is true law students don't work "one tenth" as hard as engineers and scientists. I find it patently untrue based on the experience of my friends (both scientists and lawyers) and me.This person clearly did not go to Harvard
:lol:My dad did, and he wouldn't even let me apply because he thought he got such a poor education. But now we are really going :topic: Good for Mario. :)

star
03-19-2009, 05:26 PM
He's been doing it since 2002.

Even so, he couldn't have done that in a U.S. school. Not possible.

I don't think law school in the U.S. is so much of a intellectual feat -- because god knows I've seen many dunderheads get a law degree even from good schools -- let alone third tier schools -- but it takes some full time going to class. There are exams at the end of each course -- not just a ending exam, and unless someone is in class -- except for the most brilliant -- it would be difficult to pass the exams. It would be impossible to take classes just in the tennis off season.

It's not a catch as catch can endeavor in the U.S. I thought maybe different in Croatia, but I'm seeing that posters from there are also skeptical.

Komodo
03-19-2009, 05:32 PM
I already commented this in the original thread about 1 year ago.
I get the feeling that only non-academical people who don't know much about these things believe that Ancic did this the honest way.

OMG Super-Mario can play top 10 tennis and simultaneously finish studies that take 6 years of full time work. It was izi cuz Super-Mario had a whole year of pause from tennis cuz of mono!!!! Don't you understand?!! OMG!

For arguments, feel free to read that old "Ancic got his law degree" thread.
Again, maybe he got some kind of "lower"(shorter) law degree, then he isn't a lawyer, though.

And yes, going for some education is a very positive thing for a sports pro to do.
I just suspect that top 100 tennis is so tough on the body and takes so much effort in terms of fitness training that these guys don't find the needed energy nor time to do it.
But that wasn't the subject of discussion here.

GlennMirnyi
03-19-2009, 05:45 PM
That's simply untrue. I don't think I worked unusually harder than anyone else I went to law school with. It's a qualitatively different kind of study. I know many scientists and engineers who say they could never study law that it would be too hard for them because they're just not "language"-based people. It's simply different. To get a law degree in the US you need 7 years of full-time education and two degrees. Obviously it's different in Croatia if Mario was studying for his law degree for 6 years and is only just turning 25. You can't possibly suggest how it is around the world and if you've never studied law, you can't begin to guess how hard we have to work to memorize all this shit, often written in language that's just as complicated as engineering and mathematical equations. I have many friends who are scientists of all types because I went to an undergraduate university with a particularly large science and engineering section, and I really don't think they'd say they've worked harder than I had to work in law school. Most people's minds are boggled when I tell them how much I had to study, and i'm sure Mario would agree.

I'd say you're just being biased, but I don't wanna argue.

Words are words. Anyone literate can understand them.

Integrals, differential equations, quantum physics. Needs much more than just literacy to understand.

shotgun
03-19-2009, 06:10 PM
Either way I don't think Ancic will have trouble practicing his profession, especially if he wants to get specialized in sports law. He has the diploma, he's famous in Croatia and has acquired the right "connections" for the job across the world.

Plenty of people around the world that went to shit unis/schools but are making/have made plenty of money in their profession just because they happen to know the right persons in their respective industries.

Federerhingis
03-19-2009, 06:12 PM
This person clearly did not go to Harvard
:lol:

I sure did not, however I've more than enough proof that you do not need to go to Harvard in order to turn out a great lawyer, for this same matter any other profession. Harvard still has the name and the reputation, nevertheless the last time I saw those US Newsweek rankings, Yale beat Harvard for most of the divisions in law, Mathematics, English and a few others just to make a small list.

As a matter of fact I would rather go to Fordham Law or New York Univ Law than Harvard. Furthermore, MIT has been leaving Harvard behind in all divisions for decades now. :shrug:

star
03-19-2009, 06:14 PM
Either way I don't think Ancic will have trouble practicing his profession, especially if he wants to get specialized in sports law. He has the diploma, he's famous in Croatia and has acquired the right "connections" for the job across the world.

Plenty of people around the world that went to shit unis/schools but are making/have made plenty of money in their profession just because they happen to know the right persons in their respective industries.

He's wise to lay a foundation for his future.

The whole point is that it can't really be a legit degree. It must be a bit bitter for those in his country who have struggled to get through the entire course of study.

As for your last point -- we had one here in the U.S. who did quite well that way -- G.W, Bush. :lol:

Zirconek
03-19-2009, 06:23 PM
I'd say you're just being biased, but I don't wanna argue.

Words are words. Anyone literate can understand them.

Integrals, differential equations, quantum physics. Needs much more than just literacy to understand.

No, you're being biased, I've been to both sides so I can tell you ;)

J.Su
03-19-2009, 06:34 PM
Ancic will be giving a thesis in how to maximise your height on the tennis court and win finals.

Smoke944
03-19-2009, 06:44 PM
I wouldn't see Ancic as a brilliant law specialist with his diploma.

However, clearly he does know a lot about law so maybe he can apply to it to sports like tennis and get a job in that area, because clearly he also knows everything about being a pro-athlete. There's a lot of room of improvement in the judicial rights of tennis players for example in cases of drug testing and bans because of small bets made on unrelated sporting events. This has been a witch hunt in recent years, reasonable doubt didn't even come to it (for example it has been almost impossible for a player to be fully cleared of a false positive drugs test or when there was no willful intend to use doping by the player proven in court later -- their lives and careers were ruined anyway).

Great post.

liz-bj
03-19-2009, 07:17 PM
While I like Ancic a lot, I must say that I'm also "surprising" that he has finished his doctorate in law, on the other hand I think it's not impossible. My cousin is a lawyer and completed his degree while he was working and he didn't have to "give up" his life for it.
I can't assure you that Mario's degree is completely legitimate, but otherwise I can't assure that it isn't, I don't know him and I don't know how he manage his life ...
I think that at least he deserves the benefit of the doubt...
Nobody is guilty until proven otherwise, the rest are pure suppositions, no one, unless knows him can say if it is legitimate or not.

Bascule
03-19-2009, 07:26 PM
Everyone who lived in ex Yugoslavia or lives in Croatia now know that Split University is a joke. I wouldn't take serious any other university in Croatia, but in Zagreb. My neighbor used to study in Split, but when she came to Belgrade, she hardly finished a so-called "High school" which should be twice as easier and last for twice as shorter than studying on a standard university.
For sure that they helped him a lot to get this degree for the short time. I wouldn't say nothing about buying the same, but that Mario is rich as well as those rural "universities" at this area are not immune on corruption...
Not possible to study something for real and to be a prof player at the same time, but I respect his desire to be educated, though having this paper doesn't mean the same, but in a narrow sense and only for those who studied for real (which includes serious sacrificing in meantime).

I have to add this:
as far as I spoke to several students who went to some USA high schools for a year or to study after finishing high school or university here, with the respect to all educated individuals in USA, especially with MIT degree, they usually knew more than other students in their classes. But, the war and economic crisis surely ruined the quality of our educational system as well as other social institutions. Now we struggle to get back.

GugaF1
03-19-2009, 08:08 PM
I think it is great what he did, but I don't see the big deal in not being able to do it. Is not like a pro atlhete needs to be trainning all the time, there are limits to what the body can take on and off court. Athletes do have a good deal of off time, where they need to give the body rest, recovery. Many of them develop activities to pass time, you can see that in tournaments a lot. Ancic just ate books, which is a great pass time..

Is not much different or tougher than a person who needs to work for 8 hours a day plus study at a University. I did that and play for the tennis college team which actually kept me motiveted to study more. Lots of energy needed for having a full days work and going to university at night, waking up early the next morning again and again.

sawan66278
03-19-2009, 08:37 PM
Even so, he couldn't have done that in a U.S. school. Not possible.

I don't think law school in the U.S. is so much of a intellectual feat -- because god knows I've seen many dunderheads get a law degree even from good schools -- let alone third tier schools -- but it takes some full time going to class. There are exams at the end of each course -- not just a ending exam, and unless someone is in class -- except for the most brilliant -- it would be difficult to pass the exams. It would be impossible to take classes just in the tennis off season.

It's not a catch as catch can endeavor in the U.S. I thought maybe different in Croatia, but I'm seeing that posters from there are also skeptical.

Getting a degree in the States (Juris Doctorate) does NOT require one to go full time. Many of my classmates went part-time, and were able to complete their degrees going at night. As a matter of fact, in Virginia, you can sit for the bar if you have studied for the required time under a practicing attorney. It can be done...especially if he started in 2002.

Everyone who lived in ex Yugoslavia or lives in Croatia now know that Split University is a joke. I wouldn't take serious any other university in Croatia, but in Zagreb. My neighbor used to study in Split, but when she came to Belgrade, she hardly finished a so-called "High school" which should be twice as easier and last for twice as shorter than studying on a standard university.
For sure that they helped him a lot to get this degree for the short time. I wouldn't say nothing about buying the same, but that Mario is rich as well as those rural "universities" at this area are not immune on corruption...
Not possible to study something for real and to be a prof player at the same time, but I respect his desire to be educated, though having this paper doesn't mean the same, but in a narrow sense and only for those who studied for real (which includes serious sacrificing in meantime).

I have to add this:
as far as I spoke to several students who went to some USA high schools for a year or to study after finishing high school or university here, with the respect to all educated individuals in USA, especially with MIT degree, they usually knew more than other students in their classes. But, the war and economic crisis surely ruined the quality of our educational system as well as other social institutions. Now we struggle to get back.

Sad, but true. The U.S. University system? Don't believe the hype. I've studied at many of the so-called top institutions here, and, most of the classes were a joke...professors only concerned about their ongoing research...and showing a distinct incapability of actually teaching the material.

Law school is run so poorly...and compared with medical school, truly fails to prepare students for life as attorneys. Remember: law school is primarily about legal theory...and, unlike medical school (where the last two years of the four-year program are clinical), one only gains skills by serving in an internship or clerkship SEPARATE from law school itself.

Congrats should still go out to Mario...because at least he is trying to further his education. But, by no means does this likely mean he is "fit" to practice law.

Oh...and the bar exam is a hellish experience. But, ironically, covers "black letter law" that is almost never touched upon in law school...pathetic.

Bascule is right...our students don't compare to the rest of the worlds (generally)...unless they too are international students studying here;)

Burrow
03-19-2009, 09:08 PM
good for him because he isn't doing anything in tennis with his ridiculous backswings and service action :tape:

oranges
03-19-2009, 09:14 PM
good for him because he isn't doing anything in tennis with his ridiculous backswings and service action :tape:

.. as evident from the fact that he's nominated for the comeback player of the year :rolleyes:

CooCooCachoo
03-19-2009, 10:01 PM
At Harvard, Ancic will speak on the history and structure of the ATP, as well as hot-button issues such as doping, gambling and athletes' rights and representation, all topics he covered in the 68-page thesis he wrote to culminate his coursework. He initiated his invitation to Harvard by contacting visiting sports law lecturer Peter Carfagna, former general counsel for the sports marketing giant IMG, who is now in private practice in Cleveland.

Sounds like his thesis is all over the place :lol:

Still, a very commendable effort. I doubt he'd be a great speaker at Harvard, but I do support the effort of him combining studying with being a full-time pro. It's not an easy thing to do at all.

CooCooCachoo
03-19-2009, 10:03 PM
I'd say you're just being biased, but I don't wanna argue.

Words are words. Anyone literate can understand them.

Integrals, differential equations, quantum physics. Needs much more than just literacy to understand.

Oh God.

:spit:

I hope you are kidding.

Bascule
03-19-2009, 10:32 PM
I'd say you're just being biased, but I don't wanna argue.

Words are words. Anyone literate can understand them.

Integrals, differential equations, quantum physics. Needs much more than just literacy to understand.

This is true. I know a lot of engineers who are better orators than many lawyers, but no lawyer who can solve a simply differential equation, and everyone has learn this at a high school.

BTW, I am an electrical engineer and we had the lectures and labs on university for 5 years, with 6 months or a year you need at least to finish a diploma work for final exam....you could not finish electrical studies for less than 6 years. At least, it was like this few years ago, I don't know if they changed something in meanwhile. And...I had 47 exams, by the way(including the last one for diploma).

petar_pan
03-19-2009, 10:53 PM
bravo ancic,this is very rare.

michellej
03-19-2009, 11:10 PM
Does not matter if he is smart or not

you cant ever play pro tennis and study law at the same time

It took him 5 years of part-time study and 1 year devoted solely to law (he was injured/mono) to complete his degree. Surely any student with any smarts at all should be able do the same.

All the carping of criticism about how Ancic got his degree (knowing poeple?) better start networking ASAP. That helps becaus e in law that helps lawyers become successful...by creating a network. Or else you end up doing real estate law in an office by yourself, trying to drum up clients.

And it doesn't take 7 or 8 hours a day for three years of courses to get a degree. Not unless you are having difficulty with the courses.

I taste sourt grapes in these posts.

And good for Ancic. Now all this year's law students at Harvard will know who he is. And Ancic has just launced another fantistic career for himself. and that's really something for this hard-working, smart 25 year old.

Hank777
03-19-2009, 11:17 PM
For a minute I thought maybe some people are right, and it's just an HONORARY title or similar...

But reading the article, it looks like he took 6 YEARS to get his law degree, which is more than an average student requires, BUT IS VERY IMPRESSIVE as he also is a top tennis player.

I also feel that a sentiment of jealousy may play a part with some who question the "Genuineness" of his degree... NO OFFENSE, but if it is real, and I think it looks that way, than hats off to MARIO, pretty solid achievement! :worship:

BTW his thesis subject seems right up his alley (DUH... ;)) so it looks very plausible, and I've heard of a pro football(soccer) player who was also a lawyer, so guess some can do both! :worship:

cobalt60
03-19-2009, 11:36 PM
However he got it; he has it:yeah: Good for him! Surely compared to any other pro tennis player he must have some smarts. Hopefully someone will put up his talk on line :p Then we can all really have some sort of an opinion.

prima donna
03-19-2009, 11:41 PM
I taste sourt grapes in these posts.

Indeed. Also, I find it interesting that some of the more dismissive and caustic remarks are coming from people who have no legal background. I'm still awaiting a response from the lone HLS graduate on this forum. Although I somehow doubt that she'll bother to opine on the matter.

At any rate, I'm sure that Ancic will be treated respectfully during his visit. This should prove to be a great learning experience. I'm happy for the guy.

habibko
03-20-2009, 12:36 AM
Indeed. Also, I find it interesting that some of the more dismissive and caustic remarks are coming from people who have no legal background. I'm still awaiting a response from the lone HLS graduate on this forum. Although I somehow doubt that she'll bother to opine on the matter.

At any rate, I'm sure that Ancic will be treated respectfully during his visit. This should prove to be a great learning experience. I'm happy for the guy.

well said, the tennis world and players should be proud of what Ancic achieved, he sets a great example :worship: :)

Grunge
03-20-2009, 12:58 AM
Omg, I cannot believe how naive some people can be. I understand that you need some sort of fairy tale to believe in, but reality is a bit different. I will put it simply like this: give me 50 000$ - 100 000$, and I will get you diploma from almost any university in ex-yugoslavia..just name which one you wish.
It is very known fact that some famous people (politicians, sport players ...) in ex-yu often get their diplomas in following ways:

a) buying exams with money
b) passing exams through their friendship with influental people
c) combination of a) and b)

El Legenda
03-20-2009, 01:01 AM
I can get anyone a law degree for $5000 ;)

El Legenda
03-20-2009, 01:02 AM
and for an extra $1000, ill toss in a minor in any other field.

oranges
03-20-2009, 08:20 AM
and for an extra $1000, ill toss in a minor in any other field.

You're obviously so in the know about our education system that you're not aware there are no minors. :retard:

OffsideSpin
03-20-2009, 10:05 AM
Omg, I cannot believe how naive some people can be. I understand that you need some sort of fairy tale to believe in, but reality is a bit different. I will put it simply like this: give me 50 000$ - 100 000$, and I will get you diploma from almost any university in ex-yugoslavia..just name which one you wish.
It is very known fact that some famous people (politicians, sport players ...) in ex-yu often get their diplomas in following ways:

a) buying exams with money
b) passing exams through their friendship with influental people
c) combination of a) and b)

Go and get one for Faker.

MD, psychyatry.

Elena A.
03-20-2009, 01:56 PM
Omg, I cannot believe how naive some people can be. I understand that you need some sort of fairy tale to believe in, but reality is a bit different. I will put it simply like this: give me 50 000$ - 100 000$, and I will get you diploma from almost any university in ex-yugoslavia..just name which one you wish.
It is very known fact that some famous people (politicians, sport players ...) in ex-yu often get their diplomas in following ways:

a) buying exams with money
b) passing exams through their friendship with influental people
c) combination of a) and b)


Exactly, we all in Croatia, except 13-year old girls that are in love with pretty Mario, for a fact know he bought his degree.
And he is a matter of joke here, regarding all that fake fuss.
Croatia is highly corrupted country, you outside fellas, in which three months ago, in capital city of Zagreb, where the first police action started, police literally bumped into few colleges, and they arrested, literally took couple of profesors in cuffs, in aligations of coruption-selling exams.Now they're waiting for trail.Some students were also arrested, and even got their retributions last month.
Just the fact that, as some american citizens who actually have studied said, in order to finish law school, you have to give up your social life, study for months as crazy, and go nuts a bit.
Law college in Croatia lasts 4 and a half years, but the avarage years of studying are 6 (meaning the avarage of finishing it among all students is 6 years), and you have about 40 exams to pass to get a diploma.
So students who do it regular way, study a lot, BIG TIME, full 4 and a half years.Not just 6 months when you have mono AND NO ENERGY(HA!), as a result of mono. So Mario not that lies, he lies bad.
He said in an interview when he had mono for 6 months, he mostly slept for half a day, and had no energy to even take a walk.As every mono patient feels, cause that's what mono is about, you HAVE NO ENERGY, you're drained.But too bad of a lier he then said he prepared his exams while having mono.HA!A comedy.
And you certanly can not finish law school in 6 months even if you are healthy and have loads of energy.
The thing is it's surreal to execute proffesional tennis and have time and energy to study as much as law students do.PERIOD.
And law students (real ones!) study for 8 hours a day, months before each exam, it is full time job.Having a training for 6-7 hours each day, then match, then press, then massage, you have to eat, you have to shower, and like that every day, where do you possibly find time and energy to also study 8 hours EACH DAY for YEARS?Not in a bloody hell.Only if Ancic's day lasts 84 hours.
Another thing.Many of you in US wonder about this "magic" thesis he did.
Let me explain.In whichever University in Croatia, when you pass all the exams, you then have to do, in order to get your diploma, this final thing, and it's the thesis.It's just formality.It's like an essay you do, and you choose your theme, from whatever area you want.
It takes for about two months to do it, and it's nowhere near of difficult as study for exam, it's the easiest part.You can also bought it, have someone else write it for you.:crazy:
So to clearify, he got full degree. This thesis has no special roll, it's just the way we do it in Croatia, write a thesis at the end.Formality. The real work is years of studying.
And yes, if someone has some extra money, and needs to be a lawyer, come to Split.:)

Ps.Mario is not lawyer yet, he just has law degree.
In order to become lawyer he needs to pass bar exam, and it takes about 6 months of hell to prepare.
He'll probably do it this weekend. :haha: :bs:

Grunge
03-20-2009, 02:42 PM
Go and get one for Faker.

MD, psychyatry.

No problem, just give me the money first.
I am just curious...you want him to get degree in psychiatry so you can visit him? :devil:

El Legenda
03-20-2009, 10:23 PM
You're obviously so in the know about our education system that you're not aware there are no minors. :retard:

I was talking about the U.S. system :ras: you mug

Federerhingis
03-25-2009, 12:31 AM
Getting a degree in the States (Juris Doctorate) does NOT require one to go full time. Many of my classmates went part-time, and were able to complete their degrees going at night. As a matter of fact, in Virginia, you can sit for the bar if you have studied for the required time under a practicing attorney. It can be done...especially if he started in 2002.



Sad, but true. The U.S. University system? Don't believe the hype. I've studied at many of the so-called top institutions here, and, most of the classes were a joke...professors only concerned about their ongoing research...and showing a distinct incapability of actually teaching the material.

Law school is run so poorly...and compared with medical school, truly fails to prepare students for life as attorneys. Remember: law school is primarily about legal theory...and, unlike medical school (where the last two years of the four-year program are clinical), one only gains skills by serving in an internship or clerkship SEPARATE from law school itself.

Congrats should still go out to Mario...because at least he is trying to further his education. But, by no means does this likely mean he is "fit" to practice law.

Oh...and the bar exam is a hellish experience. But, ironically, covers "black letter law" that is almost never touched upon in law school...pathetic.

Bascule is right...our students don't compare to the rest of the worlds (generally)...unless they too are international students studying here;)


I couldn't agree with you more, most of the top research universities are all about that. Professors only like you or help you only if you'l contribute to their own research or research team. :rolleyes:

At the same time these professor's lack the proper preparation to instill pedagogy and obviously care very little about their actual teaching skills. :o